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years. Professor Runnels and Dr. Johnson.

PEDIATRICS

1. IvCctures and Clinics. Twice a week. Third and fourth years.

Assistant Professor Boericke.

2, Oyt-patieat Clinic* Daily. Assistant Professor Boericke.



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534 Homeopathic Medical School

OPHTHALMOLOGY

1. Recitations. Twice a week. Third year. Second semester. Dr.*

Wynn.

2. Advanced Work. Lectures and quizzes. Twice a week. Fourth

year. First semester. Professor Myers.

3. Refractions. Class in sections. Fourth year. One hour, twice

a week. Professor Myers.

4. Clinic. General and Operative. One hour. Five times a week.

Professor Myers and Staff.

OTO-LARTNGOLOGT

1. Recitations. Twice a week. Second year. Second semester. Dr.

Wynn.

2. Recitations. Twice a week. Third year. First semester. Pro-

fessor Myers.

3. Lectures and Quizzes. Fourth year. Twice a week. Second

semester. Professor Myers. '

4. Clinic: General and Operative. One hour. Five times a week.

Professor Myers and Staff.

DBRMATOLOGT

I. Lectures and Recitations. One hour a week. Third year. Both
semesters. Assistant Professor •Bobricke.

3. Clinic. Two hours a week. Third and fourth years. Both se-
mesters. Assistant Professor Boericke.

6ENIT0-URINARY DISEASES

I. Lectures and Recitations. One hour a week. Third year. Both
semesters. Assistant Professor Boyd.

3. Clinic : General and Operative. Two hours a week. Third
and fourth years. Both semesters. Surgical Staff.

ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS AND RADIOGRAPHY

Clinic. Ten hours a week. Both semesters. Dr. Dueling.



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Requirements for Gradtiation 535

SPECIAL PATHOLOGY

Laboratory Examinations and Analysis. Class in sections. One
hour. Fourth year. Dr. Hanna, Miss Buckley, and Mr.

MACKINNON.

HOSPITAL LABORATORY

Every morning. Specimens from hospital clinics. Class in sec-
tions. One hour. Dr. Hanna, Miss Buckley, and Mr. Mac-
Kinnon.

PHARMACY

Lectures and Recitations. Once a week. Second semester. Sec-
ond year. Assistant Professor Boericke.

Subjects Pursued in Connection with Classes in Other
Schools of Colleges of the University.

Anatomy, Bacteriology ; Botany ; Chemistry (General, Qualita-
tive, Organic, and Physiological) ; Embryology ; Histology ; Hygiene ;
Medical Jurisprudence ; Organic Evolution ; Osteology ; Physics ; Phy-
siology; Zoology. The instruction in these subjects is given in con-
nection with classes in the Medical School, the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, and the Law School. The nature, extent, and
arrangement of these courses may be seen by reference to other pages
of this Catalogue.

EXAMINATIONS

At the end of each semester examinations (written, oral, or both
written and oral) are held on all subjects taught during the semester,
and each student's grade is entered upon the records of the Faculty
in accordance with the following system of marks: A, excellent; B,
good ; C, fair ; D, deficient ; E, not passed. Students "conditioned"
(D grade) cannot apply for another examination in the same subject
until the close of the next course or semester, except that a student
conditioned at the close of the college year may ask for another ex-
amination in the first two weeks of the following year. Students re-
ported "not passed" (E grade) arc required to take the course over
again before applying for another examination.



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

To receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine, a student must be
twenty-one years of age and possess a good moral character. He
must have completed the required courses in laboratory work, and
have passed satisfactorily examinations on all the required studies



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536 Homoeopathic Medical School

included in the full course of instruction. He must have been en-
gaged in the study of medicine for the period of four years, the last
of which must have been in this school.



COURSES FOR PRACTITIONERS

Medical science has made such rapid progress during recent years
that graduates of a short time ago feel the necessity of returning
to medical centers for supplementary study. The laboratories and
special courses of this School offer superior advantages to graduates.

The nature of the work arranged for graduate students in hygiene,
bacteriology, pathology, physiology, histology, physiological chemis-
try, and anatomy, may be learned by reference to pages 469 to 4177.

In practical branches, such as materia medica, physical diagnosis,
surgery, ophthalmology, otdogy, laryngology, obstetrics, gynecology,
dermatology, electro- therapeutics, and genito-urinary diseases, gradu-
ate instruction may be had, by special arrangement with the pro-
fessors in charge, in connection with the demonstration courses given
in the last two years.



OTHER FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION

Museums and Laboratories

The museums of anatomy and materia medica, comprising thou-
sands of specimens, models, and charts, afford the best means attain-
able for the close study of anatomy, physiology, pathology, and phar-
maceutics. The general and special cabinets of the University, con-
taining about 355,000 specimens, are also open freely to all students.
(Compare pages 63 to 66). The facilities for the study of chemistry,
afforded by the chemical laboratory, are not excelled in any medical
college in this country, and the arrangements for the laboratory work
are such that medical students, in classes, and working under the di-
rection of the professors in charge, receive practical instruction in
the courses in qualitative chemistry, and the analysis of fluids and
secretions of the body, a knowledge of which has become absolutely
indispensable to the successful physician. The histological laboratory,
amply supplied with microscopes, sphygmographs, stereopticon, etc.,
offers rare facilities for the prosecution of practical work in experi-
mental physiology and histology. The hygiene and anatomical labora-
tories are models of convenience, affording facilities for instruction
in hygiene and in practical anatomy unsurpassed by those of any
other institution of learning in the United States. For a fuller
description of the laboratories of the University used by homceopathic
students in common with students of other schools and colleges, tee
pages 68 to 75 and pages 481 to 485.



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Pees and Expenses 537

Pathogenetic Laboratory

A laboratory of experimental pathogenesy, in one of the Homoeo-
pathic buildings is equipped with the necessary apparatus for experi-
mentation with medical .substances on the healthy human body, a
special feature of this college. Provings are made, and each student
is required to do a certain amount of original work and research in
the pathogenic field. A complete course in homueopathic pharmaceu-
tics is also given in this laboratory.

Libraries

The General Library of the University (see page 59), is open
to the free use of students. Important additions have recently been
made to the collection of works on Homoeopathy. A large number
of publications, domestic and foreign, are received regularly and kept
on file in the library reading room.

Other Facilities

Students in the school have the privilege of attending the
scientific and philosophical lectures, collateral to medicine, given in
the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. For a description
of the gymnasiums, and the conditions on which they are open to
students, see page 79.



THE UNIVERSITY HOMOEOPATHIC
HOSPITAL

The University Homoeopathic Hospital stands a little to the
northeast of the University campus. It has a frontage of two hun-
dred feet, and the ground plan resembles, in general, the letter T.
Each end of the top line of the letter represents a ward, and the
base is occupied by the operating and clinic rooms. The building
extends back over the brow of a hill, and a rear view shows five
stories in the clear. The general wards are planned each for sixteen
beds. Sun parlors, one in front of each ward, are available as sitting-
rooms for patients able to leave their beds. The plumbing is elab-
orate and of thorough construction. The building is heated by steam,
and the ventilating system is guaranteed to change the air in the
entire building every five minutes.

There are separate buildings for children and for obstetrical pa-
tients. The facilities for treating obstetrical cases have been largely
increased. During the past year each senior student attended several
cases of confinement.

The hospital is furnished with electrical appliances, and under
direction, skilled attendants apply electrical treatment. The junior
and senior students receive special instruction in this subject.



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53^ Homceopathic Medical School

Medical, surgical, g3mecologicaly neurological, and ophthalmolog-
ical clinics are held daily in the spacious amphitheater. Examina-
tions of patients are made by the professors in charge, and by stu-
dents under the direction of professors and assistants; prescriptions
are given; and surgical operations are performed, in the presence of
the class. The several clinics are held on separate days, of which
the profession throughout the state will be notified at the opening of
the University year.

Much attention is paid to physical diagnosis, and the abundance
of clinical material furnishes many interesting cases. Students are
required to take the history of patients, and, under proper super-
vision, make personal examinations and prescribe remedies. It is
the aim of the Faculty to make clinical instruction systematic and
thorough.

The hospital is kept open for patients during the college year,
and also during the summer vacation. The expenses to patients are
only for their board, for unusual appliances or special nursing, and
for medicines, the services of the faculty being rendered gratuitously
to those made available for clinical instruction.

Patients who desire to enter the hospital are requested to write
to the Medical Superintendent to ascertain if there is room for their
accommodation, and to obtain a Circular giving more fully the rules
governing admission.

Welfare Staff

The Children's Welfare Staff is under the management of Mrs.
Elmie Warner Mallory, Ph.B., a woman of wide practical and tech-
nical experience, having occupied the position of women's dean in two
educational institutions. She is a specialist in social and juvenile
problems. The personnel of the staff, in part, is an information sec-
retary, maternity and pediatric nurses, kindergarten principal and
teachers. The department of Education of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts of the University, upon request, will supervise
the teaching in the hospital school thereby insuring expert direction.

TRAINING SCHOOL FOS NURSES

In connection with the Hospital there are two nurses' homes, and
a training school under the charge of a competent and experienced
principal. For admission is required the completion of a full four-
year course in a standard high school. The term of study and service
extends through three years of forty-eight weeks each, at the expira-
tion of which time those who have proved competent and trustworthy
are granted certificates of graduation. For further information in
regard to this school, application may be made to Miss Edna M*
Crandei.i., Principal, Ann Arbor, Michigan.



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Courses of Instruction 539

RULES GOVERNING PARTICIPATION IN PUBLIC
ACTIVITIES

For the rules governing participation in, public activities see
page no.



FEES AND EXPENSES



The Matriculation Fee and the Annual Fee must be paid in ad-
vance, and no student can select his seat until after such payment.
For the rules governing Second Semester fees and the refunding of
fees see page 117.

Matriculation Fee. — For Michigan students, ten dollars; for
all others, twenty-five dollars.

Annual Fee. — For Michigan students, one hundred forty dollars
for men, one hundred thirty-six dollars for women; for all others,
two hundred dollars for men, one hundred ninety-six dollars
for women. This annual fee covers the laboratory and demonstration
course fees, formerly charged separately.

Graduation Fee. — For all alike, ten dollars.

SuKMAKY. — The total amount of fees paid to the University dur-
ing the whole four years' curriculum in medicine, including fees for
matriculation and graduation is, for Michigan students, about $580,
and, for others, about $730.

For additional information in regard to expenses see page 115.

Students arriving in Ann Arbor, and desiring further informa-
tion, should apply at the office of the Dean. The office will be open
daily during the latter part of September. Members of the Faculty,
or other persons competent to give information will be in attendance.



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College of Dental Surgery



A special Announcement giving furtlier information in regard to
this College is published annually. For copies of this Announcement,
or for other information relating to the College, address, The College
of Dental Surgery, Ann Arbor, Michigan,



The College of Dental Surgery was established a^ a Department
of the University in 1875. The college year extends from Tuesday.
September 27, 1921, to Monday, June 19, 1922. Lectures close about
June 16 in order to allow for the final examinations before Commence-
ment.

Four years of study arc required for the dental degree.

This College is on the approved list of reputable colleges of
the National Board of Examiners, which insures the standing of its
graduates before all State Examining Boards. The College is also
a member of the Dental Faculties Association of American Universi-
ties, which maintain the highest standards known in dental education.

The requirements for admission to the College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts are stated on page 120.



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

September, 192 i, and THEREArrER.

Beginning with the session of 1921-1922, tbe requirements
for admission are one year of collegiate work (30 semester hoars),
which may be pursued in the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts of this University, or in any college which is on its
accredited list. The work must be as follows: General Chem-
istry, 4 hours; Qualitative Chemistry, 4 hours; Zoology, 4 hours;
Botany, 4 hours; English, 6 hours; electives, 8 hours. The
electives should be made up from the following subjects: Lan-
guage, botany, mathematics, shop practice, history, geology.

September, 1920, and Theretofore.

The requirements for men and women are the same. An ap-
plicant for admission to the College of Dental Surgery must be at
least 17 years of age and must present a certificate of graduation
and recommendation from an accredited high school, or an equivalent ;



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Combined Curriculum 541

which equivalent is interpreted to mean 15 units, — ^nine of which arc
in required subjects and six elective, — of preparatory work in a rec-
ognized college, academy. State normal school, or like institution.

In lieu of a certificate of graduation or an equivalent, admission
may be obtained by examination in the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts of the University of Michigan, on the subjects outlined
below, providing a- grade satisfactory to the Faculty of this College
is earned in each subject.

Students from foreign countries will be accepted for enrollment
upon presentation of a matriculation certificate issued by the standard
matriculation body in the country from which they come, provided
such certificate covers the subjects specified below.

All entrance credentials will be valued on the unit basis, a unit
meaning a study pursued for a year with five recitations each week,
of not less than 45 minutes duration.

The fifteen units required for admission must include at least
three units in English, two units in Mathematics (elementary algebra
and plane geometry), one unit in Physics, one unit in Chemistry, and
two units in Latin.* The other six units may be selected by the ap-
plicant from the following list. The scope of the preparatory work
is described on pages 123 to 13 T.

The subjects from which choice may be made, and the number
of units which will be accepted in each subject are as follows :

English Composition, 3 units. Trigonometry, J^ unit.

English Literature, I unit. Physics, I unit.

Latin, a, 3, or 4 units. Chemistry, i unit.

French, a, 3, or 4 units. Botany, }^2 or i unit.

German, a, 3, or 4 units. Zoology, H or i unit.

History, I, a, or 3 units. Physiography, J/2 or i unit.

Algebra, i, iH» or 2 units. Drawing, l^ unit.

Geometry, \ or lYi units. Manual Training, i unit.

In compliance with a rule of the National Association of Dental
Examiners, no student can be given credit for a full course of in-
struction in this college who does not matriculate on or before the
tenth day after the annual session begins.



COMBINED CURRICULUM IN LETTERS AND
DENTAL SURGERY

Students desiring to obtain the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in
the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and of Doctor of
Dental Surgery in the College of Dental Surgery, may, by euroll-

• One year's work in German or FVench may be substituted for the
second year in Latin.



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54^ College of Dental Surgery

ing on the Combined Curriculum in Letters and Dental Surgery,
shorten from eight years to seven the time required to earn the two
degrees. This privilege is open only to students who throughout
their course maintain a uniform record of good scholarship. The work
is under the- direction of a Committee of five members, representing
the College of Literature^ Science, and the Arts, and the College of
Dental Surgery. With the consent of the Committee in charge, a
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, who has been a stu-
dent in the College ^f Literature, Science, and the Arts for at least
one year, and has 90 or more hours to his credit, of which at least
30 hours have been earned in the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts of this University, may enroll upon the combined curricu*
lum; that is, while continuing his registration in this College he may
also register in the College of Dental Surgery, provided the work
he has already completed includes a sufficient number of the courses
enumerated below to enable him to complete with one year the specific
requirements described in the following paragraph.

Students who desire to enter upon the Combined Curriculum
must in May of the year preceding double registration, file with the
Registrar, on a blank to be obtained from him, a petition to be
granted that privilege.

When the student so registered in the two Colleges has com-
pleted the first year of the dental curriculum and not less than 90
hours in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, he will be
recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, provided he has
satisfied the requirements for graduation from the latter College,
(see page 138), and provided his work has included the following
courses : •

Rhetoric, 6 hours, including Courses i and 2.

French and German, 16 hours of either one, and 8 hours of the
other.

Physics, 12 hours, including 4 hours of laboratory work.

Chemistry, general, qualitative, and organic, 14 hours for stu-
dents presenting Chemistry for entrance, otherwise 18 hours.

Botany, 4 hours.

Zoology, 10 hours.

English, 6 hours.

History, 8 hours.

Total, 84 or 88 hours.

Suggested electives: Latin or Greek, 8 hours; Philosophy, 3
hours; Physical Chemistry, 3 hours.

The foregoing curriculum will undergo modification on account
of the lengthening of the Dental Curriculum to four years.



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Courses of Instruction 54 j

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING

Persons having qualifications for admission to this College, and
having studied dentistry in other colleges for at least one year, may
be admitted to advanced standing after satisfying the Faculty that
they have completed an amount of work equivalent to that which has
been done by the class in which they seek admission.

Students having had one or more years in a reputable medical
college or a college of Literature, Science, and the Arts, are allowed
credit toward graduation for as much of the required course in den-
tistry as was included in their course.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

The curriculum covers four college years of nine months each
and one summer session of eight weeks. The first year is occupied
with the study of fundamental and preparatory subjects which lead
the way to a clearer conception of the strictly dental problems. In
view of the recognized importance of dentistry and dental operations
to the general health, and its relation to general medical practice,
dentistry must be taught in its relation to general medicine. There
has been included in the curriculum therefore, as much underlying
ancillary and medical education as is possible to give in the prepara-
tion for the special dental subjects.

SCHEDULE OF STUDIES*
First Year

HRST S&MESTER SECOND SEMESTER

Class Lab. Class Lab.

Inorganic Chemistry 85 119 English II 51

Biology 34 loa Histology 85 140

English I 51 General Anatomy 380

Technical Drawing 68





170


389




136


420




Summer Sesnon






Physics


138


64












Second Tear






Qualitative Chemistry


34


153


Dental Anatomy and






Bacteriology




160


Prosthetic Technics


34


493


Dental Anatomy and






Organic Chemistry


68




Prosthetic Technics


34


350


Physiology
Dental Histology
Comparative Dental


85
34










Anatomy


34






68


663




255


493



• The columns o( figures show the total number of hours required for
each course of study.



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544 College of Dental Surgery







Third Year






General Pathology


68


160


Dental Pathology


34


68


Materia Medica


34




Crown and Bridge


17




Oral Hygiene


17




Oral Surgery II


34




Prosthodontia


68




Therapeutics


34




Operative Technics




265


Metallurgy


17




Physiological Chemis-






Surgical Anatomy


17




try and Hygiene


68


17


Clinics




510




355


442




153


578






Fourth Year






Oral Surgery I


17




Oral Surgery 1


17




Oral Surgery II


34


17


Oral Surgery II


34


17


Clinical Pathology


17




Metallurgy


«7




Dental Therapeutics


17




Dental Therapeutics


17




Crown and Bridge


34




History and Ethics


34




Orthodontia


34




Operative Dentistry


17




Metallurgy


17




Clinic


17


510


Operative Dentistry


17










Ginic


17


510










240


527




153


5«7



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

English and Drawing

The instruction in the subjects of English and Drawing is given
in the Colleges of Engineering and Architecture. Instruction in these
subjects given in other colleges or universities and accepted for credit
by the College of Engineering and Architecture as the equivalent of
that given in this University will be accepted for advance standing
by the College of Dental Surgery.

Physics, Zoology, and Chemistry

These subjects are given in the several departments of Physics,
Zoology, and Chemistry of the University. They are taught in the
laboratories and under the personal direction of the teachers of the
respective departments.

Anatomy, Embryology, Histology, Physiology,

Bacteriology, and Pathology

These subjects are given in the Medical School. They are taught
in the form of lectures and laboratory instruction by members of the
medical faculty. Especial attention, however, is given in Anatomy
and Histology to the head and neck region. All other tissues and



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Courses of Instruction 545

organs of the body are studied somewhat less intensively. These two
courses ftre supplemented by instruction in the Dental College upon
comparative dental anatomy and dental histology. The Odontological
Museum, the gift of the late Professor Ford, which has been greatly
increased by a contribution from Dr. William Mitchell of London,
England, offers exceptional opportunities for this work.

Materia Medica and Therapeutics

In dental materia medica and therapeutics a special course of lec-
tures embraces the history, pharmacy, pharmacology, and therapeu-
tics of all drugs and remedies used in the treatment of diseases oc-
curring in dental practice. The course also includes a discussion of



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 48 of 75)