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model.

Throughout this discipline, in the observation and artistic rep-
resentation of line, form, proportion, light and shade, the aim is to
develop in the student the power of free artistic expression. The
student is advanced as rapidly as his progress warrants. The pencil,
charcoal, and monochrome wash are used. A special course is pro-
vided for Architectural students in rendering in pen and ink. The
instruction considers the character of such drawings necessary for
reproduction. A course in painting in water color from still life is
also required of students in Architecture, but may not be taken with-
out first completing Courses 21 and 33 in Drawing, or their equiva-
lent. Rendering in wash and color is carried on throughout the
courses in design.



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Courses of Instruction 455

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Architecture

To earn the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architecture, the
student must secure one hundred and forty hours of credit* in a
prescribed curriculum, as given below, four hours of which must be
earned by four months' practical experience in an architect's office.
A time limit is not set, but four years are usually needed for the
work required for the degree.

Candidates for degrees in Architecture and in Architectural En-
gineering enroll in the College of Architecture upon entering the Uni-
versity. They elect one of the three four-year programs of study,
which are substantially identical for the first year.

Hours Credit Required in the Three Four- Year Programs and

IN THE Two- Year Program for Special Students in

Architecture

One hour of credit represents ordinarily about three hours of
actual work during each week of one semester.

Architecture: I II III Spl.

Elements of design 3 3 3

Architectural design 31 37 17 23

Allied arts design 3 3

History of architecture 8 8 6 8

Office work 4 4 4

Construction :

Structural mechanics 6 6 7

Roofs and bridges, and framed structures . . . . 5

Construction (elementary) 2 a 2 2

Structural design (steel) 5 5 2

Masonry and reinforced concrete 4 4 5

Testing materials 2

CHiemistry of materials 3

Surveying 2

Building Equipment:

Building sanitation i i i i

Heating and ventilation 2 2 2 2

Heat engines 4

* One credit hour indicates for each week during one semester one
recitation or lecture with two hours of preparation or three hours of drawing
or laboratory work.



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45^ Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

Drawing :

Free-hand drawing lo lo 6 6

Water-color painting 3 2 .. a

Descriptive geometry and shades and

shadows 3 3 3 i

Perspective and stereotomy 2 2 2 2

Science :

Mathematics 13 4 18

Physics 4 4 10

Acoustics 2 2

Chemistry 5

Geology or Mineralogy 3 3 3

Language :

English 6 6 6

French or German 12 12 12

General :

Business Administration 3 3

History of art 3 3 . . 3

Landscape Design 3

Cultural and free electives 8 8 10 10

140 140 140 66

ARCHITECTURE

Architectural Design

In the following courses in Architectural Design problems are
assigned to be worked out in the drafting-room. Lectures are given
from time to time bearing on the type of building then being de-
signed. Study of the requirements of various classes of buildings
and of the artistic possibilities of building materials, training of the
student in composition in plan, section, elevation and perspective, in
accurate draftsmanship and rendering in line, black-and-white, and
color.

Courses 4 and 10 inclusive constitute a progressive series of prob-
lems in architectural planning and design, advancing from the small
building to the more important classes of buildings and to the group
problem. The courses must be taken in the order given.

FIRST semester

I. Elements of Design. Three hours. Assistant Professors Ben-
nett and LooMis.
An introductory course to the field of artistic design, decorative
and architectural. Principles of design, and the possibilities in



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Courses of Instruction 457

design of line, color and form. Architectural elements, their
function and form ; the influence of material. The pier, lintel,
arch, wall, openings; the plan and roof.
Methods of indication; rendering, lettering. Drawing exercises
and lectures. This course or its equivalent must precede all
architectural design courses. It should be accompanied or pre-
ceded by Drawing 4a and 21.

4. Architectural Design.. Threi hours, Mr. 0*Dell.

A continuation of Course I ; the orders and simple problems in

design. Illustrated lectures and drawing exercises.
Course 4 must be preceded by Course i, Drawing ^ and 21.

5. Architectural Design. Four hours. Professor Boynton.

The small ensemble. Course 5 should be preceded by Drawing
5a and 22, and by Courses 4 and 21 in Architecture.

6. Architectural Design. Four hours. Assistant Professor Loomis.
This course, a continuation of Course 5, should be preceded by

Architecture 5 and 32.

7. Architectural Design. Six hours. Profes^r Rousseau.
Plan problems.

This course must be preceded by Architecture 6.

8. Architectural Design. Six hours. Professor Rousseau.
Plan problems.

This course must be preceded by Architecture 7.

9. Architectural Design. Six hours. Professor Rousseau.
Advanced plan problems.

This course must be preceded by Architecture 8.

10. Architectural Design. Eight hours. Professor Rousseau.
Advanced plan problems.
This course must be preceded by Architecture 8 or 9.

30. Architectural Design. Hours to be arranged. Professor Rous-
seau.
Special problems in planning and design. Must be preceded by
the equivalent of Architecture 10.

Technical and Historical Deyelopment of Architecture
and Design

For students in Architecture, Courses 12, 13, and 14 assume some
knowledge of history, drawing, and design; they should be elected
in the order given. The purpose of these courses is to study the his-
torical conditions, building materials and methods, planning and de-



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45^ Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

sign, as well as the sculptured and painted decoration and ornament
of the mort important and significant works of architecture. The
courses are carried on by means of illustrated lectures, conferences,
drawing exercises and research.

13. Gothic, Renaissance and Modern Architecture. Three hours.

Professor Lorch.
Should be preceded by Architecture la.
The Gk)thic, Renaissance and Modem .Architecture of European

countries, and Architecture in the United States.

14. Architectural History Research. Two hours. Professor Lorch.
Must be preceded by Courses la and 13 and one year of archi-
tectural design.

An intensive study of the architecture of a specific period or
country, and the making of one or more designs embodying the
results of this study.

[15. General Course in the History of Architecture. Two hours.

The aim of this course is to give students seeking a liberal cul-
ture a survey of the development of the art of building. The
temples, cathedrals, palaces and other characteristic monuments
of the ancient, medieval, renaissance and modem styles* their
design, sculpture and painted decorations will be studied by
means of lectures illustrated by the stereppticon, and collaterid
reading. This course is open to all students in the University,
but cannot be counted towards graduation in architecture.

For students of art and archaeology desiring a more intensive
study of the technical and historical development of architec-
ture. Courses 11, la, 13, and 14 are recommended. Omitted in
i9i9-i9ao.]

18. Architectural Composition. One hour.

This course supplements the courses in architectural design by
a series of illustrated lectures.

33. Architectural History. Professor Lorch.

A thesis on the architectural work of a period or on a particular
monument Must be preceded by the equivalent of Architec-
ture 13, 13. and 14-

Bttilding Construction and Equipment

19. Architectural Mechanics. Three hours. Assistant Professor

Newman.
The principle of equilibrium. Analysis of stresses in simple
frames by graphic and algebraic methods. Must be preceded
by Mathematics lE and Physics I.



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Courses of Instruction 459

JO. Architectural Mechanics. Advanced Problems in Statics. Strength
of Materials. Three hours. Professor McConkey.
Must be preceded by Architecture 19.

24. Building Sanitation. One hour. Professor McConkey.

Plumbing and Drainage. A study of materials, fixtures, meth-
ods of assembling and modes of arrangement. Lectures and
drawing.

Prerequisites: Architecture 4 and 21.

23. Steel and Fireproof Construction. Three hours. Assistant Pro-
fessor Newman.

Must be preceded by Architecture 19 and 20, or for students in
Program III, Engineering Mechanics i and 2.

Lectures, problems, notes and assigned reading on building ma-
terials and methods of construction, with particular reference
to steel and enclosing and protection materials against fire and
other destructive elements. Design of columns, beams, plate
girders, and trusses; specifications and estimates.

23. Structural Design: Steel. Two hours. Assistant Professor
Newkan.
Must be preceded or accompanied by Architecture 22.
Working drawings and details of a steel-frame building.

26. Masonry and Reinforced Concrete. Two hours. Professor Mc-

Conkey.

Must be preceded by Architecture 19 and 20.

Lectures, problems, text and assigned reading on building ma-
terials and methods of construction, with particular reference
to reinforced concrete. Brick, stone, terra cotta, cements and
waterproofing are also considered; specifications and estimates.

27. Structural Design: Masonry. Two hours. First semester. Pro-

fessor McConkey.
Must be accompanied by Architecture 26.
The design of foundations, columns, slabs, beams and girders of

various t3rpes, as used in buildings.

35. Structural Design. Special problems in building construction.
Four hours. Assistant Professor Newman.
Must be preceded by equivalent of Architecture 22, 23, 26, and
27, or C. E. 2, 2fl, and 3.

Drawing and Painting

The aim of the instruction in free-hand drawing and in painting
is to teach accurate observation of form, proportions, light and shade,
and color, and their artistic representation and interpretation, both as



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460 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

a matter of general education and as part of a more specific training
for teaching or in pictorial or decorative art, or in architecture.

For the general student Courses 21, 22, and 24, will give an ele-
mentary training in drawing and painting. Course 30 provides more
advanced work in painting; Courses 25, 26, and 27, more advanced
training in drawing. Course 23 is a special course in the drawing
of ornament for students of architecture and decoration, while Course
35 is primarily for architectural students, although open to others.
Outdoor sketching and painting can best be studied during the sum-
mer session.

At present there are no classes in portrait painting nor painting
from the costume model, but such instruction can, under certain con-
ditions, be arranged for groups of students who have adequate ad-
vanced preparation.

The drawing is done in pencil, crayon, charcoal, and pen and
ink from various kinds of objects and models including ancient, me-
dieval, Renaissance, and modern ornament and sculpture. Rapid
sketching from the figure is carried on as part of Courses 27 and 28
to stimulate indication of essentials.

The painting is done mostly in water colors, although non-archi-
tectural students may paint in oil.

Still-life painting in water color or oil, cannot be studied profit-
ably without some preliminary training in free-hand drawing (Draw-
ing 21 and 22). For drawing from the living model some prelim-
inary training is required from the antique (Drawing 25 and 26).

All the courses are given both semesters and instruction is given
in Courses 21 to 26 inclusive every morning and afternoon. The
hours for these and other courses are shown in the classification
pamphlet of the Colleges of Engineering and Architecture published
at the beginning of each semester.

In general six hours class work per week for a semester are re-
quired for a two-hour credit course. A given course must be elected
with a single instructor and in periods of not les^ than two hours
consecutively.

Advancement in all these courses is individual, depending on the
progress made by the student and determined largely by work done
without criticism. Advanced standing may be had as in other sub-
jects on the basis of satisfactory work done elsewhere. Drawings
should be brought to help determine the student^s standing, also letters
or certificates from the institution attended.

The following courses are open to others as well as architectural
students. The courses are to be elected as Drawing 21, 22, etc., and
in the order given.

21. Free-Hand Drawing. T700 hours. Mr. Makiei.ski, Mr. O'Dell,
and Miss Heller.
Drawing from simple forms in line and light and shade*



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Courses of Instruction 461

33. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours, Mr. Makielski, Mr. Barnes,
Mr. O'Dell, and Miss Heller.
Drawing from simple decorative forms, natural and architec-
tural.

33. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours. Mr. Barnes.
Drawing from decorative forms and portions of the figure.

34. Water Color Painting. Two hours. Mr. Barnes.
Painting from still life.

35 and 26. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours each. Mr. Makielski.
Drawing from the full figure.

27 and 38. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours each. Mr. Makielski.
Drawing from life.

Admission to these courses is limited to those who have satis-
factorily completed the preceding courses or their equivalent.

30. Water Color Painting. Two hours. Mr. Makielski, and Mr.
Barnes.
Painting in water color from still life. This course must be
preceded by Drawing 34.

[33. Clay Modeling. Two hours.
Omitted in 1919-1920.]

35. Pen and Ink. One or two hours. Mr. Barnes.

For regular students of architecture this course must be preceded
by 0>urses 4^1^ 3I, 23, and 23 in Drawing and Architecture 5.
Students not registered in Architecture should have the equiv-
alent of six credit hours in free-hand drawing before elect-
ing it.

SECOND semester

Architectural Design

In the following courses in Architectural Design problems are
assigned to be worked out in the drafting-room. Lectures are given
from time to time bearing on the type of building then being de-
signed. Study of the requirements of various classes of buildings
and of the artistic possibilities of building materials; training of the
student in composition in plan, section, elevation, and perspective, in
accurate draftsmanship and rendering in line, wash, and color.

Courses 4 to 10 inclusive constitute a progressive series of prob-
lems in architectural planning and design, advancing from the small
building to the more important classes of buildings and to the group
problem. The courses must be taken in the order given.



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462 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

I. Elements of Design. Tkrea hours. Assistant Professor Looiiis.

4. Architectural Design. Thrte hours. Assistant Professor Ben-

NETr, and Mr. O'Dell.
The orders and problems in which they are employed. This
course must be preceded by Drawing 4a, Drawing ai, and
Architecture I.

5. Architectural Design. Four hours. Professor Boynton.

The small ensemble. Course 5 should be preceded by Drawing
Sa, and 22, and by Courses 4 and 21 in Architecture.

6. Architectural Design. Four hours. Assistant Professor Loom is.
This course is a continuation of Course 5, and must be preceded

by it and by Architecture 32.

7. Architectural Design. Six hours. Professor Rousseau. Plan

problems.
This coarse must be preceded by Coarse 6.

8. Architectural Design. Six hours. Professor Rousseau. Plan

problems.
This course must be preceded by Course 7.

9. ID. Architfjctural Design. Eight hours. Professor Rousseau.

Advanced plan problems.
These courses must be preceded by Course 8.

12. Ancient and Medieval Architecture. Three hours. Second se-
mester. Professor Lorch.

Should be preceded by Drawing 21 and accompanied by Archi-
tecture 4.

The architecture of Egypt, Assyria, Persia, Greece, and Rome
and a survey of the subsequent architectural development to
Gothic architecture.

17. The Allied Arts of Design. Lectures, research, and exercises in
design. Three hours. Professor Lorch.
Ornament, mural painting, decorative sculpture, furniture, metal
work, glass, ceramics, and textiles.

Building Construction and Equipment

19. Architectural Mechanics. Statics. Stresses in Simple Trusses.

Three hours. Assistant Professor Newman.

20. Architectural Mechanics. Advanced Problems in Statics. Strength

of Materials. Three hours. Professor McConkey.
Must be preceded by Architecture 19 and accompanied by labora-
tory tests.



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Courses of Instruction 463

21. Wood Construction. Lectures, conferences, text-books, drawings,

and visits to buildings. Two hours. Professor McConkey.
Building materials and processes; primarily wood construction;
working drawings.

22. Steel and Fireproof Construction. Three hours. Professor Mc-

Conkey.

Must be preceded by Architecture 19 and 20.

Lectures, problems, notes and assigned reading on building ma-
terials and methods of construction, with particular reference
to steel and enclosing and protection materials against fire and
other destructive elements. Design of columns, beams, plate
girdeifs. and trusses; specifications and estimates.

22fl. Steel and Fireproof Construction. Three hours. Assistant Pro-
fessor Newman.
Same as Architecture 22 but especially arranged for students in
Program III in Architecture.

23. Structural Design: SteeL Two hours.
Must be accompanied by Architecture 22.

Working drawings and details of a steel-frame building.

2$a, Structural Design : Steel. Two hours, ' Assistant Professor
Newman.
Same as Architecture 23, but especially arranged for students in
Program III in Architecture.

25. Building Details. Two hours. Professor Boynton.
Must be preceded by Architecture 6, 21, and 22.
The purpose of this course is to give some specific training in
detailing portions of buildings. Scale and full-size details.

35. Structural Design. Special problems in building construction.
Hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor Newman.
Must be preceded by equivalent of Architecture 22, 23, 26 and
27, or C E. 2, 2a, and 3.

Free-Hand Drawing and Painting

These courses are required of architectural students, but may be
elected by others.

21 and 22. Elementary Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours, Mr. Ma-
KiEi.SKi, Mr. Barnes, Mr. 0*Dell, and Miss Heller.

23. Drawing of Decorative Form. Two hours, Mr. Barnes.

24. Painting in Water Color from Still Life. Two hours, Mr.

Barnes.



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464 Colleges of Engineering and Architecture

25 and a6. Drawing from the Antique. Two hours. Mr. Makielski.
27 and 28. Drawing from Life. Two hours. Mr. Makielski.
35. Pen and Ink. One and two hours. Mr. Barnes.

SUMMER session OF I92I

4. Study of the Orders. Three hours. Professor Rousseau.

5. Elementary Architectural Design. Three hours. Professor

Rousseau.

7. Intermediate Architectural Design. Credit to be arranged. Pro-
fessor Rousseau.

9. Advanced Architectural Design. Credit to be arranged. Pro-
fessor Rousseau.

A. Free-Hand Drawing in Charcoal, and Painting in Water-Color.
Two hours. Mr. Slusser.

Arts Course for Supervisors, Art Instructors, Grade Teachers,
School Principals. Credit to be arranged. Miss Grattan.

This course will include nature study, industrial art, object draw-
ing, construction, poster designing, costume designing, interior
decoration, and home planning and landscape gardening.



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Medical School



A special ennouncement giving further information in regard to
this School is fublished annually. For copies of this Announcement,
or for other information relating to the School, address Dr. Charles
W, Edmunds, Assistant Dean of the Medical School, Ann Arbor,
Michigan,



The Medical School, for which provision was made in the legis-
lative act by which the University was organized in 1837, was opened
for students in 1850. The college year was lengthened from six to
nine months in 1877. The course was lengthened to three years in
1880, and to four years in 1890.

The academic year extends from Tuesday, September 37, 192 1,
to Monday, June 19, 1922. The lectures continue until early in June.
The examinations are then begun, and concluded in time for the Com-
mencement exercises.

For the summer session of this School, see a subsequent chapter.



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

The following will be admitted to the Medical School as candi-
dates for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine :

I. Graduates of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
of this University, or of collegiate departments of other universities,
or of approved colleges and scientific schools, provided they present
credentials showing that they have had two years of Latin, two years
of either French or German (one of which must have been taken in
college), and one year each of collegiate work in Biology (Zoology
and Botany), Chemistry (including Organic Chemistry) and Physics
(including laboratory). Applicants holding graduate degrees, name-
ly, A.M., M.S., Ph.D., and D.Sc., are subject to the same regulations.

IT. Students registered on the combined curriculum in Letters
and Medicine, offered in this University, and who have followed this
curriculum as outlined, may enroll in the Medical School after having
obtained 67 hours (B.S. and M.D. degrees) in the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, or 90 hours (A.B. and M.D. degrees), if
they meet the other requirements. (See Combined Curriculum in Let-
ters and Medicine).



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466 Medical School



III. Matriculate candidates for the bachelor^s degree (a) of the
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts of this University, and
(b) of the collegiate department of other universities, and of ap-
proved colleges and scientific schools, who can present evidence of be-
ing graduates of an approved high school, and in addition thereto
can bring from the Dean of the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts of this University a statement showing that they have com-
pleted the equivalent of 60 hours of credit in that College will be
admitted in case their credentials show that they have covered the
subjects named under I.

In order to meet the requirements in Latin the applicant should
have covered Latin grammar and at least four books of Caesar or
their equivalent

No student therefore will be admitted to the school who has not
completed two years of college work, in addition to graduating from
an approved High School, or its equivalent, and no entrance condi-
tions will be allowed.

Standard of Scholaraliip Required for Admission to the
Medical School

Students enrolled in the College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts of this University who desire to enter the Medical School must
present credentials showing not only a minimum of two years of
college credit, 60 hours, (including the specific subjects required for
admission to the school), but also furnish evidence of an average
scholarship for the two years of at least a "C" grade. In addition
they must not be on the "Warned" or "Probation" list during the
final semester in that College.

Students coming from other institutions not employing a similar
grading system will be required to furnish a recommendation from
the proper authority in the school from which they come.

COMBINED CURRICULA IN LETTERS AND MEDICINE
A3. AND M.D.

Students desiring to obtain the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in
the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the Doctor of
Medicine in the Medical School, may, by enrolling in the Combined
Curriculum in Letters and Medicine, shorten from eight years to seven
the time required to earn the two degrees. This privilege is open only
to students who throughout their course maintain a* uniform record
of good scholarship. The work is under the direction of a Commit-
tee of five members representing the College of Literature, Sciemce,
and the Arts, and the Medical School. With the consent of the Com-
mittee in charge, a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, who



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 41 of 75)