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[Illustration: IN FRONT OF THE THEATER AT THE TIME OF THE FIRE, December
30th, 1903, 4 P.M.]




"LEST WE FORGET"


Chicago's Awful Theater Horror


By THE SURVIVORS AND RESCUERS


WITH INTRODUCTION BY
BISHOP FALLOWS


Presenting a Vivid Picture, both by Pen and Camera,
of One of the Greatest Fire Horrors of Modern Times.


Embracing a Flash-Light Sketch of the Holocaust,
Detailed Narratives by Participants in the Horror,
Heroic Work of Rescuers, Reports of the Building
Experts as to the Responsibility for the Wholesale
Slaughter of Women and Children, Memorable Fires
of the Past, etc., etc.


PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED WITH VIEWS OF THE SCENE OF
DEATH BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE FIRE


MEMORIAL PUBLISHING CO.




Copyright, 1904, by
D. B. McCURDY




[Illustration: HON. CARTER H. HARRISON, Mayor of Chicago.]

[Illustration: LEADING ACTRESS IN THE "BLUEBEARD, JR.," COMPANY. MISS
BONNIE MAGINN.]

[Illustration: DOOR TO THE FIRE ESCAPE THAT COULD NOT BE OPENED; MANY DIED
HERE.]

[Illustration: FRONT VIEW OF THE IROQUOIS THEATER.]

[Illustration: MEASURING THE EXIT WHERE HUNDREDS WERE KILLED AND BURNED.]

[Illustration: FIREMEN RESCUING THE LIVING.]

[Illustration: JEWELRY AND CLOTHING OF THE VICTIMS OF THE FIRE.]

[Illustration: IN FRONT OF THE THEATER; LAYING DEAD ON THE SIDEWALK.]

[Illustration: FRONT ROWS OF SEATS AND FRONT OF STAGE.]

[Illustration: RUINS ON THE STAGE.]

[Illustration: SKYLIGHT ON ROOF OF THEATER, WHICH WAS NAILED DOWN DURING
THE FIRE.]

[Illustration: BACK PART OF THE THEATER WHILE THE FIRE RAGED.]




INTRODUCTION.

By the RT. REV. SAMUEL FALLOWS, D.D., LL.D.


When Chicago was burning, a little girl in a christian home in a
neighboring city stamped her foot indignantly on the floor and said: "Why
doesn't God put out the fire?"

The cry of many an agonized heart, beating in children of a larger growth,
has been: "Why doesn't a God of wisdom and love prevent such an awful
occurrence as the Iroquois fire?" "I have lost all faith in God," said a
dear friend of mine, as its full meaning began to break upon him.

When we were carrying out the dying and the dead from that horrible
darkness and choking smoke to the outer air, those of us who were wont to
pray could only say, "O God have mercy! O God have mercy!"

But there must be no panic in our faculties. Reason must not desert her
rightful throne. Blinded by tears, we must not in our consuming passion of
resentment against the sickening catastrophe, attempt with our puny arms
to strike against God. He did not cause the calamity. No responsibility
for it can be rolled upon Him. God is law; and his laws had been palpably
broken by human negligence and incompetency. God is love; and human greed
and selfishness had violated every principle of love which "worketh no ill
to his neighbor."

God cannot coerce man, as one by sheer brute force can another. The savage
father may break both the body and soul of his child. Not so God, those of
his children. Man must render a voluntary obedience to the Divine command.
By pains and crosses and sorrows and shame he may be led to that
surrender. But he must say with a free, princely spirit at last, "I will
to do thy will O God."

It is the old problem of evil with which this terrible tragedy has brought
us face to face. The generic evil, out of which all evils spring, every
giant intellect of the ages has grappled with, and it has thrown them all.
The question is not "Why should God permit this special evil to come to
us, which has well nigh paralyzed our city and thrilled the civilized
world both with horror and sympathy, but why did he create the world at
all and put man upon it?" The finite cannot measure the Infinite.
Imperfection belongs to the one; perfection to the other. Where there is
imperfection there is always the possibility of evil.

A reverent faith will bow before the mystery and yet master it with an
undaunted courage. Evil must exist if the Universe is to be. The Universe
is, and it is the best possible Universe God can create. If he could have
given us a better one he would not be the God we revere.

Evil is the vast, dark background against which He brings out the
brightest pictures of beauty and life. From a "Paradise Lost" comes forth
a "Paradise Regained" with its transcendent glory of progress, and
allegiance to law and love.

"Calvary and Easter Day,
Earth's saddest day and gladdest day,
Were but one day apart."

God did not forsake his son in that supreme hour of anguish upon the
Cross, when he cried out "My God, My God, why hast thou forsaken me?" He
has never forsaken his world, nor the sinning and suffering souls that are
in it. "God in history," is faith's jubilant assertion. He is in its
minutest incidents and in its mightiest events, "in the rocking of a
baby's cradle and the shaking of a monarch's throne," in the fiery furnace
of the Iroquois Theater and in the most joyous assembly of his adoring
saints.

God permitted this great evil in harmony with man's free will; he did not
cause it. The evidence is overwhelming that human law, as well as divine
law, had been consciously or unconsciously defied. Two thousand lives or
more were brought together in a building professedly fire-proof, and
warranted as the best, because the latest of its kind, in the city if not
of the continent. It was not fire proof. The law forbade the crowding of
aisles; they were filled from end to end, until almost every inch of
standing room was taken up. The unusual number of exits was boasted of.
Most of them were unseen or actually bolted and locked. The alleged fire
proof curtain was a flimsy sham, and was resolved in almost a moment of
time, into scattered fragments by the surging flames. The scenery was of
the most combustible material, loaded down with paint and oil. Not a
bucket of water was on the stage, and only one water stand-pipe without
any hose. There never had been a fire apparatus of any kind in the balcony
or the gallery. There was none in the auditorium except one small water
stand pipe. There was not a fireman to answer the call for help. At no
time had there been a fire drill by the employes of the theater. There
were no notices posted to tell what to do in case of fire. There was no
fire alarm box anywhere in the structure. Common prudence and common sense
were completely set aside. Coroner Traeger in advance of the final finding
of the jury, is reported to have said: "Sufficient proof has been already
found to show that there was gross mismanagement and carelessness. There
is no need of denial. Instead of being the safest theater in Chicago, the
Iroquois was the unsafest."

But He who "maketh the wrath of man to praise him," who is ever bringing
good out of evil, will overrule and is already overruling this dire
calamity for the well being of mankind.

As I looked upon the charred and mangled and bruised bodies of tender
women and little children and once strong men; as I listened to the moans
of agony, and the cry of the living, tortured ones for help and for loved
friends whom they had left behind or been separated from as the fiery
blast swept them onward and outward, I said in my haste, "you all are
'martyrs by the pang without the palm'." I do not say it now. Martyrs
indeed they were, by the criminal neglect of recreant men. But the palm is
theirs. They have saved others, themselves they could not save. Thousands,
perhaps millions, will in the future be secure in their places of resort,
because these went on that fateful day to their inevitable doom. Mayors,
architects, fire-inspectors, managers, stage carpenters, electricians,
ushers and chiefs of police in every city have had their duty burned into
their inmost consciousness by this consuming fire.

Human law, which has been so flagrantly set at naught, demands punishment.
The public conscience will be outraged if the guilty parties do not meet
stern, inexorable justice. It is not vengeance that is sought, for
"Vengeance is mine, I will repay, saith the Lord."

But those who are immediately responsible, have not been the only
transgressors, although they must suffer for their own guilt, and also
vicariously for the sins of omission by others. For we have all sinned and
come short of our duty. A common blame rests upon the whole community.
Many a minister has been preaching upon the fire, but has his own church,
perhaps crowded to the door, been safe while his eager congregation has
listened to his impassioned utterances? Suppose the unexpected had
happened, and the cry of fire had been heard and bursting flames been
seen, would his hearers have escaped unhurt? Not if the church doors swung
inward instead of outward; not if the means of escape were not abundant;
not if camp chairs blocked the passages to the street. Who then would have
been responsible? The clergymen, the church officers, the janitor, with
the municipal or legal authorities would have had to share the blame.

Nearly two score of our city school teachers perished in the theater. How
many school buildings are in such an imperfect condition today that
thousands of young lives are in constant danger? Suppose again the
unexpected should happen and tragedies be enacted which might even surpass
the Iroquois disaster, would the Mayor, and his subordinates and the Board
of Education and the teachers be held guiltless? Yet that fearful
contingency might have taken place.

It is a question seriously to be considered whether or not the great
majority of the apartment buildings in Chicago have the doors of the main
entrance swinging outwards. I have climbed to the fourth and fifth stories
of some of these edifices in which there are dark, narrow stair cases, and
all the doors swing inwards. There is not a single element of fire
proofing in them. I have gone up, in open elevators, in manufactories and
office buildings where scores and hundreds of persons are employed, and
have never felt safe a moment while remaining in them. They are fire traps
of the worst description.

There are hotels whose very construction invites the devouring flames.
There are stores crowded literally with thousands of persons on special
occasions, where the consequences in case of fire would eclipse by far the
Iroquois holocaust. No coaxing, or pleading, or grafting, or business
considerations should stand in the way both of speedy condemnation and
renovation in all these cases by our city officers.

Man is greater than Mammon. The sanctity of human life must be held
supreme. The body is more than raiment and the soul than the body. A new
civic spirit must pervade the people as the saltness the sea. Duty must
tower infinitely above self-indulgence. Law must take the place of luck.

The plain lesson for our whole country and the world is to be alert to
meet the dangers which may menace human life in the home, the workshop,
the manufactory, the hotel, the theater, the church. Let ample means of
exit be provided and always known to audiences. The tendency to a panic is
always increased when people are apprehensive of danger and believe that
they are hemmed in. Fear is contagious. A crowd feels and does not reason.
Self-preservation, the first law of nature, asserts itself the more
vehemently when the way of escape is uncertain. Panics may not always be
prevented, but their dangers will be greatly diminished if every
individual knows that he may with comparative leisure get out when he
wishes so to do.

In the theater let it be known that every modern contrivance has been
employed to secure safety. Let the curtain be of steel and so arranged
that it will have full play to work in its grooves. Let automatic
sprinklers be provided. Let the firemen in costume be in plain sight. Let
the policemen be in full evidence. Let the aisles always be clear. Let
there be ample room between the seats, and let the seats be easily raised
to afford rapid departure. Let the ushers be drilled like soldiers to keep
their places and allay confusion. All these and other things of like
character appeal forcibly to the reasoning powers and tend to give an
audience self command.

In many of our public schools the pupils are occasionally called from
their rooms, during recitation hours, and promptly assembling are marched
in an orderly way out of the building. This is an excellent plan.

Two marked instances of superb self-control among children in the panic at
the Iroquois theater have been brought to my notice. Two little daughters
of a highly esteemed friend slid down the balusters from the upper balcony
and reached the main floor unhurt. One of my Sunday School teachers met a
young lad she knew, leading by the hand a girl younger than himself to her
home. They were sitting together when the stampede took place. "Jump on my
shoulders," said the boy. Then holding her fast by her feet, he said: "Now
use your fists and fight for all you're worth." Bending his head he forced
his way with his conquering heroine to life. Let every safeguard that
human ingenuity can devise be furnished and yet there always remains the
personal element to be taken into the account. Habitual practice of
self-control in daily life will help give coolness and calmness in times
of peril. Keeping one's head in the ordinary things prevents its losing
when the extraordinary occurs.

Samuel Fallows.




TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

CHAPTER I.

THE STORY OF THE FIRE 33

WAVE OF FLAME GREETS AUDIENCE - FEW REALIZE APPALLING
RESULT - DROP WHERE THEY STAND - MANY HEROES ARE
DEVELOPED - DEAD PILED IN HEAPS - EXITS WERE CHOKED
WITH BODIES - SURVEY SCENE WITH HORROR - FIND BUSHELS
OF PURSES.


CHAPTER II.

FIRST AID TO THE INJURED AND CARE FOR THE DEAD 51

GREAT PILES OF CHARRED BODIES FOUND EVERYWHERE IN THE
THEATER - MOAN INSPIRES WORKERS IN MAD EFFORT TO
SAVE - NONE LEFT ALIVE IN GALLERY - DEAD AND DYING
CARRIED INTO NEARBY RESTAURANT BY SCORES - TERRIBLE
REALITY COMES TO AWESTRICKEN CROWD - ONE LIFE BROUGHT
BACK FROM DEATH - ONE HUNDRED FEET IN AIR, POLICE
CARRY INJURED ACROSS ALLEY - CROWDS OF ANXIOUS
FRIENDS - BALCONY AND GALLERY CLEARED - FINANCE
COMMITTEE OF CITY COUNCIL ACTS PROMPTLY.


CHAPTER III.

TAKING AWAY AND IDENTIFYING THE DEAD 67

HEARTRENDING SCENES WITNESSED AT THE UNDERTAKING
ESTABLISHMENTS - FRIENDS AND RELATIVES EAGERLY SEARCH
FOR LOVED ONES MISSING AFTER THEATER HOLOCAUST.


CHAPTER IV.

SCENES OF HORROR AS VIEWED FROM THE STAGE 77

STORY OF HOW A SMALL BLAZE TERMINATED IN TERRIBLE
LOSS - ORCHESTRA PLAYS IN FACE OF DEATH - CLOWN PROVES
A HERO - ALL HOPE LOST FOR GALLERY.


CHAPTER V.

EXCITING EXPERIENCES IN THE FIRE 86

EXPERIENCE OF CHICAGO UNIVERSITY MEN - BISHOP BRAVES
DANGER IN HEROIC WORK OF RESCUE - WOMEN AND FOUR
CHILDREN SUFFER - LEARNS CHILDREN HAVE ESCAPED - FINDS
HIS DAUGHTER - MR. FIELD'S NARRATIVE - NARROW ESCAPES
OF YOUNG AND OLD - PULLS WOMEN FROM MASS ON FLOOR.


CHAPTER VI.

HEROES OF THE FIRE 94

PILES OF DEAD IN THE GALLERY - EDDIE FOY'S HEROISM - AN
ELEVATOR BOY HERO - TWO BALCONY HEROES - THE MUSICAL
DIRECTOR'S STORY - CHILD SAVES HIS BROTHER.


CHAPTER VII.

THE ORIGIN OF THE FIRE - THE ASBESTOS CURTAIN AND THE
LIGHTS 105

ACCOUNT OF THE FIRE'S ORIGIN - WERE ELECTRIC LIGHTS
TURNED OUT? - STATEMENT OF MESSRS. DAVIS AND POWERS,
MANAGERS OF THE THEATER - FIRST RELIABLE STATEMENT AS
TO WHY THE CURTAIN DID NOT COME DOWN - ANOTHER STORY
AS TO WHY THE CURTAIN DID NOT LOWER - THE THEATER
FIREMAN'S NARRATIVE - THE STAGE CARPENTER - THE CHIEF
ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR'S TALE - ONE OF THE COMEDIANS
SPEAKS - ABOUT THE LIGHTS.


CHAPTER VIII.

SUGGESTIONS OF ARCHITECTS AND OTHER EXPERTS AS TO
AVOIDING LIKE CALAMITIES 116

ROBERT S. LINDSTROM'S SUGGESTIONS - THE ARCHITECT
SPEAKS - EXAMINATION BY ARCHITECTURAL EDITOR - PROPOSED
PRECAUTIONS FOR NEW YORK THEATERS.


CHAPTER IX.

THIRTY EXITS, YET HUNDREDS PERISH IN AWFUL BLAST 123

HORRIBLE SIGHT MET THE FIREMEN UPON ENTERING
AUDITORIUM - THE GALLERY HORROR - GIRL'S MIRACULOUS
ESCAPE - AN ACCOUNT FROM THE BOXES - INSPECTION AFTER
THE FIRE - A YOUNG HEROINE - A NARROW ESCAPE - FINDS
WIFE IN HOSPITAL - A MIRACULOUS AND UNCONSCIOUS
ESCAPE - LITTLE GIRL'S MARVELOUS ESCAPE - FOUR
GENERATIONS REPRESENTED - DAUGHTERS AND
GRANDDAUGHTERS GONE.


CHAPTER X.

HOW THE NEW YEAR WAS USHERED IN 137

MOURNING IN EVERY STREET - NOISE SEEMS A SACRILEGE -
MAYOR ASKS FOR SILENCE - MERRIMENT IS SUBDUED - CITY
OF MOURNING - BUSINESS WORLD IN MOURNING.


CHAPTER XI.

A SABBATH OF WOE 143

SEVEN TURNER VICTIMS - SAD SCENES AT WOLFF HOME -
PATHETIC SCENE AT CHURCH - BURY CHILDREN AND
GRAND-CHILDREN - FIVE DEAD IN ONE HOUSE - ENTIRE FAMILY
IS BURIED - MRS. FOX AND THREE CHILDREN - MRS. ARTHUR
E. HULL AND CHILDREN - HERBERT AND AGNES LANGE -
SWEETHEARTS BURIED AT THE SAME TIME - FIVE BURIED IN
ONE GRAVE - BOYS AS PALLBEARERS - WINNETKA SADDENED -
MOTHER AND DAUGHTERS BURIED TOGETHER - HOLD TRIPLE
FUNERAL - WOMEN FAINT IN CHURCH - LIFE-LONG FRIENDS
MEET IN DEATH - EDWARD AND MARGARET DEE - MISS E. D.
MANN AND NIECE - ELLA AND EDITH FRECKELTON - MISS
FRANCES LEHMAN.


CHAPTER XII.

WHAT OF THE PLAYERS? 152

THE CHORUS GIRL - THE MUSICAL DIRECTOR - THE JOY OF
THE OPENING - SPENDTHRIFT HABITS - GAMBLING, PURE AND
SIMPLE - THE SHOW ON THE ROAD - THE ONE-NIGHT STAND -
THE "MR. BLUEBEARD" COMPANY.


CHAPTER XIII.

OTHER HOLOCAUSTS 181


CHAPTER XIV.

STORIES AND NARRATIVES OF THE HOLOCAUST 193

MRS. SCHWEITZLER'S STORY OF THE BURNING OF THE
CURTAIN - ESCAPE OF MOTHER AND TWO SMALL CHILDREN -
EXPRESSION OF THE DEAD - ONLY SURVIVOR OF LARGE
THEATER PARTY - ALL HIS FAMILY GONE - A FAMILY PARTY
BURNED - CARRIES DAUGHTER'S BODY HOME IN HIS ARMS - SAD
ERROR IN IDENTIFICATION - THE HANGER OF THE ASBESTOS
CURTAIN - KEEPSAKES OF THE DEAD - THE SCENE AT
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT - LIKE A FIELD OF BATTLE - WOMEN
EAGER TO HELP - STEADY STREAM OF BODIES - CLOTHING TORN
TO SHREDS - PRAYERS FOR THE DYING - CHILD SAVED FROM
DEATH BY BALLET GIRL - PRIEST GIVES ABSOLUTION TO
DYING FIRE VICTIMS - LITTLE BOY THANKS GOD FOR
CHANGING HIS LUCK - USE PLACER MINER METHODS - DAUGHTER
OF A. H. REVELL ESCAPES - PHILADELPHIA PARTNER IN
THEATER HORRIFIED - ALL KENOSHA IN MOURNING - FIVE OF
ONE FAMILY DEAD - COOPER BROTHERS DEEPLY MOURNED.


CHAPTER XV.

SOCIETY WOMEN AND GIRLS' CLUBS 214

MISS CHARLOTTE PLAMONDON'S ACCOUNT OF THE FIRE -
SCREAMS OF TERROR HEARD - CHORUS GIRLS ESCAPE, PARTLY
CLAD - FOY TRIES TO PREVENT PANIC - ESCAPE OF ANOTHER
SOCIETY WOMAN - MINNEAPOLIS WOMAN'S STORY OF THE
FIRE - GIRLS' CLUBS SORELY STRICKEN.


CHAPTER XVI. 220

EDDIE FOY'S SWORN TESTIMONY - DESCRIBES STAGE
BOX - CURTAIN WOULD NOT COME DOWN - LIGHT NEAR THE
FIRE - SAW NO EXTINGUISHERS - TALKS OF APPARATUS - ONLY
ONE EXIT OPEN - WIRE ACROSS AUDITORIUM.


CHAPTER XVII.

EFFECT OF THE FIRE NEAR AND FAR 230

NEW YORK THEATERS AND SCHOOLS - CRUSADE IN PITTSBURG -
WASHINGTON THEATER OWNERS ARRESTED - MASSACHUSETTS
THEATERS INVESTIGATED - ACTION IN MILWAUKEE -
PRECAUTIONS AT ST. LOUIS - ORDERS AFFECTING OMAHA
THEATERS - EFFECT ABROAD - HORROR FELT IN LONDON -
LONDON THEATER PRECAUTIONS - PRESENT RULES FOR LONDON
THEATERS - CURTAIN OFTEN TESTED - CLOSE WATCH FOR
FIRE - TREE TELLS OF RUSE - FORTUNE FOR SAFETY - W. C.
ZIMMERMAN ON EUROPEAN THEATERS - THE EFFECT ON GAY
PARIS - UPHEAVAL OF BERLIN THEATRICAL WORLD - MR.
SHAVER ON BERLIN THEATERS - VIENNA RECALLS A HORROR
OF ITS OWN - THE NETHERLANDS AND SCANDINAVIA.


CHAPTER XVIII.

SUGGESTIONS FOR SAFE THEATERS 243

FRANCIS WILSON SAYS "NO STEPS" - STAIRCASES WITH
RAILINGS - PRECAUTIONS ENFORCED IN LONDON - WHAT THE
CHICAGO CITY ENGINEER SAYS - OPINION OF A FIREPROOF
EXPERT - ILLUMINATED EXIT SIGNS.


CHAPTER XIX.

THE SWORN TESTIMONY OF THE SURVIVORS 251

THE FIRST WITNESS - MARLOWE'S EXPERIENCE - MUSICAL
DIRECTOR'S SWORN STATEMENT - MRS. PETRY'S ESCAPE - UP
AGAINST LOCKED DOORS - BLOWN INTO THE ALLEY - JUST OUT
IN TIME - SPORTING MEN TESTIFY - AN ELGIN PHYSICIAN'S
TALE - MR. MENHARD'S DIFFICULT EXIT - THE THEATER
ENGINEER - A SCHOOL GIRL'S ACCOUNT.


CHAPTER XX.

LACK OF FIRE SAFEGUARDS 271

A UNIVERSITY STUDENT'S STORY - A CLERGYMAN'S STORY -
THE FLY MAN'S STORY - SCHOOL TEACHER'S THRILLING
EXPERIENCE - GLEN VIEW MAN'S EXPERIENCE - THE LIGHT
OPERATOR - THE JAMMED THEATER - GAS EXPLOSION HOURS
BEFORE THE FIRE - PANIC AMONG THEATER EMPLOYEES - AN
EX-USHER'S WORDS.


CHAPTER XXI.

IRON GATES, DEATH'S ALLY 300

EVIDENCE OF GEORGE M. DUSENBERRY, SUPERINTENDENT OF
THE THEATER - PURPOSE OF THE TWO IRON GATES - NEVER
ANY FIRE DRILLS - GATES WERE BATTERED - DIDN'T BOTHER
ABOUT LOCKED DOORS.


CHAPTER XXII.

DANCED IN PRESENCE OF DEATH 306


CHAPTER XXIII.

JOIN TO AVENGE SLAUGHTER OF INNOCENTS 312

ATTORNEY T. D. KNIGHT SPEAKS - CORONER'S WORK
THROUGH - REMARKS BY ELIZABETH HALEY.


CHAPTER XXIV.

AWFUL PROPHECY FULFILLED 317

MOURNING AND INDIGNATION - NOTHING ELSE SO
HORRIBLE - UNFORTUNATE VICTIMS - FIRE! FIRE! - BEFORE
THE DISASTER - THE HOLOCAUST - THE STAMPEDE BEGINS -
ONE OF STUPENDOUS HORRORS - CURSED AND BLASPHEMED -
DEAD BODIES FOUND - SUDDENLY AND FOREVER PARTED - THE
FRENZY OF FRIENDS - TOO HORRIBLE TO DWELL UPON - HOW
THE THEATERS SHOULD BE BUILT.


CHAPTER XXV.

LIST OF THE DEAD 325


CHAPTER XXVI.

THE STORY OF THE BURNING OF BALTIMORE 357




MEMORIAL PRAYER.

The Rt. Rev. Samuel Fallows wrote this prayer for Chicago on its appointed
day of mourning. It is a prayer for all mourners of all creeds:

"O God, our Heavenly Father, we pray for an unshaken faith in Thy
goodness as our hearts are bowed in anguish before Thee.

Come with Thy touch of healing to those who are suffering fiery pain.

Open wide the gates of Paradise to the dying.

Comfort with the infinite riches of Thy grace the bereaved and
mourning ones.

Forgive and counteract all our sins of omission and commission.

All this we ask for Thy dear name and mercy's sake. Amen."




MEMORIAL HYMN.

Bishop Muldoon selected as the one familiar hymn most deeply expressive of
the city's mourning, "Lead, Kindly Light," which he declared should be the
united song of all Chicagoans on Memorial Day.

"Lead, kindly Light, amid th' encircling gloom,
Lead Thou me on;
The night is dark, and I am far from home,
Lead Thou me on.
Keep Thou my feet; I do not ask to see
The distant scene; one step enough for me.

I was not ever thus, nor prayed that Thou
Shouldst lead me on;
I loved to choose and see my path; but now
Lead Thou me on.
I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears,
Pride ruled my will: remember not past years.

So long Thy power hath blessed me, sure it still
Will lead me on
O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent, till
The night is gone,
And with the morn those angel faces smile,
Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile."




POEM BY A CHILD VICTIM.

The following poem, written by Walter Bissinger, a boy victim of the
Iroquois Theater fire, fifteen years old, was composed two years ago, in
honor of the tenth anniversary of the youthful poet's uncle and aunt, Mr.
and Mrs. Max Pottlitzer, of Lafayette, Ind., whose son Jack, aged ten,
perished with his cousin in the terrible disaster:


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