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Upthecrove.

8. • Metallography of Iron and Steel. Two hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Upthegrgve.

9. Technical Exiamination of Gas and Fuel. Two hours. Mr.

Brown, and Assistant.

10. Gas and Fuel Analysis. One hour. Mr. Brown.

12. Chemical Technology. Three to eight hours. Professor Leslie,
Assistant Professor Upthegrove, and Mr. Brown.

CHEMISTRY

For a description of all courses offered in the department of
Chemistry, see page 191.

Students admitted with a deficiency in entrance chemistry must
remove it by completing Course i, or lb, but the credit thus ob-
tained is entered on the admission, not the graduation requirements.



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4i6 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

Other courses in chemistry are given in the College of Literature,
Science^ and the Arts, and may be elected by students of the Colleges
of Engineering and Architecture, who have had the requisite prep-
aration.

FIRST SEMESTER

I. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Experimental lectures, reci-
tations, and laboratory work. Four hours. (For entrance, sec
above.) Professor Bigelow.

2E. Principles of Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures, recitations, and
laboratory. Five hours. Dr. Hodges, and Assistants.
Open to those who have passed the entrance requirements in
chemistry.

3. Qualitative Analysis. Recitations and laboratory work. Five
hours. Assistant Professor Carney, Mr. Cole, and Mr. Mc-
Alpine.
Open to those who have completed Courses 2 or 2E.

3a. Qualitative Analysis. Recitations and laboratory work. Four
hours. Mr. Soule.
Open to those who have completed Course 2 or 2E.

3^. Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of Course 3^1. Four hours.
Mr. Cole.

5. Quantitative Analysis. Beginning course. Recitations and lab-
oratory work. Five hours. Professor Willard, and Assistant
Professor Meloche.
Open to those who have completed Course 3 or 3^.

7. Organic Chemistry. Lectures and laboratory work. Five hours.
Professor Gomberg, Assistant Professor Schoepfle, and Mi
Sullivan.
Open to those who have completed Course 3 or 3^.

SE. Elementary Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Lectures and
recitations. Three hours. Professor Bartell.
Open to those who have had Chemistry 3 or 3^, Physics 2, and
Calculus.

15. History of Chemistry and Development of Chemical Theory.
Two hours. Professor Smeaton.

28. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work, with lec-

tures and quiz. Three to five hours. Professor Willard.
Open to those who have completed Course 5.

29. Elementary Chemical Miscroscopy. Two hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Carney.



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Courses of Instruction 417

34. Chemical Reading. One hour. Professor Campbell.

43. Advanced Organic Chemistry and Ultimate Analysis. Labora-
tory work and reading. Two to four hours. Professor GoM-
BERG, and Assistant Professor Schoepfle.

SECOND SEMESTER

i^. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. Lectures, reci-
tations, and laboratory. Professor Lichty.
This course offers an opportunity for those entering the Uni-
versity at the opening of the second semester to commence the
study of chemistry, but no student will be admitted who might
have elected Coarse i. Special permission must be obtained
from the instructor in order to elect this course.

2E. Principles of Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures, recitations, and
laboratory. Five hours. Dr. Hodges, and Assistants.
Open to those who have passed the entrance requirements in
chemistry.

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations. Con-

tinuation of Course i. Four hours. Professor Smeaton.

3. Qualitative Analysis. Recitations and laboratory work. Five

hours. Assistant Professor Carney, Mr. Cou, and Mr. Mc-
Alpine.
Open to those who have completed Course 2 or 2E.

3j. Qualitative Analysis. Recitations and laboratory work. Three
sections. Four hours. Mr. Cole, and Mr. Soule.
Open to those who have completed Course 2 or 2E.

Sb. Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of Course 3^1. Four hours.
Mr. Cole.

5. Quantitative Analysis. Beginning course. Recitations and lab-
oratory work. Five hours. Professor Willard, and Assistant
Professor Meloche.
Open to those who have completed Course 3 or 3^.

7a. Organic Chemistry. Continuation of Course 7. Five hours.
Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Professor GoM-
berg. Assistant Professor Schoepfle, and Mr. Sullivan.
Open to those who have completed Course 3 or 3^, and who re-
ceive special permission.

8. Elementary Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Four hours.
Professor Bigelow.



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4i8 Colleges of Bngineering and Architecture

15. History of Chemistry and Development of Chemical Theory.
Two hours. Professor Smeaton.

28. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work, with lec-

tures and quiz. Three to five hours. Professor Willard.
Open to those who have completed Course 5.

29. Elementary Chemical Microscopy. Two hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Carney.

34. Chemical Reading. One hour. Professor Campbell.
Course 34 requires special permission.

43. Advanced Organic Chemistry and Ultimate Analysis. Labora-
tory work and reading. Continuation of Coarse 42. Two to
four hours. Professor Gomberg, and Dr. Britton.

SUMMER SESSION DF 1 92 1

(See College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.)

CIVIL ENCnfEERING

The work offered in this department includes Structural, Hy-
draulic, Transportation, Municipal, Sanitary, Highway, and Geodetic
Engineering.

The Announcement of the College of Engineering should be con-
sulted for information as to the sequence of courses.

FIRST SEMESTER

1. Drafting Room Practice. Two hours, Mr. Alt, Mr. Elliott,

and Mr. Pope.

2. Theory of Structures. Three hours. Professors Gram and Cis-

SEL, Assistant Professor Eriksen, Mr. Alt, Mr. Elliott, and
Mr. Pope.

2a, Elementary Designing Structures. Two hours. Assistant Pro-
fessor Eriksen, Mr. Alt, Mr. Elliott, and Mr. Pope.

3. Masonry. Three hours. Professors Gram and CissEL, and As-

sistant Professor Eriksen.

5. Design of Structures. Three hours. Professor CisSEL.

6. Advanced Masonry and Foundations. Two hours. Professor
Gram.

10. Hydrology. Three hours. Professor King.

II. Hydraulics. Two hours. Professor King.



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Courses of Instruction 419

20k Railroad Location. Two hours, Mr. Alt.

23. Railroad Construction and Maintenance. Two hours. Professor
RiGGS.

26. Specifications and Contracts. Two hours. Professor Riggs.
30. Water Works. Three hours. Professors Hoad and Decker.
32. Sewerage. Two hours. Professors Hoad and Decker.

34. Manidpal and Industrial Sanitation. Two hours. Professor

Hoad.

35. Sanitary Engineering Design. Three hours. Professor Decker.

40. Highway Engineering. Two hours. Professor Blanchard.

42. Highway Engineering Laboratory. Two hours. Assistant Pro-
fessor Bateman.

60. Sanitary Engineering Research. Credit to be arranged. Pro-
fessors HoAO and Decker.

66. Highway Engineering Research. Credit to be arranged. Pro-
fessor Blanchard.

SECOND semester

1. Drafting Room Practice. Two hours. Mr. Alt, Mr. Elliott,

and Mr. Pope.

2. Theory of Structures. Three hours. Professors Gram and Cis-

SEL, Assistant Professor Eriksen, Mr. Alt, Mr. Elliott, and
Mr. Pope.

2a, Elementary Design of Structures. Two hours. Assistant Pro-
fessor Eriksen, Mr. Ai.i, Mr. Eluott, and Mr. Pope.

3. Masonry. Three hours. Professor Cissel, and Assistant Profes-

sor Eriksen.

4. Higher Structures. Two hours. Professor Gram.

5. Design of Structures. Three hours. Professor Cissel, and As-

sistant Professor Eriksen.

6. Advanced Masonry and Foundations. Two hours. Professors

Gram and Cissel.

7. Advanced Design of Structures. Three hours. Professor Cissel,

and Assistant Professor Erfksen.



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420 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

ya. Concrete and Steel Highway Bridge Design. Three hours. Pro-
fessor CissEL, and Assistant Professor Eriksen.

8. Analysis and Design of Arches. T700 hours. Professor Cissel.
10. Hydrology. Three hours. Assistant Professor WiSLER.

12. Development of Water Power. Three hours. Professor King.

13. Administration of Water Resources. Two hours. Professor

Johnston.

14. Irrigation and Drainage. Ttvo hours. Professors King and

Johnston.

16. Design of Hydraulic Structures. Three hours. Professor King,
and Assistant Professor Wisler.

18. Rivers and Harbors. One hour. Professor King.

24. Railroad Engineering. Three hours. Professor Riggs.

26. Specifications and Contracts. Two hours. Professor Riggs.

37. Public Utility Problems. One hour. Professor Riggs.

30. Water Works. Three hours. Professor Hoad.

31. Water Purification. Two hours. Professor Decker.
3a. Sewerage. Two hours. Professor Decker.

33. Sewage Disposal. Two hours. Professor Hoad.

35. Sanitary Engineering Design. Three hours. Professor Decker.

36. Municipal Engineering. Two hours. Professor Hoad, and As-

sistant Professor Bateman.

40. Highway Engineering. Two hours. Professor Blanch ard.

41. Highway Transport Surveys and the Theory and Economics of

Highway Improvements. Two hours. Professor Blanc hard.

42. Highway Engineering Laboratory. Two hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Bateman.

43. Highway Engineering Design. Three hours. Assistant Profes-

sor Bateman.

44. Highway Transport Economics, Methods, Legislation and Man-

agement. Two hours. Professor Blanch ard.



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Courses of Instruction 421

60. Sanitary Engineering Research. Credit to be arranged. Profes-

sors HoAD and Decker.

61. Irrigation and Drainage. 7 wo hours. Professors King and

Johnston.

62. Advanced Hydraulic Design. Two hours. Professor King.

63. Advanced Railway Design. Thr^^ hours. Professor Riggs.

64. Hydraulic Engineering Research. Credit to be arranged. Pro-

fessor King.

65. Strnctnral Engineering Research. Credit to be arranged. Pro-

fessor Gram.

66. Highway Engineering Research. Credit to be arranged. Pro-

fessor B1.ANCHARD.

SUMMER SESSION OF 1 92 1

2. Theory of Structures. Threg hours. Mr. Alt.

Graduate Short Period Courses

Graduate work in highway engineering and highway transport
leading to the degree of Master of Science or Master of Science in
Engineering, has been arranged especially for men engaged in the
practice of highway engineering and highway transport. These
courses will be given in periods of two weeks each during the months
from December to March, inclusive. This plan will afford highway
engineers, chemists, contractors, engineer-salesmen, highway transport
engineers and managers, motor truck salesmen, and others interested
in highway engineering and highway transport an opportunity to
obtain advanced knowledge during the season of the year when a
leave of absence may be easily obtained. These courses are open only
to graduate students and qualified special students.

67. Highway Transport Surveys. Two hours. Professor Bl^nchard.

68. Bituminous Surfaces and Bituminous Pavements. Two hours.

Professor Bianchard.

69. Highway Laboratory Research. Two hours. Assistant Profes-

sor Bateman.

70. Highway Structures. Two hours. Professor Gram.

71. Highway Specifications, Contracts and Jurisprudence. Two

hours. Professor RiGGS.



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4aa Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

72. Earth, Sand-Clay, Gravel and Broken Stone Roads. Two hours.

Assistant Professor Bateman.

73. Brick, Cement-Concrete, Stone Block and Wood Block Pavements.

Two hours. Assistant Professor Bateman.

74. Bituminous Materials. Two hours. Assistant Professor Bate-

man.

75. Highway Engineering Seminar. Two hours. Professor Blanch-

ard.

76. Highway Engineering Theory, Design and Economics. Two

hours, Piofessor Blanchard.

77. Highway Engineering Financing, Administration and Organiza-

tions. Two hours. Professor Blanchard.

78. Grading Machinery and Operations. Two hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Bateman.

79. American and English Highway Traffic Legislation and Regula-

tions. Two hours. Professor Blanchard.

80. Interrelationship of Highway, Railway and Waterway Transport

Two hours. Professor Riggs.

81. American and English Highway Transport Methods. Two

hours. Professor Blanchard.

82. Highway Transport Management, Costs and Record Systems.

Two hours. Professor Blanchard.

83. Highway Transport Seminar. Two hours. Professor Blanch-

ard.

DRAWING

FIRST SEMESTER

I. Geometrical Drawing. Two, three or four hours, (Elective).
Assistant Professor Finch.

\d. Instrumental and Free- Hand Drawing. Three sections. This
course is planned for students of Dentistry. One hour, • As-
sistant Professor Orbeck, Mr. Hudnutt, Mr. Cole, and Mr.
Hansen.

4. Descriptive Geometry I. Lectures and Drawing. Two hours.
Thirteen sections. Professor Goulding, Assistant Professors
Finch, Orbeck, Palmer, Mr. Heyden, Mr. Hudnut, Mr.
Clark, Mr. Cole, Mr. Cook, Mr. Hansen, and Mr. Potter.



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Courses of Instruction 423

4a. Descriptive Geometry and Shades and Shadows. Recitations and
drawing. Three hours. Assistant professor Bennett.

5. Descriptive Geometry II. Lectures and Drawing. Two hours.
Five sections. Course 5 must be preceded by Course 4. Pro-
fessor GouLDiNG, Assistant Professors Finch and Palmer*
Mr. HuDNUTT, and Mr. Clark.

10. Free-Hand Lettering. Two hours, (Elective). Assistant Pro-
fessor Palmer.

SECOND semester

I. Geometrical Drawing. Two, three or four hours, (Elective).
Assistant Professor Finch.

id. Instrumental and Free-Hand Drawing. This course is planned
for students of Dentistry. One hour, Mr. Hudnut.

4. Descriptive Geometry I. Lectures and Drawing. Five sections.

Two hours. Professor Goulding, Assistant Professors Finch,
Orbeck, Palmer, and Mr. Heyden.

411. Descriptive Geometry and Shades and Shadows. Recitations
and drawing. Three hours. Assistant Professor Bennett.

5. Descriptive Geometry II. Lectures and Drawing. Twelve sec-

tions. Two hours. Professor Goulding, Assistant Professors
Finch, Bennett, Orbeck, Palmer, Mr. IIeyden, Mr. Hud-
nut, Mr. Clark, Mr. Cole, Mr. Cook, Mr. Hansen, and Mr.
Potter.
Course 5 must be preceded by Course 4.

5a. Advanced Projections and Stereotomy. Two hours. Assistant
Professor Bennett.

10. Free-Hand Lettering. Two hours, (Elective). Assistant Pro-
fessor Palmer.

SUMMER session OF I92I

A. Free-Hand Drawing in Charcoal and Pencil, and Painting in
Water-Color. Two hours, Mr. Slusser.

C. Descriptive Geometry. Four hours. Assistant Professor Finch.

I. Geometrical Drawing. Two, three, or four hours. Assistant
Professor Finch.

id. Instrumental and Free-Hand Drawing. One hour. Professor
Goulding.



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4^4 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

4. Descriptive Geometry I. Tivo hours. Professor Goulding.

5. Descriptive Geometry H. Two hours. Professor Goulding.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

BOTH SEMESTERS

I. Elementary Electrical Design. Recitations and drawing. Two
hours. Professor Bailey, and Assistant Professor Moore.
Prerequisite : Drawing 4.

3. Electrical Apparatus and Circuits I. (Fundamentals.) Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Four hours. Professor Parker,
Assistant Professors Davidson and Stason, Mr. Fairman, Mr.
Dreese, and Mr. Anderson.
Prerequisites: Courses lE and 2E in Physics and Course I in
Engineering Mechanics.

2a, This course is similar to Course 2, but is intended exclusively for
non-electrical students. Recitations and laboratory work. Four
hours. Professors Parker, Higbie, and Lovell, Assistant
Professors Davidson, Moorb, Stason, Mr. Fairman, Mr.
Dreese, Mr. Anderson, and Mr. Attwood.

3. Electrical Apparatus and Circuits II. (Theory). Recitations

and laboratory work. Four hours. Professors Higbie and
Cannon, and Assistant Professor Davidson.
Prerequisite : Course 2.

4. Electrical Apparatus and Circuits III. (Advanced Theory).

Recitations and laboratory work. Thrge hours. Professor
Bailey, Mr. Fairman, and Mr. Anderson.

Prerequisite: Course 3.

Note : — Course a is devoted mainly to the study of direct current
circuits and machines; Course 3 to alternating current circuits
and machines; Course 4 to operating characteristics of rotary
alternating current machines. While it is impracticable to keep
these subjects segregated as clearly as might be understood from
the above statement, it has been found that this arrangement of
the ground to be covered in the study of the fundamentals of
electric circuits and machines enables the teaching to be done
most effectively.

Students of high proficiency may, after completing Course a, take
certain of the specialized courses described in the following
paragraphs although those who will take Course 3 are advised,
and electrical students are required, to complete Course 3 be-
fore taking the specialized courses with the exception of 5, 7.



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Courses of Instruction 42$

30» 3i» 35» 36, which may be taken by electrical students
simultaneously with Course 3.

5. Design of Electrical Machinery and Appliances. Lectures, rec-

itations, and drawing. Four hours. Professor Bailey, and
Assistant Professor Moore.
Prerequisite: Courses i, 3, and 14.

7. Illumination and Photometry. Lectures, recitations, and labora-

tory work. Two hours. Professor Higbie, Assistant Professor
Davidson, and Mr. Anderson.
Prerequisite: Course 2,

9. Special Laboratory Problems. Credit to be arranged.
Prerequisite: Course 3.

II. Power Plants, Transmission and Distribution. Lectures and
recitations. Five hours. Professors Parker and Lovell.
Prerequisite: Course 3.

[13. Principles of Electric Communication. Lectures, recitations, and
laboratory work. Four hours.
Prerequisite: Course 3. Not offered in 1920-1921.]

14. Mechanism of Electrical Machines. Lectures, recitations, and
drawing. Three hours. Professor Bailey.
Prerequisites: Course i in Electrical Engineering, and Course 2
in Engineering Mechanics.

17. Electromechanics. Lectures and recitations. Four hours. Pro-

fessor Cannon.
Prerequisite: Course 3.

18. Research Work. Hours to be arranged. Various members of

the Department Faculty.
May be elected only by permission of the Head of the depart-
ment.

FIRST SEMESTER ONLY

8. Principles of Electric Traction. Lectures and recitations. Two

hours. Professor Lovell.
Prerequisite : Course 3.

33. Industrial Electrical Engineering. Lectures and recitations.
Two hours. Professor Lovell.
Prerequisite: Course 3.

SECOND SEMESTER ONLY

6. Design of Electrical Machinery and Appliances. Lectures, reci-

tations, and drawing. Two hours. Professor Bailey.
Prerequisite: Courses.



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426 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

6A, (An extended form of Coarse 6). Four hours. Professor
Bailky.

10. Advanced Theory of Electrical Machinery and Circuits. Lectures
and reading. Two hours. Professor Bailiy.
Prerequisite: Course 3.

15. Advanced Lighting. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work.
Two hours. Professor Higbie.
Prerequisite: Course 7.

[16. Advanced Telephones. Recitations and laboratory work. Three
hours.
Prerequisite: Course 13. Not offered in 1930-1921.]

19. Study of Design, Power Plants. Lectures and design problems.
Two hours. Professor Lovell.
Prerequisite: Course 11.

30. Study of Design, Electric Transmission and Distribution Sys-
tems. Two hours. Professor Parker.
Prerequisite: Course 11.

[22. Radio Telegraphy and Telephony. Lectures, recitations, and
laboratory work. Two hours.
Prerequisite: Course 13. Not offered in I920-I92X.]

[25. Electrical Engineering Colloquium. Two hours.
(By invitation only). Not offered in 1920-1921.]

36. Rates and Cost Analysis. Lectures and recitations. One hour.
Professor Parker.
Prerequisite : Course 2. Open to seniors only.

summer session of 192 1

2. Electrical Apparatus and Circuits L Four hours. Professor

Parker, and Mr. Dreese.

2a, Electrical Apparatus and Circuits L Designed for Engineering
students other than electrical engineers. Four hours. Assist-
ant Professor Moore, Mr. FairmaN, and Mr. Drbssi.

3. Electrical Apparatus and Circuits H. Four hours. Professor

Cannon.

4. Electrical Apparatus and Circuits III. Three hours. Professor

Bailey.

5. Design of Electrical Machinery and Appliances. Four hours.

Professor Bailey.



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Courses of Instruction 427



II. Power Plants. Five hours. Professor Parker.

17. Electromechanics. Four hours. Professor Cannon.

18. Research Work in Electrical Engineering. Credit to be arranged.

EN6IN£ERnfG MECHANICS

BOTH SEMESTERS

1. Statics, Center of Gravity, Movements of Inertia. Nine sections.

Four hours. Professors Patterson, Airey, and Menefee,
Associate Professor Van den Broek, Assistant Professors
Stevens, Swinton, and Olhstead.

Course i must be preceded by Course $£ in Mathematics and
Course lE in Physics.

2. Strength and Resistance of Materials. Fundamentals of Struc-

tural Design. Theory of strength and stiffness of beams, gird-
ers, columns, shafts, etc. Twelve sections. Three hours. Pro-
fessors Patterson and Menefee, Associate Professor Van den
Broek, Assistant Professors Swinton and Eriksen, and Mr.

LiDDECOAT.

Course a milst be preceded by Course i in Engineering Me-
chanics.

3. Djrnamics. Work and Energy. The use of velocity, accelera-

tion and other diagrams in the studying of dynamic problems
relating to machines. Nine sections. T^ree hours. Professors
Patterson and Airey, Assistant Professors Stevens, Swinton,
and Erikson, and Mr. Liddecoat.
Course 3 must be preceded by Course i in Engineering Me-
chanics.

4. Hydromechanics. Pressure of Fluids. Flotation. Flow of water

through pipes and orifices, over weirs, and in open channels.
Seven sections. Two hours. Professor Menefee, Assistant
Professor Olmstead, and Mr. Liddecoat.
Course 4 must be preceded by Course i in Engineering Me-
chanics.

5. Testing Materials. A study of methods and results of laboratory

investigations of the physical properties of engineering mate-
rials. Two hours. Professor Menefee, and laboratory as-
sistant.
Course 5 must be preceded by Courses i and 2 in Engineering
Mechanics.



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428 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

SECOND SEMESTER ONLY

6. Strength of Materials. Testing. The elementary theory of the
strength of ties, struts, beams, and shafts. Laboratory prac-
tice in commercial testing and investigation methods. Three
hours. Professor Menefee, and laboratory assistant.
Course 6 must be preceded by Course i or 2 in Engineering
Mechanics. It is an abridgment of the work covered in
Courses 2 and 5, and may not be elected by any one who has
passed, or intends to elect either of these courses.

SUMMER SESSION OF 192 1

I. Statics. Four hours. Professor Patterson', and Mr. Liddicoat.

2. Strength and Elasticity of Materials. Three hours. Professor
Van den Broek, and Assistant Professor Stex'ens.

3. Dynamics. Work and Energy. Three hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Ste\'ENS.

4. Hydromechanics. Two hours, Mr. Liddicoat.

ENGLISH

The work in English is based on the assumption that the engi-
neering or architectural student needs in general to be able to speak
and to write, and to enjoy books in a sensible and discriminating
way. He must also prepare definitely for the particular kind of
writing demanded by his profession. There have been provided,
therefore, in addition to the general reading and writing courses, a
number of technical courses designed to meet the special needs of the
student in engineering and architecture.

first semester

1. Theme-Writing and Oral Expression. Four hours. Fifteen

sections. Mr. Klocksiem, Mr. Egi.v, Mr. Walton, Mr.
Lyman, Mr. ten Hoor, Mr. Keena, Mr. Dahlstrom.
There are, in addition, four sections for students in the College
of Dental Surgery.

ifl. Theme-Writing and Oral Expression. Two hours, Mr. Keena.

IX. Theme-Writing. For students conditioned in i and la. Two
hours without credit. Mr. Wenger.

2. Theme-Writing and Oral Expression. Two hours. Mr. Klock-

siem.

3. Oral Exposition and Argument. Two hours. Mr. Egly.



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Courses of Instruction 429



4. Note-Taking. Two hours, Mr. Walton.

6. Report- Writing. For juniors and seniors. Two hours. Two
lectures and six quiz sections. Professor Nelson.

9. Business English. For juniors and seniors. Advertising and
Commercial Correspondence. Two hours. Four sections. As-
sistant Professor Thoknton, and Mr. Lyman.

10. Business English Sales. For juniors and seniors. Two hours.
Two sections. Assistant Professor Thornton.



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