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THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY

March, 1889

Vol. XLIII. No. 3.



CONTENTS.


EDITORIAL.

TO THE PASTORS AND CHURCHES

A CALL FOR ENLISTMENT

PARAGRAPHS

SUPREMACY OF THE WHITE RACE IN THE SOUTH

TRAINING OF COLORED STUDENTS FOR THE EPISCOPAL MINISTRY

A MONTHLY CONCERT AND SUPPLEMENT

NOTES FROM NEW ENGLAND

ENGLISH AS IT IS NOT TAUGHT - CLIPPINGS


THE SOUTH.

REVIVAL AT LEMOYNE INSTITUTE

EVERY-DAY LIFE

CROWDED SCHOOL-ROOMS

PARAGRAPHS - DEATH OF MRS. HATTIE B. SHERMAN


THE CHINESE.

LOO QUONG'S APPEAL


BUREAU OF WOMAN'S WORK.

PARAGRAPHS

CHRISTMAS AT FORT YATES

MISS COLLINS


FOR THE CHILDREN.

OUR SCHOOL GIRLS - JOSIE MIKE - POLLIWOG


RECEIPTS



NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION.
Rooms, 56 Reade Street.

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in Advance.
Entered at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., as second-class matter.

* * * * *


American Missionary Association.


PRESIDENT, Rev. WM. M. TAYLOR, D.D., LLD., N.Y.


_Vice-Presidents._

Rev. A.J.F. BEHRENDS, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass.
Rev. F.A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill.
Rev. D.O. MEARS, D.D., Mass.
Rev. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo.


_Corresponding Secretaries._

Rev. M.E. STRIEBY, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._
Rev. A.F. BEARD, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Recording Secretary._

Rev. M.E. STRIEBY, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Treasurer._

H.W. HUBBARD, Esq., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Auditors._

PETER McCARTEE.
CHAS. P. PEIRCE.


_Executive Committee._

JOHN H. WASHBURN, Chairman.
ADDISON P. FOSTER, Secretary.


_For Three Years._

J.E. RANKIN,
WM. H. WARD,
J.W. COOPER,
JOHN H. WASHBURN,
EDMUND L. CHAMPLIN.

_For Two Years._

LYMAN ABBOTT,
CHAS. A. HULL,
J.R. DANFORTH,
CLINTON B. FISK,
ADDISON P. FOSTER.

_For One Year._

S.B. HALLIDAY,
SAMUEL HOLMES,
SAMUEL S. MARPLES,
CHARLES L. MEAD,
ELBERT B. MONROE.


_District Secretaries._

Rev. C.J. RYDER, _21 Cong'l House, Boston_.
Rev. J.E. ROY, D.D., _151 Washington Street, Chicago_.


_Financial Secretary for Indian Missions._

Rev. CHAS. W. SHELTON.


_Field Superintendents._

Rev. FRANK E. JENKINS,
Prof. EDWARD S. HALL.


_Secretary of Woman's Bureau._

Miss D.E. EMERSON, _56 Reade St. N.Y._



COMMUNICATIONS

Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretaries; letters for "THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY," to the
Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the
Treasurer.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be
sent to H.W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when
more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational
House, Boston, Mass., or 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill. A payment
of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member.

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. - The date on the "address label," indicates the
time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on
label to the 10th of each month. If payment of subscription be made
afterward, the change on the label will appear a month later. Please
send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former
address and the new address, in order that our periodicals and
occasional papers may be correctly mailed.


FORM OF A BEQUEST

"I bequeath to my executor (or executors) the sum of - - dollars, in
trust, to pay the same in - - days after my decease to the person who,
when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer of the 'American
Missionary Association,' of New York City, to be applied, under the
direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its
charitable uses and purposes." The Will should be attested by three
witnesses.

* * * * *

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY.


VOL. XLIII. MARCH, 1889. No. 3.


American Missionary Association.

* * * * *


TO THE PASTORS AND CHURCHES

_Who take Collections for the A.M.A. in March, April and May._

Dear Brethren: The work of this Association requires $1,000 per day. The
receipts for the first four months of our fiscal year have been only
about $800 a day. Here is the germ of a debt. Unless it is chilled and
destroyed in the vigorous months of March, April and May, when the
churches are full and active, it will, during the hot summer months,
when the audiences are thin, grow rapidly, and develop its bitter
fruit - a great deficit. The coming three months will be the test. We are
the servants of the churches and are doing their work, and we are
confident that they intend to give us the means to carry it forward.

We, therefore, appeal to the pastors whose collections come during these
three months, or whose collections can conveniently be brought within
these three months, to lend us their great help by emphasizing our needs
when the collections are taken, and we appeal to our patrons that they
will, both in their church collections or by their special donations,
come to our aid in a time when that aid will be so beneficial.

* * * * *


A CALL FOR ENLISTMENT.

Perhaps we never shall cease our urgent appeals for the "sinews of war."
The growing work of this Association requires increasing funds to meet
the enlarged demand. But we are beginning to feel the need of a greater
force in the field. We sound forth the bugle note calling for recruits
for the army of the Lord in our glorious warfare. We appeal to students
in theological seminaries, colleges, normal schools and female
seminaries, to consider the claims of this great work. We make this
appeal with special urgency to the Congregational institutions of the
land, for it is from this body of Christians that we receive nearly all
the funds with which we carry on our work, and there is a special
fitness that the sons and daughters of these churches should enter the
field for which the funds are contributed.

But we wish to make a distinct announcement in connection with this
appeal. We wish only to "get the best." The needy people for whom we
labor have suffered such privations, and such absolute destitution of
all adequate religious instruction, that we feel they are now entitled
to as good as can be given them. We send no teachers to the field that
are incompetent and without adequate experience. We do not believe that
everybody is qualified to teach the Negroes, at least it is not fair to
them, that we should employ those who cannot find occupation anywhere
else. Good health, good training, good powers of discipline, a
missionary spirit and a membership in some evangelical church, are the
absolute essentials for all persons that we employ. We call for
recruits, but we ask for only those that are well equipped, courageous
and ready to endure hardness as good soldiers of Christ.

* * * * *

The treasurer of a church in the West, who had been an officer in a
colored regiment during the war, in remitting the contribution of the
church to which he belongs, thus expresses his reason for his interest
in the welfare of the colored people:

"I was an officer in the 5th United States Colored Troops, the first
colored regiment raised west of the Alleghenies, just before the
massacre of colored troops at Fort Pillow, and knowing so much of the
fidelity and valor and good service of those troops in the war to the
Nation, to which they then owed so little, I have special interest in
the enlightenment and uplifting of the colored race in the South."

* * * * *

In the last month's _Missionary_, we published some statements showing
that persons declined to contribute to our treasury because we had been
so enriched by the Daniel Hand Fund. It gives us pleasure to know that
all our patrons do not take this view of the matter, as will be seen
from the following extract from the letter of a practical business man:

"If A.M.A. means _A Million Accepted_, I hope you will be able to write
it once a year till you can build churches, school-houses and colleges
all through the South, but not enough to take away from the churches of
the North and East the privilege of helping the poor and needy till they
are able to take care of themselves."

* * * * *

Rev. Chas. H. McIntosh has for some months assisted Dr. Roy in
collecting funds for the Association, using a stereopticon as a
means of illustrating his lectures on the varied phases of our
work.

Pastor Leeper of Red Oak, Iowa, writes: "We were much pleased with
Brother McIntosh's lecture and exhibit. He does well, and makes in every
way a good impression. The lantern works promptly and makes clear
pictures. That mode of presenting the work is the best I have seen. The
people will not soon forget what they saw and heard. They were surprised
to know that the A.M.A. is doing so extensive a work. I had often
preached on the subject, but pictures make the facts stand out so much
more vividly. We had crowded houses."

* * * * *

Rev. J.B. Chase, of Hull, Iowa, wishes to complete his files of the
_American Missionary_ to have them bound for a public library. If any of
our readers have the numbers for August and September, 1880, and April,
1878, that they can spare and willingly give, it would be a favor to us
if they would mail them to the above address. Our edition for those
months is exhausted.

* * * * *


THE SUPREMACY OF THE WHITE RACE IN THE SOUTH.

Never since the days of reconstruction and of the adoption of the
Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution, has the question of the equal
suffrage of the races in the South awakened public attention as it does
now. In many quarters, some of them very influential, the right of the
Negro to a fair vote and a fair count is strenuously advocated. On the
other hand, the supremacy of the whites as the ruling race in the South
is set forth by leading Southern men more distinctly than ever before.


WHITE SUPREMACY.

Col. Grady, of Atlanta, in his famous speech at Dallas, Texas, urges
this in these emphatic terms:

Standing in the presence of this multitude, sobered with the
responsibility of the message I deliver to the young men of the
South, I declare that the truth above all others to be worn
unsullied and sacred in your hearts, to be surrendered to no
force, sold for no price, compromised in no necessity, but
cherished and defended as the covenant of your prosperity, and
the pledge of peace to your children, is that the white race
must dominate forever in the South, because it is the white
race, and superior to that race with which its supremacy is
threatened.

Hon. W.C.P. Breckinridge, member of Congress from Kentucky, and many
other prominent men in the South, express the same sentiment, so that
this may be regarded as the ultimatum of Southern popular requirement.


HOW THIS SUPREMACY IS TO BE ATTAINED.

The most _obvious_ way is that which is in use at present, the
intimidation of the colored man and the manipulation of the ballot-box.
But against this the sober second thought of the South itself begins to
revolt. Thus a paper so thoroughly Southern as the Charleston _News and
Courier_ utters this salutary and emphatic protest:

"It appals thinking men to know and see that the present
generation and the rising generation of white men in the South
are taught in practice that republican institutions are a
failure, and that elections are to be carried, not by the honest
vote of a fair majority, but by campaigning, which begins with
rank intimidation and ends with subterfuge and evasion. The
white people suffer more by the trickery and malfeasance by
which they score victory than the colored people suffer. The
supremacy of what, for convenience, is called Anglo-Saxon
civilization, though there is little of the Anglo-Saxon manner
or of civilization in the mode of securing it, must and will be
maintained, but it can be maintained without sectional divisions
in politics and without the maintenance of radical lines at
elections."

As these old methods are beginning to find little favor with the South
itself, a multitude of other schemes are brought to the front.

The _Age-Herald_, of Birmingham, Ala., claims a patent (which it says
others are infringing) for the scheme which it thus sets forth:

"The Negroes could be induced to emigrate to a Western Territory, if it
were set apart for their especial use without any force being used to
compel them to go."

A writer in the Richmond _Dispatch_ proposes that the Negroes in the
South be induced to voluntarily emigrate to Brazil, Mexico or other
countries where they are wanted, and even the old plan of fifty years
ago, to return them to Africa is again brought forward. To this last
suggestion, the _Yonkers Statesman_ replies:

The notion that the black can be successfully re-shipped to
Africa dies hard; but there are few things plainer than that he
has no desire and no purpose to be thus disposed of, but regards
this land as being as much his as it is the white man's. It
would be hard to dispute his title, grounded as it is in age and
effective service. The Negro believes he belongs here, and here
he means to remain; and the prospect that his mind can be
changed is certainly not very cheering.

The _Times-Democrat_ of New Orleans thinks that the true solution is
white immigration, but the _Daily Express_ of San Antonio, Texas,
replies: "The principal objection to this scheme is that the Negro will
not go till the white immigrants come, and the white immigrants will not
come until the Negro goes."

Congressman Oates, of Alabama, advocates the disfranchisement of the
Negroes, or rather as a Democrat he suggests that the Republicans do it.
He says that as the Republicans gave him the ballot, the South would
cheerfully acquiesce if they should take it away from him. But it is not
likely that the Republican administration will lead off in such a
movement. Indeed, from present appearances, the new President is looking
in exactly the opposite direction.


WISER VIEWS.

There are men, however, in the South, wise, conscientious and "to the
manner born," who take entirely different views of this great problem.
The Hon. J.L.M. Curry, once a General in the Confederate Army,
subsequently the efficient Secretary of the Peabody Fund, more recently
our Minister in Spain, and now again at his post as Secretary of the
Peabody Fund, utters himself in this forcible language:

"I want to say to you, in perfect frankness, that the man who
thinks the Negro problem has been settled is either a fanatic or
a fool. I stand aghast at the problem. I don't believe
civilization ever encountered one of greater magnitude. It casts
a dark shadow over your churches, your government of the future.
It is a great problem which will tax your energies. Your
ancestors and mine a few years ago were cannibals and pagans.
They have become what they are, not by virtue of white skin, but
by improving government and good laws. You let the Negro
children get an education where yours do not, let the Negro be
superior to you in culture and property, and you will have a
black man's government. Improvement, cultivation, education is
the secret, the condition and guarantee of race supremacy. I
will astonish you, perhaps, by saying that if the Negro develops
and becomes in culture, property and civilization, superior to
the white man, the Negro ought to rule. You see to it that he
does not become so. The responsibility rests with you."

Rev. A.G. Haygood, D.D., Secretary of the Slater Fund, closes a review
of Senator Eustis's recent paper in these earnest words:

Whatever political theory men form or oppose; whatever their
speculative opinions about the origin of races; whatever their
notions concerning color or caste; whatever their relations
heretofore to slavery and what went along with it, this is
absolutely certain: no question involving the rights and wrongs
of men, civilized or savage, white or black, was ever yet
settled so that it would stay settled by any system of mere
repression. And to those who believe in Jesus Christ it is
equally certain that nothing can be rightly settled that is not
settled in harmony with the teachings of the Sermon on the
Mount. If there be a Divine Providence no good man need be
afraid to do right to-day; nay, he will fear only doing wrong.

* * * * *


THE TRAINING OF COLORED STUDENTS FOR THE EPISCOPAL MINISTRY.

A very interesting discussion occurred in the Missionary Council of the
Episcopal Church, held in Washington, D.C., November 13th and 14th, in
regard to the education of colored students for the ministry in the
Episcopal Church. The motive for not educating them in the existing
Episcopal Seminaries appeared to be simply the caste-prejudice, and some
marked utterances and facts were given on that subject, which we wish to
preserve.

The Bishop of Kentucky, whose generous feelings toward the colored race
we have had occasion to notice heretofore, quoted from another, and
endorsed for himself, the declaration: "The white man is not fit to
study for the ministry who is not ready to have his black brother sit by
him in the class room," and he subsequently added: "I believe I can
speak for my brothers, and I say out of my heart I would just as soon
sit by the side of a black man if he were in the House of Bishops, as
one of my white brothers." But yet the Bishop suggested and endorsed the
plan for the separate education of colored students, for two reasons:
(1) "The power of heredity is not to be overthrown in a day nor an
hour... This subtle spirit of caste is perhaps the demon hardest to cast
out of the human spirit, the one that requires the most prayer and
fasting, without which it will not go out," and (2) "It is certainly
true that the colored men themselves do not want to go there. It is just
as true that the white men do not want to have them there."

As to the first point, it is to be regretted that the good Bishop did
not give himself to fasting and prayer to cast out this malignant demon,
rather than to yield to it, and that he did not heed the words which
Jesus uttered when his disciples could not cast out a demon, "_Bring him
hither to me._" If bishops and churches will only bring this demon of
caste to Jesus, the work will be done.

The Bishop's second point, that the colored people desired the
separation, was pointedly answered by Dr. Crummell (rector of St. Luke's
Colored Church, Washington,) who was invited to speak on the subject.
Dr. Crummell said: "I do not think that any man in this country has seen
any statement by any number of black men or black students that they
wanted to be by themselves. I do not think such an utterance can be
found among the race. I myself never heard such a thing, and wherever
they have had entrance to other schools they have gone to them."

The decision reached by the Council was to erect, in connection with
some of the colored universities in the South, a hall under Episcopal
control for colored Episcopal students for the ministry, who should also
attend the college classes in the University. So far as the principle is
concerned, we regret this decision. How much better if the wealthy and
intelligent Episcopal Church in this country had lent its vast influence
in repudiating the spirit of caste by introducing colored theological
students into its own excellent seminaries.

* * * * *


A MONTHLY CONCERT AND SUPPLEMENT.

BY REV. EDWIN N. ANDREWS.

Do they say the monthly concert is dull? If so, it is likely owing to
one or two causes like the following, (1) Perhaps only two or three
families take any missionary Magazine, hence but little information can
be expected. People are not interested in what they know nothing of. Or,
(2) there is a lack of preparation and purpose to make the meeting
interesting on the part of those to whom the leader ought to look for
help.

However, our last meeting took a rather interesting turn. It had been of
the average sort only, when towards the close one of the ladies spoke of
a call among the Freedmen for dolls and clothing, (not clothing for
dolls). The pastor suggested that we gather together, from the families,
various contributions, such as partly-worn garments, toys, books,
religious papers, etc., and make a New Year's donation to the people to
whom such things would be a god-send and good as new.

The suggestion was favored, and the animated countenances and talk that
followed betokened an after-meeting of unusual interest, and certainly
the most practical if not the best part of our conference. Something to
do, then and there, had been suggested; tongues were somehow set loose;
each one seemed to have a new-born interest, each held common stock in
the enterprise. Dr. Roy was consulted by the pastor as to a proper and
responsible party. Meanwhile the goods began to come in, often sent by
the boys or girls, who thus began to do missionary service, The pastor's
wife and daughter did the packing. Picture cards were pasted in cloth
folios for the little ones; old hats were trimmed; coats and vests went
in, shawls, Bibles, toys, etc., till a barrel, a large sugar barrel,
take notice, was crammed.

After awhile there came the address of a colored graduate of Tougaloo
University, living at or near Chattanooga, whose name was marked on one
end of the barrel, and the freight sent forward. After some delay, the
letter of acknowledgment came, saying, "The barrel came safe. The things
are just what so many of the people need, and they will go to those most
in need. Accept our thanks."

This letter will be read at our next concert, which should be a
thanksgiving occasion for the opportunity of doing something for the
destitute, and for the discovery of a way to make a monthly concert
interesting.

* * * * *


NOTES FROM NEW ENGLAND.

BY DISTRICT SECRETARY C.J. RYDER.

Here comes a gift of five dollars from an aged friend ninety-one years
old! He has contributed to the A.M.A. every year for a generation. Who
will step into the place of these grand veterans when they are called
from the ranks? Such examples ought to thrill younger men and untie
their purse strings.

* * * * *

At a recent visit to Wellesley College, the great company of students
listened patiently more than an hour to the story of the "American
Highlanders; where they are, who they are, and what the A.M.A. is doing
for them."

This interest on their part is characteristic of the intelligent people
throughout New England. The churches are asking for information
concerning these most interesting mountaineers, and are prayerfully
considering their duty toward them. In view of this general interest, I
give in these notes this month the following review of a book which I
have been requested by several New England pastors to present in THE
AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

_The Loyal Mountaineers of Tennessee._ By Thomas William Humes, S.T.D.
Ogden Brothers & Co.: Knoxville, Tenn.

Another interesting book on the Mountain people of the South. Those who
are familiar with the mountain missions of the A.M.A. will hail this new
volume with special delight. Those who read it will understand better
the magnitude and importance of this great field into which the A.M.A.
has pushed out its vanguard, and the necessity of following up these
advances with a solid phalanx of intelligent and enthusiastic
missionaries. This historical sketch brings prominently before us the
heroic manhood of these American Highlanders during the years of bitter
and systematic persecution by the rebel government. There is stuff in
these Highland chieftains and their clans!

Three facts that stand out from the pages of this history must intensify


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary — Volume 43, No. 03, March, 1889 → online text (page 1 of 6)