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2. Extempore Speaking. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor

Immel, Mr. Wilner, Mr. Hathaway, and Mr. Brandt.

Studies in public speaking and the delivery of short original
speeches for special occasions. Emphasis is laid on the prep-
aration of a thorough brief for each speech. Speeches are
given from the platforrti without the use of notes. This course
aims to give as much practice in self-expression as possible.

Course 2 must be preceded by Course I or its equivalent.

3. Study of Great Orators. Three hours credit. Professor True-

blood.

Lectures on methods of public address and sources of power.
Study of representative orations. Structure of the oration.
Qualities of a good oration. The preparation and delivery of
speeches. Those who desire at some time to enter the oratorical
contests should take this course. Orations prepared for Uni-
versity contests will be accepted as a part of the work.

Course 3 must be preceded by Courses I and 2 or their equivalent.

5. Debating. Three hours credit. Professor Trueblood.

Study and application of the principles of argumentation. Prep-
aration of briefs. Leading questions of the day studied and
debated in class. Students take part in six debates. The aim
is to develop readiness in extempore speaking, to give freedom
and ease on the platform, and to cultivate the logical processes
of analysis and discrimination. All who expect to enter the
debating contests or who expect to teach argumentation should
take this course.

Course 5 must be preco<lrd l»y Courses I and 2 or their e^juivalent.

6. Story Telling. T'^ro hours iredit. Assistant Professor Immet.

A study of literature for children, with practice in story telling
Ix'fore tlie class and before audiences of children. Intended



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Courses of Instruction 343

for those especially inlerested in library work, playground
supervision, and primary teaching.
Course 6 must be preceded by Course 1 or its equivalent, and
may be elected only by si>ecial permission of the instructor.

[7. Shakespearean Reading. T/irci' hours credit. Professors True-
blood and HoLLiSTER.

Critical study of two plays, a tragedy and a comedy. Analysis
of character, plot, and incident. Expressional reading of prin-
cipal scenes. Characters assigned to members of the class and
scenes presented from the platform. Public presentation of
plays twice each semester. Plays selected from the following:
Julius Caesar, Othello, The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and
Juliet, The Tempest.
* Course 7 must be preceded by Course i or its equivalent.

Omitted in 1920-1931.]

7j. Shakespearean Reading. Three hours credit. Continuation of
Course 7. Professors Trueblood and Holmster.

Plays to be seleitted from the following: Coriolanus, King John,
Henry VII, Anthony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors,
The Taming of the SJirew, Measure for Measure,

Course 7a must be preceded by Course I or its equivalent.

9. Interpretative Reading. Two hours credit. Professor Hollister.
This course involves a study in the appreciation and oral inter-
pretation of masterpieces of literature. Special effort is made
first, to understand and feel ; second, to express for others.
Selections drawn from miscellaneous sources are read aloud
in class and delivered from the platform. The coarse is de-
signed not only to develop good reading for purposes of culture
and public entertainment, but especially for those who expect
to teach English Literature.

14. Play Production. Two hours credit. Professor Holuster.

A study of plays suitable for stage presentation, and of the
problems involved in producing such plays. One or more
plays will be presented in costume. Open only to advanced
students who receive permission from the instructor. Not to
be elected in connection with Course 7j.

[15. Theory of Expression. Two hours credit. Professor Holuster,
An investigation of one or more problems in oral expression,
lectures, assigned readings, discussions, experiments. Each
members of the class assigned a topic for investigation, report,
and thesis. Open only to seniors and graduates who receive
permission. Special attention will be given to problems of
vocalization and speech l)etterment. Omitted in 1920-1921.]



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344 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

SECOND SEMESTER

1. Principles of Expression. TArre hours credit. Assistant Pro-

fessor IMMEL, Mr. WiLNER, Mr. Hathaway, and Mr. Brandt.
This is the same as Course i, given in the first semester.

i^. Speech Correction. Assistant Professor Holuster.

A practical laboratory course in vocalization. Open to students
who wish to correct their own vocal defects and weaknesses.

2. Extempore Speaking. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor

IMMEL, Mr. WiLNER, Mr. Hathaway, and Mr. Brandt.
This is the same as Course 2, given in the first semester.
Course 2 must be preceded by Course I or its equivalent

3. Study of Great Orators. Three hours credit. Professor True-

BLOOD.

This is the same as Course 3, given the first semester.

Students who desire to enter the oratorical contests of the fol-
lowing year are advised to take this course and prepare their
orations.

Course 3 must be preceded by Courses i and 2 or their equiva-
lent.

[4. Shakespearean Reading.* Two hours credit. Professor True-
blood, and Mr. Wilner.

Oral reading of two plays, a tragedy and a comedy. Characters
assigned to members of the class and plays presented from
the platform. Public presentation of plays twice each semester.
The aim is to stimulate interest in Shakespeare by vocal inter-
pretation and dramatic presentation. Plays selected from the
following: Macbeth, Richard III, Much Ado About Nothing,
Henry IV (Part I), The Winter's Tale, A Midsummer Night's
Dream,

Course 4 must be preceded by Course I or its equivalent.

Omitted in 1920-1921.]

4a, Shakespearean Reading. Continuation of Course 4. Two hours
credit. Professor Trueblood, and Mr. Wilner.

Plays to be selected .from the following: Hamlet, King T.ear,
Henry V, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Cymbeline,

Course 4a must be preceded by Course I or its equivalent

5. Debating. Three hours credit. Professor Trueblood.
This is the same as Course 5. given in the first semester.
Course 5 must be preceded by Courses 1 and 2.

6. Story Telling. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Immel.
This is the same as Course 6, given in the first femeiter.



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Courses of Instruction 345

10. Advanced Public Speaking. Three hours credit. Professor True-

BLOOD.

Examination of the Webster-Ha3me» the Lincoln-Douglas, and
other great debates. Study of famous platform addresses.

Preparation and delivery by each student of an extended address.
Participation in a public debating or oratorical contest during
the semester, or the presentation of an equivalent amount of
practical speaking before public assemblies is required.

Open to students who have shown exceptional proficiency in
speaking and reading. The class is limited to sixteen persons.

Course 10 must be preceded by Courses i, a, and 3 or 5.

[11. Oral Interpretation of Tennyson. Two hours credit. Professor

HOLUSTER.

Open to students who have had Course i or its equivalent.
Omitted in 19JO-1931.]

I la. Oral Interpretation of Browning. Two hours credit. Professor

HOLLISTER.

Open to students who have had Course i or its equivalent.

15. Oral English. Two hours credit. Professor Hollister.

A study of the aims, problems, and methods of oral English
teaching. Open to advanced students and graduates who expect
to teach English or Public Speaking or who are interested in
the educational aspects of English study.

I4tf. Play Production. Two hours credit. Professor Hollister.
This is similar to Course 14, given during the first semester.
Open only to advanced students who receive permission. Not to
be elected with Course 4 or 4/1.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

la. Principles of Expression. Two hours credit. Assistant Profes-
sor IMMEL, and Mr. Wilner.

3. Extempore Speaking. Two hours credit, Mr. Wilner.

'jb, Shakespearean Reading. Two hours credit. Mr. Wilner, and
Assistant.

Sa. Debating. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Immel.

9a. Interpretive Reading. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Immel. '

I3<i. Speech Problems. Two hours credit. Professor Hollister.

14^. Play Production. Two hours credit. Professor Hollister, and
Assistant.



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34^ College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

RHETORIC

I -

(Group I; excepting Courses i and 2.

Courses I and 2 are required of all first-year students, and must
precede all other courses.

The courses ofTered in this department are of three principal
kinds: (i) Courses intended primarily to give the student practice
in the leading types of prose composition, including Courses i, 2,
3, 4, 15, 18, and 20. (2) Courses intended primarily to familiarize
the student with the fundamental principles of Rhetoric and Criticism,
including Courses 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 16, 17, and 19. (Courses 7, 8, 12,
23, and 24 combine advanced composition with the study of rhetorical
and critical theory.) (3) Courses for students who are preparing
for newspaper work. A special circular regarding these courses may
be obtained upon application to the Secretary of the University.

Courses i and 2 are introductory. They aim to promote clearness
and correctness of expression through practice in the simpler kinds
of composition. Courses 3 and 4, providing systematic practice in
the four principal types of prose composition, are intended to follow
Course 2, and are usually taken in the second year. Courses 5, 12,
15, 16, 18, and 20, being still more advanced, belong naturally in the
third year. In Courses 7 and 8 it is assumed that the student has
already acquired considerable proficiency in composition and is pre-
pared to give attention chiefly to the discussion of principles. Courses
23 and 24 are for those who show exceptional ability in writing or
who aim to follow literary composition as a profession. Courses q,
9<i, 10. and loa are for students who arc working for the higher
degrees.

The advanced and graduate courses presuppose an acquaintance
with the fundamental principles of rhetoric and a reasonable pro-
ficiency in the technic of prose. Composition, except where it is
pursued with reference to the theory of teaching, is regarded as an
undergraduate study.

Students in the Combined Literary and Law Curriculum should
elect Courses i. 2, 3, and 4, though Course 15 may with permission
of the instructor be substituted for Course 3 or Course 4.

From September 20 to 24, inclusive, an instructor will be in
Room 201, W. H., from 10 to 12 daily, to assist students in making
their elections.

FIRST SEMESTER

!. Composition and Rhetoric. Three hours credit, Mr. Everett,
Dr. Gkim, Dr. Wier, Mr. Con key, Mr. Peterson, Dr. Scott,
Mr. Waiter, Mr. Wright, Mr. Ham., Mr. Schenck, Mr.
Lasher, Mr. Wk ker, Mr. MirniEii.. Mr. Crocker, Mr.
Johnson, Mr. Aoams, Mr. S( hmiedeskamp, Mr. Quinneu.,
Mr. norcii\Rr>, Mr. Kunv, Mr. Abbot.



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Courses of Instruction 347

2. Continuation of Course i. T/irre /tours credit. Mr. Johnson.

. 'Hiis course is the same as Course 2, given in the second semester.
It is open only to students who have already completed Course
1, or have received credit for it Students who need three
hours to complete the requirement in Rhetoric for graduation
are expected to take Course 2 in the first semester, as the sec-
tions announced for the second semester are not open to such
students.

3. Advanced Composition and Rhetoric. Essays in description and

narrative. Three hours credit. Professor Rankin, Assistant
Professors Mallory and Cowden, Dr. Grim, Dr. Scott, and
Mr. Pbterson.

7. Interpretations of Literature and Art. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Scott.
The course begins with a discussion of critical principles. Later
these principles are applied in the appreciation and interpre-
tation of specimens of literature and art. Open only to senior
and graduate students who have permission. The course is
conducted as a seminary.

9. Seminary in Rhetoric and Criticism. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Scott. .
The subjects of discussion vary from year to year. Among the
problems to be investigated are the following: the origins of
prose; the nature and origin of the leading t3rpes of discourse;
the sociological basis of the principles of usage; the origin,
development, and laws of the process of communication ; prose
rhythm.
Open only to graduate' students.

()a. Special Problems in Rhetoric and Criticism. Two hours credit.
Professor Scott.
Limited to students who are working for the doctor's degree.

[15. The Theory and Practice of Argumentation. Three hours credit.
Professor BRUMXf.
A study of the principles which underlie argument. Special
attention will be paid to the brief and to the relative value
or various forms of proof. This course is intended for those
who desire special training in argumentation. Open to stu-
dents who have had Courses i, 2, 3, and 4, and others who
receive special permission. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

17. Diction and Usage. Three hours credit. Assistant Professor
Cowden.
The work of this course is intended to accomplish two results:
(i) the establishment of a method of dealing with problems



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348 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

in diction and usage; (2) the development of the student's
sense for the right use of word, phrase, and idiom. Un.der
the first heading various questionable expressions will be dis-
cussed with a view to determining their standing as parts of
the English language. Under the second heading passages
from standard prose and verse will be examined with a view
to discovering whether each word or phrase used is the one
best adapted to the author's purpose.

19. Studies in the Drama. Three hours credit. Professor Rankin.

Lectures and study of modem plays. Special attention will be

given to comparison of the methods of present-day play-writing

with those of earlier times, in order to determine what are

the permanent elements of dramatic technique.

Open only to seniors and graduate students.

23. Seminary in Advanced Composition. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Scott.
This course is intended for a limited number of advanced stu-
dents who, writing with facility and being in the habit of
writing, desire personal criticism and direction. No work is
assigned and no set program is followed, but each student it
expected in the course of the semester to submit for revision
a considerable number of manuscripts. In connection with
the class discussions, there will be talks upon the essentials of
English composition and the principles of criticism and re-
vision. Open only to seniors who receive special permission.

Cotirses in Journalism

The courses in Journalism are open only to juniors and seniors
or such other students as have completed Courses i, 2, and 3 or 4
in rhetoric. The work is designed for students who are following
the announced curricula in Journalism.

In the following courses the instruction will be supplemented,
when possible, by special lectures given by experienced newspaper
workers.

31. Newspaper Organization and Practice. Lectures, discussions, and
written exercises. Three hours credit. Professor Brumm.
A study of the nature and function of the public press, with
practice in reporting, interviewing, rewriting, and copy editing,
including the writing of headlines. Particular stress will be
laid upon the distinction between genuine news values and
merely sensational appeals.

33. Editorial Writing. Lectures, discussions, and written exercises.
Three hours credit. Professor Brumm.
A critical study of the editorial. The aim of this course will be



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Courses of Instruction 349

to determine the proper function of editorial writing, especially
in its relation to the shaping of public opinion. Written
assignments will include the selection of topics for editorial
comment* the use of reference books, and the preparation of
the expository and argumentative types of editorial articles.

35. Seminary in Newspaper Problems. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Brumm.
This course will deal with newspaper problems and with special
phases of editorial routine. Newspaper policy and responsi-
bility will receive particular attention, together with an analysis
of the relation of journalism to literature.

SECOND SEMESTER

1. Same as Course i, given in the first semester. Three hours credit,

Mr. Johnson.
Open only to students who enter at the beginning of the second
semester, or who have failed to receive credit in Course i
the first semester.

2. Composition and Rhetoric. Three hours credit.
Continuation of Course i. The hours and instructors are the

same as those announced under Course i, the first semester.
Students cannot change from one section to another at the
beginning of the second semester without obtaining special
permission.

4. Advanced Composition and Rhetoric. Essays in Exposition and

Argument. Three hours credit. Professor Rankin, Assistant
Professors Mallory and Cowden, Dr. Wier, Dr. Grim, Dr.
Scott, and Mr. Peterson.

5. Rhetorical Analysis. Two hours credit. Professor Rankin.
Special attention will be given to the minute analysis of structure.
Open to juniors and seniors.

8. Prose Fiction. Two hours credit. Professor ScoTT.

Studies in the structure and function of the leading types of

prose fiction, including the short story.
Open only to senior and graduate students who have permission.

The course is conducted as a seminary.

10. Seminary in Rhetoric and Criticism. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Scott.
Continuation of Course 9. Open only to graduate students.

loa. Special Problems in Rhetoric and Criticism. Two hours credit.
Professor Scott.
Limited to students who are working for the doctor's degree.



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350 College of Literature, Scieuee, and the Arts

12. Book Reviews. Ihree hours Hidil. .\ssistaiit Professor Mai.-
LORY.

A study of critical principles, followed by discussions of selected
works of contem|X)rary literature.

1 6. Modern English Prose. Two hours credit. Professor CowDEN.

A study of the development of English prose style as exemplified
in the writings of Sidney, Lyly, Bacon, Milton. Bunyan,
Drydcn, Defoe, Swift, Steele, Addison, Johnson, Lamb, De
Quincey, Carlyle, Macaulay, Emerson, Hawthorne, Ruskin,
Arnold, Pater, and Stevenson. Written reports and classroom
discussions.

Open only to juniors and seniors.

1 8, Junior Composition. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor

COWDEN.

A course intended to give training in the writing and revision
of compositions. The student will be expected to submit five
or six manuscripts during the semester.

Open only to juniors who have had Rhetoric 3 or 4, and limited
to twenty students. All those wishing to take this course
should consult with the instructor before making their election.

20. Short Story Writing. Two hours credit. Professor Rankin.
Analytic studies in the technique of the short story will be accom-
panied by constructive work in story writing.
Open only to juniors and seniors who have had Coarse 3.

24. Seminary in Advanced Composition. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Scott.
Continuation of Course 23. Open only to students who receive
special permission.

Courses in Journalism

32. Newspaper Feature Writing. Three hours credit. Professor
Brumm.
Special attention will be given in this course to feature stories
and special articles, with practice in copy editing.

34. Written Criticism. Three hours credit. Professor Bri'MM.

A study of critical principles in their application to literature,
painting, music, and the drama, including the photoplay.

36. Seminary in Editorial Practice. Two hours credit. Professor
Brumm.
A study of editorial methods as exemplified in the leading metro-
politan papers. An attempt will be made to distinguish the
elements that characterize the best professional journalism.



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Courses of Instruction 351

38. Advertisement Writing. T7C0 hours credit. Professor Brumm.
This course is intended for students who arc preparing to take
up advertising as a profession. It will include (i) practice
in all of the more important types of advertising publicity,
and (2) lectures by advertising exjjerts. Open only to seniors.
A course in the Psychology of Advertising is offered in the
department of Philosophy and Psychology (Course 25). .

SUMMER SESS10>J OF I92I

I and 2. First Year Rhetoric. Three or six hours credit. Dr. H. P.
S<OTT, and Mr. Everett.

3</. Narrative Writing. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Mallory.

12a. Book Reviews. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Mallory.

16a. Modern English Prose. Two hours prose. Assistant Professor
COWDEN.

17a. Diction and Usage. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
COWDIN.

27. Description. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Cowden.

1 9tf. Studies in the Drama. Two hours credit. Professor Rankin.

JO. Short-story Writing. Two hours credit. Professor Rankin.

30. Studies in Rhetorical Theory. Two hours credit. Professor
Rankin.

31a. Newspaper Organization and Practice. Two hours credit. Pro-,
fessor Brumm.

3/7. Written Criticism. T7U0 hours credit. Professor Brumm.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

(Group I.)
French

Students especially interested in language study are advised to
elect two foreign languages in the freshman year. Two new lan-
guages, however, should not be begun at tlie same time. See page 155.

Courses I, 2, 3, 4, must precede all others. Students in these
courses are expected to remain in the same section throughout the
year, and should choose their section accordingly. Students intend-
ing to enter upon the study of French at any point of their course
win find it greatly to their advantage to do so in their first year.



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352 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Students who have had one year of French in preparation for
the University should elect Course 2 ; those who have had three years
should elect Coarse 4.

Students desiring to become teachers of French should consult
Professor CANnELD as soon as possible. Only students who have
marked linguistic ability are encouraged to prepare themselves for
teaching, and no student who has not been more than ordinarily suc-
cessful in his work in the department, and acquired more than an
average proficiency, will be recommended.

Members of the staff may be consulted concerning the arrange-
ment of their work, from September 20 to 34, inclusive, as follows :

Professor Can field, from 9 to la, in Room 104, S. W.
Professor Levi, from 10 to la, in Room aoo, S. W.
Professor Eitinger, in the Dean's office.
Professor Thieme, from 10 to la, in Room 300, S. W.
Professor Wagner, from 10 to 12, in Room 203, S. W.
Assistant Professor Talamon, from 10 to 12, in Room 300*, S. W.
Assistant Professor McLaughun, from 10 to 12, in Room 104,
S. W.

HRST SEMESTER
Primarily for Undergraduates.

I. Elementary Course. Grammar and easy reading, with practice
in speaking. Four hours credit. Mr. Eddy, Mr. De Filippis,
Mr. Hackes, Mr. Hootkins, Dr. Learned, Mr. Muyskens,
and Mr. Purnell.
This course is open only to freshmen and sophomores. Juniors
and seniors enrolling in these sections must elect as Course lOi
and will receive but three hours credit.
No credit toward graduation is counted for this course until
Course 2 is satisfactorily completed.

Tfl. Elementary French for Juniors and Seniors. The main stress
in this course will be on the acquisition of the ability to read
French rapidly and accurately. Four hours credit. Assistant
Professor Scholl, and Mr. Hager.
No credit toward graduation is counted for this course until
Course 2a is satisfactorily completed.

2. Elementary French. Continuation of Course i. For those who
have had Course i, or one year of French in the high school.
Four hours credit. Assistant Professor Scholl, Mr. Hager,
Mr. Hootkins, Mr. Kerr, Mr. Mathieu, and Mr. Pargment.

3. Elementary French of the Second Year. Modern prose and
plays, with practice in speaking and writing. Four hours
credit. Professors Levi and Thieme, Assistant Professors



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Courses of Instruction 353

BuRSi.EY, McLauchun, and Scholl, Mr. Carry, Mr. Hackks,
Mr. Hager, Mr. Kerr, Dr. Learned, Mr. Mathieit, Mr.
MuYSKENS, Mr. Pargment, Mr. Patterson, and Mr. Rovil-



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