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to be arranged. Must be accompanied or preceded by Course
17.

SUMMER SESSION OF I93I

(See College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.)

MODERN LANGUAGES

Professors Wait and Lee, Assistant Professors Adams, Kenyon, and
WiiJ), Mr. Albaladejo, Mr. Jobin, Mr. Britton, Mr. Gaiss,
Mr. McGuire, Mr. Driscoli., and Mr. Luzunaris.

GERMAN

The aim of the instruction in German is to help the student to
a reading and speaking knowledge of the language. Special atten-
tion is paid to scientific and technical literature. Elective courses
are offered for the accommodation and benefit of students who have
the time and inclination to carry their language work beyond the
limits of the required courses.



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Courses of Instruction 443

BOTH SEMESTEKS

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and reading with constant prac-

tice in writing and speaking German. Four hours,

2. Elementary Course continued. Four hours,

3. Intermediate German. Four hours,

4. German Scientific and Technical Literature. Four hours,

9. German Chemical Reading. Two hours, (First semester only.)
Professor Leb.
This course is equivalent to Chemistry 20.

SUMMER SESSION OF 1 92 1

las. Beginners' Course. Four hours. Professors Winkler and

DiEKHOFF.

FRENCH

The aim of the instruction in French is to help the student to
a reading and speaking knowledge of the language. Elective courses
are offered for the acconunodation and benefit of students who have
the time and inclination to carry their language work beyond the
limits of the required courses.

BOTH semesters

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and reading, with constant prac-

tice in writing and speaking French. Four hours,

2. Elementary Course continued. Four hours.

3. Intermediate French. Four hours,

4. Advanced French. Four hours,

5. Advanced Composition and Conversation. Two hours, Mr.

JOBIN.

This course may be taken only after completing French 4 or its
equivalent.

6. French Literature in English. An outline of the development of

French literature. Lectures, assigned readings, and reports.
Two hours. Assistant Professor Adams.
This course is intended as a general culture course. No knowl-
edge of French is required. Open to students who have com-
pleted the regular language requirements.



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444 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

9. French Chemical Reading. Two hours, (Second semester oftly.)
Equivalent to Chemistry 20a. Professor Lee. (Second semes-
ter only.)

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

is. Beginners' Course. Six hours. Assistant Professor Kenyon.
I. Beginners* Course. Four hours. Professor Wait.

SPANISH

The courses in Spanish are offered chiefly to meet the demands
of students looking forward to a professional career in countries
where Spanish is the prevailing medium of communication.

Opportunity for advanced work in Spanish is offered to students
who desire to make themselves specially proficient in this language.

BOTH SEMESTERS

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and reading, with constant prac-

tice in writing and speaking Spanish. Four hours,

2. Elementary Course continued. Four hours,

3. Reading, Conversation, and Correspondence. Four hours,

4. A Continuation of Course 3. Four hours,

5. Advanced Composition and Conversation. Two hours, Mr.

Albaladejo.
This course may be taken only after completing Spanish 4 or its
equivalent '

6. Spanish Literature in English. An outline of the development

of Spanish literature. Lectures, assigned readings, and re-
ports. Two hours. Assistant Professor Kenyon.
This course is intended as a general culture course. No knowl-
edge of Spanish is required. Open to students who have com-
pleted the regular language requirements.

SUMMER session OF I92I

(See College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.)



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Courses of Instruction 445



NAVAL ARCHITECTURE AND MARINE ENGINEERING

FIRST SEMESTER

I. Naval Architecture. Structural design. Lectures and recita-
tions. One hour. Professor Sadler.

3. Naval Architecture. Stability and rolling of ships and prelim-

inary design. Lectures and recitations. Three hours. Pro-
fessor Sadler.

5. Naval Architecture. Mould loft and structural drawing. Two

hours. Assistant Professor Lindblad.

6. Naval Architecture. Ship drawing and design. Three hours.

Professor Bragg, and Assistant Professor Lindblad.

8. Marine Boilers. Lectures and recitations. One hour. Professor

BRAca

9. Marine Engines. Lectures and recitations. Two hours. Pro-

fessor Bragg.

10. Marine Boiler Design. Three hours. Professor Bragg, and As-

sistant Professor Lindblad.

SECOND semester

a. Naval Architecture. Ship calculations and strength. Lectures
and recitations. Three hours. Professor Bragg.

4. Naval Architecture. Resistance and propulsion of ships, and

screw propellers. Lectures and recitations. Three hours. Pro*
fessor Sadler.

5. Naval Atchitecture. Mould loft and structural drawing. Two

hours. Assistant Professor Lindblad.

7. Naval Architecture. Ship drawing and design. Three hours

Professor Sadler, and Assistant Professor Lindblad.

9. Marine Engines. Lectures and recitations. Two hours. Pro-
fessor Bragg.

11. Marine Engine Design. Two or three hours. Professor Bragg.



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44^ Colleges of Engineering and\ Architecture

BOTH SEMESTERS

Primarily for Graduates.

I a. Experimental Tank Work. OnCy two or three hours. Professors
Sadler and Bragg.

13. Ship and Engine Specifications. One or two hours. Professor

Saolbr.

14. Shipyard Plants. One hour. Professor Sadler.

15. Naval Architecture. Advanced reading. Three hours. Profes-

sor Sadler.

16. Advanced Drawing. Three to five hours. Professor Sadler.

17. Marine Engines. Advanced reading. Three hours. Professor

Bragg.

18. Marine Engines. Advanced drawing and design. Three to five

hours. Professor Bragg.

PHYSICS

Professors Randall, Smith, Henderson, Willums, Colby, Assist-
ant Professors Rich, Sijcatgr, and Lindsay, Dr. Kent, Dr.
Sawyer, Dr. Sheldon, Dr. Fazel, Mr. St. Peter, Mr. Becker,
Mr. Parsons, Mr. Cork, Mr. Geiger, Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Cooley,
Mr. GuNN.

Z. Physics for Admission. This coarse is intended for students who
have not presented the required unit of entrance physics. It
is required for admiission to Courses i and lE. No credit will
be allowed for this course. Four times a week, first semester.
I/ours to be arranged, Mr. Cork.

I. General Physics: Mechanics, Sound and Heat. Lectures and
recitations four times a week, and laboratory work. Both
semesters. Professor Randall, Assistant Professor Rich, Pro-
fessor Colby, and Assistants.

la. Physics Problems, once a week. Both semesters. Assistant Pro-
fessor Sleator.
Students in Architecture i and 2 elect i and la for four hours
credit



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Courses of Instruction 447

I £. Mechanics, Sound and Heat. Lectures, recitations, and labora-
tory work. Fivg hours. Both semesters. Professor Williams,
Assistant Professor Rich, and Assistants.

For Courses i and lE a knowledge of plane trigonometry is
indispensable. No student is admitted to the class who has
not had the preparatory course in Physics.

In Course lE at least half the semester is devoted to elementary
Mechanics; the remainder of the time to Sound and Heat, all
with experimental illustrations. All members of the class have
one period a week in the laboratory.

2. General Physics: Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. Lectures
and recitations, four times a week, and laboratory work. Both
semesters. Professor Randall, Assistant Professor Rich, Pro-
fessor Colby, and Assistants.

2a. Physics Problems, once a week. Both semesters. Assistant Pro-
fessor Sleator.
Students in Architecture i and 2 elect 2 and 2a for four hours
credit

2E. Magnetism, Electricity and Light. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory work. Five hours. Both semesters. Professor
Williams, Assistant Professor Rich, and Assistants.

Course 2E must be preceded by Course lE and by Course 2E
in chemistry or an equivalent. It is a continuation of Course
lE and takes up the fundamental phenomena and laws of
these subjects, with ample class illustrations. Laboratory work
as in Course lE.

Course lE and 2E are required from all engineering students.
Students transferring their credits from the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts will be required to offer Courses i,
la, and 2, 2a, as equivalents of Course lE and 2E.

5E. Electrical Measurements. Lectures and laboratory. Two hours.
Both semesters. Professor Smith.
In the class work Ihe principles of electrical behavior are crit-
ically studied and discussed. The laboratory exercises are de-
signed to illustrate and emphasize these principles and to give
the student some personal experience in the careful use of
electrical measuring instruments. The course includes the mod-
ern methods of measuring current, resistance, electromotive
force, capacity, inductance, and hysteresis of iron, and the cali-
bration of the instruments employed.
Course 5E must be preceded by lE and 2E, or their equivalents.
A knowledge of calculus is also desirable.



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44^ Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

II. Laboratory Work in Heat. Thret hours. First semester. Dr.
Kent.
An experimental course accompanied by lectures, covering the
fundamental principles of heat and the methods of heat meas-
urements. The course will meet the needs of either technical
students, or those specializing in Physics.

14. Electron Theory and Radioactivity. Two hours. Lectures and

laboratory. Professor Smith.
The laboratory work deals largely with radioactive substances.
The distinguishing characteristics of alpha rays, beta rays, and
gamma rays are studied, and the half-life periods of several
substances are determined by each student.

15, 16. Electrochemical Physics. Class and laboratory work. Two

hours. Throughout the year. Professor Henderson.

Course 15 must be preceded by Course 2E in Physics and Course
2E in Chemistry. A course in qualitative analysis is also de-
sirable.

This course is designed, (a) to meet the needs of those prepar-
ing to teach physics and chemistry, (b) to furnish a basis for
the application of electrochemical principles to practical prob-
lems in chemistry and electricity, and (c) to prepare for re-
search in electrochemical physics.

18. Measurement of High Temperatures. Three hours. Second se-
mester. Dr. Kent.
An experimental course accompanied by lectures, covering the
theory and practice of the present methods of high temperature
measurements. The work involves the use of thermocouples,
resistance thermometers, and the modem types of optical and
total radiation p3rrometers. For technical students and those
specializing in Physics.

30. Architectural Acoustics. Two hours. Assistant Professor Rich.
Lectures, with illustrative problems on sound transmission, dis-
tribution, and absorption, and an experimental study of the
acoustical properties of certain rooms.

24. Theory of Light. Two hours. Assistant Professor Lindsay.
The essential phenomena of optics, including interference and

diffraction, dispersion, absorption, polarization, and double re-
fraction.

25. Theory of Heat. Two hours. First semester only. Professor

Randall.
Course 25 must be preceded by Course aE,



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Courses of Instruction 449

27, 38. Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. Three
hours. Throughout the year. Professor Colby.
This course must be preceded by Course 2£. A knowledge of
the calculus is required. It is devoted to a mathematical as
distinguished from an experimental study of electrical phe-
nomena.

^$, Vacuum Tubes in Radio Communication. Two hours. Professor
W1LUAM8.

Lectures and laboratory work. The theory of the transmission
of electricity through gases will be treated in this course, to-
gether with a study of the different types of tubes used in radio
work. The characteristics of such tubes will be determined ex-
perimentally and the electric circuits employed in their use
will receive considerable attention.

Prerequisites: Course 5 in Physics and the Calculus.

37. German Reading. Two hours. First semester. Assistant Pro-
fessor Lbs.

In this course the subject of Physics is studied in German to
acquaint the student with the technical terms used in modern
German physics.

This coarse may be taken only by such students as convince the
instructor of their satisfactory preparation.

Course 37 is continued in the second semester as Course 38,
two hours,

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

Course Z intended for students preparing for entrance to the
College of Engineering, and Courses i, lE, 2, 2E, la, 2a, 5, 5E, 6,
6E, 9, 12, 14, 30, 31, as described for the regular session, will be
offered in the Summer Session of 192 1.

SHOP PRACTICE

All courses in shop practice are under the direction of Professor
AiKEY, Acting Superintendent of Shops. Instruction is given in the
various branches by special shop assistants.

The shop courses consist of actual practice in the shops, together
with class-room recitations for which outside preparation is made
from text-books and oral instruction. Courses i to 4 may be con-
tinued by advanced students as Courses id and 4a. Special arrange-
ments are made for students who desire to take more advanced shop
courses with a view of preparing themselves for teaching these
subjects.



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450 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

BOTH SEMESTERS

1. Wood Shop Practice. Two hours.

2. Forge Shop Practice. Two hours,

3. Foundry Practice. Four hours,

4. Machine Shop Practice. Four hours,

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I '

1. Wood Shop. Two hours, Mr. Yeatman. , , '

2. Forge Shop. Two hours, Mr. Telfer. , ^

3. Foundry. Four hours, Mr. Hastings.

4. Machine Shop. Four hours, Mr. Sweet.

SURVEYINO

Courses i, 3» and 3 are designed primarily for students of Civil
Engineering. Students of Landscape Design are now required to take
these courses and they are frequently elected by others who desire
a thorough training in the elementary theory and practice of survey-
ing. All courses are given on the campus at Ann Arbor, except
Course 3, which embraces the field work at Camp Davis. Course 4 is
offered for the convenience of students who desire a brief course in
the use of instruments. All students of engineering, except those of
the Civil Engineering group, are required to take this course. It is
offered both semesters and daring the summer session. Courses 12
and 13 are designed for students of Forestry. The work prescribed
therein runs parallel to Courses i and a in so far as possible. When
students have completed Courses 12 and 13 they are qualified to elect
Course 3.

Course 3 is given during the regular summer session, beginning
soon after the first of July and ending a few days after the 20th of
August. The camp is conducted on a practical basis and the methods
employed are such as are generally applied in the field. The student
is able to secure different work for practically every day of the ses-
sion, however, so that the training obtained is more varied than an
engineer would receive in a period covering many years of actual serv-
ice in the field. The exercises embrace railroad surveys, triangulation
surveys, sounding work, earthwork, azimuth observations and com-
putations, adjustments of instruments, stadia surveys, canal surveys,
the measurement of base lines, office work, etc.

Students cannot successfully carry the elementary courses in sur-
veying until they have completed a thorough course in plane trigo*



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Courses of Instruction 451

nometry. The student has less difficulty after he has completed
courses in analytic geometry and higher algebra. A knowledge of
physics and calculus is helpful. Course 3E Astronomy should precede
Course 3.

1. Elementary Surveying. Lectures. Text-book and field practice.

Three hours. Four sections. Professors Johnston, Merrick,
and Carey, Assistant Professors Brodie, Bouchard, and
Mitchell, and Mr. McFarlan.
Course i is given only during the first semester, field work be-
ing prosecuted until about the first of December.

2. Continuation of Course i. Four hours. Course 2 is given dur-

ing the second semester only.

3. Summer Work at Camp Davis, described above.

BOTH SEMESTERS

4. Use of Instruments. Four sections. Two hours.
Course 4 is also offered during the summer session.

5. Least Squares. Two hours. Professor Johnston.

6. Geodesy. Lectures. Reading. Three hours. Professor John-

ston.

7. Municipal Surveying. Two hours. Assistant Professor Bouch-

ard.

8. The Surveyor and the Public. Two hours. Professor Johnston.

[9. Railwiay Surveying. One hour. Associate Professor Merrick.
Omitted in 1918-1919.]

10. Engineering Photography. Two hours. Assistant Professor
Brodie.

12. Surveying and Drawing, Elementary, for Students of Forestry.

Four hours. Associate Professor Carey. First semester only.

13. Continuation of Course 12, for Students of Forestry. Four hours.

Associate Professor Carey. Second semester only.

summer session of 192 1

Course 4 is offered at Ann Arbor, and Course 3 at Camp Davis,
Douglas Lake, Cheboygan County. Professor C. T. Johnston, and
Assistant Professor Bouchard.



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452 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE



EQUIPMENT

The College of Architecture is housed in commodious quarters
on the main floor of the Engineering building, inunediately adjoin-
ing the library. The drafting rooms are well lighted and provided
with drafting tables of special design. On the walls are hung a
number of valuable original competition and measured drawings.
The free-hand drawing room is situated on the top floor at the north
end of the Engineering building. It is about sixty feet square, is
lighted by means of windows and a north skylight, and is fully
equipped for the instruction in free-hand drawing, pen and ink, water
color, and drawing from life. There is a comprehensive collection of
plaster casts of decorative and architectural form, pottery and textiles
for painting from still life and several original drawings in pencil,
color and pencil, pen and ink by D. A. Gregg, H. G. Ripley, and
others. The architectural library is housed with the engineering
library. It consists of a large amount of carefully selected reference
and illustrative materials, and is made up of the standard books,
about 1, 800 volumes, portfolios of plates, photographs, and about
10,000 lantern slides. The leading architectural journals are also
kept on flle.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Three four-year curricula or programs of study are offered. In
each of these provision is made for the essentials of a liberal educa*
tion, — ^language, mathematics, science, and flne arts — for cultural
electives, and for as much specific training in drawing, architectural
design and history, construction, and building equipment as seems
permissible during a period of four years.

Program I provides a general curriculum; in Program II, archi-
tectural design receives greater emphasis; while in Program III, ad-
vanced construction and the mechanical equipment of buildings are
given a relatively large amount of time, particularly during the
fourth year. The first year is practically identical for the four-year
programs while the students in all these groups share the same classes
in architecture during the first three years.

There is also a two-year program for special students, open under
certain conditions to experienced architectural draftsmen; college
graduates may also enter as special students.

A certificate is awarded upon the completion of the two-year
program.



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Courses of Instruction 453

SCHOLARSHIPS IN ARCHITECTURE

There are at present two scholarships for students of architec-
ture, intended primarily for those just entering college. Preference
is given to experienced architectural draftsmen and to students show-
ing artistic ability.

NATURE OF COURSES

Architectural Design. — In the courses in Architectural Design
the students work out, in the drafting room, designs for a great
Variety of buildings, ranging from a small house to large public
buildings, problems of a practical character being interspersed with
more ideal ones. The aim throughout these courses, of which there
are eight offered, is to develop the imagination, creative power, abil-
ity t6 work out the organism of a building and skill in the clear and
artistic presentation of the drawings.

The courses in Architectural Design are grouped as follows:
Courses 4 and 5, Elementary Design; Courses 6 and 7, Intermediate
Design; Courses 8, 9, and 10, Advanced Design; Courses 30 and 31,
Graduate Design. Students must complete the requirements of one
group before proceeding to the next. Students of average ability
are able to complete this work in the usual number of years while
those of unusual ability may do so in a shorter period.

In the course in Allied Arts of Design, designs are made for a
piece of furniture, decorative glass, metal, and mosaic and of other
objects or features commonly used in connection with architecture.

Architectural Construction. — The work in construction continues
through three years and is conducted by means of lectures, quizzes,
text-books, visits to buildings, and the preparation of working draw-
ings. The character of building materials, their practical and artistic
possibilities and the methods of present building practice are studied.
The drawing work of the courses in construction begins with the
making of working drawings of a small building. This includes
the framing plans of the floors, walls, and roof, and full-size details
of some essential portions. This is followed by the working draw-
ings for a larger building of heavy construction and involves foun-
dations, masonry walls, piers, columns, floors, roof, and details. This
in turn, is fpUowed by steel and re-inforced concrete construction,
in the course of which girders, columns, trusses, and other structural
work of a high, fire-proof building are designed. A course in the
testing of materials is given in the senior year. Specifications are
discussed in connection with the work in construction.

The courses in structural mechanics, strength and resistance of
materials, testing of materials, and advanced construction or struc-
tural design are studied under specialists and given partly by the
College of Architecture and partly by the departments of Engineering
Mechanics and Civil Engineering.



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454 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

Heating and Ventilation, — The course in heating and ventila-
tion of buildings is given by the department of Mechanical Engi-
neering.

Building Sanitation, — In this course in Building Sanitation the
principles are studied which should guide the design and installation
of drainage and pumping systems.

History of Architecture, — In these courses the technical and
artistic development of the art of building is traced from earliest
times to the present day. The causes and influencei which helped
mould the various modes of building are analyzed and wherever pos-
sible demonstrated by means of the stereopticon. Many of the impor-
tant buildings of the world are fully illustrated and critically studied,
the student thus gaining an appreciation of the finest achievements of
his art. Not only are the buildings studied in their larger aspects, but
also in many of their details of construction, form, and detalL His-
toric ornament is taken up with the architecture of the various periods,
as also are decorative sculpture and color.

In addition to the above all architectural students elect one or
more courses in the history of art given by the department of Fine
Arts in order to acquaint them with the development and master-
pieces of painting and sculpture.

Free-hatid Drawing, — Pen and Ink Rendering; Water Color
Painting, — Considerable attention is devoted to free-hand drawing by
students of Architecture. They begin drawing from simple geo-
metrical solids involving the accurate representation of form in line
and light and shade; simple decorative, natural and architectural,
forms are next drawn, after which portions of the figures, the haAd,
foot, head, etc., are drawn from cast (Elementary Antique) ; then
the entire figure is drawn from cast (Advanced Antique), after the
satisfactory completion of which follows drawing from the living



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 40 of 75)