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than those given in secondary schools. In the laboratory the student
learns the use of the apparatus and methods employed in ordinary
physiological experimentation, and personally observes many of the
more impvortant physiological processes. Especial attention is given
to the physiology of man, the students alternating as subject and
observer.

Course 4, intended primarily for dental students, covers the
jrround of Courses I and 2, but more rajiitlly, and is probably more
desirable for those who wish to obtain a general view of physiology.



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3o8 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

but do not intend to specialize in the subject It should be preceded
by courses in physics and chemistry biology, vertebrate anatomy, and
histology.

Course 5 is a course in physiological research, and is open only
to advanced students.

FIRST SEMESTEB

2. Lectures and recitations. Continuation of Course I. Four hours

credit. Daily, beginning March first. Professor Lombard.

3. Laboratory work. Three hours credit. Given in two sections, in

the first and last half of the semester. Professor Lombard and
Assistant Professor Cope.

SECOND SEMESTER

I. Lectures and recitations. Five hours credit. Professor Lombard.

4. Lectures and recitations. Five hours credit. Assistant Professor

Cope.

5. Research work. Credit to be arranged with the instructor. Pro-

fessor Lombard.

Anatomy

I. Systematic Course in Gross Human Anatomy. The course is
repeated in periods of about twelve weeks each. October to
December, January to April. Daily, afternoons, I ;oo to 5 :30.
Professor McCotter and Assistants.

Id. Systematic Course in the Anatomy of the Upper Part of the
Body, including the abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities.
Six hours credit,

lb. Systematic Course in the Anatomy of the Lower Part of the
Body, including the abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities.
Six hours credit.
In this course the student makes a complete dissection of the
entire human body, and at the same time the bony framework
is studied from bones loaned for this purpose. In each section
the student completes the dissection of one-half of the entire
body. The dissections are carried out under the guidance of
the members of the staff. Daily conferences are held, consist-
ing of recitations and reviews in which the more important
features are considered and their morphological and embryo-
logical significance discussed.

2. Embryology, Histogenesis, General Histology, Organology, and
Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs and Central Nervous



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Courses of Instruction 309

System. Two portions with six hours credit each. Lectures,
recitations, and laboratory work. Professor Huber and As-
sistants.
It is the aim in this course to interpret the adult structure of the
elementary tissues and organs through their development and
histogenesis. In that portion of the course devoted to the study
of the central nervous system a complete dissection of the
human brain is undertaken and the brain stem is studied by
the use of a series of mounted cross-sections. Special consid-
eration is given to the more important motor, sensory, and
association paths.

MeUUurcr

(See Chemistry)

MINERALOGY AND PETROGRAPHY

(Group II)

All courses offered by this department are given in the Min-
eralogical Laboratory which is located in the northeast corner of
the new Natural Science Building. The mineral collections, Room
M 222, are open for inspection daily throughout the session, from 9
to 12 A. M., and 2 to 4 P. M.

Courses i, 2, 17, and 17J are beginning courses. Course i is
open to all students desiring an elementary knowledge of Mineralogy,
and is given both semesters. Course I may be followed to advantage
by Courses 4 and 5, or 9. Those desiring a more comprehensive
beginners' course are advised to elect Course 2, which serves as the
basis for the more advanced work of the department. Course 17 is
designed to give a general knowledge of gems and gem minerals,
and is open to all students, no previous training in mineralogy or
tHe sciences being necessary. Students desiring a more intimate
knowledge of gems should also elect the laboratory work, designated
as Course I'ja. Students of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
are advised to take Courses 2 and 5, or Courses I, 4, and 5. Students
of Forestry are required to take Courses i and 9, and are advised to .
elect, if possible. Courses 4 and 5. For advanced students of Geology,
Courses 2, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 1 1 are strongly recommended.

Consultation Hours. — ^Throughout registration week, September
20 to 24. Professor Kraus, 9 to 9:30 a. m., daily. Room M
227, X. S.

FIRST SEMESTER

I. Elements of Mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work. Two
hours credit. Professor Kraus, Assistant Professor Peck, and
Mr. Slawson.
This course includes the elements of crystallography, physical



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3IO College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

and chemical properties, occurrence, uses, and determination
of the more conunon minerals. For this course a knowledge
of elementary inorganic chemistry is necessary.

2. General Mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work. Five hours

credit. Professors Kraus and Hunt, and Assistant Professor
Peck.

Students who have successfully completed Course I may elect
this course as Course 2a and receive three hours credit.

Principles of crystallography, physical and chemical properties,
origin, formation, decomposition, distribution, uses, and deter-
mination of the more important minerals.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 and 3.

3. Crystal Measurements. Measurements, calculation, and projec-

tion of crystals. Lectures and laboratory work. Three hours

credit. Professor Hunt and Mr. Slawson.
This course is given both semesters and may be pursued for

either one or two semesters.
Prerequisite: Coarse 2.

4. Determinative Mineralogy. Laboratory work. Tiuo hours credit.

Professor Hunt and Mr. Slawson.
Intended for students who have completed Course i or 2 and
wish to become more proficient in the determination of min-
erals by means of their physical characters.

5. Qualitative Blowpipe Methods. Two hours credit. Lectures and

laboratory work. Professor Hunt.
This course involves the use of blowpipe reactions upon charcoal

and plaster tablets, as well as other chemical methods useful

in the determination of minerals.
Prerequisites: Course 2 or Courses i and 4 in Mineralogy, or

Courses 3a and 3^ in chemistry.

6. Physical Crystallography. Lectures and laboratory work. Four

hours credit. Professor Kraus and Assistant Professor Peck.
This course involves a critical study of the various properties of

crystals, including the use of the polarizing microscope and

other crystallographic optical instruments.
Must be preceded by Course 2, and, if possible, by Course 3.
Students desiring to study only the optical properties of crystals

may elect this course as 6a and receive thr^'e hours credit,

7. Current Literature of Mineralogy. One or two hours credit.

Professor Hunt and Assistant Professor Peck.
This course consists of discussions, translations, ami abstracts
of important current literature.



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Courses of Insiruciion 311

8. Research Work. Laboratory work. Credit to be arranged. Pro-

fessors Kraus and Hunt, and Assistant Professor Peck.
For students who are properly qualified, opportunity is given for
original research along the lines of crystallographic measure-
ments, chemical crystallography, the formation and .origin of
minerals blowpipe methods, and petrography.

9. Lithology. Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours credit.

Lectures and laboratory work. Professor Hunt and Mr.

Sl^WSON.

The lectures include, aside from a review of the rock-forming
minerals, a discussion of the origin, modes of occurrence,
alterations, methods of determination and uses of the more
important rocks. In the laboratory the student is required to
determine by means of the macro-physical properties a large
number of rock specimens. Field excursions will also be made
in order to acquire facility in the rapid determination of rocks
in the field.

Prerequisites: Mineralogy i and Geology i.

10. Petrography. Lectures and laboratory work. Three, four, or
five hours credit. Lectures and laboratory work. Professor
Hunt.

After reviewing the optical characters and methods of investiga-
tion of crystals, the various properties of the important rock
minerals are discussed in detail. The mineralogical and chem-
ical composition, texture, genesis, forms of occurrence, and
mctamorphism of rocks are then studied. The laboratory work
is devoted to the systematic study of rock minerals and rocks,
with the aid of the polarizing microscope.

Prerequisites: Mineralogy 2 or 1, and 4, 6, or 6a, and 9.

12. Quantitative Blowpipe Methods. Reading and laboratory work.

Two hours credit. Professor Hunt.
Practice in assaying by blowpipe methods of various kinds of

ores, especially those of gold, silver, copper and lead.
Prerequisite : Course 5.

15. Advanced Qualitative Blowpipe Analysis. Reading and labora-
tory work. Credit to be arranged . Professor Hunt.
This course involves the application of blowpipe and other chem-
ical methods in determining the less common minerals, and
those containing some of the rarer elements.
Prerequisites: Mineralogy 5 and Chemistry 3 or ^a and 3*.

SECOND semester

I. Elements of Mineralogy. I^tures and laboratory work. Two
hours credit. Professor Kraus, Assistant Professor Peck, and
Mr. Si-AWSON.



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312 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

This course includes the elements of crystallography, physical
and chemical properties, occurrence, uses and determination of
the more common minerals. For this course a knowledge of
elementary inorganic chemistry is necessary.

17. Gems and Precious Stones. Lectures and demonstrations. Two
hours credit: Professor Kraus and Mr. Slawson.
This course discusses the general properties, occurrence, deter-
mination, and history of the various minerals used as gems
and gem minerals. The various methods of distinction, espe-
cially from imitations and synthetic gems, will also be con-
sidered. No previous training in mineralogy or the sciences
is required, although an elementary knowledge of chemistry
and physics is highly desirable.

[17J. Gems and Precious Stones. Laboratory work. One hour credit.
Professor Kraus and Assistants.
Students will be given an opportunity to familiarize themselves
with the various methods used in the scientific determination
of gems and gem minerals. Three hours a week in the labora-
tory to be arranged. Must be accompanied or preceded by
Course 17. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

3. Crystal Measurements. Measurement, calculation, and projection

of crystals. Lectures and laboratory work. Three hours credit.

Professor Hunt and Mr. Slawson.
This course is given both semesters and may be pursued for

either one or two semesters.
Prerequisite: Course 2.

4. Determinative Mineralogy. Laboratory work. Two hours credit.

Professor Hunt and Mr. Slawson.
Intended for students who have completed Course i or 2 and
wish to become more proficient in the determination of min-
erals by means of their physical characters.

8. Research Work. Laboratory work. Credit to be arranged.

Professors Kraus and Hunt, and Assistant Professor Pick.
For students who are properly qualified opportunity is given for
original research along the lines of crystallographic measure-
ments, chemical crystallography, the formation and origin of
minerals, blowpipe methods, and petrography.

9. Lithology. Lectures and labirator^ivork. Two hours credit.

Professor Hunt and Mr. Slawson
This lecture includes, aside from a* fcview of the rock-forming
minerals, a discussion of the origin, modes of occurrence, alter-
ations, methods of 'Kleterrainatioit and uses of the more im-



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Courses of Instruction 313

portant rocks. In the laboratory the student is required to
determine by means of the macro-physical properties a large
number of rock specimens. Field excursions will also be made
in order to acquire facility in the rapid determination of rocks
in the field.

II. Petrography. Lectures and laboratory work. Three, four, or
five hours credit. Professor Hunt.
This is a continuation of Course 10.

16. Mineralogy and Lithology. Lectures and laboratory work. Three
hours credit. Professor Hunt and Mr. Slawson.

This course is designed primarily for students of architectural
engineering, but may be pursued by students of this college
with special permission of the instructor. The first half of
the course treats of the elements of crystallography, the physi-
cal and chemical properties, uses and determination of the
common rock forming minerals, and of those ores from which
the metals and materials commonly used for building purposes
are obtained. The second half is devoted to a discussion of
the origin, n^odes of occurrence, description, and uses of the
common rocks, with special emphasis upon those used for
structural and decorative purposes. Lectures are also given
on the methods of quarrying, finishing, and testing of building
stones.

For this course a knowledge of elementary inorganic chemistry
is necessary.

SUMMER SESSION OF IQ2I

I. Elements of Mineralogy. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Peck, and Mr. .

4. Determinative Mineralogy. Two hcfurs credit. Assistant Pro-

fessor Peck, and Mr. .

5. Qualitative Blowpipe Methods. Two hours credit. Assistant

Professor Peck.

9. Lithology. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Peck, and
Mr. .

8. Special Work. Credit to be arranged. Assistant Professor Peck.

MUSIC

The courses in Music open to students who evince sufficient

ability to pursue them with ")fit, and are subject to the general rule
regarding elections. As al' he courses in music run through the
entire year, the students are e 'mestly advised to take them both se-
mesters. The instruments in t e Stearns Collection, an "Aeolian Or-



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314 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

chestrclle," a "Pianola," "Victor" records, and lantern slides arc used
for purposes of illustration.

Practical Music. — Credit, not to exceed two hours per semester,
will be given for advanced work in Pianoforte, Organ, Violin, Sing-
ing, and Advanced Public School Methods, taken in the University
School of Music under conditions given below. (See Courses 17
and 18.)

CoNsiJiTATioN Hours. — During the period of registration, daily,
10-12, at Registrar Hall's office.

FIRST semester

Technical Courses. — i, 3, 5, 7, and 17. (Course 7 is intended
primarily for graduates, but is open to undergraduates who receive
special permission.)

I. Science of Harmony. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Moore.

In this course, as in the other technical courses, the student is
encouraged to make a practical application of the subject
through creative work of a nature conditioned by the scope
of the course and the ability of the student.

By devoting two extra periods (hours to be arranged) the stu-
dent may secure one hour additional credit.

3. Simple Counterpoint; Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Moore.

7. Canon and Fugue. Two hours credit. Professor Stanley.

17. Advanced Practical Music. One or two hours credit.

This course may be elected only by written permission of Pro-
fessor Stanley, and all elections must be in his name. It may
be elected thereafter as 17^ or 17^, if deemed advisable or
deserved, under the same condition.

Historical and Critical Courses— u, 9, 11, 13, 15.

la. Creative Listening. Three hours credit. Professor Stanley.
In this course, which requires no preparatory training, students
are led to an appreciation of the best music through system-
atic and directed listening, supplemented by the study of the
best critical writers. The opportunities for hearing good
music, elsewhere stated, will in this manner become increas-
ingly stimulating and valuable, and must be utilized as a con-
dition of receiving credit.

9. History of Music. From the Christian Era to the Beethoven
Period. Three hours (rcdit. Professor Stanley.



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Courses of Instruction 315

13. Evolution of Musical Instruments. Two hours credit. Professor

Stanley.

[15. Seminary. Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms. Two hours credit.
Professor Stanley.
The subjects covered each year being different in nature and
scope, this course may be re-elected with Professor Stanley's
consent. Omitted in 1920-192 1.]

19. Musical Analysis. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Moore.

second semester
Technical Courses.

• 2. Science in Harmony. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Moore.

4. Simple Counterpoint. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Moore.

6. Double Counterpoint. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Moore.

8. Canon and Fugue.. Two hours credit. Professor Stanley.

18. Advanced Practical Music. One or two hours credit.

This course may be elected only by written permission of Pro-
fessor Stanley, and all elections must be in his name. It may
be elected again as i8^i or 18^.

Historical and Critical Courses

2a. Creative Listening. A continuation of Course la. Three hours
credit. Professor Stanley.

10. History of Music. From the Beethoven period to the Ultra
Modems. Three hours credit. Professor Stanley.

14. Evolution of Musical Instruments. Two hours credit. Professor

Stanley.

[16. Seminary. Continuation of Course 15. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Stanley.
The subjects covered each year being different in nature and
scope, this course may be re-elected with Professor Stanley's
consent. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

20. Musical Analysis. Continuation of Course 19. Two hours credit.

Assistant Professor Moore.



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3i6 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Old Bulgarian

(Sec Indo-European Languages and IJteralurcs)

Old Norse

(Sec Germanic Languages and Literatures)

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY

Important Notice to Students. — ^Therc is such wide diversity
in the preparation, needs, and aims, of individual students that the
department cannot lay down inflexible rules with regard to sequence
of courses.

Students are advised that courses under A come first. Those
who have elected no course under A should not elect any course
under B without permission from the instructor.

As a general rule, students should begin with Course i in Phil-
•osophy, or Course 7 in Psychology.

Students desirous of specializing in Philosophy must begin with
Course i. Further work will be mapped out to meet particular needs.

Graduate Work. — Candidates for higher degrees in Philosophy
are requested to communicate with Dean Lloyd as soon as possible —
preferably before entering.

Related Courses. — Various departments offer courses of special
value to students of philosophy. The instructors will be glad to
point out the more useful related courses to any student who may
make application.

Philosophical Society. — The Acolytes 19 a society to which stu-
dents, who have distinguished themselves in philosophy, may be elected
on recommendation of the faculty.

Psychological Laboratory. — The Psychological Laboratory oc-
cupies forty rooms of various sizes in the Natural Science building.
The rooms are amply supplied with water, gas, high and low voltage
currents to furnish power and to replace primary batteries in ordi-
nary experiments.

The equipment includes a complete set of the apparatus required
for demonstration and class use, models of the brain and sense
organs, a full set of reaction-time instruments, and an unusually large
collection of pieces for recording bodily expressions during effective
states. The laboratory is particularly well equipped for experiments
on sound, and there is an adequate supply of instruments for work
in other lines. Such apparatus as is needed for advanced work or
research will be procured as required, and many of the newest appli-
ances are added each year. Every, facility and encouragement are
offered to students of sufficient preliminary training to undertake in-
vestigations on some special proljlem.



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Courses of Instruction 317

Group Requirements for Graduation. — All the courses oflFered
in this department which are listed under the caption Philosophy fall
under Group III (see page 138). Courses in Psychology, and so
listed, fall under Group II.

Consultation Hours. — Throughout registration week, September
20 to 24, a department representative, daily, 11-12. Room 106,
M. H.

Philosophy

(Group III)

FIRST SEMESTIR

A. Introductory Courses, (See notice above.)

1. Philosophical Introduction. Lectures, discussion, sections, exer-

cises. Three hours credit. Professors Wenley, Lloyd, Vib-
BERT, Parker, and Mr. Trap.
The object of this course is to explain to beginners in the most
elementary manner possible, the meaning, interest, and scope
of philosophy; to compare its outlook with other standpoints,
such as those of the average man (common-sense), of liistory,
and of science (including psychology). This is a three-hour
course; every student will attend one discussion section per
week ; this in addition to the two lectures ; after the beginning
of the semester, the class will be divided into sections for this
purpose, and each student will have an opportunity of electing
the hour most suitable fof the section work.

7. Elementary General Psychology. See under Psychology.

2. Ethics. Introduction to the Study of Moral Institutions. Sub-

ject in 1920-21 : — Roman and Mediaeval Cosmopolitanism with
special reference to its bearing upon contemporary "Interna-
tionalism." Text-book : G. S. Brett, The Government of Man,
Two hours credit. Professor Wenley.

3. Introduction to Logic. Lectures, collateral reading, and text-

book work. Text-book : Sellars' Essentials of Logic, Course
I is a natural prerequisite to this course. Three hours credit.
Professor Sellars.

4. Introduction to Systematic Ethics. Lectures, discussions, and

assigned readings. Three hours credit. Professor Sellars.
This course is designed primarily as an introduction to system-
atic ethics. The first part will concern itself with the theory
or moral conduct, while the latter part will be devoted to social
problems of ethical significance.



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3i8 College of Literature, Seiencc, and the Arts

6. Introduction to Aesthetics. Lectures, prescribed reading, and a
thesis. Three hours credit. Assistant Professor Parker.
The definition, forms, and standard of Beauty. The application
of genera] aesthetic principles in poetry and the fine arts. The
relation of art to science, morality, religion, and philosophy.
Lectures, reading, and a thesis. Text-book. Parker's The
Principles of Aesthetics,

8. Introductory Physiological and Experimental Psychology. Sen-
sation, Attention, Association. See under Psychology.

B. Second Courses,

9a. History of Ancient Philosophy from Thales through Aristotle.
Lectures, reading, exercises. Three hours credit. Professor
Lloyd.
Open to approved students who have had any one of the intro-
ductory courses or an equivalent.

10. The Philosophy of Plato. Three hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Parker.
A study of the chief Dialogues (in translation). Lectures, dis-
cussions, and prescribed reading.

12. Contemporary French Philosophy. A general survey of the main
currents of French philosophical thought today in their rela-
tions to economic, social, artistic, religious, and cultural tend-
encies. Professor Vibbert.

14. Metaphysics. A study of uttimafe problems: — substance, law and
individuality, purpose and casualty, the one and the many, the
self and nature. Three hours credit. Assistant Professor
Parker.

C. Courses jor Undergraduates with Permission and for Graduates.

l6rt. Political Philosophy. Lectures, discussions, theses. 7'wo hours
credit. Professor Li.ovD.
A history of the theories of society, ancient and modern. .At-
tention will be given especially to the contract theory of the
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

17. Seminar in Contemporary Epistemology. This course is designed
for graduates, and seniors with permission. Reports, readings,
and discussions. Three hours credit. Professor Sellers.

D. Courses for Graduates Only.

33 {<i* t), c, etc.). Seminaries will be organized as required. Pro-
fessors Wenley, Lloyd, Vibbert, and Sellars, and Assistant



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 28 of 75)