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\b. Laboratory Work in Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. One hour
credit,

2. General Physics. Four hours credit. Magnetism, Electricity, and

Light. Professors Randall and Colby, Assistant Professor
Lindsay, Mr. Kent, Mr. Babbitt, and Assistants. Lectures,
recitations, and laboratory work.

This course must be preceded by Course T.

StUilents wlio transfer their cn'<lits to the College of Engineering



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Courses of Instruction 331



will be required to offer Courses 2 and 2d as an equivalent
of 2E.
All elections, including those of upper classmen, must be made
through the Classification Committee.

2a. Problem Course. One hour credit. Assistant Professor Si EATor.

2b, Laboratory Work in Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. One
hour credit.

B, For Graduates and Undergraduates.

6. Electrical Measurements. Lectures, reci(ati<)ns and lalwjratory.
Four hours credit. Professor Smith.

This is a continuation of Course 5, and includes nuasurcments
of capacity, self and mutual inductance, and the fundamental
measurements, with alternating currents. I-^speeial altcntion
is given to the theory of the magnetic circuit and tlic <|pter-
mination of the magnetism and hysteresis curves of iron and .
steel.

A working knowledge of the calculus is required.

8, Advanced Physics. Four hours credit. Continuation of Course
7. Assistant Professor Lixi>s\Y.
Courses I and 2 are prerequisites of this course, and a knowledge
of calculus is required. Course 8 naturally follows Course 7,
but may precede it.

10. Alternating Currents. Tico hours credit. Professor Wii.UAMS.

12. Laboratory Work in Light. Tivo hours credit. Laboratory work.
Dr. Meyer.
This course includes work with the prism and grating spectrom-
eters, refractomcter, and Pulfrich and Michelson interferom-
eters. Experiments are performed by \\\e student in diffrac-
tion, resolving power, and double refraction. Some elementary
spectroscopic work is done.

14. Electron Theory and Radioactivity. T^co hours credit. Lectures,
laboratory. Professor Smith.
The laboratory work deals largely with radioactive substances.
The distinguishing characteristics of ali)ha rays, beta rays, and
gamma rays are studied, and the half-life periods of several
substances are determined by each student.

16. Electrochemical Physics. Tnut hours credit, Profes-ior nK\r»F,R-
SON.
This course must l>e preceded by Cortrse 15, or an e(|uiv;drnt
course in Electrochemistry.



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33 3 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

i8. Measurements of High Temperatures. Two hours credit. Dr.
Kent.
An experimental course accompanied by lectures, covering the
present methods of high temperature measurement. Oppor-
tunity is offered to use the gas thermometer, resistance ther-
mometer, and various types of thermoelectric and radiation
pyrometers.

30. Architectural Acoustics. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Rich.
A lecture course on the causes underlying good and bad acous-
tical conditions in auditoriums, with illustrative problems on
sound transmission, distribution, and absorption. This course
is designed primarily for architects, but is also open to other
students.

C, Courses Primarily for Graduates,

22, Theoretical Mechanics. Continuation of Course 2i. Professor
Field.

24. The Theory of Ught. A theoretical course in which selected
chapters of the subject are considered. Two hours credit. Dr.
Meyer.

36j. Radiation, II. Two hours. Professor Randall.

A lecture course dealing principally with series relations in
spectra; the Zeeman and Stark effects; theories of atomic
structure and allied topics. Continuation of Course 26. Given
in 1 920- 192 1 and alternate years.

28. Electricity and Magnetism. Continuation of Course 27. Three
hours credit. Professor Colby.

30. Special Problems.

32. Thermod3mamics and Gas Theory. Two hours credit. Continua-
tion of Course 31. Professor Colby.

38. French Reading. One hour credit. Assistant Professor Lee.

This course is of the same nature as the one in German reading
(37) given during the first semesf^'.

42. Seminary. Two hours credit. —

46. Colloquium.



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Courses of Instruction 333

SUMMER SESSION OF 1 92 1

For Undergraduates,

Z. Physics for Entrance. Dr. Lindsay.

1. General Physics. Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. Four hours

credit. Professor Williams, Dr. Kent, Dr. Fazel, Mr.
Becker, and Mr. Babbitt.

2. General Physics. Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. Four hours

credit. Assistant Professor Rich, Dr. Sheldon, Mr. St. Peter,
and Mr. Cork.

la. Problems. One hour credit. Assistant Professor Sleator.

2a, Problems. One hour credit, Assistxint Professor Sleator.

I E. General Physics. Five hours credit. Professor Williams, Dr.
Kent, Dr. Fazel, Mr. Becker, and Mr. Babbitt.

2E. General Physics. Five hours credit. Assistant Professor Rich,
Dr. Sheldon, Mr. St. Peter, and Mr. Cork.

iD. General Physics. Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. Four hours
credit. Professor Wiluams, Dr. Kent, Dr. Fazel, Mr.
Becker, and Mr. Babbitt.

2D. General Physics. Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. Four
hours credit. Professor Rich, Dr. Sheldon, Mr. St. Peter,
and Mr. Cork.

l^. Laboratory Work in Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. One hour
credit, Mr. St. Peter.

2b, Laboratory Work in Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. One
hour credit, Mr. St. Peter.

3. Teachers' Course. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Rich.

5. Electrical Measurements. Four hours credit. Professor Smith,

and Dr. Sawyer.

For Graduates and Undergraduates.

6. Electrical Measurements. Four hours credit. Professor Smith,

and Dr. Sawyer.

7a. Advanced Physics. Mechanics. Two hours credit. Assistant
Professor Lindsay.

8. Advanced Physics. Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. Four
hours credit. Assistant Professor Lindsay.



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334 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

%a. Advanced Physics. Light. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Lindsay.

8^. Advanced Physics. Electricity and Magnetism. Two hours
credit. Assistant Professor Lindsay.

11. Laboratory Work in Heat. Two hours credit. Dr. Kent.

14. Electron Theory and Radioactivity. Two hours credit. Professt)r
Smith.

17. Sound. Four hours credit. Assistant Professor Si.eator.

18. ^^(•asuremcn^s of High Temiwratures. Two hours credit. Dr.

Kent.

For Graduates.

24. Theory of Light. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Lind-

say.

25. Theory of Heat. T7V0 hours credit. Professor Randai.u

26. Radiation, L Two hours credit. Professor Randall.

29. Advanced Laboratory Work. Tivo hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Sleator, and Dr. Kent.

33. Vacuum Tubes in Radio Communication. Two hours credit.
Professor Williams.

38. Research. Credit to be arranged. , Professor Randall.

Physiological Chemistry

(See Medical Sciences)

Physiology

(See Medical Sciences)

Political Economy

(See Economics)

POLITICAL SCIENCE

(Group IIL)

The courses in Political Science cover elementary as well as ad-
vanced and si)ecialii:ed study- of the entire field. A list of all cours.es
presented in this department is v^'^tw Ixdow. Some of these are not
jjiven every year. This list is so arranged as to indicate the.sub-
orch'natc fiehls of study within the scope of Politics. It is followed



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Courses of Instruction 335

by a description uf such courses as are offered during the year for
which this Announcement api>ears.

Courses I aiid 2 are prerequisites for all other courses in Political
Science,

Consultation Hours. — Throughout registration week, September
20 to 34, a departmental representative, daily, 10-12. Room 108, Ec.

SUMMARY OF ALL COURSES OFFERED IN THIS
DEPARTMENT

Introductory and General Courses

first semester second se^fest£r

I. American GovernnienL 2. American Government.

15. World Politics. 16. National Politics.

31. Introduction to Law. 22. Principles of Politics.

13. Seminar and Journal Club 14. Seminar and Journal Club

in Political Science. in Political Science.

Government
7. British Government. 8. European Governments.

9. Colonial Government. 10. U. S. Constitutional Law.

3. Municipal GovcrnmenL 4. Municipal Government.

17. Municipal Administration. 18. Municipal Administration.

12. Municipal Finance.
19. Comparative Government. 20. Comparative Government.

30. State Government.
13/J. Seminar. 14/1. Seminar.

International Law and Diplomacy
5. International Law. 6. International Law.

27. American Diplomacy. 28. European Diplomacy.

39. Diplomatic and Consular

Methods.
13^. Seminar. 14^. Seminar.

Comparative Law
31. Introduction to Law.

33. Roman Law. 34. Roman Law.

35. Comparative Jurisprudence. 36. Principles of Public T,a\v.
37. Primitive Law. 38. Modern Legal Theory.

I3<-. Seminar. 14^. Seminar

Political Theory



21. Political Origins.


22. Principles of Politics.


23. Political Theory: Ancient


24. Political Theory: Modern.


and Mediaeval.




25. Political Theory: Ninrteenth


26. Political Thr'ory : Twentieth


Century.


Century.


I3</. Seminar.


14*/. Seminar.



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33^ College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
COURSES OFFERED IN 1920-1921

FIRST SEMESTER

/. Primarily /or Undergraduates,

I. American Government. Lectures, readings, recitations, and re-
ports. Three hours credit. Professors Reeves and Hayden,
• and Dr. Kirkpatrick.

This is a course designed primarily for undergraduates as a
preparation for citizenship. It is conducted by means of lec-
tures and recitations with supplementary readings extending
throughout the year. It is expected that all students electing
other courses in Political Science shall have had this course or
its equivalent. The first semester is devoted to a study of Na-
tional Government and Administration. In the second semester
the work is divided between the study of State Governments
and Administration and that of the American Party System.
Throughout the course attention is centered rather upon the
actual workings of government than upon the more mechanical
side of administration.

//. For Graduates and Undergraduates,

3. Municipal Government. Lectures, recitations, and reports. Three
hours credit. Professor Crane.
The commission and manager forms of city government are
studied in the first semester along with other questions of the
sociological, political, and legal character, organization, and
frame-work of the municipality. The second semester is de-
voted to the activities of these governments,— city planning,
police, social welfare, public improvements, utilities, finance,
and other functions. While in part historical and compara-
tive, the courses deal mainly with American cities of the present
time. The method of instruction is by lectures, text, and quir.
Outside readings or special reports may be assigned at dis-
cretion.

5. Public International Law. Lectures, recitations, and discussion.
Three hours credit. Professor Reeves.
The work in international law is conducted principally by means
of classroom discussion. The intention is not so much to drill
in dogmatic statements of the law as to develop in the student
the ability to analyze international situations for himself with
some degree of clearness. The work comprises a general view
of the elementary principles of the subject by text-book and
informal lectures, the investigation and discussion of interna-
tional incidents, and the consideration of the leading cases in
international law, British and American.



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Courses of Instruction 337

7. British Government and Administration. Text, collateral read-
ings, and discussion, supplemented by lectures. Three hours
credit. Professor Hayden.
In this course attention will be centered on those features of
modern British government which have justified the large in-
fluence it has exercised upon governments both in America and
in Europe. Parliament, its sovereignty, structure, and work-
ing, the Cabinet and responsible government, the Crown and
functions of the executive, the judiciary and the English
conception of law, and the problems connected with the growth
of the Empire, are the topics of prime consideration.

15. World Politics. Lectures, collateral reading, and reports. Two
hours credit. Professor Crane.

This course presents a general discussion from a non-technical
point of view of tho political problems, national and interna-
tional, of the present day. The proper solution of these ques-
tions depends upon the development of sound public opinion.
The obligation of the college num and woman in the formation
of that opinion is manifest.

The aim of this coarse is to collect the scattered elements of the
always confusing situation of the moment and to try to grasp
them as one connected whole. Attention will first be directed
to the general political tendencies of the period immediately
preceding the Great War and then to the effect of the War
upon their future development.

By si>ecial permission, a third hour may be elected, with credit
for quiz and discussion.

17. Municipal Administration. Lectures, discussion, and reports.
Two hours credit. Dr. Upson.
This is an advanced course dealing with the practical methods
by which the purposes of municipal governments are accom-
plished. Attention is centered upon the character of municipal
functions and the machinery by which they are made effective.
The student will be given such advantages of field training as
can be secured from discussion of field problems, a first-hand
acquaintance with field organisation and a very limited amount
of field work. It is preferable to take this work after or in
conjunction with the courses in Municipal Government, Politi-
cal Science 3 and 4.

21. Political Origins. Texts, collateral readings, and discussions, sup-
plemented by lectures. Two hours credit. Dr. Kirkpatrick.
A consideration of the contributions which anthropology and so-
ciology make to political science. Brief notice will be taken of '
man's origin, racial characteristics, and distribution. More
time will be given to the study of the beliefs and practices of
primitive peoples, and of their family and group life as they
advance toward modern society and the state.



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338 College of Literature, Seietiee, and the Arts

29. Diplomatic aud Consular Melliods. Two hours credii. Professor
Crane.
Beginning wilh a historical survey of the development of the
diplomatic and consular functions in the United States, this
course will treat of the organization and administration of the
American foreign service and the activities of American diplo-
matic and consular officers.

///. For Graduates,

13. Seminary and Journal Club in Political Science. Two hours
credit. Professor Reeves and members of the department of
Political Science.
Reports of original work by faculty and students, discussion of
current questions of government, administration, international
and constitutional law, and examination of recent scientific lit-
erature. Each student will be assigned work in any part of
the field of politics in which he may have a particular interest.
The seminary will thus cover the entire scope of Politics, and
whenever desirable it will be conducted in sections devoted to
Government, International Law and Diplomacy, Comparative
Law, and Political Theory.

IQ. Comparative Government. Two hours credit. Professor Hayden.
This course is primarily for graduate students, but is open to
others by permission. Intensive study will be given to se-
lected political institutions of our own and foreign govern-
ments. Subjects such as the relation of upper and lower legis-
lative chambers, national budget making, legislative control of
national finances, legislative procedure, electoral laws, the re-
lations of the executive and the legislative branches of gov-
ernment, local and central government will be investigated,
the choice of topics being made by the instructor and the stu-
dents. Students wishing to elect this course should consult
with Professor Hayden.

23. Political Theory : Ancient and Mediaeval. Readings and discus-
sion. Two hours credit. Professor Crank.
The historical development of political theories is studied in four
consecutive semesters, covering two years* work, Courses 23,
24, 25, and 26.
After a survey of the i>criod under consideration, an exhaustive
examination will be undertaken of some small portion of it.
The purpose is to give thorough grounding in the fundamental
principles, and at the same time to give training in the method-
ology, of politics. Open only to candidates for the doctor's
degree. The hours are subject to change.



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Courses of Instruction 339

SECOND SEMESTER

/. Primarily for Undergraduates,

2. American Government. Lectures, readings, recitations, and re-
ports. Three hours credit. Professor Reeves and Mayden,
and Dr. Kirkpatrick.
It is expected that those who have successfully pursued Course
I will follow with Course 2. Course I is a prerequisite to
Course 2.

//. For Graduates and Undergraduates.

4. Municipal Government. Three hours credit. Professor Crane.
This is a continuation of Course 3 and. deals with the actual
functions of city government rather than with its organization.
Either of these courses may be taken independently of the
other.

6. Public International Law. Cases, assigned readings, discussion,
and reports. Three hours credit. Professor Reeves.
A continuation o"f Course 5, which is a prerequisite.

8. Continental European Governments. Three hours credit. Pro-
fessor Hayden.
In this course attention is directed mainly to the governments
of France, Italy, Switzerland, and Germany. Particular con-
sideration will be given to the political ideals of the various
nations as exemplified in their institutions and practice. Struc-
tural reorganization of the European governments, old and new,
will receive special treatment.

12. Administration of Municipal Finance. Lectures, readings, and
reports. Two hours credit. Mr. Steffens.
This course will deal from the standpoint of the administrator
with the problems of finance in the precise form in which they
confront our city authorities. The work will cover the budget
and budget methods, the sources and collection of revenues,
assessment, custody of money, appropriations and their proper
objects, loans, sinking funds and serial bonds, purchasing, and
audit.

16. National Politics. Lectures, collateral readings, and reports. Two
hours credit. Professor IIavden.
This course presents a study of the more important current issues
of national politics in the United States, and is given from
the standpoint of the citizen who wishes a basis for rational
opinion upon them. National defense, foreign relations, Latin-
American affairs, the colonial policy of the United States, in-
cluding the Philippine and Porto Rican problems, a national



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340 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

budget, government ownership, the tariflf, the organization of
political parties, prohibition, the relation of the government
to capital and labor, the vital problems arising out of recon-
struction and the existing industrial unrest, and other ques-
tions will be considered. The positions of the great political
parties on these questions will be studied, and reference will
be made to the experiences of other countries in connection
with them.

i8. Municipal Administration. Two hours credit. Dr. Upson.

A continuation of Course 14. It may be taken before or after
that course or alone; but preferably after or in conjunction
with the course in Municipal Government, Political Science
3 and 4.

22. Principles of Politics. Texts, lectures, readings, and quiz.
Three hours credit. Professor Crane.
The purpose of this course is to clarify political terms in com-
mon use and to give the student a sounder conception of the
theoretical principles by which actual politics are so pro-
foundly governed. A brief treatment of the development of
political institutions, concluding in a rapid analysis of some
of the great governments of the world today, is followed by
a study of the history of some of the most important political
ideas from Greek times to our own. In the light of these
'• principles, various fundamental views of political authority are
discussed, such as the socialistic and the anarchistic doctrines.

III. For Graduates.

14. Seminary and Journal Club in Political Science. Two hours
credit. Members of the department of Political Science.
This course is of the same nature and conducted in the same
manner as Course 13. These courses are not repeated, the
subject matter being always new. They may be taken con-
secutively, or either may be taken separately. Candidates for
the degree of doctor of philosophy in Political Science are
expected to continue the seminary during residence.

20. Comparative Government. Two hours credit. Professor Hayden.
This course is conducted in the same manner as Course 19, of
which it is a continuation. It may, however, be elected inde-
pendently, as the subjects chosen for investigation vary with
each semester. Students wishing to elect this course should
consult with Professor Hayden.

24. Political Theory: Modern. Readings and discussion. Two hours
credit. Professor Crane.
This course deals with the development of political theory from
Machiavelli through the Eighteenth Century. It properly fol-



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Courses of Instruction 34 1

lows Course 23, but may be taken independently of that course.
After a survey of the period under consideration, an exhaustive
examination will be undertaken of some small portion of it.
The purpose is to give thorough grounding in the fundamental
principles, and at the same time to give training in the method-
ology, of politics. Open only to candidates for the doctor's
degree.

30. Problems in State Government. Lectures, readings, and reports
• on assigned topics. Two hours credit. Dr. Kirkpatrick.
A study of recent state constitutional development and of tend-
encies in the organization and practice of state administration
Michigan will be used as a standard of comparison.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

itf, American" Government. Two hours credit. Professor Reeves.
3tf. Municipal Government Two hours credit. Professor Crane.
5tf. Public International Law. Two hours credit. Professor Reeves.
22a. Principles of Politics. Two hours credit. Professor Crane.

Psychology
(See Philosophy and Psychology)

PUBLIC SPEAKING

Students who desire practice in public speaking in addition to
that offered in the classroom are advised io join a literary society
and take part in the debates and oratorical contests provided by the
Oratorical Association. For information regarding the contests of
the Northern Oratorical League, the Central Debating League, and
the Midwest Debating League, and the medals and testimonials
offered, see page 87, or consult the instructors of this department.

Students who wish to acquire exceptional proficiency in public
speaking should begin class work early in their college course.

Those preparing to teach Public Speaking should take at least
twenty hours of work in the department selected after consultation
with the professors in charge. Only those who show marked ability
in expressive reading and in public speaking will be encouraged to
prepare for teaching.

Consultation Hours. — Consultation hours will be posted on the
bulletin board in Room 302, M. H.

During registration week, September 20 to 24, Professor True-
blood, Professor Hollister, or Assistant Professor Immel, 10 to 12.
Room 302, M. H.



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342 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



FIRST SEMESTER

1. Principles of Expression. Three hours credit. Assistant Pro-

fessor Immel, Mr. WiLNER, Mr. Hathaway, and Mr. Brandt.
This course consists in (i) a study of the theory of expression
by voice and action, (2) exercises of developing the voice and
improving the stage presence, (3) practice in reading and
speaking. The course seeks to give the student the funda-
mental principles necessary to self-criticism, and an oppor-
tunity to apply these principles in practice. Orations are
studied, memorized, and interpreted from the platform, and
short original speeches are given, with special reference to
distinct, direct, interesting speaking. Students with previous
training may, by special permission, omit Course i.



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 30 of 75)