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and Harbors.

Courses in hydraulics, hydrography, and in theory and design of
the different branches of hydraulic engineering are given by
the department of Civil Engineering.

Courses in hydraulic machinery, water turbines, turbine design^
and pumping machinery are given by the department of Me-
chanical Engineering.

Courses in electrical machinery, generating stations, and elec-
trical distribution are given by the department of Electrical
Engineering.

(C) Railroad Transportation Engineering,

Courses in railway location, construction and maintenance, rail-
way design courses, and history of transportation are given
by the department of Civil Engineering.

Surveying and advanced railway surveying courses are given
by the department of Surveying.

Courses in elements of accounting, railway accounting, railway
operation, railway finance, railway tariffs, and economics are
given by the department of Economics.

Courses in signalling and electrical engineering are given by
the department of Electrical Engineering.

{T}) Sanitary . and Municipal Engineering, — Covering the subjects of
public water supplies, water purification for municipal and in-
dustrial purposes, city sewerage and drainage, the treatment
and disposal of city sewage and industrial wastes, and general
municipal and industrial sanitation.

Courses in theory, design, and laboratory are given by the de-
partment of Civil Engineering.

Courses in bacteriology, water analysis, and hygiene are given
in the Medical School.

Courses in testing materials are given by the department of
Engineering Mechanics.

Courses in heating and ventilation are given by the department
of Mechanical Engineering.

Courses in city surveying are given by the department of Sur-
veying.

Courses in economics and in municipal administration are given
by the department of Economics.



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Facilities for Instruction 405

(E) Highway Engineering and Highway Transport,

Courses in highway en^neering^ fundamentals, economics and
theory, highway engineering design courses, laboratory courses
in bituminous and non-bituminous paving materials, advanced
courses in the construction and maintenance of earth, gravel,
and broken-stone roads, bituminous surfaces, bituminous pave-
ments, cement concrete pavements, and brick pavements, courses
in highway bridges, specifications and contracts, municipal
engineering, and highway transport, and highway engineering
seminar courses are given by the department of Civil Engi-
*neering.

Courses in automobiles and motor trucks, mechanical handling
of materials, and scientific management are given by the de-
partment of Mechanical Engineering.

Municipal surveying courses are given by the department of
Surveying.

Courses in the elements of economics and accounting are given
by the department of Economics.

Courses in geology are given by the department of Geology.

(F) General Engineering Science. — This group is specially arranged

to permit civil engineering students who are candidates for
the bachelor's degree, to secure the fundamental training in
civil engineering and to pursue advanced elective work in
mathematics, physics, astronomy, mechanics, or chemistry.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING GROUPS

(A) Steam Power Engineering. — This group may include all the

elective courses in Mechanical Engineering relative to steam
prime movers, and auxiliary machinery found in steam power
plants, including steam boilers, steam turbines, steam engines,
coal handling machinery, pump and air compressors, power
house design and construction.

(B) Internal Combustion Engineering. — Includes courses in Mechan-

ical Engineering relating to internal combustion engines and
gas producers, including oil, gas and gasoline engines, their
design, construction, and operation.

(C) H ydro-Mechanical Engineering, which may include courses in

hydraulic machinery such as turbines, reciprocating pumps,
and centrifugal pumps. A special laboratory is maintained
for the testing of hydraulic machinery.

(D) Heating, Ventilating, and Refrigerating Engineering. Special

courses are given in Heating, Ventilation, and Refrigeration,



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4o6 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

including the design of heating and ventilating plants. The
mechanical laboratory has special apparatus designed for con-
ducting tests in Heating and Ventilation ; it also has a re-
frigerating plant used entirely for experimental purposes.

(E) Industrial Engineering, — This group is arranged to provide for

students who to prepare themselves for business branches of
manufacturing plants or to study methods of management or
production in manufacturing plants. It includes courses in
shop management, motion study, design of shop machinery,
and business administration. The engineering shops are used
for experimental work in these lines.

(F) Automobile Engineering. — Special work is given in the design,

construction and operation of the AiTtomobile, which includes
courses in engine and chassis design. A special laboratory is
maintained for the experimental study of the Automobile.
Every student is required to elect a design coarse in some par-
ticular group. He must have the prerequisites in this group
of studies for this design course which he elects.



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GROUPS

(A) Communication Group, — About Course i6 — Advanced Telephones

— which forms the key subject, the student may group selected
courses bearing on the communicating arts or supplementing
the technique thereof by the broader matters of economics,
phonetics, etc.

(B) Machine Design Group. — Either Course 6 or 6d may be taken

as the key subject supplemented by cognate subjects in Elec-
trical, Mechanical, or Civil Engineering, or economics, aiming
toward the preparing of the student for machine design, appli-
cation, or factory production.

(C) Power Group. — Design Course 19 forms the key course about

which may be grouped courses in Electrical, Civil, and Me-
chanical Engineering and economics, so as to train the student
for the design and operation of power plants, the supervision
of power production or its application in industry and trans-
portation.

(D) Railway Group. — Course 8 in Electric Railways is the key

course. The other group courses are Electrical, Mechanical,
and Civil Engineering courses and courses in economics such as
will fit the student for work on railways, either steam or elec-
tric, in operation, administration, or design.



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Facilities for Instruction 407

(E) Illumination (7r^«^.— About Course 15 in Advanced Lighting
may be grouped courses in physics, chemistry, psychology, eco-
nomics» architecture, and fine arts, such as will train the stu-
dent toward ability to solve problems concerned with the most
effective production of illuminants and their most efficient,
effective, and artistic application.



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING GROUPS

(A) Metallurgical Group. — This group contains options from the

advanced courses in metallurgy, and chemical engineering ma-
chinery in the department of Chemical Engineering; the test-
ing of materials in the department of Engineering Mechanics;
and courses in mineralogy and geology.

(B) Gas Engineering Group, — This group contains options from the

courses in gas manufacture and chemical engineering machinery
in the department of Chemical Engineering ; gas engines, power
plants, and the valuation of public utilities in the department
of Mechanical Engineering; electrical distribution and illumin-
ation in the department of Electrical Engineering; and busi-
ness organization and management in the department of Eco-
nomics.

(C) Organic Industrial Group, — This group contains options from

the courses in the department of Chemical Engineering cover-
ing the fundamental organic chemical industries along with
options from the courses in theoretical and organic chemistry
in the' department of Chemistry; bacteriology in the Medical
School; water purification and sewage disposal in the depart-
ment of Civil Engineering; and courses in Economics.

(D) General Manufacturing Group. — This group contains options

from the courses in chemical engineering machinery in the
department of Chemical Engineering ; from courses in mechan-
ical engineering, electrical engineering, and economics; and
eight hours of free electives.

(E) Pulp and Paper Manufacturing Group, — ^This group contains

options from the courses in pulp and paper manufacture and
the courses in chemical engineering machinery in the depart-
ment of Chemical Engineering; from courses in identification
of woods in Forestry and in the microscopic study of woody
plants in Botany; from courses in Electrical Engineering;
Mechanical Engineering; in hydraulics; in Civil Engineering;
and in Economics.



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4o8 ' Colleges of Engineering and Architecture



MARINE AND AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING GROUPS

(A) Naval Architecture. — The courses in this department are ar-

ranged for those who wish to devote the principal part of
their studies to the design and construction of ships. It also
includes courses in the department of Engineering Mechanics,
Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering.

(B) Marine Engineering. — Tlie courses in this department are ar-

ranged for those who wish to specialize more in the design
of the machinery connected with ships. Courts in steam tur-
bines, gas and oil engines, and hydraulic machinery are given
in the department of Mechanical Engineering, and courses in
electrical machinery in the department of Electrical Engineer-
ing.

(C) Aeronautical Engineering. — Both theory and design of aero-

nautical structures are taught in these courses. Properties of
the atmosphere; aerod3mamics ; resistance and propulsion, sta-
bility, and operation of all kinds of air craft, as well as the
elements of motors, propellers, aerodromes, etc., arc taken up
and followed by courses in which designs illustrative of these
principles are prepared.



SEQUENCE OF STUDIES

The work of the first year in the four-year curricula leading to
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering is the same for all
students in the College of Engineering. At the end of the first year,
all Engineering students elect either the civil engineering, the me-
chanical engineering, the electrical engineering, the chemical engi-
neering, or the marine engineering curriculum.

There is a limited opportunity for electives, as outlined in the
description of the group system, and credit obtained in advance at
entrance may leave a place for further elections. After the first year
the student may take work to the amount of eighteen hours per week,
as arranged by the classification committee; but he may wisely, in
some cases, take a smaller number of hours, if he can in thaft way
do better work.



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Requirements for Graduation 409

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN ENGINEERING

To earn the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering, the
student must secure one hundred and forty hours of credit^ in a pre-
scribed curriculum, as given below, eight hours of which can be
earned in one summer session. • The diploma given indicates the line
of study pursued. A time limit is not fixed ; but four years and one
summer session are usually needed for the work required for the
degree.

Hours of Work Required for the Degree of Bachelor of Science
IN Engineering.

Subject. Civil Mech. Elec. Chem. Mar. Aero.

English 6 6 6 6 6 6

Language and Cultural Electives i6 i6 i6 i6 i6 i6

Mathematics i8 i8 i8 i6 i8 i8

Physics 10 lo 14 10 10 10

Chemistry 5 5 5 31 5 5

Astronomy 2 o o o o' o

Geology 3 o o o o o

Drawing 4 4 4 4 4 4

Shop Practice 4 12 8 4 4 12

Survejring 15 2 2 2 2 2

Engineering Mechanics 12 12 12 7 12 12

Civil Engineering 22 3 3 o 3- 3

Mechanical Engineering 2 28 4 9 26 or 20 23

Electrical Engineering 4.4 31 4 4 4

Chemical Engineering 3 3 3 19 3 3

Marine Engineering o o o o 15 or 21 o

Aeronautical Engineering o o o o o 14

Group Option 12 17 14 12 12 8

Total 140 140 140 140 140 140



COMBINED COLLEGIATE AND ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

An arrangement has been entered into between Albion College
and the College of Engineering of the University, whereby students
who satisfactorily complete three years of work at Albion, including
certain specified courses, may enroll in the College of Engineering,

• For explanation of the term Hour of Crtdit, and for further informa-
tion about the courses prescribed for graduation, see Engineering Announce-
ment.



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4IO Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

and receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Albion College at
the end of their first year of residence at the University and the
degree of Bachelor of Engineering at the end of the following year.
The details of this course will be given in the Announcement of the
College of Engineering.

A similar arrangement has been made with Olivet College.

FELLOWSHIPS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

The Roy D, Chafin Fellowship in Highway Transport, — This
Fellowship is offered to provide for the investigation of an approved
subject relative to Highway Transport. It pays the sum of $250 with
an allowance of $50 for expenses. Awarded to Herschel C. Smith,
A.B., 1913; B.C.E., 1915.

The Roy D, Chapin Fellowship in Highway Engineering, — This
Fellowship is offered to provide for the investigation of an approved
subject relative to hard surfaced roads and pavements. It pays the
sum of $250 with an allowance of $50 for expenses. Awarded to'
Richard R. Fauver, A.B., 1917, Oberlin College.

Two Detroit Eidison Company Fellowships in Highway Engineer-
ing. — These Fellowships are offered for the investigation of approved
subjects relative to moderate cost country roads. Each Fellowship
pays the sum of $250 with an allowance of $50 for expenses. Awarded
to E. R. Olbrich, C.E., 1915, Pennsylvania State College; and Chia
T. Yeh, B. Sc. in C. E., 1916, Government Institute of Technology,
Shanghai, China; M.C.E., 1920, Cornell University.

National Steel Fabric Company Fellowship in Highway Engi-
neering. — ^This Fellowship is offered to provide for the investigation
of the design of cement-concrete pavements and foundations as struc-
tures. It pays the sum of $250 per semester or winter period,, with
an allowance of $50 for expenses. Awarded to Harold T. Corson,
B.S. (C.E.), 1918.



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

The courses offered for the year 1920-192 1 are described below.
The amount of credit toward graduation assigned to each course is
indicated by the expressions one hour, two hours, etc.

ASTRONOMY

For a description of all courses offered in the department of
Astronomy, see page 178.

Courses 3 and 4 treat of the theory and practice of making and
reducing astronomical observations. These courses require day and
night work at the Observatory during a portion of the semester.

Course 3£ is prescribed for students in Civil Engineering in the
second semester, sophomore year.



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Courses of Instruction 411

nRST SEMESTER

1. General Astronomy. The Solar System. Two sections. Three

hours. Professors IIUSSEY and CuRTiss.
A descriptive course, including the fundamental principles of
Astronomy, and a presentation of the leading facts respecting
the sun, moon, planets, and comets. Occasional lantern illus-
trations.

3. Practical Astronomy. Two hours. Assistant Professor RuFUS.
The elements of Spherical Astronomy with practical applications.
Theory of the sextant and transit and their use in the deter-
mination of time, latitude, longitude, and azimuth. The ob-
servational work at the Observatory in connection wfth this
coarse will be varied to suit the needs of students from differ-
ent departments.

3^. Spherical Astronomy. Two hours. Three sections. Professor
CuRTiss, Assistant Professor RuFUS, and Mr. Rossitbr.
A brief resnrn^ of Descriptive Astronomy followed by a thor-
ough drill in the principles of Spherical Astronomy and com-
putation.

20. Navigation. (First Course). Four hours. Professor Curtiss.
Principles of Seamanship and Pilotage, with appropriate labora-
tory practice.

SECOND SEMESTER

2. General Astronomy. Stars and Nebulae. Two sections. Three

hours. Professors HussEY and Curtiss.
A general descriptive coarse in stellar and nebular astronomy.
Occasional lantern illustrations. May be taken in continua-
tion with Coarse i, or independently, as desired.

2a. Elementary Practical Astronomy. One hour. Dr. Rufus.
Constellation studies and telescopic examinations of the heavenly
bodies. Selected problems with the celestial globe and the
equatorial telescope. Observational work during the day and
night at the Observatory.

3/^. Spherical Astronomy. Ttjoo hours. Three sections. Professor
Curtiss, and Mr. Rossiter.
A brief resum^ of Descriptive Astronomy followed by a thor-
ough drill in the principles of Spherical Astronomy and com-
putation.

22. Navigation. (Second Course). Three hours. Professor Curtiss.
The principles of piloting, dead reckoning, and nautical astron-
omy, with appropriate observatory practice.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

(See College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.)



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412 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

FIRST SEMESTER

1. Engineering Materials. Lectures and recitations. Three hours.

Professors A. H. White, and A. E. White, Assistant Profes-
sors Upthegrove, Baker, and Mr. Brown.
Prerequisite: Course 2E in Chemistry.

2. Fuels and their Utilization. Lectures and recitations. One

hour. Professor Badger.
Prerequisite : This course must be preceded or accompanied by
Course i in Chemical Engineering and preceded by Course 2E
in Physics.

4. Salts, Acids, and Alkalis. Lectures and recitations. Two hours.

' Assistant Professor Baker.

Prerequisite: Courses i and 2 in Chemical Engineering, Course
8 or SE in Chemistry, and Course 2E in Physics.

5. Chemical Technology of Carbon Compounds. Lectures and reci-

tations. Four hours. Professor E. H. Leslie.
Prerequisite: Courses 2 and 4 in Chemical Engineering and
Courses 7 and ya in Chemistry.

6. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. Lectures and recitations. Two

hours. Assistant Professor Wood.
Prerequisite: Courses i and 2 in Chemical Engineering or
Course I in Chemical Engineering and Course 3 in Mechanical
Engineering.

8. Metallography. Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours.

Assistant Professor Upthegrove.
Prerequisite : This course must be preceded or accompanied by
Course 6 in Chemical Engineering and preceded by Course 5
in Chemistry or Course 2 or 6 in Engineering Mechanics.

9. Technical Examination of Gas and Fuel. Two hours. Mr.

Geniesse.
Should be preceded or accompanied by Chemical Engineering 2.

10. Technical Examination of Gas, Fuel, and Water. One hour.
Mr. Brown.'
Special course for mechanical engineers. Not open to chemical
engineers.

12. Special Problems. Largely laboratory work. Three to eight
hours. The Chemical Engineering Staff.
Prerequisite : Courses i, 2, and 4 in Chemical Engineering, and
Chemistry 28; with Course 5 in Chemical Engineering, and



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Courses of Instruction 413

Chemistry 7 and 7a in addition if the subject involves org^anic
chemistry; and Chemical Eng^ineering 7 ot 8 for metallurgical
problems. A reading knowledge of French or German (pref-
erably German) is also required.

rj. Evaporation, Distillation, Filtration, and Transportation of

Liquids on the Manufacturing Scale. Two hours. Professor
Badger.

Prerequisite: Courses i, 2, and 4 in Chemical Engineering.

15. Seminary. Reading and reports on selected subjects. Tivo
hours. Professor Leslie.
Open only to graduates and seniors who receive special permis-
sion. A reading knowledge of German or French is required.

31. Special Laboratory Work. Five to eight hours. This is research
work along special lines. These courses are open only to grad-
uates and seniors who receive special permission.

a. The Constitution of Steel. Professor Campbelu

b. Hydraulic Cements. Professor Campbell.

c. Gas Manufacture and Purification. Professor A. H. White.
It should be preceded or accompanied by Course 16.

d. Paints and Varnishes. Professors A. H. White, and Holley.
c. Pulp and Paper. Professor A. H. White.

h. Evaporation. Professor Badger.
i. Ferrous Metallurgy. Professor A. E. White.
j. Non-ferrous Metallurgy. Assistant Professor Upthegrove.
k. Fuel Oils and Motor Fuels. Professor Leslie.

34. Pyrometry and Furnace Design. Tivo hours. Assistant Profes-
sor Wood.
Prerequisite: Course 3 and 6 in Chemical Engineering.

36. Advanced Ferrous Metallurgy. Two hours. Professor A. E.

White.
Prerequisite : Course 8 in Chemical Engineering.

37. Design of Chemical Engineering Machinery. Drafting and con-

sultations. Two or more hours. Professor Badger.
Prerequisite: Course 13 in Chemical Engineering, and Course 2
in Mechanical Engineering.

SECOND semester

I, Engineering Materials. Lectures and recitations. Three hours.
Professors A. H. White, and A. E. White, Assistant Profes-
sors Upthegrove, and Baker, and Mr. Brown.
Prerequisite : Course zE in Chemistry.



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414 Colleges of Bngineering and Architecture



2. Fuels and their Utilization. Lectures and recitations. One hour.
Professor Badger.
Prerequisite: This course must be preceded or accompanied by
Course i in Chemical Engineering and preceded by Course 2E
in Physics.

4. Salts, Acis, and Alkalies. Lectures and recitations. Two hours.

Professor A. H. White.
Prerequisite : Course i in Chemical Engineering, Course 8 or 8£
in Chemistry, and zE in Physics.

5. Chemical Technology of Carbon Compounds. Lectures and reci-

tations. Four hours. Professor Leslie.
Prerequisite: Courses 2 and 4 in Chemical Engineering, and
Courses 7 and 7a in Chemistry.

6. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. Two hours. Assistant Professor

Wood.
Prerequisite: Courses i and a in Chemical Engineering; or
Course i in Chemical Engineering and Course 3 in Mechanical
Engineering.

7. Non-ferrous Metalst Lectures and recitations. Two hours. As-

sistant Professor Upthegrovk.
Prerequisite: Courses i and a in Chemical Engineering or
Course i in Chemical Engineering and Course 3 in Mechani-
cal Engineering.

8. Metallography. Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours.

Assistant Professor Upthegrove.
Prerequisite: This course must be preceded or accompanied by
Course 6 in Chemical Engineering and preceded by Course 5
in Chemistry or Course a or 6 in Engineering Mechanics.

9. Technical Examination of Gas and Fuel. Two hours Mr.

Geniesse.
Should be preceded or accompanied by Chemical Engineering 2.

10. Technical Examinations of Gas, Fuel, and Water. One hour.
Mr. Brown. ^

Special course for mechanical engineers. Not open to chemical
engineers.

12. Special Problems. Largely laboratory work. Three to eight
hours. The Chemical Engineering Staff. Same as Course 12
the first term.

14. Machinery and Processes for Conveying, Drying, Calcining, and
Grinding. Lectures and recitations. Two hours. Professor
Badger.
Prerequisite : ^Courses i, 2, and 6 in Chemical Engineering.



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Courses of Instruction 415

16. r Gas Manufacture. Lectures and recitations. Two hours. Pro-
fessor Leslie.
Prerequisite: Course 5 in Chemical Engineering, and Course 3
in Mechanical Engineering.

18. Non-ferrous Metallography. Two hours. Assistant Professor
Ufthegrove.
Prerequisite: Course 7 in Chemical Engineering.

a I. Special Laboratory .Work. Five to eight hours. This is research
work along special lines. These courses are only open to grad-
uates and seniors who receive special permission.
The same subjects are offered as in the first semester.

23. Design of Chemical Plants. Lectures and recitations. Two

hours. Professor Badger.
Prerequisite : Course 13 in Chemical Engineering.

24. Pyrometry and Furnace Design. Two hours. Assistant Profes-

sor Wood.
Prerequisite: Courses 2 and 6 in Chemical Engineering.

27. Design of Chemical Engineering Machinery. Drafting and con-
sultation. Two or more hours. Professor Badger.
Same as Course 27 in the first semester.

SUMMER SESSION OF 1 92 1

1. Engineering Materials. Three hours. Professor Leslie.

2. Fuels and their Utilization. One hour, Mr. Brown.

6. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. Two hours. Assistant Professor



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 37 of 75)