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lain.

4. Modern prose and plays. Continuation of Course 3. For those

who have taken Course 3, or three years of French in the
high school. Four hours credit. Assistant Professor Mc-
Laughlin, Dr. Cloppet, Mr. Hackes, Mr. Kerr, Dr. Learned,
Mr. Mathibu, Mr. Rovillain.

5. Introduction to French Literature. Representative authors of

various periods. Three hours credit. Professors Canfield,
Levi, and Thiemb, Assistant Professors McLaughlin and
Talamon, and Mr. Rovillain.
This course is a prerequisite to all advanced courses in French
literature.

7. Composition. Must accompany Course 5 or have been preceded
by it. Two hours credit. Professor Levi, Assistant Professor
Bursley, Mr. Hackes, Mr. Pargment, and Dr. Cloppet.

I3tf. Conversation. One hour credit. Open to students taking Courses
3 or 4. Mr. Pargment, and Dr. Cloppet.

13A. Conversation One hour credit. Open to students taking Courses
5 or 7. Mr. Carry, and Dr. Cloppet.

ly. Conversation. One hour credit. Open to students having had
Courses 5 and 7, or the equivalent. Assistant Professor Tala-
MON.
Courses 13^, 13^, and 13^ are intended to accompany and sup-
plement other courses. Each course gives one hour credit.
The size of the sections is limited and students should con-
sult the instructor before electing these courses. Preference
is given those who are preparing to teach.

15. Advanced French Composition. Practice in writing idiomatic
French. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Talamon.

For Graduates and Undergraduates.

17. History of the Novel in France. Two hours credit. Professor
Effinger.
This course will trace the growth of the novel as a form of lit
erature and its various transformations. A number of repre-
sentative masterpieces of different periods will be read, and
both their technical qualities and their relation io the social
and intellectual environments will be studied. Particular at-
tention will be given to the preparation and development of
realism in the nineteenth century.



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354 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

19. Contemporary France. French government and political institu-
tions; political parties; social and religious conditions; in-
dustries; literature, art, science, and education. Ttvo hours
credit. Assistant Professor McLaughlin.
This course is intended to give such a knowledge of the French
.people of today as will enable one to interpret intelligently
the events involving French reported in the current news of
the world. Recommended specially for students of journalism,
and for those preparing to teach French.

21. Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours credit. Profes-
sor Canfield.
This course deals with the main aspects of poetry in France
from the beginnings of Romanticism to the present time. The
chief and representative poets are studied in connection with
the currents of thought of the time. Lectures, reading, and
discussions.

33. Corneille and Racine. Three hours credit. Assistant Professor
Talamon.

[25. French Society and Culture in the Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and
Eighteenth Centuries. A survey of the principal factors that
^contributed to the formation, development, and decay of the
classical ideal in French literature. Three hours credit. Pro-
fessor Thieme. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

2Sa. French Criticism. The main representatives of literary criticism
in France will be studied in such a way as to form a basis for
history of French Criticism. Three hours credit. Professor
Thieke.

[25^. The Literature of the Sixteenth Century. With Montaigne and
Rabelais as center of attention, the whole movement of the
Renaissance as reflected in letters will be studied. Three hours
credit. Professor Thieme. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

[27. Moliere. A careful study of his comedies. Readings, lectures,
and reports. Two hours credit. Professor Levi. Omitted in
1920- 192 1.]

27<i. French Grammar. A systematic review. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Levi.
This course is intended specially for those intending to teach
French, and have already taken Courses 7 and 8. It aims to
develop and systematize the student's knowledge of the forms
and particularly of the syntax of French.

2Sa. French Reading for stud^-nts of Biology. Elect as Zoology,
Course 28, and Bctany, Course 29.



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Courses of Instruction 355



39. French Pronunciation and Diction. Practice in reading, speak-
ing, and reciting, with a view to acquiring an accurate com-
mand of individual French sounds and a correct "accent."
One hour credit. Assistant Professor Talamon.
Open only to students who are preparing themselves to teach.
The number to be admitted is strictly limited, and the in-
structor's permission must be obtained before the course is
elected.

Primarily for Graduates,

51. Seminary in French Literature. Two hours credit. Professor
Canfield.
The work will consist in special studies connected with the his-
tory of French literature. Subjects will be chosen for inves-
tigation according to the needs and preparation for students.

53. Historical French Grammar, I. Phonology. Lectures, with
illustrative ,01d French readings. Two hours credit. Assistant
Professor Adams.

[55. Introduction to Old French Literature. Reading of selected texts
and lectures. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Adams.
Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

35. French Versification. A critical and historical study of French
verse structure from its origin to the present. Two hours
credit. Professor Thieme.

37. Journal Club. Review of results of current research in the field
of Romance languages and literatures, by the instructors of the
department and advanced students. One hour credit.

59. Anglo-French Linguistic Relations, Tenth to Fifteenth Centuries.
Two hours credit. Dr. Learned.

The aim of the course is to study French accessions to the Eng-
lish vocabulary, their sources and later development, together
with certain pertinent syntactical problems. The Old French
dialects involved will be noticed, and the phonetic changes in
Middle English will be briefly reviewed in connection with
the history of the Old French loan-words.

Some knowledge of Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, or Old French
is desirable but not necessary.

Undergraduates who have credit for French i, 2, 3, and 4, or
who have had Anglo-Saxon, may be admitted to the course by
permission of the Head of the department.



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35^ College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

' Second semester
Primarily for Undergraduates,

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and easy reading, with practice

in speaking. Four hours credit.
No credit toward graduation is counted for this course until
Course 2 is satisfactorily completed.

2. Elementary Course continued. Reading of modem prose and

plays, with practice in speaking and composition. Four hours
credit '

This course is open only to freshmen and sophomores. Juniors
and seniors enrolling in these sections must elect as Course

I02, and will receive but three hours credit,

2a, Elementary French for Juniors and Seniors. Continuation of
Course la. Four hours credit. Assistant Professor Scholl,
and Mr. Hager.

3. Elementary French. Continuation of Course 2; also for students

who have had two years of French in the high school. Four
hours credit,

4. Elementary French of the Second Year. Modem prose and

plays, with practice in speaking and writing. Four hours
credit, . .

The sections of the first semester will be continued at the same
hours.

$a. Continuation of Course 4. Four hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor McLaughlin, Dr. Learned, and Mr. Mathieu.

6. Introduction to French Literature. Continuation of Course 5.
Professors Canfield, Levi, and Thieme, Assistant Professors
McLaughlin and Talamon, and Mr. Rovilij^in.
This course is a prerequisite to all advanced courses in French
literature.

8. Composition. Continuation of Course 7. Must accompany Course
6 or have been preceded by it. Two hours credit. Professor
Levi, Assistant Professor Bursley, Mr. Hackes, Mr. -Parg-
MENT, and Dr. Cu)ppet.

141. Conversation. One hour credit. Open to students taking Course
4or$a. Professor Canfield, Mr. Pargment, and Dr. Cloppet.

14A. Conversation. One hour credit. Open to students taking Courses
6 or 8. Mr. Carry.
Open to students who have had 13^ or 14^; to others only after
consultation with instructor.



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Courses of Instruction 357

I4r. Conversation. One hour credit. Open to students who have had
13^ or i^b; to others only after consultation with instructor.
Mr. Mathieu.
Courses 14a, 14^, and 14^ are intended to accompany and sup-
plement other courses. Each course gives one hour credit.
Election of these courses is subject to the same restrictions as
that of I3fl, 13^, and 13^ of the first semester.

16. Advanced French Composition. Two hours credit. Assistant
Professor Talamon.
Continuation of Course 15. May also be elected by properly
qualified students who have not taken Course 15, after con-
sultation with instructor.

18. The Dramatic Literature of the i8th and 19th Centuries. Pro-
fessor Effinger.
A study of the dramatic work of LeSage, Marivaux, Cr^billon,
Voltaire, Diderot, Nivelle de la Chaasse, Beaumarchais ; the
Melodramas of Pix^recourt; the Romantic drama; Scribe; the
classical reaction; Dumas fils, Augier, Henri Becque, and the
modern school. Lectures in French with assigned readings
and reports.

20. Contemporary France. Continuation of Course 19. Two hours
credit. Assistant Professor McLaughlin.

22. The Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. Continuation of Course
21. Three hours credit. Professor Canfield.

24. Molicre. Three hours credit. Assistant Professor Talamon.

[26. Continuation of Course 25. French Society and Culture in the
Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth Centuries. Professor
Thieme. Omitted in 1920-1921.J

26tf. French Criticism. Continuation of Course 26. Three hours
credit. Professor Thieme.

[26/». French Literature in the Sixteenth Century. Continuation of
Course 25^. Three hours credit. Professor Thieme. Omitted
in 1920-1921.]

42. Teachers* Course. Two hours credit. Professor Thieme.

This course aims to be of practical help to those who expect to
teach French, General questions, such as. the place of foreign
languages in the school, the aims of language study, methods,
text-books, canon of reading, reference books, etc., will be
discussed.

28. The Works of Edmond Rostand, with special reference to
Chatitecler. Two hours credit. Professor Levi.



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358 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

2^b. French Reading for Students of Chemistry and Physics. See
Chemistry 20a and Physics 38.

39. French Pronunciation and Diction. One hour credit. Assistant
Professor Talamon.
See the description of the course in the first semester. Elections
limited in the same way as in the first semester. It may not
be taken a second time.

Primarily for Graduates,

52. Seminary in French Literature. Continuation of Course 51.
Two hours credit. Professor Canfield.

54. Historical French Grammar, II. Morphology. Lectures and
readings. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Adams.

[56. Introduction to Old French Literature. Continuation of Course
55. Two hours credit; hours to be arranged. Assistant Pro-
fessor Adams. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

60. Continuation of Course 59. Two hours credit. Dr. Learned.

SUMMER SESSION OF T92I

is. Beginners' Course. Six hours credit. Assistant Professor Ken-
yon.

1. Beginners' Course. Four hours credit. Professor Wait.

2. French of the Second Semester. Four hours credit. Mr. Bar-

nett.

3. Second Year French. Four hours credit. Dr. Learned.

4. Modern Prose. Four hours credit. Assistant Professor Bursley.

5^. Introduction to French Literature. T^vo hours credit. Assistant
Professor Talamon.

7. Composition. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor McLArcH-
mn, and Dr. Ct.oppet.

13^. Conversation. Two hours credit. Dr. Cloppet.

15. Advanced Composition. Two hours credit. Dr. Cloppet.

igx. Contemporary France. T%vo hours credit. Assistant Professor
McLaughlin.

41. French Literature in the Twentieth Century. Two hours credit.
Assistant Professor Talamon.



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Courses of Instruction 559

42. Teachers* Course. Two hours credit. Professor Canfield.

44. Outline History of French Literature. Two hours credit. Pro-

fessor Thieme.

45. French Pronunciation and Diction, Tivo hours credit. Assistant

Professor Talamon,

For Graduates,

51. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. Two hours credit.
Professor Thieme.

53. Outlines of Old French Grammar. Two hours credit. Dr.

Learned.

54. Old Provencal. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Adams.

61. Seminary in French Literature. Two hours credit. Professor
Canfield.

63. Introduction to Romance Philology. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Canfield.

Italian

FIRST SEMESTER

1. Italian Grammar. Easy Prose. Three hours credit, Mr. De

FiLIFPIS.

No credit towards graduation is counted for this course until
Course 2 is satisfactorily completed.

3. Dante. La Vita Nuova and La Divina Commedia, Lectures

and recitations. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Mc-
Laughlin.

SECOND SEMESTER

2. Continuation of Course i. Modem readings. Three hours credit,

Mr. De Filippis.

4. Dante. La Divina Commedia. Continuation of Course 3. Lec-

tures and recitations. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
McLaughlin.

summer session of i92i

\s. Beginners* Course. Four hours credit. Mr. .

For Graduates,
3j. Dante. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor McLaughlin.



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36o College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Spanish

Students especially interested in the study of language are advised
to elect two foreign languages in the freshman year. Two new
languages, however, should not be begun at the same time. See
page 155.

Courses I and 2 must precede all others. Students whose pur-
pose in taking up Spanish is to acquire fluency in speaking and
writing, should then take Courses 3, 4, 7, 8, 19, 20, and 21. Those
desiring to acquire a knowledge of the literature of Spain should
follow Courses i and 2 by 3, 4, 5, 6, and then 9 and 10, or 22 and 23.

Students who have had one year of Spanish in preparation for
the University should enter Course 2.

Prospective teachers of Spanish should secure an early start and
consult with Professor Wagner at the earliest opportunity.

FIRST SEMESTER

1. Elementary Course. Grammar, oral work, and reading. Four

hours credit. Assistant Professor Burslev, Dr. Barja, Mr.
Bement, Mr. Eddy, Mr. Esteves, Mr. Hering, Mr. Hootkins,
Mr. Kerr, Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Michaud, Mr. Patterson, Mr.
Rey, Mr. del Toro, Mr. Willey.
No credit toward graduation is counted for this course until
Course 2 is satisfactorily completed.

2. Elementary Course. Continuation of Course i. Four hours

credit.

3. Second Year. Composition, conversation, and reading of selected

texts. Four hours credit. Professor Wagner, Assistant Pro-
fessor BuRSiEY, Mr. Hering, Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Mercado, Mr.
del Toro, Mr. Willey.

4. Second Year. Continuation of Course 3. Four hours credit,

Mr. Lincoln.

5. Cervantes and his Contemporaries. Three hours credit. Pro-

fessor Wagner.
An introduction to Spanish life and literature of the Golden Age.
Open to students who have completed Course 4 or the equivalent.

7. Advanced Spanish Composition. Two hours credit. Mr. Mer-
cado, and Mr. Willey.
Open to students who have completed Course 4 or an equivalent.

9. The Drama of the Seventeenth Century. Three hours credit.
Professor Wagner.
Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6, or an
equivalent.



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Courses of Instruction 361

[11. The Early Spanish Novel and Its Influence in Europe. Two
hours credit. Professor Wagnke.
Primarily for graduates. May be elected only after consultation
with the instructor. Omitted in 1920-192 1.]

[13. General View of Spanish Literature. One hour credit. Omitted
in 1920- 192 1.]

15. Spanish Historical Grammar and Introduction to Old Spanish
Literature. Two hours credit. Professor Wagner.
Primarily for graduates.

19. Spanish and Spanish-American Life and Literature. Lectures,
assigned readings, reports, and quizzes. Conducted in Spanish.
Three hours credit, Mr. del Toro, and Dr. Barja.

This course is designed to increase the student's practical knowl-
edge of Spanish, and at the same time to give him general
information regarding the Spanish-speaking countries, their
literature, life, and customs, and their relations to ourselves.

Mr. DEL ToRO's sections will deal with Spanish America, and Dr.
Barja's with Spain.

Open to students who have had Spanish 3 and 4 or the equivalent.

21. Advanced Conversation. Two hours credit. Dr. Barja.

Open only to students who have had Course 20 or the equivalent.
Primarily for prospective teachers, and may be followed in
the second semester by Course 17.

[23. Modem Spanish Literature. Lectures, reports, and discussions,
covering the Spanish drama, poetry, and novel of the Nine-
teenth and Twentieth centuries. Three hours credit. Professor
Wagnkr.
Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6 or an
equivalent. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

SECOND SEMESTER

1. Elementary Course. Grammar, reading, and oral work. Four

hours credit,
Xo credit toward graduation is counted for this course until
Course 2 is satisfactorily completed.

2. Elementary Course. Continuation of Course i. Reading of

modern prose, with practice in speaking and writing. Four
hours credit.

3. Continuation of Course 2. Four hours credit.

4. Second Year. Continuation of Course 3. Four hours credit.
All sections continued from first semester.



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362 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

6. Cervantes and His Contemporaries. Continuation of Coarse 5.

Three hours credit. Professor Wagner.

8. Advanced Composition. Continuation of Course 7. Two hours
credit.
Sections and instructors as in the first semester, unless otherwise
announced.

10. The Drama of the Seventeenth Century, Continuation of Course
9. Three hours credit. Professor Wagner.

[12. The Early Spanish Novel. Continuation of Course 11. Two.
hours credit. Professor Wagner.
Omitted in 1920-192 1.]

[14. General View of Spanish Literature. Continuation of Coarse 13.
One hour credit. Professor Wagner. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

16. Old Spanish Literature. Continuation of Course 15. Two hours

credit. Professor Wagner.

17. Teachers' Course. Two hours credit. Professor Wagner.

An attempt to contribute toward the practical preparation of the
teacher. Lectures, readings, and problems. Discussion of
values and aims, methods old and new, text-books, curricula,
history of the Spanish language and elementary Spanish
phonetics.

20. Spanish and Spanish-American Life and Literature. Continua-
tion of Course 19. Three hours credit.
Sections and instructors as announced for the first semester.

[24. Modern Spanish Literature. Continuation of Course 23. Three
hours credit. Professor Wagner. Omitted in 1920-192?.]

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

1. Beginners' Course, Four hours credit, Mr. Michaud.

2. Elementary Course. Four hours credit, Mr. Lincoln.

3. Second Year Spanish. Four hours credit, Mr. Willev.

4. Continuation of Course 3. Four hours credit. Assistant Pro-

fessor BuRSLEV, and Mr. Michaud.

7. Advanced Practical Spanish. T7U0 hours credit, Mr. Wii.i.EV.
17. Teachers* Course. Two hours credit. Professor Wagner.

19. Latin-American Life and Literature. Four hours credit, Mr.

DEI. TORO.



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Courses of Instruction 363

For Graduates,

•5. The Don Quixote. Two hours credit, Mr. del Toro.

II. The Early Spanish Novel and its Influence in Europe. Two
hours credit. Professor Wagner.

33. The Modem Spanish Novel. Two hours credit. Professor Wag-
ner.

ROMAN LAW AND JURISPRUDENCE

The courses in Roman Law are closely associated with the work
in Latin. Either of the courses may be taken with profit by the
student of Latin who is also interested in history or law.

HRST SEMESTER

I. Roman Private Law. The History and Fundamental Principles
of Roman Private Law. Two hours credit. Professor Drake.
10. The Science of Jurisprudence. Two hours credit. Professor
Drake.

'Russian
(See Indo-European Languages and Literatures.)

Sanskrit
(See Indo-European Languages and Literatures.)

Scandinavian

(See Oermanic Languages and Literatures.)

SEMITICS, INCLUDING STUDIES IN THE ENGLISH BIBLE
AND THE mSTORT OF RELIGIONS

(Group I)

The department of Semitics, while carefully avoiding sectarian
instruction, offers courses in Religious History, Biblical Literature,
Geography, and History, and the Semitic languages upon the same
basis as courses in other departments of language, literature, history,
etc. All the non-linguistic courses are open to students who have not
taken the languages offered by the department.

Students who intend to pursue theological studies are advised
to consult the head of the department as to the lines of study which
may be pursued with greatest advantage in connection with Semitics,
and as a preparation for the work of the theological seminary.

Students may begin the study of Hebrew in their sophomore year,
and those who intend to enter a theological seminary, or make a
special study of Semitics, are advised to begin early in their course.

Students who have taken Hebrek and Hellenistic (New Testa-



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364 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

merit) Greek for four semesters are allowed special privileges in
several of the theological seminaries. NoU the following:

(i) They may graduate in two years, thus saving a whole
year; or,

(2) They are permitted to enter upon advanced courses for
which they would not, otherwise, be prepared. They are thus ena))led
to gain a commanding knowledge of the Literature of the Bible
which is impossible to students who are compelled to spend a large
))ortion of their junior and middle years in the seminary in the purely
academic work of learning languages, and, further, are enabled to
enter into competition for the large fellowships offered by the semi-
naries for foreign studies.

Consultation Hours. — September 20 to 24, 10 to 12, Room
201, M. H.

The courses in Hellenistic (New Testament) Greek, formerly
given in the department of Semitics, will now be found in the depart-
ment of Greek.

Hebrew

FIRST SEMESTER

1. Course for Beginners. Grammar and easy reading. Three hours

credit. Professor Waterman.

3. Intermediate Hebrew. Critical reading of the books of Samuel

and Kings. Two hours credit. Professor Waierman.

SECOND semester

2. Continuation of Course i. Reading of selections from Genesis;

grammar and Hebrew prose writing. Three hours credit. Pro-
fessor Waterman.

4. Continuation of Course 3. Isaiah, Chapters 40-55, and selections

from the Minor Prophets. Two hours credit. Professor Water-
man.
A critical reading of the prophecies in Hebrew, with an intev
pretation of them in the historical light of their times.

Assyrian

5. Course for Beginners. Three hours credit. Professor Water-

man.

Aramaic

[7. Grammar and Reading of the Aramaic parts of the Old Testa-
ment (Daniel 2:4-7, and 27; Ezra, 4:8 — 6:18, and 7:12-26).
Three hours credit. Professor Waterman. Omitted in 1920-
192 1.]



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Courses of Instruction 365

Arabic

[9. Course for Beginners. Grammar and easy reading. Three hours
credit, Professor Waterman. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

Semitic History and Literature

FIRST SEMESTER

11. A Historical Survey of the Semitic Orient from Prehistoric Times

to 1200 B. C. Two hours credit. Professor Waterman.

13. The Origin of the Bible. Two hours credit. Professor Water-

man.
A study of its formation and transmission, consisting of a detailed
analysis and chronological arrangement of the Old Testament
and Apocrypha, together with the transition to the New Testa-
ment. Special attention is given to the place of the various
writings in the development of religion and their relation to
the present.

17. Israelitish History and Prophecy. Two hours credit. Professor

Waterman.

This course will deal with the developments and the mutual rela-
tions of history and prophecy in the great creative periods of
Israel's religion, from the 9th to the 7th century, B. C.

Prerequisite : Course 13 or equivalent.

19. The Scriptures and Democracy. Two hours credit. Professor



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