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FAVORITE
FAIRY TALES

THE CHILDHOOD CHOICE
OF REPRESENTATIVE
MEN AND WOMEN


ILLUSTRATED
BY
PETER NEWELL


[Illustration]


NEW YORK AND LONDON
HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
MCMVII




Copyright, 1907, by Harper & Brothers.

_All rights reserved._
Published October, 1907.




[Illustration: "Can't you render me some assistance?"
See p. 209]




CONTENTS


JACK THE GIANT-KILLER. Charles Perrault

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Arthur Twining Hadley
President of Yale University
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler
President of Columbia University
Dr. Henry M. Alden
Editor of _Harper's Magazine_
J. F. Hosic
Professor of English, The Chicago Normal School
J. M. Pereles
Chairman of the Wisconsin Free Library Commission


CINDERELLA; OR, THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER. Charles Perrault

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Thomas R. Lounsbury
Professor of English Yale University
Dr. J. H. Canfield
Librarian of Columbia University
The Honorable John Bigelow
Author and Publicist
J. M. Pereles
And the Children of The Honorable Grover Cleveland


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK. Charles Perrault

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler
Dr. Hamilton Wright Mabie
President of the New York Free Kindergarten
Association. Associate Editor of _The Outlook_


THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOOD. Charles Perrault

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Shailer Mathews
Professor of Systematic Theology in the University
of Chicago. Editor of _The World To-day_
Dr. Hamilton Wright Mabie
Dr. Henry Van Dyke
Author. Professor of English Literature in
Princeton University


LITTLE RED-RIDING-HOOD. Charles Perrault

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Henry M. Alden


THE UGLY DUCKLING. Hans Christian Andersen

_This Story is the Choice of:_
The Honorable William J. Bryan
Publicist and Editor
Miss Jane Addams
Head Resident of Hull House, Chicago


HOP-O'-MY-THUMB.

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Henry James
Author


BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. From the French of Madame Gabrielle de
Villeneuve

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Mrs. Julia Ward Howe
Author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic"


LITTLE SNOWDROP.

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Howard Pyle
Artist and Author


THE STORY OF THE THREE BEARS. Robert Southey

_This Story is the Choice of:_
F. A. Kendall
Secretary of the Illinois Pupils' Reading Circle


SNOW-WHITE AND ROSE-RED. Grimm

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Frederick Dielman
President of the National Academy of Design


THE WILD SWANS. Hans Christian Andersen

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Henry Van Dyke
Mrs. Alice Meynell
Poet and Essayist


ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP.
"The Arabian Nights' Entertainments"

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Charles William Eliot
President of Harvard University
Dr. Henry Van Dyke
J. M. Pereles
Dr. Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain)
Author


ALI BABA AND THE FORTY THIEVES.
"The Arabian Nights' Entertainments"

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Samuel L. Clemens
Dr. Charles William Eliot
Dr. Lyman Abbott
Editor of _The Outlook_


THE SECOND VOYAGE OF SINDBAD THE SAILOR.
"The Arabian Nights' Entertainments"

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. Lyman Abbott


THE HISTORY OF ALI COGIA, A MERCHANT OF BAGDAD.
"The Arabian Nights' Entertainments"

_This Story is the Choice of:_
Dr. William Dean Howells
Author




ILLUSTRATIONS


"CAN'T YOU RENDER ME SOME ASSISTANCE?" _Frontispiece_

"I WILL BROIL YOU FOR MY BREAKFAST" _Facing p._ 2

THE SLIPPER FITTED EXACTLY " 48

JUST AS HE LAID HIS HAND UPON ONE OF THEM,
THE LITTLE DOG BARKED MOST FURIOUSLY " 66

A YOUNG GIRL OF WONDERFUL BEAUTY LAY ASLEEP
ON AN EMBROIDERED BED " 82

HE ASKED HER POLITELY WHERE SHE WAS GOING " 88

SOME LITTLE CHILDREN THREW PIECES OF BREAD
INTO THE WATER " 114

THE CHILDREN BEGAN TO CRY AS LOUD AS THEY COULD " 120

SHE SAW AT HER FEET A HANDSOME, GRACEFUL YOUNG
PRINCE " 170

"OH, HEAVEN," THEY CRIED, "WHAT A LOVELY CHILD!" " 180

THE VOICE OF THE LITTLE, SMALL, WEE BEAR
AWAKENED HER AT ONCE " 200

ELISE SAW AN ICE PALACE, WITH ONE BOLD COLONNADE
BUILT ABOVE ANOTHER " 238

"I AM THE SLAVE OF THE RING, AND WILL OBEY THEE
IN ALL THINGS" " 260

CASSIM FORGETS THE MAGIC WORD " 294

THE MERCHANTS BEGAN THEIR SHOUTING TO FRIGHTEN
THE EAGLES " 318

THE CALIPH LISTENING TO THE CHILDREN'S COURT " 342


_Decorative borders by
Francis I. Bennett_




INTRODUCTION


What are the best fairy stories? Are they not those which have lived
most vividly in active minds? The ripeness of after life works its
changes; but we are not dealing with literary judgments - rather with
the choice of childhood which fortunately lingers in memory, whatever
store of wisdom may come in later years. There is here no question of
the new or unusual. On the contrary, it is the ideas or visions handed
down for generations or centuries and set in final form that remain
with us as types of fancy or wisdom. Of these there are so many that a
selection is essential. No one book can be a complete treasure-house
of all the imagination, humor, and sentiment of the fairy tale. But it
has been possible to obtain a representative judgment for this volume
which we believe to be of peculiar worth.

This book gives us the favorite fairy tales of men and women who have
gained eminence in American life. It is a book, therefore, based upon
an original plan, which stands by itself. Any collection formed by one
person must reflect personal preferences. It must have obvious
limitations, however excellent - as in the case of Miss Mulock or
Laboulaye - the choice of the single editor may be. But to a large
extent such a collection as this represents that consensus of opinion
which invests a given work with the rank of a classic. The desire of
the publishers has been to determine the youthful preferences of those
whose opinions carry weight and to present their selections among the
wealth of fairy tales which the world cherishes from one generation
to another. Such a thing as a collection of _all_ good fairy tales
would be unthinkably cumbersome. We need guidance and selection. For
the expressions of personal choice afforded in the interests of this
book, the publishers desire to offer their grateful acknowledgments.

It has happened naturally that more than one vote has been cast for
the same story. For example, the president of Yale, in his selection
of "Jack the Giant-killer," had the companionship of the president of
Columbia and of the editor of _Harper's Magazine_, who are really
represented, therefore, by a second choice. The three stories
preferred by the chairman of the Wisconsin Free Library Commission had
all been preferred by others.

But "Cinderella" is evidently quite the equal of "Jack the
Giant-killer" in the affections of readers, and the choice of this
well-loved tale has been accompanied by some charming letters from
which it is impossible not to quote.

Thus the Hon. John Bigelow writes: "Perrault's story of Cinderella
made the deepest impression upon me. It is the only one from which I
can now remember to have received a distinct and permanent ethical
impression."

"I am not really conscious of any special preference for one fairy
story over another," wrote Professor Lounsbury, "but as somebody, it
seems to me, ought to stand up for sentiment, I am going to vote for
'Cinderella.' I hesitated a moment about 'The Sleeping Beauty,' but I
leave that for one younger."

In a letter rich in personal quality, the Hon. Grover Cleveland wrote:
"My youthful days are so far away, and fairy stories had so little to
do with their enjoyment, that I do not feel that I ought to venture an
opinion on such an important subject as that to which you refer. For
want of a better thing to do, I have submitted the question to my
children, and so far as I am able to determine, the canvass of their
votes is in favor of 'Cinderella.' It is only fair to say that two of
the three to whom the question was submitted are little girls."

Another glimpse of domestic sympathy comes in the choice of the Hon.
William J. Bryan, editor and author, as well as publicist, who says:
"My wife assures me that I shall make no mistake if I commend the
tales of Hans Christian Andersen, notably that of 'The Ugly
Duckling.'"

It is a change from public life to the world of letters to find Dr.
Van Dyke and Dr. Mabie in agreement with Dr. Shailer Mathews regarding
the rank of "The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood." But it is not to this
that Dr. Van Dyke gives precedence. "If my memory serves me right," he
says, "the first fairy story which made a strong impression on my
mind in boyhood was that of 'Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp.' Next
after that in time, and, I think, a little beyond it in interest, came
the story of the 'Seven Wild Swans,' and next to that the story of
'The Sleeping Beauty.'"

As to "Hop o' My Thumb" we may be pardoned for quoting the close of a
singularly delightful letter from Mr. Henry James, who says: "It is
the vague memory of this sense of him, as some small, precious object,
like a lost gem or a rare and beautiful insect on which one might
inadvertently tread, or might find under the sofa or behind the
window-cushion, that leads me to think of 'Hop o' My Thumb' as my
earliest and sweetest and most repeated cupful at the fount of
fiction."

Quite literally a world removed from this was the answer of the modest
Japanese conqueror, General Kuroki, who laughed at first and
disclaimed Japan's possession of fairy tales as we understand them. "I
always tried to forget fairy tales," he said; "but of nursery stories
I think the most popular and the most widely known in Japan is the
story of Momotaro." But this tale of the "son of a peach," which
relates the conquest of a stronghold of devils, and the rescue of two
daughters of daimios does not come within the scope of this volume.

A broader choice than those which have been quoted is afforded by Mrs.
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, who writes: "As a child I was a great
reader and lover (and a small creator) of fairy tales. But of them all
the only ones which come readily to my mind are Hans Christian
Andersen's." Equally comprehensive is the answer of Mrs. Georgia A.
Kendrick, the lady principal of Vassar College: "Grimm's tales stand
to me for the best of that kind of lore."

An even more catholic liking breathes in the answer of President
Woodrow Wilson, who declares: "The truth is that I was so voracious of
fairy tales when I was a small boy, that I loved them all almost
equally well, and cannot now say that I had any favorite. All was
grist that came to my mill. I am very much interested in the
undertaking, and wish it all success."

In some cases, much to the regret of the publishers, it has not been
possible to include a choice. Thus Dr. John S. Billings, librarian of
the New York Public Library, tells us that the story which made the
most impression upon him was the "Nibelungenlied" as presented by
Carlyle in the _Westminster Review_ for July, 1831, of which an odd
number came in his way when he was a boy. "I did not understand one
quarter of it," Dr. Billings writes, "but what I did impressed me
greatly. If I had to select from Perrault's fairy tales, I should
probably agree with Dr. Hadley" - another tribute to the perennial
charm of "Jack the Giant-killer."

The interest of these personal literary experiences justify a
quotation from Dr. E. G. Cooley, superintendent of the Chicago
schools: "I was pretty well grown," he writes, "before any of this
literature reached me. My people were not believers in fairy stories,
and circumstances did not put them in my way. My boyhood hero was
Eumenes, as described in the second volume of Rollin's _Ancient
History_." Unfortunately the scope of the present volume has not
permitted the inclusion of Carlyle's version of the "Nibelungenlied"
or of Rollin's tale of Eumenes, or of the old ballad of "The Children
in the Wood," which was the choice of Dr. W. H. Maxwell, City
Superintendent of Schools in New York.

While the reply of that sincere nature-lover, John Burroughs,
represents a gospel of negation, yet there is a vivid suggestiveness
in the later interest of the man - one whose sympathies and perception
have remained fresh and wholly sincere. "The truth is," he writes, "I
knew no fairy stories in my youth. That kind of literature did not
come within my reach. Our school library held no novels or fairy
books. An old woman who visited our house used to tell us youngsters
the story of 'Jack and the Bean-stalk,' and 'Jack the Giant-killer,'
'Bluebeard,' etc. When I had a boy of my own, I used to read Hans
Christian Andersen to him, and get quite as much interested as he did.
I do not recall that I ever read any fairy tales before Andersen's,
and did not read these till past middle life."

It may be said again that while this book lays no claim to
comprehensiveness, we believe that its personal guidance represents a
high value which is fitly reinforced by the distinctive imagination
of Mr. Peter Newell. In the light of his quaint fancy, unexpected
humor, and sympathetic insight, these classic tales reveal a new store
of riches, and are clothed with a charm which even those of us who
love them had not foreseen.

In the majority of cases these stories reproduce the excellent
versions given in Miss Mulock's _Fairy Book_ (Harper & Brothers). But
the publishers desire to acknowledge the courtesy of Messrs. Longmans,
Green & Co., for their permission to reproduce the admirable versions
of "Aladdin," the "Forty Thieves," and the "Story of the Three Bears"
from their _Blue and Green Fairy Books_, edited by Mr. Andrew Lang.
The "Second Voyage of Sindbad the Sailor" is from the series edited by
Mr. W. T. Stead, entitled, _Books for the Bairns_.




FAVORITE FAIRY TALES




JACK THE GIANT-KILLER


In the reign of the famous King Arthur, there lived, near the Land's
End of England, in the county of Cornwall, a worthy farmer who had an
only son named Jack. Jack was a boy of a bold temper; he took pleasure
in hearing or reading stories of wizards, conjurors, giants, and
fairies, and used to listen eagerly while his father talked of the
great deeds of the brave knights of King Arthur's Round Table. When
Jack was sent to take care of the sheep and oxen in the fields, he
used to to amuse himself with planning battles, sieges, and the means
to conquer or surprise a foe. He was above the common sports of
children, but hardly any one could equal him at wrestling; or, if he
met with a match for himself in strength, his skill and address always
made him the victor.

In those days there lived on St. Michael's Mount, of Cornwall, which
rises out of the sea at some distance from the main-land, a huge
giant. He was eighteen feet high and three yards round, and his fierce
and savage looks were the terror of all his neighbors. He dwelt in a
gloomy cavern on the very top of the mountain, and used to wade over
to the main-land in search of his prey. When he came near, the people
left their houses; and after he had glutted his appetite upon their
cattle he would throw half a dozen oxen upon his back, and tie three
times as many sheep and hogs round his waist, and so march back to his
own abode.

[Illustration: "I will broil you for my breakfast"]

The giant had done this for many years, and the coast of Cornwall was
greatly hurt by his thefts, when Jack boldly resolved to destroy him.
He therefore took a horn, a shovel, a pickaxe, and a dark lantern, and
early in a long winter's evening he swam to the Mount. There he fell
to work at once, and before morning he had dug a pit twenty-two feet
deep and almost as many broad. He covered it over with sticks and
straw, and strewed some of the earth over them, to make it look just
like solid ground. He then put his horn to his mouth, and blew such a
loud and long tantivy that the giant awoke and came towards Jack,
roaring like thunder: "You saucy villain, you shall pay dearly for
breaking my rest; I will broil you for my breakfast." He had scarcely
spoken these words when he came advancing one step farther; but then
he tumbled headlong into the pit, and his fall shook the very
mountain.

"Oho, Mr. Giant!" said Jack, looking into the pit, "have you found
your way so soon to the bottom? How is your appetite now? Will nothing
serve you for breakfast this cold morning but broiling poor Jack?"

The giant now tried to rise, but Jack struck him a blow on the crown
of the head with his pickaxe, which killed him at once. Jack then made
haste back to rejoice his friends with the news of the giant's death.
When the justices of Cornwall heard of this valiant action, they sent
for Jack, and declared that he should always be called Jack the
Giant-killer; and they also gave him a sword and belt, upon which was
written, in letters of gold:

"This is the valiant Cornishman
Who slew the giant Cormoran."

The news of Jack's exploits soon spread over the western parts of
England; and another giant, called Old Blunderbore, vowed to have
revenge on Jack if it should ever be his fortune to get him into his
power. The giant kept an enchanted castle in the midst of a lonely
wood. About four months after the death of Cormoran, as Jack was
taking a journey into Wales, he passed through this wood, and as he
was very weary he sat down to rest by the side of a pleasant fountain,
and there he fell into a deep sleep. The giant came to the fountain
for water just at this time and found Jack there; and as the lines on
Jack's belt showed who he was, the giant lifted him up and laid him
gently upon his shoulder to carry him to his castle; but as he passed
through the thicket the rustling of the leaves waked Jack, and he was
sadly afraid when he found himself in the clutches of Blunderbore.

Yet this was nothing to his fright soon after; for when they reached
the castle he beheld the floor covered all over with the skulls and
bones of men and women. The giant took him into a large room, where
lay the hearts and limbs of persons who had been lately killed; and he
told Jack, with a horrid grin, that men's hearts, eaten with pepper
and vinegar, were his nicest food, and, also, that he thought he
should make a dainty meal on his heart. When he had said this he
locked Jack up in that room, while he went to fetch another giant, who
lived in the same wood, to enjoy a dinner off Jack's flesh with him.
While he was away, Jack heard dreadful shrieks, groans, and cries from
many parts of the castle; and soon after he heard a mournful voice
repeat these lines:

"Haste, valiant stranger, haste away,
Lest you become the giant's prey.
On his return he'll bring another,
Still more savage than his brother;
A horrid, cruel monster who,
Before he kills, will torture you.
Oh, valiant stranger! haste away,
Or you'll become these giants' prey."

This warning was so shocking to poor Jack that he was ready to go
mad. He ran to the window and saw the two giants coming along arm in
arm. This window was right over the gates of the castle. "Now,"
thought Jack, "either my death or freedom is at hand."

There were two strong cords in the room. Jack made a large noose with
a slip-knot at the ends of both these, and, as the giants were coming
through the gates, he threw the ropes over their heads. He then made
the other ends fast to a beam in the ceiling, and pulled with all his
might, till he had almost strangled them. When he saw that they were
both black in the face, and had not the least strength left, he drew
his sword and slid down the ropes; he then killed the giants, and thus
saved himself from a cruel death. Jack next took a great bunch of keys
from the pocket of Blunderbore, and went into the castle again. He
made a strict search through all the rooms, and in them found three
ladies tied up by the hair of their heads, and almost starved to
death. They told him that their husbands had been killed by the
giants, who had then condemned them to be starved to death, because
they would not eat the flesh of their own dead husbands.

"Ladies," said Jack, "I have put an end to the monster and his wicked
brother; and I give you this castle and all the riches it contains, to
make you some amends for the dreadful pains you have felt." He then
very politely gave them the keys of the castle, and went farther on
his journey to Wales.

As Jack had not taken any of the giant's riches for himself, and had
very little money of his own, he thought it best to travel as fast as
he could. At length he lost his way, and when night came on he was in
a lonely valley between two lofty mountains. There he walked about for
some hours, without seeing any dwelling-place, so he thought himself
very lucky at last in finding a large and handsome house. He went up
to it boldly, and knocked loudly at the gate; when, to his great
terror and surprise, there came forth a monstrous giant with two
heads. He spoke to Jack very civilly, for he was a Welsh giant, and
all the mischief he did was by private and secret malice, under the
show of friendship and kindness.

Jack told him that he was a traveller who had lost his way, on which
the huge monster made him welcome, and led him into a room where there
was a good bed in which to pass the night. Jack took off his clothes
quickly; but though he was so weary he could not go to sleep. Soon
after this he heard the giant walking backward and forward in the next
room, and saying to himself:

"Though here you lodge with me this night,
You shall not see the morning light;
My club shall dash your brains out quite."

"Say you so?" thought Jack. "Are these your tricks upon travellers?
But I hope to prove as cunning as you." Then, getting out of bed, he
groped about the room, and at last found a large, thick billet of
wood; he laid it in his own place in the bed, and hid himself in a
dark corner of the room. In the middle of the night the giant came
with his great club, and struck many heavy blows on the bed, in the
very place where Jack had laid the billet, and then he went back to
his own room, thinking he had broken all his bones. Early in the
morning Jack put a bold face upon the matter, and walked into the
giant's room to thank him for his lodging.

The giant started when he saw him, and he began to stammer out: "Oh,
dear me! is it you? Pray how did you sleep last night? Did you hear or


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