V. A Barradale.

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PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC




HOW THE BANANAS GROW.



PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC

Being Sketches of Missionary Life

and Work in Samoa and other

Islands in the South Seas



BY

V. A. BARRADALE, M.A.



WITH NINETY-THREE ILLUSTRATIONS.



TL o n D o n
LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY

1 6 NEW BRIDGE STREET, E.C.

Trade Agents
MESSRS. SIMPK1N, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT & CO., LTD

1907



CUTLER & TANNER.

THE SELWOOD PRINTING WoRliS,

FROME. AND LONDON.



DeOfcateC) to

MY PARENTS, WHO BEQUEATHED TO ME THE MISSIONARY SPIRIT;

MY FOSTER-PARENTS, WHO LOVINGLY CHERISHED IT;

MY WIFE, WHO BRAVELY SHARED IT ;

AND MY CHURCH, WHICH GENEROUSLY HONOURS IT.



PREFACE

Ti /I Y aim in Pearls of the Pacific is to give boys and girls a clear,
-*- A true picture of life, as well as Mission work, in the South
Seas.

My own experience of this life and work was all too short ; it was
limited to three brief, happy years in Samoa, and therefore my main
purpose has been to write of what I have seen. That, and that alone,
accounts for Samoa filling so large a space in the following pages.

My best thanks are due to my friends and former colleagues, the
Revs. J. E. Newell, of Malua, and Walter Huckett, formerly of Apia,
for much valuable and suggestive information (indeed, the book
could not have been brought up to date without the help of the
former) ; also to my school-fellow and college friend, the Rev. L. H.
Gaunt, M.A., the London Missionary Society's Editor, for much kindly
editorial assistance.

I wish also to express my deep indebtedness to Mr. A. Tattersall,
of Apia, and my friend and former colleague, Mr. H. S. Griffin, of the
L.M.S. Printing Press, Malua, for the use of their photographs.

V. A. BARRADALE.

CUCKFIELD,

June i, 1906.



CONTENTS



PAGE

CHAPTER I



SAMOA AND OTHER PEARLS . . . . . . . .13

CHAPTER II

THE FIRST MISSIONARY SHIPS



CHAPTER IV
SAMOA : As IT WAS .....

CHAPTER V
HOISTING THE FLAG



PEOPLE, HOUSES AND FOOD



CHAPTER VII

PLAY



CHAPTER III
MORE MISSIONARY SHIPS ......... 32



44



53
CHAPTER VI



74



CHAPTER VIII
CLIMATE, CLOTHING, ANIMALS AND INSECTS ... 83



io CONTENTS

PAGE

CHAPTER IX

SEASONS AND SOILS ......... 93

CHAPTER X
TRADES AND EMPLOYMENTS ........ 103

CHAPTER XI

SAMOA : As IT is HOME LIFE AND INDUSTRIES . . . 1 1 5

CHAPTER XII

SCHOOL LIFE . . . . . . . . . . .129

CHAPTER XIII

/
THE MALUA INSTITUTION . ...... 139

CHAPTER XIV
CHURCHES .... ..... 151

CHAPTER XV
SUNDAY SCHOOLS ... ...... 163

CHAPTER XVI

THE FOREIGN MISSION WORK OF THE SOUTH SEA CHURCHES . . 173

CHAPTER XVII

MORE FOREIGN MISSIONARY WORK . . . . . . .184



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

How the Bananas grow ....... Frontispiece

PAGE

Polynesia (Map) . . . , . . . ^ . . .14
Pagopago Harbour, Tutuila, Samoa . . . . . . .16

Pagopago Harbour, Samoa . . . . . . . .18

John Williams, " The Apostle of the South Seas " . . . .20

The Duff ............ 22

Captain Wilson . .......... 23

Aitutaki : The Mission House . . . . . . . . 26

An Inland Lake, Samoa ......... 28

A Samoan Girl ........... 30

Apia Town and Harbour, Upolu, Samoa . . . . . -33

Samoan Canoe ........... 35

A Samoan Village .......... 36

A Samoan Mission Boat . . . . . . . . .38

Captain Turpie ........... 39

The s.s. John Williams ......... 40

Captain Hore ........... 41

Captain Wyrill on deck of s.s. John Williams ..... 42

The L.M.S. Church at Sapapalii ........ 45

Sapapalii : The Landing-place of John Williams .... 46

A Samoan Warrior .......... 47

Taboos, to Frighten Thieves from Stealing . . . . .48

Map of Samoan Group . . . . . . . . -53

High Chief Mataafa . . ....... 54

Part of the Procession . . . . . . . . .56

A High Chief's House ......... 58

Inside a Samoan House . . . . . . . . .61

Beginning to Build a Samoan House ....... 62

Ready for Thatching ......... 63

A House Half-thatched ......... 64

An Afternoon Nap .......... 65

A First-class Samoan Road . ... 66

Taro Plantation ..... .... 67

Breadfruit Tree ... ...... 69

The Breadfruit .......... 70

Making Kava ....... ... 72

Samoan Boys .... ..... 75

Lafoga, a Samoan Game resembling Quoits . . 76

Educated Girls ... . . 77

A Young Samoan ... . ... 78

Girls Mixing Kava ....... . . 79

Surf at Apia ..... . 81

A Samoan Deacon and his Daughter .84

A Samoan Warrior, with Head-dress ... ... 85

A Beautiful Scene in Samoa ..... 88

A Model Village 89



12 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

On the Lagoon, Falealili . . . . . . . . -91

A Cocoanut Palm .......... 95

Cocoanut Palms struck by Lightning ....... 96

Travelling through the Bush ........ 97

A Banyan Tree ........... 98

War Drill . . . . . . . . . . 101

Boys at Leulumoega School preparing Ginger . . . . .103

Mission Boys repairing a Boat . . . . . . . .105

Malua Students preparing to Fish . . . . . . .106

Tattooing . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Coral piled for Firing . . . . . . . . . .no

Curios : Fans, Hatchets, Baskets, Canoe with outrigger, Combs, Clubs,

Bamboo Pillow, Fly-flapper . . . . . . .113

Samoan Houses . . . . . . . . . . .116

Leulumoega Boys preparing Arrowroot . . . . . .118

Cascara Rubber Tree in the Gardens at Leulumoega . . . .119

The Old Printing House . . . . . . . . .120

The New Printing House . . . . . . . . .121

Bookbinding Department of Printing House . . . . .122

Mr. Griffin and Native Printers . . . . . . . .124

A Native Church (Rev. J. E. Newell conducting a Service) . .126

Rev. J. W. Hills and Boys of the Leulumoega High School . .130

Village School Examination, Samoa . . . . . . .131

The School Inspectors' Visit . . . . . . . 133

The Apia Central District School . . . . . . 135

A Gala-day at Papauta . . . . . . . . .136

Girls' High School, Atauloma . . . . . . . .137

Malua Bay ........... 141

Saaga, with his Wife (Sose) and Family ...... 142

Students' Cottages, Malua ......... 143

The Jubilee Hall, Malua ......... 144

A Sewing Class : Mrs. Barradale and the Students' Wives . . . 147

The Apia Native Church . . . . . . . . -153

A Village Church . . . . . . . . . .154

A " May Meeting " in Samoa . . . . . . . .156

Native Food, as prepared for a Church Opening or " May Meeting " . 159
Christian Endeavour Convention in the Jubilee Hall, Malua. . . 164

Christian Endeavour Convention : a Front View ..... 167

The Badge of the Samoa C.E. Union. ...... 168

The Niue, presented to the New Guinea Mission by the people of Niue . 176
The new Niue, built in 1005 ........ 177

New Guinea Warriors . . . . . . . . .179

A Pupil Teacher at the Papauta Girls' School, Samoa . . .180

Memorial Church, Vatorata, New Guinea . . . . . .182

South Sea Teachers on the John Williams, going to New Guinea . .185

A Samoan Missionary in New Guinea . . . . . .188

Ruatoka . . ......... 189

Tablet erected in the Jubilee Hall, Malua ...... 190



CHAPTER I
SAMOA AND OTHER PEARLS

, bother it, where's Samoa ? " says Dick (Dick being, of
course, the typical boy, who likes to use slang). " Oh,
dear me, I don't know where Samoa is," says Mary (who shall stand
for the typical girl). Well, let me say straight away for your com-
fort, that it is not altogether surprising if you do not know where
Samoa is. It is not a very large place, and it is not a British colony
(or you would be sure to know), and it is a very long way off ; more-
over (let us whisper it), even some of your fathers and mothers do
not seem to know where it is. When I lived there, sometimes letters
used to be sent to us, addressed to

Samoa, South China,
and once a parcel came safely to hand, addressed to

Samoa, South Africa.

You might think those were only slips of the pen, but two or three
times at Missionary conversaziones (there's a long word I hope
you will look it up in father's dictionary) I have been asked, " However
did you manage to get along during those terrible Boxer troubles ? "
Now, seeing the Boxer troubles arose in China, evidently these good
people also thought that Samoa was in China.

Let me tell you then what it is and where it is. Samoa is not



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SAMOA AND OTHER PEARLS 15

the name of an island (some ministers do not know that, though
sometimes they are expected to know almost everything) ; it is the
name of a group of ten islands. And the islands are not in China or
South Africa, but in the South Seas, which is another name for the
southern part of the Pacific Ocean.

If you will take your atlas and look at the map of the world (or,
if there is a " globe " at school, that will do better still), you will
see to the north of New Zealand a lot of dots, almost as if baby had
been trying to write. Those dots represent islands, and amongst
those islands you will see the words " Samoa, or Navigators' Islands"
And if you will look at the Map of Samoa in this book you will see
that the four largest islands are called SAVAII, UPOLU, TUTUILA and
MANUA. Aren't they curious names ? I think next time you see
a missionary from Samoa you had better ask him how to pronounce
them.

Those are the largest islands ; but after all they are not very
large. Some of you have been to the Isle of Wight, and know what
a small island that is ; well, Savaii, the largest island in Samoa, is
only about twice as long as the Isle of Wight, and not quite twice
as wide. Samoa is the native name of the group, and it is the name
which everybody uses now ; the name of Navigators' Isles was given
by the Frenchman who discovered them ; because he saw the people
so often paddling about in their canoes, he thought they must be
good navigators. And he was quite right ; the Samoans are fearless
sailors and clever fishermen (and fisher-women too), and they are
almost all skilful swimmers.

I have told you that Samoa is not a British colony. It partly
belongs to Germany and partly to the United States of America.
But the London Missionary Society was the first Missionary Society



:6



PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC



to go there, and it is of the work that it has done, and is still doing
so well, that I wish to write.

We all know, then, by this time, that Samoa is in the South Seas ;
but perhaps we do not quite realize how far away it is. There are
two ways of going there. You can take a steamer from Liverpool
to New ifork, and then go by train right across America, from New
York to San Francisco, and then catch another steamer from San




Francisco to Samoa. That journey will take you about a month.
But there is a cheaper way to go, and that is by sea all the way from
London to Samoa. If you were to go that way you would have to
change steamers at Sydney, in Australia, and you would be eight or nine
weeks in getting to the end of your voyage. In fact, Samoa is just
about as far away from England as it can be. It is 3,000 miles further
than Sydney, and Sydney is more than 12,000 miles from London,
so some of you who are quick at sums will be able to reckon how



SAMOA AND OTHER PEARLS 17

far Samoa is from England. Did some one say, " about 15,000 miles ? "
Yes, that's right !

Now I want you boys and girls who are fond of jumping to take
that big jump with me. Jump 15,000 miles (only in fancy, of course ;
I don't want any of you to be afraid and stay behind), jump all the
way from England to the South Seas. I hope we shan't jump into
the sea ; we shouldn't drown if we did happen to jump just a little
short, because the natives would soon hop over the sides of their boats
and swim out to save us ; but we might get our clothes wet or frighten
a shark, and as we do not wish to be uncomfortable ourselves or make
others uncomfortable, I hope we shall all jump the whole way, right
on to the land. One, two, three, and away we go / . . .

And while we are on the way, I can explain the title of this book,.
" PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC." Samoa is a very hot country and
very damp ; it is not the best place for white people to live in, because
it is often steamy like a greenhouse ; but plants and trees grow
splendidly, and cover nearly the whole of the islands, and so it looks
a very beautiful place, and for that reason Samoa has been called the
" Pearl of the Pacific"

But what are the other " pearls." Please look again at the map
on page 14, and you will see a long word Polynesia. It only means
" many islands," and these " many islands " are for the most part
fair and beautiful like Samoa. So when I call this book " PEARLS
OF THE PACIFIC," you will understand that I want to tell you about
Samoa mostly, but something also about other beautiful islands in
the Southern Seas where missionaries have lived and worked for
Jesus.

Now if you are still looking at the map, you will see a note at the
bottom saying that Tahiti, in the Society Islands, is away to the N.E. of

B




18



SAMOA AND OTHER PEARLS 19

the Cook Islands. It is a pity we could not show the Society Islands
in this map, but you will be able to find them in your school atlas.

It was to Tahiti that the first missionaries of the London
Missionary Society were sent. They sailed from England in
1796 in the Duff, commanded by Captain Wilson (so you see
our Society is no years old this year), and it took them nearly
seven months to reach Tahiti. When they got there they had many
difficulties to overcome, and eleven long years passed by before any
of the people gave up their idols and began to love Jesus. But after
that King Pomare and some of the native chiefs and many of the
people became Christians.

Here is a true story, which shows how Christianity changed their
lives : In the island of Raiatea, not very far from Tahiti, King Tama-
loa became a Christian. Some of the people followed his good exam-
ple ; but the heathen priests and most of the people were so angry
at this that they waged war upon them. Tamatoa was victorious,
but instead of killing the rebel chiefs, he invited them to a great
feast, to show them how kind the religion of Christ made even
savages become.

The missionary who, more than any one else, was the means of
spreading the Gospel abroad amongst the islands of the South Seas
-was JOHN WILLIAMS. He worked first in the Society Islands,
and afterwards was the means of taking the Gospel to Aitutaki
and Mangaia and Rarotonga, all islands of the Hervey or Cook Group.
(Please look on the map on page 14, and see where they are.) While
he was at Rarotonga, with the help of the natives he actually built
a ship for himself, that he might travel about in safety from island
to island. He called this vessel The Messenger of Peace. Was not
that a suitable name for the ship that was to carry the Gospel of



2O



PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC



Peace ? In the Messenger of Peace John Williams visited Fiji, Niue,
and afterwards Samoa, which he made his home.

But still he could not remain content on one island, when hun-
dreds of islands seemed to cry, Come over and help us ! Before very
long he sailed away to carry the good news of a loving God to the




JOHN WILLIAMS, " THE APOSTLE OF THE SOUTH SEAS."

New Hebrides. He landed with another missionary, Mr. Harris,
on the island of Erromanga, but both were cruelly done to death by
the savage natives. For more than twenty years John Williams had
lived for the peoples of the South Sea Islands, and on November 20,
1839, he laid down his life for them. But " he, being dead, yet



SAMOA AND OTHER PEARLS 21

speaketh " ; twice every year the fine missionary steamer named
after him, the John Williams, sails across the Pacific ^from group to
group, visiting many of the islands where he himself worked, and
always serving as a reminder of his loving efforts.

That is a short account of early missionary work in the South
Seas. In later chapters we shall see how the work spread from Samoa
and Rarotonga to New Guinea, and away to the north and north-
west, to the Tokelau, Ellice, Gilbert and other groups ; and we shall
see, too, how the Samoans and Rarotongans, rejoicing to have heard
about Jesus themselves, soon became brave missionaries to others in
their heathen darkness.

* * :;: # :;.-

Note. Please don't forget to find all these places on the map of
Polynesia. You will understand so much better all that has been said.




CHAPTER II

THE FIRST MISSIONARY
SHIPS



I



F I were to ask you the name
of the " Children's Mission-
ary Ship," many of you would
quickly answer, " the John
Williams" There are, of course
other ships doing the work of
the London Missionary Society.
But the John Williams is the
most important of our little

fleet, and you may like to hear something about it, and about the
story of other missionary ships which did such useful work before the
present fine John Williams was built.

If you are Xew Year Collectors, and if you give what you can
out of your own pocket, I am sure you will be interested. There is
nothing like working and giving to arouse interest. If you have not
proved this for yourselves, begin now, and see if I am not right.

Xow you do not want too many dates, but a few will be neces-
sary, and to make up for bothering you with dates you shall have
a lot of pictures, pictures of missionary ships and their captains. Look
at them well, for without those captains and their ships, God's message
would have spread very slowly amongst the peoples of the Pacific.
What was the name of the first vessel used by the London Mis-



THE FIRST MISSIONARY SHIPS



sionary Society ? I told you in the first chapter. That's right

the Duff. You remember that it sailed from England in 1796, and

carried to Tahiti the very first missionaries which the Society sent

out. Captain James Wilson was in command, and his passengers

had a pleasant and prosperous voyage,

though it was a very long one, lasting

208 days. The Duff aroused a

great deal of interest, because it

was the first missionary ship

that ever sailed from this

country. A farewell service

was held on board, and

crowds of people gathered

on the wharves and banks of

the Thames as these first

missionaries sailed down the

river, singing the hymn,

Jesus, at Thy command
We launch into the deep.

Three days after starting, they
were hailed in the night by a man-
of-war. CAPTAIN WILSON.

" Whither bound ? " " Otaheite " [or Tahiti].
" What cargo ? " " Missionaries and provisions."
The captain of the man-of-war could not understand this. He
had never heard of such a thing as missionaries being sent out all
the way to Tahiti from London. So he sent a midshipman on board
to make inquiries, and when it was found that the description of
the cargo was true, the D^tff was allowed to keep on its way.




24 PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC

There were thirty missionaries on board, not counting their wives
and children. The mission flag which was hoisted over the Duff,
and which still floats over the John Williams, represents three white
doves on a purple background, carrying olive branches in their bills.
You know how gentle and innocent a dove is, and perhaps you know
that to offer the olive branch is a proverb which means to wish to
be at peace. You will agree that the flag is a very beautiful and
fitting one, for the missionary ship carries the gospel of peace.

Captain Wilson was a man who had had many adventures, and
escaped from great dangers. His father was a captain, and the boy's
early years were spent at sea. Later on he went to America, and
fought in the battle of Bunker's Hill in 1775. Still later he went
to India and was engaged in fighting there, until at length he was
captured and flung into prison by Hyder Ali. He escaped by
swimming across several rivers which were full of alligators, but
he was caught again and put in irons and kept for days in a dark
dungeon. There were 112 prisoners altogether, and eighty of them
died during the cruel imprisonment. Captain Wilson was one of the
thirty-two who survived. When he was set free he went to sea again,
and passed through many more dangers. All this time he was not
a believer in God ; but God had a great work for him to do, and two
years after his return to England he was greatly moved by a sermon
preached by the Rev. John Griffin, of Orange Street Chapel, Portsea,
and was led to believe in the truth and power of the Gospel.

Success often depends on the character of the leaders, and Cap-
tain James Wilson was just the right man to command on this first
missionary voyage. He was bold and brave, and a sincere enthu-
siastic Christian.

The Duff left missionaries at Tahiti and in the Friendly and Mar-



THE FIRST MISSIONARY SHIPS 25

quesas Islands [remember to look at the map], and then, having sailed
to China and got a new cargo, reached England in safety in July,
1798. Its work was ridiculed by some ; in China it was nicknamed
" The Ten Commandments " ; but all who love Jesus should thank
God for the success of the first voyage of this first missionary ship-
The Duff sailed again from London with another party of missionaries
in 1798 ; but two months later it was captured by the French and
sold, and its missionary life thus came to an end.

The second missionary vessel about which I have to tell you was
the Messenger of Peace. This interesting little ship was never in
England ; it was built in the South Seas, and in some ways is the
most interesting of all the missionary fleet. In Chapter I you have
read how John Williams built this ship, that he might voyage in safety
from island to island and group to group. He had long been
anxious that all should hear of the love of Jesus, and, not being able
to buy or hire a vessel, he made up his mind to build one. He knew
very little about shipbuilding, he had very few tools with which to
build, and he had many difficulties to overcome. He made bellows
out of goatskins, and when these were eaten up by rats, he made a
pair of wooden ones. He made charcoal out of cocoanut shells, and
nails out of wood, and ropes out of the bark of trees, and sails out
of native mats. Of course the people of Rarotonga, where the vessel
was built, helped him a great deal with their advice and labour ; but
it says much for the skill and perseverance of John Williams that
the vessel was built under such conditions and was able to do much
useful work.

The first voyage of the Messenger of Peace was a short one to
Aitutaki ; only 145 miles from Rarotonga. The second was longer,
all the way to Raiatea. Fortunately, the weather was fine and the



25



PEARLS OF THE PACIFIC



wind moderate, for when Raiatea was reached the little Messenger
of Peace was found to be in a very unseaworthy condition. It
looked as if God in His providence had watched over the missionaries
and crew and made them His special care.

Afterwards, when canvas sails had been bought and the ship
thoroughly repaired, John Williams started on the work amongst




AITUTAKI : THE MISSION HOUSE.



the heathen islands which for so long he had been anxious to do,
and for which he built the Messenger of Peace. He visited Mangaia
and some of the other Cook Islands Atui, Mauke and Mitiaro
and then went again to the most important island, Rarotonga, where,
you will remember, the vessel was built.



THE FIRST MISSIONARY SHIPS 27

Rarotonga occupies to-day an important place in the L.M.S. South
Sea Missions. From it certain outstations of the Gook Islands are
superintended, and on it is a long-established Training Institution for
Cook Island pastors. Like its big younger brother, the Malua Insti-
tution in Samoa, it has had the honour of sending out many of its
students as missionaries to New Guinea and other parts of the Pacific.
It may not have occurred to you that there are brown missionaries
as well as white doing the work of God and obeying the great com-
mand of our Lord, but some of the hardest and noblest work in the
South Seas has been done by brown missionaries.

From Rarotonga the Messenger of Peace sailed to Aitutaki, and
left a native teacher there ; then on to Savage Island or Niue
[pronounced Neway]. The former name was given to it by Captain
Cook, because the natives rushed on him like wild boars ; but for many
years now " Savage Island " has been a Christian land. Mr. Lawes,
who has been our missionary there for nearly forty years, says that
practically the whole population is now within the church.

But John Williams was still anxious to carry the " good news "
further, and soon the well-named Messenger of Peace was on its way
to Tongatabu, the most important of the Friendly Isles. A native
teacher of the London Missionary Society had been there for some
time and was doing good work, but the Wesleyan Society had also


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Online LibraryV. A BarradalePearls of the Pacific : being sketches of missionary life and work in Samoa and other islands in the South Seas → online text (page 1 of 10)