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14. The Engineer and His Reading. For juniors and seniors. Two
hours,

16. English for Foreign Students. Two hours. Four hours recita-
tion required. Mr. TEN HooR.

31. Readings in Contempprary Literature. Two hours. Two sec-
tions. Assistant ffP^ssor Schneider.

33. The Modern Novel. Two hours, Mr. Langworthy.

34, The Short Story. Two hours. Assistant Professor Schneider.

SECOND semester

I. Theme-Writing and Oral Exposition. Four hours. Ten sections.
Mr. Klocksiem, Mr. Egly, Mr. Wenger, Mr. Walton, Mr.
Lyman, Mr. ten Hoor, Mr. Keena, Mr. Dahlstrom.

IX Theme- Writing. For students conditioned in i and lo. Two
hours without credit, Mr. Wenger.

3. Theme-Writing and Oral Exposition. Two hours, Mr. Klock-
siem.

3a. Theme-Writing and Oral Exposition. Two hours, Mr. Keena.
There are also four sections of English a for students in the
College of Dental Surgery.

3. Oral Exposition and Argument. Two hours, Mr. Egly.

4. Note-Taking. Two hours. Two sections. Mr. Walton.

5. Scientific and Technical Papers. For juniors and seniors. Two

hours, Mr. TEN HooR.

6. Engineering Reports. For juniors and seniors. Two hours.

Three lectures and seven quiz sections. Professor Nelson.

9. Business English. For juniors and seniors. Two hours. Four
sections. Assistant Professor Thornton, and Mr. Lyman.



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430 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

10. Business English. For juniors and seniors. Two hours. Six
sections. Assistant Professor Thornton.

14. The Engineer and His Reading. For juniors and seniors. Two
hours, Mr. Langworthy.

17. English for Foreign Students. Two hours. Four recitations
required. Mr. Klocksiem.

21. General Reading Course. Two hours. Three sections. Assist-
ant Professor Schneider, Mr. Walton, and Mr. ten Hoor.

33. The Modem Novel. Two hours. Two sections. Mr. Lang-
worthy, and Mr. Klocksiem.

34.' The Short Story. Two hours. Two sections. Assistant Pro-
fessor Schneider.

a6. The Modem Drama. Two hours, Mr. Wenger.

37. Scientific Literature. Two hours. Assistant Professor Thorn-
ton.

SUMMER session OF 1 93 1

I. Theme-Writing and Oral Exposition. Four hours. Assistant
Professor Schneider.

14. The Engineer and His Reading. Two hours. Assistant Pro-
fessor Schneider.



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

For a desci^iption of all courses offered in the department of
Geology, see page 255.

The courses in Geology are planned to meet the requirements of
students of engineering whose profession makes some knowledge of
geology essential ; men who are to have in their hands the control or
operation of mines; and consulting geologists and geological engi-
neers.

Research is especially encouraged along the lines of structural
geology, paleontology, glacial geolo^, geography, and geophysics.

FIRST SEMESTER

lA, Introduction to Geology, for Engineering and Forestry Stu-
dents. A course adapted to the needs of students in tliese de-
partments but open to others as well. Three hours. Professor
HoBBS, and Assistant.
Students who can spare the time are recommended to take i^
as a continuation. (See below.)



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Courses of Instruction 431

l6a. Economic Geology (non-metals). A general coarse treating of
the nature, occurrence, and distribution of the non-metallic
mineral resources such as coal, oil and gas, salt, gypsum, build-
ing stones, phosphate rock, etc. Geology la or lE and Min-
eralogy I are prerequisite, while Geology lb is strongly rec-
ommended. Three hours. Professor Cook.

37. Oil Geology. . A course treating of the origin, occurrence, and
exploitation of deposits of oil and gas. This course should be
preceded by Course lE (or la and i^), and should be fol-
lowed by Courses 6 and 28. Three hours. Professor Cook.

SKCOND SEMESTER

I. Introduction to Geology for Engineering and Forestry Stu-
dents. A course adapted to the needs of students in these de-
partments, but open to others as well. Three hours. Professor
HoBBS, and Assistant
Students who can spare the time are recommended to continue
later with i^.

i^. Elementary Historical Geology. A course describing the strati-
graphy of North America and the origin and evolution of life
during geological time. Lectures and laboratory work. Three
hours. Professor Case, and Assistant.

ISF. Soil Geology. A comprehensive survey of the subject including
the origin of soils, their physical and chemical constitution,
the influence of climate on soil fertility, irrigation and drwn-
age, tillage, fertiliiers, etc., and a consideration of the regolith
of the United States in relation to geologic, physiographic, and
climatic factors. Geology la or lE and Mineralogy I and 9
are prerequisites. Three hours. (The attention of students
desiring additional laboratory work is directed to Course 26).
Professor Cook.

16^. Economic Geology (metals). In this course the metallic min-
eral resources are treated in the same manner as are the non-
metallic resources during the first semester. Although this
course may be elected independently of Geology 15^, both are
essential to a general survey of the subject Prerequisites the
same as for Geology 16a. Three hours. Professor Cook.

28 The Stratigraphy of Oil Geology. A course describing the dis-
tribution and stratigraphic relations of the various oil horizons.
This course should follow Course 27. Three hours. Professor
Case.



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432 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture



MATHEBIATICS

Professors Ziwet, Butts, Fikld, and Running, Associate Professors
Love, and Hildebrandt, Assistant Professors Hopkins, Poor,
Nelson, Rouse, and Denton, Mr. Blessing, Mr. Kazarinoff,
Mr. Gallade, Mr. Jones, Mr. Olson, Mr. Simmons, and Mr.
Gandis.

Students of engineering are required to take in order Courses
I, 2, 3, and 4. Course 4 may be replaced by Courses 4a and 4b.
Students of chemical engineering are not required to take Course 4^.
Students who have not received credit in plant trigonometry on ad-
mission must elect Course la in their first semester.

la. Plane Trigonometry. Two hours. Both semesters.

Definitions of the trigonometric functions ; principal relations be-
tween them; their application to the solution of triangles; use
of trigonometric and logarithmic tables, applied problems.

1. Algebra and Analytic Geometry. Four hours. Both semesters.
Coordinates in the plane; the straight line; linear equations;

determinants; permutations and combinations; the circle; com-
plex numbers; quadratic and cubic functions and equations;
polynomials.

2. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Four hours. Both semesters.

Elements of the differential calculus; numerical equations; the
parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola; the general equation of the
second degree; applications of the derivative; differentiation
of transcendental functions.

3. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Five hours. Both semesters.
Tracing and discussion of curves; integration and its applica-
tions; solid analytic geometry.

4. Calculus and Differential Equations. Five hours. Both semes-

ters.
Definite integrals and their application to the determination of
lengths of arcs, areas, volumes, mass moments, moments of
inertia, etc.; partial and total derivatives, infinite series. Ele-
ments of the solution of differential equations, with applica-
tions.

4a. Calculus. Three hours. Both semesters.

Definite integrals and their application to the determination of
lengths of arcs, areas, volumes, mass moments, moments of
inertia, etc.; partial and total derivatives; infinite series.



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Courses of Instruction 433



4*. Calculus. Two hours. Both semesters.

Elements of the solution of differential equations, with applica-
tions.

36. Vector Analysis. Thr^e hours. Second semester.

43. Integral Equations. Two hours. First or second semester.

57. Empirical Formulas and Graphical Methods I. Two hours

First semester.

58. Empirical Formulas and Graphical Methods II. Two hours.

Second semester.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

Z. Solid Geometry. For entrance. Professor .



Iff. Trigonometry. Elementary Course. Professor Karpinski.

1. Algebra and Analytic Geometry. Four hours. Assistant Pro-

fessor Hopkins.

2. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Four hours. Professor Run-

ning, and Assistant Professor Poor.

3. Calculus and Solid Analytic Geometry. Five hours. Professor

Field, and Assistant Professors Poor and Nelson.

4iz. Calculus. Three hours. Assistant Professor Rouse.

4^. Differential Equations. Two hours. Assistant Professor Hop-
kins.

58J. Emperical Formulas. Two hours. Professor Running.

33j. Analytical Mechanics. Two hours. Professor Field.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

first semester

1. Machine Drawing. Two hours. Professor Wilson, Assistant

Professor Mickle, Mr. Good, and Mr. Legg.

2. Elements of Machine Design. Three hours. Professor Wii.S0N>

Assistant Professor Mickle, and Mr. Legg.

3. Heat Engines. Four hours. Professors Anderson and Haw-

ley, Assistant Professor Mickle, Mr. Watson, and Mr.
Keeler.



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434 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

4. Hydraulic Machinery. Three hours. Professor ZowsKi, and Mr.

Jacodzinski.

5. Thermodynamics. Three hours. Professor Fessenden.

6. Theory of Machine Design. Four hours. Professors ZowsKi and

Wilson.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. First Coarse. Two hours. Professor

Emswiier, Mr. Watson, and Mr. Keeler.

8. Mechanical Laboratory. Second Course. Two hours. Professor

Emswiler, Mr. Watson, and Mr. Keeler.

9. Power Plants. Three hours. Professor Hawley.

10. Theory of Machine Movements. Two hours. Professor Wilson.

11. Steam Boilers. Three hours. Professor Fessenden.

13. Steam Turbines. Three hours. Professor Emswiler.

15. Internal Combustion Engines and Gas Producers. Three hours.
Mr. Good.

17. Pun«ps and Compressors. Three hours. Professor ZOWSKI.

18. Heating and Ventilation. First Course. Two hours. Professor

Anderson.

ao. Mechanical Handling of Materials. Two hours. Professor
Hawley.

20a. Design of Hoisting and Conveying Machinery. Three hours.
Professor Hawley.

23. Mechanical Laboratory. Advanced Course. Two or three hours.
Professor Emswiler.

23. Hydraulic Laboratory. Advanced Course. Tvfo or three hours.
Professor ZowsKi.

29. Gasoline Automobiles. Three hours. Assistant Professor Lay,

30. Automobile Engine. Three hours. Assistant Professor Nickel-

sen.

31. Automobile Chassis. Assistant Professor NiCKELSEN.

32. Automobile Testing. Two hours. Assistant Professor Lay.



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Courses of Instruction 435



33. Advanced Automobile Testing and Research. Assistant Pro-
fessor Lay.

[35. Scientific Shop Management. Three hours. Omitted first semes-
ter in. 19 19- 19 JO.]

[36. Scientific Shop Management. Advanced Course. Two or three
hours, as arranged. Omitted first semester in 1919-1920.]

[37. Special Topics on the Internal Combustion Engine. Two hours.
Omitted 1919- 1920.]

SECOND SEMESTER

I. Machine Drawing. Two hours. Professor Wilson, Assistant
Professor Mickle, and Mr. Lego.

3. Elements of Machine Design. Three hours. Professor Wilson,
Assistant Professor Mickle, and Mr. Legg.

3. Steam Engines and Other Heat Engines. Four hours. Profes-

sors Anderson and Hawley, Assistant Professor Mickle, Mr.
Watson, and Mr. Keeler.

4. Hydraulic Machinery. Three hours. Professor ZowsKi, and

Mr. Jagodinski.

5. Thermodynamics. Three hours. Professor Fessenden.

6. Theory of Machine Design. Four hours. Professors Zowski

and Wilson.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. First Course. Four hours. Professor

Emswiler, Mr. Watson, and Mr. Keeler.

8. Mechanical Laboratory. Second Course. Two hours. Professor

Emswiler, Mr. Watson, and Mr. Keeler.

9. Power Plants and Power Transmission. Three hours. Professor

Hawley.

90. Design of Power Plants. Three hours. Professor Hawley.

10. Theory of Machine Movements. Two hours. Professor Wilson.

iitf. Design of Steam Boilers. Three hours. Professor Fessenden.

12. Steam Reciprocating Engines. Two hours. Professor Fessen-
den.



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436 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

i2a. Design of Steam Reciprocating Engines. Three hours. Profes-
sor ZO^^SKI.

13. Steam Turbines. Three hours. Professor Emswiler.

15. Internal Combustion Engines and Gas Producers. Three hours.

Mr. Good.

iSa. Design of Internal Combustion Engines. Three hours. Mr.
Good.

16. Water Turbines. Three hours. Professor ZowsKi.

i6a. Design of Water Turbines. Three hours. Professor ZowsKi.
I 7j. Design of Pumps and Compressors. Three hours. Professor

ZOWSKI.

19. Refrigeration. Two hours. Professor Fesskndkn.

30. Mechanical Handling of Materials. Two hours. Professor
Hawley.

20a. Design of Hoisting and Conveying Machinery. Three hours.
Professor Hawley.

32. Mechanical Laboratory. Advanced Course. Two or three hours.
Professor Emswiler.

23. Hydraulic Laboratory. Advanced Course. Two or three hours.
Professor ZowsKi.

35. Heating and Ventilation. Second Course. Two hours. Pro-
fessor Anderson.

25a. Design of Heating and Ventilating Systems. Thfee hours.
Professor Anderson.

29. Gasoline Automobiles. Three hours. Assistant Professor Lay.

30fl*. Automobile Motor Theory and Design. Three hours. Assistant
Professor Nickelsen.

$Ja. Automobile Chassis Design. Three hours. Assistant Professor
Nickelskn.

32. Automobile Testing. Two hours. Assistant Professor Lay.

S$. Advanced Automobile Testing and Research. Two or three
hours. Assistant Professor Lay.



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Courses of Instruction 437

35. Scientific Shop Management. Three hours. Professor Bcjrsley.

36. Scientific Shop Management. Advanced Course. Three hours.

Professor Bursiey.

[37. Special Topics on the Internal Combustion Engine. Two hours.
Omitted in 19 19- 1920.]

SUMMER SESSION OF IQai

1. Machine Drawing. Two hours. Professor Wilson.

2. Elements of Machine Design. Three hours. Professor Wilson.

3. Steam Engines and other Heat Engines. Four hours. Profes-

sor Hawiey.

4. Hydraulic Machinery. Three hours. Assistant Professor

Sherzbr.

5. Thermodynamics. Three hours. Professor Emswiler.

7. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Tivo hours. Mr. Watson.

8. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Second Course. Two

hours. Mr. Watson.

17J. Design of Centrifugal Pumps. Three hours. Assistant Professor
Sherzer.

23. Hydraulic Machinery. Credit to be arranged. Assistant Pro-
fessor Sherzer.

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS

HRST semester

Coast Artillery

T. Infantry. Fundamental subjects in military training. One hour.
Assistant Professor Shippam.

3. Minor Tactics. Combat problems for small units. Artillery
material. One hour. Professor Arthur.

5. Orientation. Topographical operations in locating and laying
artillery. Two hours. Assistant Professor Shippam.

7. Gunnery. Problems of Artillery in the Field. Two hours. Pro-
fessor Arthur.



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438 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

Signal Corps

11. Infantry and Elementary Training. One hour. Assistant Pro-

fessor Shippam.

13. Offensive Action of Small Units. Field Radio Sets. One hour.

Professor Arthur, and Mr. .

15. Radio Telegraphy and Telephony. Tioo hours. See E. E. 32.

17. Communication Engineering. Two hours. See Physics 33.

SECOND SEMESTER

Coast Artillery

a. Military Hygiene. Sanitation. Interior Guards. One hour.
Professor Arthur.

4. Topography. Small Arms. Artillery Material. One hour. As*
sistant Professor Shippaic.

6. Motor Transportation. S^e M. £. 29.

8. Military Law. Field Engineering. Administration. Two hours.
Professor Arthur.

Signal Corps

12. Hygiene. First Aid. Guard Duty. One hour. Professor

Arthur.

14. Map Reading. Small Arms. Telegraphy and Telephony. One

hour. Assistant Professor Shippam, and Mr. .

16. Signal Communications. Organization. Two hours. Assistant

Professor Shippam.

18. Military Law. Hippology. Administration. Two hours. Pro-

fessor Arthur.

summer session of 1 92 1

camps

Coast Artillery

I. Basic. Fort Monroe, Va. Six weeks. Not prerequisite to grad-
uation. Practical and laboratory work in Infantry Drill, Ar-
tillery Drill, Artillery Material, Target Practice, Orientation,
Interior Guard Duty, Motor Transportation, Small Arms Fir-
ing, Signaling, Physical Training, and Swimming. Thiriy-^ve
hours per week.



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Courses of Instruction 439

2. Advanced. Fort Monroe, Va. Six weeks. Prerequisite to grad-
uation. Instructional or command positions or advanced work
in subjects of basic camp and practical work in Equitation,
Fire Control, Artillery Tactics, and Gunnery. Thirty-five hours
fer week,

Signml Corps

II. Basic. Camp Alfred Vail, N. J. Six weeks. Not prerequisite
to graduation. Practical and laboratory work pertaining to
the Signal Corps.

13. Advanced. Camp Alfred Vail, N. J. Six weeks. Prerequisite
to graduation. Advanced practical work pertaining to the
Signal Corps.

MINBRALOGT AND PETROGRAPHT

All courses offered by this department are given in the Mineral-
ogical Laboratory which is located in the northeast comer of the
Natural Science Building. The mineral collections, Room 223, are
open for inspection daily whenever the University is in session from
9 to 13 A. M. and 3 to 4 P. M.

Courses i, 2, 16, 17, and 17a are beginning courses. Course i is
designed to meet the needs of students desiring an elementary knowl-
edge of Mineralogy, and may be followed by Courses 4 and 5, or 9.
Students desiring a more comprehensive beginners' course are advised
to elect Course 2, which serves as the basis for the more advanced
work of the department. Course 17 is designed to give a general
knowledge of gems and gem minerals, and is open to all students, no
previous training in mineralogy or the sciences being necessary. Stu-
dents desiring a more intimate knowledge of gems should also elect
the laboratory work, designated as Course 17a. Students of Chem-
istry and Chemical Engineering are advised to take Courses 2 and 5,
or Courses i, 4, and 5. Course 16 is designed especially for students
of Architecture. A description of all courses offered in this depart-
ment may be found on page 309.

FIRST SEMESTER

I. Elements of Mineralogy. Lectures and Laboratory work. Two
hours. Professor Kraus, Assistant Professor Peck, and Mr.
Slawson.
This course includes the elements of crystallography, ph3rsical
and chemical properties, occurrences, uses, and determination
of the more common minerals. For this course a knowledge
of elementary inorganic chemistry is necessary.



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440 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

2. General Mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work. Ftva hours.
Professors Kraus and Hunt, and Assistant Professor Peck.

Students who have successfully completed Course i may elect this
course as Course 2a and receive three hours credit.

Principles of crystallography, physical and chemical properties,
origin, formation, decomposition, distribution, uses, and deter-
mination of the more important minerals. Prerequisites, Chem-
istry 2 and 3.

4. Determinative Mineralogy. Laboratory work. Two hours. Pro-

fessor Hunt.
Intended for students who have completed Course I and wish
to become more proficient in the determination of minerals by
means of their physical characters.

5. Qualitative Blowpipe Methods. Two hours. Professor Hunt.
This course involves the use of the blowpipe reactions upon char-
coal and plaster tablets, as well as other chemical methods
useful in the determination of minerals. Prerequisites, Course
2 or Courses i and 4 in Mineralogy, or Courses 3a and 36 in
chemistry.

6. Physical Crystallography. Lectures and laboratory work. Four

hours. Three lectures and three hours laboratory work a
week, to be arranged. Professor Kraus, and Assistant Pro-
fessor Peck.

This course involves a critical study of the various properties
of crystals including the use of the poralizing microscope and
other crystallographic-optical instruments. Must be preceded
by Course 2 and, if possible, by Course 3.

Students desiring to study only the optical properties of crystals
may elect this course as ta and receive three hours credit,

9. Lithology. Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours. Profes-
sor Hunt, and Mr. Slawson.
The lectures include, aside from a review of the rock-forming
minerals, a discussion of the origin, modes of occurrence, al-
terations, methods of determination, and uses of the more im-
portant rocks. In the laboratory the student is required to
determine by means of the macro-physical properties a large
number of rock specimens. Field excursions will also be made
in order to acquire facility in the rapid determination of rocks
in the field. Prerequisites, Mineralogy i and Geology I.

10. Petrography. Lectures and laboratory work. Three, four, or
five hours. Professor Hunt.
After reviewing the optical characters and methods of inves-
tigation of crystals, the various properties of the important



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Courses of Instruction 441

rock materials are discassed in detail. The mineralogical and
chemical composition, texture, genesis, forms of occurrence, and
metamorphism of rocks are then studied. The laboratory work
is devoted to the systematic study of rock minerals and rocks
with the aid of the polarizing microscope. Prerequisites, Min-
eralogy 2 or I and 4, 6 or da, and 9.

SECOND SEMESTER

I. Elements of Mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work. Two
hours. Professor Kraus, Assistant Professor Peck, and Mr.
Slawson.

This course includes the elements of cr3rstallography, physical

' and chemical properties, occurrence, uses, and determination

of the more common minerals, and also an introduction to the

use of the polarizing microscope. For this course a knowledge

of elementary inorganic chemistry is necessary.

4. Determinative Mineralogy. Laboratory work. Two hours. Pro-
fessor Hunt, and Mr. Slawson.
Intended for students who have completed Course i and wish
to become more proficient in the determination of minerals by
means of their physical character.

9. Lithology. Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours. Pro-
fessor Hunt.
The lectures include, aside from a review of the rock-forming
minerals, a discussion of the origin, modes of occurrence, alter-
nations, methods of determination, and uses of the more im-
portant rocks. In the laboratory the student is reqiyred to
determine by means of the macro-physical properties a large
number of rock specimens. Field excursions will also be made
in order to acquire facility in the rapid determination of rocks
in the field. Prerequisites, Mineralogy i, and Geology i.

11. Petrography. Lectures and laboratory work. Three, four, or

five hours. Professor Hunt.
This is a continuation of Course lo.

12. Quantitative Blowpipe Methods. Reading and laboratory work.

Two hours. Professor Hunt.
Practice in assaying by blowpipe methods of various kinds of
ores, especially those of gold, silver, copper, and lead. Pre-
requisite, Course 5.

16. Mineralogy and Lithology. Three hours. Professor Hunt, and
Mr. Slawson.
This course is designed especially for students in architecture.
Open to others only by special permission.



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443 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

The first half of the coarse discusses the physical and chemical
properties, uses, and determination of the common rock form-
ing minerals* and of those ores from which the metals and
materials commonly used for building purposes are obtained.
The second half is devoted to a discussion of the origin, modes
of occurrences, description and uses of the common rocks, with
special emphasis upon those used for structural and ornamental
purposes.

For this course a knowledge of elementary inorganic chemistry
is necessary.

17. Gems and Precious Stones. Lectures and demonstrations. Two
hours. Professor Kraus.
This course discusses the general properties, occurrence, deter-
mination, and history of the' various minerals used as gems
and gem minerals. The various methods of distinction, espe-
cially for imitations and ssmthetic gems, will also be considered.
No previous training in mineralogy or the sciences is required,
although an elementary knowledge of chemistry and physics
is highly desirable.

17a. Gems and Precious Stones. Laboratory work. One hour. Pro-
fessor Kraus, and Assistants.
Students are given an opportunity to familiarize themselves with
the various methods used in the scientific determination of
gems and gem minerals. Three hours a week in the laboratory



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