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has been a student in the College of Literature, ^ience, and the



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Requirements for Admission 467

Arts for at least one year and has 90 or more hours to his credit,
of which at least 30 hours have been earned in the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, of this University, may enroll upon the
combined curriculum ; that is, while continuing his registration in the
College he may also register in the Medical School, provided the work
he has already completed includes a sufficient number of the courses
enumerated below to enable him to complete within one year the
specified requirements described in the following paragraphs.

All students desiring to enter upon the Combined Curriculum
must, before May 15 of the year preceding the double registration,
file with the Registrar of the College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, on a blank to be obtained from him, a petition to be granted
that privilege.

When the student so registered in the College and School has
completed the first year of the Medical curriculum, and not less than
90 hours in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, he will
be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, provided he has
completed the requirements for graduation from the latter college.
(See page 138), and provided his work has included the following
courses :

Rhetoric, 6 hours, including Courses i and 2.

French and German, 16 hours of either one, and 8 hours of the
other.

English, 6 hours.

Psychology, 6 hours..

Electives from Group III, la hours, unless excused in part by
the Committee.

Physics, 8 hours, including two hours of laboratory work, and
exclusive of Physics Z. Plane Trigonometry and a unit of
preparatory Physics arc prerequisite for this work.

Chemistry, General, Qualitative, and Organic, 12 hours for stu-
dents presenting Chemistry for entrance, otherwise 16 hours.

Zoology, 10 hours.

Botany, 4 hours.

Total, 90 hours.

Suggested electives: Latin or Elementary Greek, 8 hours; His-
tory, or ' Economics, or Philosophy, 8 hours ; Qualitative Analysis,
4 hours ; Organic Chemistry, 5 hours.

B.S. (IN MED.) AND M.D.

Students who so desire, may obtain the Degrees of Bachelor of
Science in Medicine and Doctor of Medicine in six calendar years by
complying with the requirements above set forth, except that they
must complete the first and second years of the medical curriculum
and that the credit required from the College of Literature, Science,



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468 Medical School



and the Arts instead of 90 hours, shall be 67 hoors before they may
enroll upon the Combined Curriculum and 75 hours before they re-
ceive the B.S. (in Med.) degree, and shall include the following
courses :

Rhetoric, 6 hours, including Courses i and a.

French or German, 16 hours of one.

Electives from Group III, la hours.

Physics, 8 hours, including two hours of laboratory work. Plane
Trigonometry and a unit of preparatory Physics are pre-
requisite for this work.

Chemistry, General, Qualitative, and Organic, 13 hours for stu-
dents presenting Chemistry for entrance, otherwise 16 hours.

Zoology, 4 hours.

Botany, 4 hours.

Total, 75 hours.

Electives are' suggested from the courses before mentioned.

Students taking the six-year course will ordinarily need to attend
the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts two and one-half
years, or two years and two summer sessions. Those whose scholar-
ship is sufficiently high may apply for admission to elect a limited
number of extra hours.



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING

The applicant must have studied as a matriculated medical stu-
dent, in an approved medical school for a period of time at least
equal to that already spent by the class which he seeks to enter. He
must present credentials showing that he has satisfactorily completed
courses equivalent in amount and character to those given in this
school, in the year or years preceding that to which he seeks admis-
sion and must pass examinations at the beginning of the session in
all the subjects that have already been pursued by the class which he
desires to enter. Certificates of standing should be presented, but
these cannot be accepted in place of these examinations.



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

The regular curriculum covers four years of nine months each.
The first two years are devoted to the more fundamental scientific
courses which serve as a basis for the technical and clinical studies
which follow. Nearly the entire time of the first year is devoted to
laboratory work. The forenoons of the remaining three years are
devoted mainly to lectures and recitations, two or three each day; the



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Courses of Instruction 469

afternoons to laboratory work, to clinical demonstration courses, and
to clinics.

The following brief description show the character and extent
of the instruction given in the several branches during the current
year, and indicate the order in which the different portions of the
course are studied. Further details are given in the Special An-
nouncement of the School.

ANATOMY

I. Systematic Course in Gross Human Anatomy. The course is
repeated in periods of about twelve weeks each. October to
December, January to April. Daily, afternoons, I :oo to 5 :oo.

itf. Systematic Course in the Anatomy of the upper part of the
body, including the head, neck, thorax, and upp>er extremities.
Six hours,

lb. Systematic Course in the Anatomy of the lower part of the body,
including the abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities. Six hours.
Recitations for each section three hours weekly. Professor Mc-
CoTTER, and Assistants.

a. Embryology, Histogenesis, General Histology, Organology, and
Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs and Nervous System.
Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Daily, 8 to 12,
Saturday included, October to end of February. Professor
HuBBR, Assistant Professor Snyder, and Assistants.

2a, General Embryology, General Histology, and Histogenesis, and
the Structure of the Elementary Tissues. Six weeks,

2b, Organology, including the development of the organs. About
six weeks.

2c. Gross and Microscopic Anatomy of the Central Nervous System
and Special Sense Organs. Six weeks.

3. Lectures, Recitations, and Laboratory Work in Human Anatomy
for Dental Students. Fourteen weeks, March to June. Daily,
I to 5. Saturday included. Eight hours. Professor McCoT-
TER, and Assistants.

5. Lectures, Recitations, and Laboratory Work in Embryology and
Histology for Dental Students. Twelve weeks, March to June.
Two sections, each working three half days a week, i to 5.
Saturday, 8 to 12. Professor IIubkr. Assistant Professor
SxYDER, and Assistants.



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470 Medical School



5. Regional and Topographic Anatomy, based on frozen sections*

with Lectures and Demonstrations correlating developmental
microscopic and gross Anatomy. Eight weeks, April to June,
8 to II daily. Professors Huder and McCotter, Dr. Guild,
and Assistants.

6. Surgical and Applied Anatomy. Second semester. One hour.

Professor Cabot.

7. Anatomy of Special Regions. Open to Graduates in Medicine

and Undergraduates who have completed Course I. Hours to
be arranged with the Instructor in charge. Professor Mc-

COTTlSR.

8. Histology and Embryological Technique. Professor Hub£R, and

Assistants

9. Advance Course in Mammalian Embryology, Histogenesis, and

Histology. Professor Hubkr.

10. Comparative Vertebrate Neurology. Professor McCotter.

11. Advance Course in the Development and Microscopic Anatomy

of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System, Human and
Comparative. Professor Huber.

12. Research in Vertebrate Histology, Embryology, Anatomy of the

Nervous System, Gross Anatomy, Human and Comparafive.
Professors Huber and McCotter.

SUMMER SESSION OF igil

I. Laboratory Work in Human Anatomy. Professor McCotter,
and Dr. Guild.

3. Regional end Topographic Anatomy. Professor McCotter, and
Dr. Guild.

3. Embryology and Histology. Professor Huber, and Drs. Snyder
and Thompson.

Bacterit^osgr ^

(See under Hygiene.) 4

DERMATOLOGY AND STPHILOLOGT

1. Clinical lectures and conferences, one and one-half hours a week.

Fourth year. Professor Wile.

2. Histopathology of the more common cutaneous disorders. Six-

teen hours in the second semester. Dr. Marshall.



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Coursis of InsirucHon 471

3. Recitations, clinic, and lantern slide demonstration, one hour a

week, second semester. Third year. Professor WiLi.

4. Dermatology and Syphilology. Section work. Professor Wile,

and Assistants.

HYGIENE, BACTERIOLOGY, AND PHYSIOLOGICAL
CHEMISTRY

I. General Hygiene. Lectures. Three times a week, second se-
mester, second year. Professor Vaughan.
This course is open to non-medical students.

la. General Hygiene. Lectures. Four times a week, second semes-
ter. Professor Vauohan.

3. General Bacteriology. Lectures and quizzes. Daily, second se-
mester, first year. Professor Now.

3. Practical Bacteriology. Laboratory work and recitations. After-

noons for twelve weeks, beginning early in March, first year.
Professor Now, and Assistant Professor Hadley.
This course is open only to students of this School.

3tf. Practical Bacteriology. The same as Course 3, but open to stu-
dents other than those eligible to Course 3. December to
March. Professor Now^, and Assistant Professor Hadley.

^d. Practical Bacteriology. For Dental students only. Eight weeks.
I to 6, beginning the first week in October. Assistant Professor
Hadley.

3tf. Practical Bacteriology. M, W, F, 1-6, daring the second half
of the first semester. Open only to students of Sanitary Engi-
neering. Assistant Professor Hadley.

3/. Practical Bacteriology. This begins about December 1st and
continues until die end of the semester. It is open to non-med-
ical students and covers the same ground as 3d, Daily, i to 6
p. If. Three hours. Professor NovY, and Assistant Professor
Hadley.
This course is intended for literary and pharmacy students.

4, Advanced Bacteriology. Professor NovY, and Assistant Profes-

sor Hadley.
Course 4 most be preceded by Course 3, or $a. It is an optional
course, and is open only to a limited number of students.

4a, Serum Reactions and The Pathogenic Protozoa. Continuation of
Course 4. Professor NovY, and Assistant Professor Hadley.



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472 Medical School



5. Water Analysis. Chemical, microscopical, and bacteriological

study of drinking water. Professor Vaughan, and Miss Caij)-

WELT,.

5^. Water Analysis. Two afternoons weekly during the first half
of the semester. Open only to students of Sanitary Engineer-
ing. Professor Vaughan, and Miss Caldwell.

6. iFood Analysis. Chemical and bacteriological examinations of

food. Professor Vaughan, and Mr. Collins.
Course 6 is open only to students specially qualified for the
work.

7. Research Work on Hygiene Problems. Professors Vaughan

and Now.
Course 7 is open only to students specially qualified for the
work.

8. Physiological Chemistry. Lectures. Three times a week, first

semester, second year. Professor Vaughan.

9. Physiological Chemistry. Laboratory work and recitations. Af-

ternoons for nine weeks, second year. Professor Now, and
Mr. McKiNi.EY.

10. Advanced Physiological Chemistry. Afternoons for nine weeks.

Professor Now^, and Mr. McKinley.
Course lo is an optional course.

11. Research in Bacteriology and Protozoology. Professor Now.

12. The Administration of Health Laws. Professor Vaughan.

SUMMER SESSION OF IQSI

Ss. Laboratory Work in Bacteriology. Mr. A. P. Ohlmaciier, and
Assistant.

4J. Vaccines and Sero Reactions. Assistant Professor DeKruif.

gs. Laboratory Work in Physiological Chemistry. Mr. M. W. Ger-
man.

INTERNAL MEDICINE

I. Physical Diagnosis. Introductory Course. Four hours a week,
second semester, second year. Assistant Professor Wickett,
Dr. Squier, and Dr. Cori^y.

a. Laboratory Diagnosis. Four hours a week, second semester, sec-
ond year. Assistant Professor Connell, and Dr. Corley.



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Courses of Instruction 473

3. Clinical Medicine. Introductory Course. Daily except Satur-

days, I to 5 for eight weeks, third year. Assistant Professor
WiCKETT, Dr. Squier, and Dr. Corley.

4. Clinical Lectures. Three hours a week throughout the third

year. Professors Newburgh and Wilson, and Assistant Pro-
fessor Con NELL.

5. Bedside Instruction. Daily, 8 to 12, for eight weeks, fourth

year. Professors Newburgh and Wilson, and Assistant Pro-
fessor CONNELL.

6. Clinical Pathological Conference. Two hours a week through-

out the fourth year. Professors Warthin, Cabot, and New-
burgh.

7. Diagnostic Clinic. Two hours a week throughout the fourth

year. Professors Newburgh and Cabot.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

1. Physical Diagnosis. Assistant Professor Wickett.

2. Laboratory Diagnosis. Assistant Professor Connell.

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND TOXICOLOGY

1. Lectures from the legal standpoint. First semester, fourth year.

Mr. Lightner.

2. Lectures from the medical standpoint. Second semester, fourth

year. Assistant Professor Emerson.

NEUROLOGY

1. Lecture and Recitation Course. Three hours each week through-

oat the second semester, third year. Professor Camp.

2. Clinical Lecture. Two hours each week throughout the fourth

year. Professor Camp.

3. Ward Class. Two hours daily, fourth year. Professor Camp.

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

1. Theory of Obstetrics. Lectures, recitations, clinical conferences.

Three times a week, first and second semesters, third year.
Professor Peterson, Dr. Hoag, Dr. Cron, and Dr. Miliar.

2. Demonstration Course in Obstetrics. Three times a week for

eight weeks, third year.. Dr. Cron and Dr. Miller.



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474 Medical School



3. Gjrnecology. Lectures, recitations and demonstration of cases.

one hour a week, third year. Professor Peterson.

4. Obstetric and Gynecologic Clinic. One hour and a half a week,

fourth year. Professor Peterson.

5. Practical Obstetrics. Small sections. Fourth year. Dr. Cron

and Dr. Miller.

6. Obstetrics and Gynecology. Diagnostic Clinic and Ward Class.

Three hours a day for eight weeks. Professor Peterson, As-
sistant Professor Sherrick, and Assistants.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

Practical Course in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Credit will be

given for this course. Dr. Cron.
Demonstration Course. Credit will be given for this course. Dr.

Miller.

OPHTHALMOLOGY

I. Lectures and Recitations. Fourth year. Professor Parker.

2a, Clinical Lectures. Fourth year. Professor Parker.

3. Demonstration Course. Twice a week, for eight weeks, third
year. Assistant Professor Slocum.

OTO-LASYNGOLOGT

1. Lectures and Recitations. Fourth year. Professor Canheld.

2. Clinical Course. Fourth year. Professor Canfield, and Assist-

ant Professor Furstenberg.

3. Demonstration Course. Twice a week, for eight weeks, third

year. Dr. Tolan.

PATHOLOGY

1. General Pathology. Four times a week, first semester; three

times a week, second semester, second year. Professor
Warthin.

2. General Pathology. Laboratory work. Afternoons for nine

weeks, second year. Assistant Professors Weller and Taylor.

3. Special and Gross Pathology. Gross pathological anatomy. One

hour a week, third year, in addition to time taken for clinical
autopsies. Professor Warthin,



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Courses of Instruction 475

4. Autopsies. Professor Warthin, and Assistant Professor Wkl-

LER.

5. Pathological Technique. Elective. Professor Warthin, and As-

sistant Professor Weller.

6. Pathological Physiology. Professor Warthin, and Assistant

Professor Weller.

7. Special Graduate Course. Research. Professor Warthin.

8. General Pathology for Dental Students. Professor Warthin.

9. Laboratory Course in General Pathology for Dental Students.

Assistant Professors Weller and Taylor.

10. Pathology of the Female Genito-Urinary Organs. Elective and

Graduate Course. Professor Warthin, and Assistant Profes-
sor Weller.

11. Special Pathology of the Infectious Diseases. Elective and Grad-

uate Course. Professor Warthin, and Assistant Professor
Weller.

12. Special Pathology of Neoplasms. Elective and Graduate Course.

Professor Warthin, and Assistant Professor Weller.

SUMlfER session OF I92I

a. Laboratory Course in Pathology. Professor Warthin, and As-
sistant Professor Weller.

5. Course in Pathological Technique. Four hours graduate credit,.
Assistant Professor Weller.

10. Pathology of the Female Gen ito- Urinary Organs. Four hours

graduate credit. Assistant Professor Weller.

11. Special Pathology of the Infectious Diseases. Professor War-

thin, and Assistant Professor Weller.

12. Special Pathology of Neoplasms. Professor Warthin, and As-

sistant Professor Weller.

PEDIATRICS AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

I. Lectures, demonstrations, bedside instruction, and recitations on
the Specific Infectious Diseases. Once a week, third year.
Professor CowiE, and Instructor.



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47^ Medical School



2. Lectures, demonstrations, presentation of illustrative cases, and

recitations on Infantile Nutrition and Infant Feeding. Twice
a week during the second semester until the course is completed.
Third year. Professor Cowie, and Dr. Greenthau

3. Lectures, demonstrations, presentation of illustrative cases, and

recitations on the common medical diseases of infancy and
childhood. Comparison of adult and juvenile types of medical
diseases. Two hours a week, second semester. This course
follows Course 2 at the same hours.-

4. General Clinic in Pediatrics. Once a week, fourth year. Pro-

fessor Cowie.

5. Ward Work. Practical Work in Pediatrics and Infectious Dis-

eases. Professor Cowie, Dr. Grbenthal, and Dr. Hoag.

6. Post Graduate. Advanced clinical work is given in clinical chem-

istry, metabolism, infection, and immunity, particularly as re-
lated to the medical diseases of infancy and childhood and in-
fectious diseases from the viewpoint of research.

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS

1. Pharmacology. Lectures and recitations. Three times a week,

second semester, second year. Professor Edmunds.

2. Pharmacology. Lectures and recitations. Four times a week,

first semester, third year. Professor Edmunds.

3. Experimental Pharmacology. Second semester, second year. Pro-

fessor Edmunds, Assistant Professor Nelson, and Assistants.

4. Research Work in Pharmacology. Third and fourth 3rear8. Pro-

fessor Edmunds.

5. Practical Anaesthesia. Miss Davis.

summer session of 192 1
Experimental Pharmacology. Assistant Professor Nelson.

Physiological Chemistry

(See under Hygiene.)

PHYSIOLOGY

I. Physiology. Lectures, demonstrations, recitations. Five times
a week, second semester, first year. Professor Lombard.



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Courses of Instruction 477

2. Physiology. Continuation of Course i. Lectures, demonstra-

tions, recitations. Five times a week, first semester, second
year. Professor Lombard.

3. Practical Physiology. Laboratory work. Afternoons for nine
» weeks, second year. Professor Lombard, and Assistant Pro-
fessor Cope.

4. Advanced Work in Physiology. Professor Lombard.

Course 4 is open only to students who have completed Courses
I, 2, and 3, or an equivalent amount of work.

5. Research Work. Professor Lombard.

SUMMER SESSION OF 1 92 1

I. Laboratory Work in Physiology. Assistant Professor Cope.

PSYCHIATRY

1. For third-year students. Fifteen exercises, each of two hours.

Laboratory work in the pathological anatomy and physiology
of the nervous system. Professor Barrett, and Assistant Pro-
fessor GURD.

2. Psychiatry. A clinical lecture course given one and one-half

hours each week throughout the fourth year. Professor Bar-
rett.

3. Ward Class in Psychiatry. Professor Barrett, and Dr. Jacoby.

4. Laboratory Work in Neural Pathology. Professor Barrett, and

Assistant Professor Gurd.

5. Laboratory Work in Experimental Psychology. Professors Bar-

rett and PiLLSBURY.

ROENTGENOLOGY

I. Radiology end Radiotherapy. Lectures and demonstrations once
a week during both semesters, to the fourth year students.
Professor Van Zwaluwenberg,

SURGERY

1. Lectures arid Recitations. Twice a week, third year.

2. Minor Surgery. Once a week, second semester, third year.

3. Demonstration Course in Operative Surgery. Third year.



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478 . Medical School



4. Demonstration Course in General, Genito-Urinary and Ortho-
pedic Surgery. Fourth year.

Sa. General Surgical Clinic. Fourth year.

5*. Genito-Urinary Clinic. Fourth year. •

Sc Orthopedic Surgery Clinic. Fourth year.

6. Diagnostic Surgical Clinic. Fourth year.

SUlfMER SESSION OF I92I

1. Bandaging and Fracture Dressing. Assistant Professor Peet.

2. Operations Upon a Cadaver. Assistant Professor Peet.

3. Operations on Animals. Assistant Professor Peet.

BEDSIDE AND DISPENSARY INSTRUCTION

Senior students are given charge of patients, and are required to
make diagnosis, prescribe, dress wounds, and perform minor opera-
tions under the direction of the professor in charge. A lying-in
ward furnishes obstetrical cases, which are attended by the senior stu-
dents in rotation.

COURSES IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Courses in Public Health are given in the Graduate School, lead-
ing to the degrees of Master of Science in Public Health and Doctor
of Public Health.

The greatest movement of the present time is that of the pre-
vention of disease and the conservation of human life and health.
This has resulted in a great campaign of education of laymen in
matters of hygiene and sanitation, and as a natural development out
of this educational movement there has come an ever-growing de-
mand for the services of men property trained as public health offi-
cers. The next decade will see a tremendous development of public
health organization in the United States; and to meet this there must
be made available a body of men educated in public health work.
In this education of public health officers the State University finds
an especially appropriate field, as no other matter more closely touches
the lives and happiness of the citizens of the State. It is with this
view-point thnt the University of Michigan offers these courses.



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Rules Concerning Bxaminations 479



RULES CONCERNING EXAMINATIONS

1. Honor Sy si em.^FoT a number of years all the .examinations
in this School have been under student control. Under this "Honor
System" the faculty turns over to the students the complete super-
vision of all examinations. Each class elects an Honor Committee
which has charge of this matter and which is responsible to the fac-
ulty. In case there is any infraction of rules, this committee tries
the offender, and if necessary makes recommendations to the faculty
for official action.

2. Examinations (either written or oral, or both) will be held
at the close of each course or semester. The result of each exam-
ination must be reported in writing and within ten days to the secre-
tary of the Faculty by the professor in charge.

3. A student may be marked A, excellent; B, good; C, fair; D,
conditioned; or E, not passed. A student may also be reported In-
complete, in which case he may apply for examination or re-exam-
ination in the sanie subject at the close of the next course or semester
or at a time^ %ti by the professor in charge, provided he has com-
pleted the work of the course. A student reported D (conditioned)
can apply for re-examination in the same subject at the close of the
next course or semester, or at the next officially announced time for
the removal of conditions. Examinations for the removal of condi-
tions are held during, the first 'week of the session and immediately
after spring vacation. A student reported as Absent may at the discre-
tion of the professor in charge be given a special examination or
comply with the rule governing the removal of conditions. A student
reported E, "not passed," cannot apply for re-examination until he
has again taken the course in which he has failed.

4. All "Incompletes" and "Conditions" not passed within one
year become "Not Passed."

5. Candidates for graduation failing in an examination will be
allowed a re-examination before the entire Faculty, and failing in
this, such students may again present themselves for examination at
the expiration of a time which shall be determined by the Faculty,
but which shall not be less than three months, nor longer than twelve



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