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Courses of Instruction 319



SECOND SEMESTER

A, Inlroductory Courses, (see notice prefixed to announcement of

courses in this department).

I. Philosophical Introduction. Three hours credit. Same as in first
semester (which see). Professors Wenley, Lloyd, Vibbert,
Assistant Professor Parker, and Mr. Trap.

3. Introduction to Logic. Lectures, collateral reading, and text-
book work. Text-books: Sellars' Essentials of Logic. Course
I is the natural prerequisite to this course. Three hours credit.
Professor Sellars.

5/1. Ethics of Social Movements : a Study of Ethical Types as seen
in Social and Industrial Relations. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Wenley.
This course is designed specially for students of (i) history,
(2) law and sociology, (3) commerce and administration. The
problems will be approached from the standpoint of social
organization. The ethical significance of social, and political
institutions will be considered, also the relation of these insti-
tutions to the conditions of moral progress and stability in a
society. Subject in 1930-1921 : The Ways of Group- Life. Stu-
dents are advised that three coursfs fall under 5, distinguished
by letters following the No. 5. As each course is complete in
itself, all may be elected, and in any order. They deal with
phases of ethical and social development subsequent to the
French Revolution.

6. The History of Esthetics. Three hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Parker.
The development of resthetic theory in relation to the contem-
poraneous social, philosophical, and artistic movements. The
analysis and discussion of representative contributions to this
theory. Special attention will be paid to the modern period
beginning with Kant. Lectures, reading, and reports.

B. Second Courses.

gb. History of Modern Philosophy from St. Augustine, through
Kant. Lectures, reading, and reports. Three hours credit.
Professor Lloyd.
The course is open to approved students who have had any one
of the introductory courses or an equivalent. Course iia,
while not required, furnishes desirable preparation for this
course.



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320 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

ir. The Philosophy of Aristotle. Special attention will be given to
the Metaphysics, Psychology, and Ethics. Three hours credit.
Assistant Professor Parker.

13. The Philosophy of Henri Bergson and Emile Boutroux. A
detailed exposition of the philosophy of the two most important
contemporary French thinkers; the relations and contrast be-
tween their points of view. Three hours credit. Professor
ViBBERT.

15. The Principles and Main Concepts of Science. Three hours
credit. Professor Sellars.
This course is designed primarily for students of Physics,
Chemistry, and Biology, but is open to all who are interested
in the philosophical aspects of science. The Postulates of
science ; the methods of science ; the main concepts employed.
Text-book: Sellar's Essentials of Philosophy.

C. Courses for Undergraduates with Permission and for Graduates.

idb. Political Philosophy — special course. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Lloyd.

A critical study of society; the principles of political association
and evolution ; progress, the relations of political and industrial
institutions to ifundamental ideas of philosophy and religion;
the personal and the S9cial.

This course is recommended to students of history, to those who
have had or intend to take Course ita, and to students of
economics and sociology.

17. A Critical Examination of Socialism. Three hours credit. Pro-

fessor Sellars.

18. Modem Logic. Credit and hours to be arranged. Assistant Pro-

fessor Parker.
An introduction to the study of the more recent developments
of logical theory and their applications to the exact sciences.
The elements of the theory of propositions, classes, relations,
order, and number,

19. Problems of Human Conduct. Two hours credit. Professor

Lloyd.
A study of the moral ideal, motive and judgment, of conscience
and will. An elementary course in ethical theory, partly his-
torical and partly critical and constructive.

D. Courses for Graduates Only.

33. As in first semester (which see).



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Courses of Instruction 321



SUMMER SESSION OF 1 92 1

Introductory Courses,

Is. Introduction to Philosophy. Two hours credit. Professor
Wen LEY.

9. Introduction to Logic. Two hours credit. Professor Sellars.
For Graduates and Undergraduates.

5 J. Introduction to Ethics. Two hours credit. Professor Sei.lars.

1 2j. Philosophy of Religion. Two hours credit. Professor Wenley.

Psychology
(Group II)

FIRST SEMESTER

A. Introductory Courses,

7. Elementary General Psychology. Three hours credit. One lec-
ture and two discussion sections, with reports on outside read-
ing. Text-book, Pillsbury, Essentials of Psychology, Profes-
sor PiLLSBURY, Dr. Griffitts, and Mr. Brown.
A rapid survey of the facts of mind. Intended primarily for
students of pedagogy, but open to others who are not inter-
ested in the experimental and physiological aspects of Psy-
chology.

8tf, b, c. Introductory Physiological and Experimental Psychology.
Sensation, Attention, Association. Three to five hours credit.
Professors Pillsbury and Shepard, and Dr. Grifhtts.
It is suggested that six-year literary-medical students, students
of biology, and others who desire more than the rudiments of
psychology begin their work with this course. Lectures, dis-
cussion, and laboratory work. It may be elected as 8a, three
hours credit, without laboratory work ; as 8r, four hours credit,
with two lectures and four hours of laboratory work; or as
%e, five hours credit, with two lectures, a discussion section,
and four hours of laboratory work. Students who have had
previous work in psychology and desire only the laboratory
work and discussion sections may also elect it as a three-hour
course. Text-book, Pillsbury's Fundamentals of Psychology.

'B. Second Courses.

21. Mental Measurements and Certain Social Phases of Mental Path-
ology. Two hours credit. Professors Pillsbury and Barrett,
and Mr. Brown.
A review and criticism of methods of measuring mental capaci-



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322 Collcijc of Literature, Science, and the Arts

ties, with actual practice. Professor Barrett will discuss with
clinical material certain aspects of disturbances of personality
that bear on criminal cases.

22. (icMieral Comparative Psychology. Two hours credit. Professor

SUEPARD.

An elementary course on animal behavior in relation to the
human.

23. Psychology of Memory. Two hours credit. Professor Pillsbury.
A study of the recent memory investigations. The results, meth-
ods, and instruments will be studied, and some of the more
important experiments will be repeated^ Some time will also
be devoted to a study of the experimental investigations of
legal evidence, the Aussage experiments of Stem and others.

26. Psychology of Salesmanship. Two hours cr/dit. Professor

Adams.

The study of the salesman, the buyer, the commodity, and the
mental meeting ground, which includes the psychological dis-
cussion of attention, interest, desire, conviction^ and action.

Prerequisite : Course 7 or 8, or five hours of Economics.

27. Business Psychology. Two hours credit. Professor Adams.
This course deals with the three-fold problem of employment

selection, efficiency as affected by working conditions, and
efficiency as affected by the motives of the worker.
Prerequisite: Course 7 or 8, or five hours of Economics.

C. Courses for Undergraduates with Permission and for Graduates,

30. Individual and Race Differences. Two to five hours credit. Dr.
Griffitts.
The nature, extent, causes, and significance of individual and
race differences, with the emphasis on methods of measurement.
The class will meet twice a week for lectures, reports, and
discussions. In addition, each student will make a more in-
tensive study of some problem which he may choose.
Prerequisite : Course 7 or 8.

3!. Mftho<ls of Mental and Social Measurement. Two hours credit.
Mr. Bkown.
Deals with the technical and statistical methods used in the
study of mental, educational, and social problems. Among other*
topics, the course will include measurement of variable facts,
iiifasurenient of changes, measurement of groups, measurement
of relations, correlation, reliability of measurements, tables and
surfaces of frequency, graphic methods. Lectures, reports, and
the nppHrntion of the methods to actual problems.



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Courses of histruction 323

fjj. I'ljysiological Tsycliology of the Senses. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor PiLLSBURY.
A study of the main results and technique of th^ senses except
vision. This with Course 41 will give a survey of the psy-
chology of sensation. Given in 1920-1921.]

[34. The Psychology of Language. Two hours credit. Professors
P11.LSBURY and Meadbk.
Amon^ the subjects treated are the laws of thought and language
as a form of expression, the genesis of speech, and the psy-
chology of syntax.

Professor Scott will give four lectures on the origin of language.
Omitted in 1920-1921.]

36. Advanced Applied Psychology. Two or more hours credit. Pro-
fessor Adams.

a. Advertising. Reports on the literature of the subject and

laboratory work on the more important psychological phases
of advertising.

b. Experimental investigations on the problems of emplojrment

selection, the effect of environmental conditions upon the
output, and the effect of the motives upon the output, to-
gether with reports on the literature of such subjects.

P. Courses Primarily for Graduates.

50. History of Modem Psychology. Primarily for graduates. Two

hours credit. Professor PiLLSBURY.
This course will present the more important tendencies in psy-
chology from the Greeks to Locke, in an endeavor to give an
historical origin of current theories.

51. Advanced Systematic Psychology. Lectures on attention, asso-

ciation, and the more complicated mental processes. Three
hours credit. Professor Shepard.

52. Adv.anced Course in Experimental Psychology. Original inves-

tigation. Credit and hours to be arranged. Professors Piri.s-
BiiRV, SiiEPARD, and Adams.

53. Psychological Journal Club. The members of the teaching staff

and the graduate students in psychology will meet every other
Thursday night to review the current literature.

r. Graduate Seminaries.

54. Graduate seminaries will be organized as required. Professors

Pii.lsburv, Shepard, and Adams.



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324 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

SECOND SEMESTER

A, Introductory Courses,

7. Elementary General Psychology. Same as in first semester
(which see). Three hours credit. Professors Pillsbury and
Adams, and Dr. Griffitts, and Mr. Brown.

8b, d, /. Introductory Physiological .and Experimental Psychology.
Feelings, emotions, and the higher intellectual processes. Three
hours credit. Professors Pillsbury and Shefard, and Dr.
Griffitts.
Continuation of Course Sa, This course may, by special per-
mission, be elected as an introductory course without being
preceded by Course Sa, It may be elected as Sb, three hours
credit; as Sd, four hours credit, with two lectures and four
hours of laboratory work ; or as 8/, five hours credit, with two
lectures, one quiz section, and four hours of laboratory work.

B, Second Courses,

38. Psychology of the Abnormal and Occult. Two hours credit.
Professor Pillsbury.
A critical survey of the more important facts of mental derange-
ment that throw light upon the principles of general psy-
chology. The more interesting forms of modem occultism will
be considered in their bearings upon psycho-pathology.

35. Psychology of Advertising. Two houri credit. Professor

Adams.
A survey of the psychological principles involved in advertising,

with experimental study of the relative value of different types

of advertisements.
The course may be elected as 35a, three hours credit, including

one laboratory period at hours to be arranged. Laboratory

limited to 30.
Prerequisite ; Course 7 or 8, or five hours of Economics.

C, Courses for Undergraduates with Permission and for Graduates,

[41. Color Vision. Two hours credit; hours to be arranged. Profes-
sor Shefard.
Given in 1931-1933 and alternate years.]

[42. General Course in Experimental Phonetics. Lectures and lab-
oratory work. One or two hours credit. Professors Meader
and Shefard.
This course, which is designed for students of language, psy-
chology, oratory, and singing, will deal with the anatomy and
physiology of the human voice, the production of speech sounds.



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Courses of Instruction 325

description and classification of speech sounds, mechanical
methods of recording speech sounds, study of speech records.
As the number of students admitted to this course will be
small, those desiring to elect it are advised to apply early to
one of the instructors in charge.
Given in 1930-192 1 and alternate years.]

43. Individual and Race Differences. Same as 30, first semester. Two

to five hours credit. Dr. Griffitts.

44. Psycho-physical Methods. Two hours credit. Dr. Griffitts.

A discussion, with demonstrations and experiments, of the his-
toric methods.

45. Special Problems in the Psychology of Advertising. Two hours

credit. Professor Adams.
Advanced problems in the psychology of advertising to be selected

to meet the demands of the students. Limited to 8.
Prerequisite: Course 25.

46. Psychology of Character. Two hours credit. Professor Adams.
A review and criticism of the methods which had been used for

reading character, together with a constructive summary of the
experimental work which has been performed in scientific
laboratories upon this subject.

D. Courses Primarily for Graduates,

Soa, History of Modern Psychology. Professor Pillsbury. Con-
tinuation of Course 50.

57. Advanced Comparative Psychology. Three houre credit. Pro-

fessor Shbpard.

A study of the evolution of mental processes, and their com-
parative development in different forms. The lectures will be
accompanied by laboratory work on the learning processes in

. animals.

58. The Central Nervous System and Mental Processes. Two hours

credit. Professor Shepard.
Given in 1920-1921 and alternate years.

59. Laboratory Technique. A study of apparatus and methods. One

hour credit. Professor Shkpard.
Given in 1919-1920 and alternate years.

52tf. Advanced Experimental Psychology. As in Course 52, in first
semester. Professors Pillsbury, Shepard, and Adams.

53<i. Psychological Journal Club. As in first semester (which see).



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326 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

r. (Jraduate Seminarifs.

54<i. firaduatc Seminaries. As in first semester (which see).

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

Introductory Courses.

ys. Elementary Psychology. Tjvo hours credit. Dr. Griffitts.
For Graduates atid Undergraduates,

8j. Experimental Psychology. Two hours credit. Dr. GRiFnTTS.

305. Individual and Race Differences. T700 hours credit. Dr. Grif-
fitts.

255'. Psychology of Advertising. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Adams.

26^. Psychology of Salesmanship. Two. hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor. Adams.

2'js. Vocational Psychology. Two hours credit. Assistant F*rofessor
Adams.

46J. The Psychology of Character. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Adams.

541. Seminary in Psychology. Credit to be arranged. Professor

SlIEPARD.

55 Present Tendencies in Psychological Theory. Two hours credit
Professor Pillsbury.

56. Seminary in the Psychology of Reasoning. Two hours credit.
Professor Piilsbury.

2S. Psychology of the Abnormal and Occult. Two hours credit.
Professor Pit.t.sbury.

PHYSICS

(Group II)

Students entering without a preparatory course in physics will be
allowed to enter Courses i and 2 only after they have completed
Course Z.

Students expecting to teach physics in high schools should take
at least the following courses: i, \b, 2, 2b, 5, 7, and 8.

The lectures in Courses i, 2, lE, and 2E are given in the large
lecture room at the west end of the Physics Laboratory.



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Courses of Instruction 327

Two hours of laboratory work will be required for one hour
credit. No laboratory work can be taken in periods of less than
two consecutive hours. There are no laboratory fees for courses in
physics.

A suggested program in Physics is outlined on page 166.

Consultation Hours. — Throughout registration week, September
20 to 24. Professor Randai l, or a representative, will be in his
oOice in the Physics building, 2 :30 to 3 130 daily, to advise students
desiring to elect courses in Physics.

FIRST SEMESTER

A. Courses Primarily for Undergraduates.

Z. Physics for Beginners. Four hours credit. Mr. Cork.

This course is intended for students who have not presented

physics for admission and who wish to pursue studies in the

department of Physics.
No credit toward graduation wUl be alio7ved for this course,

unless it is followed by Course i. It is not counted as part of

the collegiate work in Physics required for admission to the

Medical School.

1. General Physics: Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. Four hours

credit. lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Professors
Randall and Colby, Assistant Professor Lindsay, Dr. Kent,
Mr. Babbitt, and Assistants.

Preparatory Physics and Plane Trigonometry are prerequisites
for this course. It may, however, be elected at the same time
as Mathematics T. Students who transfer their credits to the
College of Engineering will be required to offer Courses i and
la as the equivalent of Course lE.

All elections, including those of upperclassmen, must be made
through the Classification Committee.

la. Problem Course. One hour credit. Assistant Professor Sleator.

This course may be taken in conjunction with Physics i, or
afterward. ' It is recommended for students preparing to teach.

All elections must be made through the Committee on Classifica-
tion.

lb. Laboratory Work in Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. One hour
credit. Assistant Professor Ricir, and Assistants.
Hours same as for the laboratory work in Physics I.
All elections, imluding those of uppcrclassmen, must be made
through the Classification Committee.

2. (iencral Physics. Four hours credit. Magnetism, Electricity, and

Light. I.cctures, recitations, and ln1)oratory work. Assistant



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328 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Professor Rich, Mr. Becker, Mr. Cork, Mr. Ceiger, and
Assistants.

This coarse must be preceded by Course I. Students who trans-
fer their credits to the College of Engineering will be required
to offer Courses 3 and 2a as the equivalent of Course 2E,

All elections must be made through the Committee on Classifica-
tion.

2a, Problem Course. Ond hour credit. Continuation of Course \a.
As given the first semester, this course is a part of Physics 2E,
All elections must be made through the Committee on Classifica-
tion.

2b. Laboratory Work in Magnetism, Electricity and Light. One
hour credit. Assistant Professor Rich, and Assistants.
All elections must be made through the Committee on Classifica-
tion.

id. General Physics. For dental students only. Professor Randall.

B, For Graduates and Undergraduates,

5. Electrical Measurements. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory.
Four hours credit. Professor Smith and an Assistant

In the class work the principles of electrical behavior are criti-
cally studied and discussed. The laboratory exercises are de-
signed to illustrate and emphasize these principles, and to give
the student some personal experience in the careful use of
electrical measuring instruments. The coarse includes the
modern methods of measuring current, resistance, electromotive
force, and power, and the calibration of the instruments em-
ployed, together with measurements of capacity, and the mag-
netization of iron.

Course 5 must be preceded by Courses I and 3, including labora-
tory work. A knowledge of calculus is also desirable.

7. Advanced Physics. Four hours credit. Assistant Professor
Lindsay.
This course is adapted to the work of those preparing to teach
or to do graduate work in Physics. Courses I and 3 are pre-
- requisite, and a knowledge of calculus is required.

9. Direct Current Machinery. Lectures and laboratory work. Two
• hours credit. Professor Williams.

II. Laboratory Work in Heat. Two hours credit. Dr. Kent.

A lecture and experimental course covering the fundamental
principles of heat and offering the student a working knowl-
edge of the modern methods of heat determinations. The
laboratory work includes measurements of specific heats of



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Courses of Instruction 329

solids, liquids, and gases; heats of fusion and vaporization;
vapor pressures; thermal conductivities, critical temperatures,
etc. The problems are chosen with a view to illustrating pres-
ent methods of calorimetry and temperature measurement.

15. Electrochemical Physics. Lectures and laboratory work. Two
hours credit. Professor Henderson.
This course offers a study, from the view point of physics, of
the fundamental principles of electrochemistry. It is designed
(a) to meet the needs of those preparing to teach physics and
chemistry, (b) to furnish a basis for the application of electro-
chemical principles to practical problems in chemistry and
electricity, and (c) to prepare for research in electrochemical
physics.
Course 15 must be -preceded by Courses i, a, including laboratory
work.

17. Sound. Recitations and Laboratory Work. Four hours credit.
Assistant Professor Sleator.
The class work is based on Barton's Text Book on Sound, with
lectures and reference reading.

C, Primarily for Graduates,

21. Theoretical Mechanics. Three hours credit. Professor Field.
Geometry of Motion; kinematics of a particle and of a rigid
body; statics; kinetics of a particle and of a rigid body; the
problem of the top; relative motion; Lagrange's equations;
general principles of mechanics.

25. Theory of Heat. Two hours credit. Professor Randall.

This is a theoretical course in which selected chapters from
the subject of heat are discussed.

27. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. Three hours credit. Pro-
fessor Colby.
This course should be preceded by a course in electrical measure-
ments; a knowledge of calculus is also required.

29. Special Problems.

Research work on special problems under the direction of some
member of the teaching staff. Credit to be arranged.

31. Thermodynamics and Gas Theory. Three hours credit. Profes-
sor Colby.

33 Vacuum Tubes in Radio Communication. Two hours credit.
Professor Williams.
lectures and laboratory work.
The theory of the transmission of electricity through gases will



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330 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

lie treated in this case together with a study of the different
types of tubes used in radio work. The characteristics of such
lubes will be determined exi)erimcntally and the electric cir-
cuits employed in their use will receive considerable attention.
Prerequisites: Course 5 in Physics and the Calculus.

27. Reading of German Texts and Journals. One hour credit. Pro-
fessor Lee.
The purpose of this course is to cultivate facility in reading the
(jerman literature of Physics*

41. Seminary. This course will be in charge of various members of
the department, depending upon the nature of the subject
treated. Two hours credit,

43. Physics Colloquium.

Reports on original work, together with analysis and discussion
of important articles in current physical literature. All in-
structors and assistants in the deparfrtlent take part in the
Physics Colloquium.

SECOND SEMESTER

A. Courses Primarily for Undergraduates.

1. General Physics: Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. Four hours

credit. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Assistant
Professor Rich, Mr. Becker, Mr. Cork, Mr. Geiger, and
Assistants.

Students who transfer their credits to the College of Engineering
will be required to offer Courses 2 and la as an equivalent of
Course lE.

Preparatory Physics and Plane Trigonometry are prerequisites
for this course. It may, however, be elected at the same time
as Mathematics i. All elections, including those of upperclass-
men, must be made through the Classification Committee.

\a. Problem Course. Que hour credit.

As given the second semester this course is. a part of Physics lE.



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 29 of 75)