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correspondents have pets. I have a dear little dog named Sport. He
is very playful and mischievous, and is exceedingly fond of taffy
and pea-nuts.

EMMA M.

* * * * *

ANGELS CAMP, CALIFORNIA.

We like YOUNG PEOPLE ever so much. Mamma reads us the stories. I
read the letters, and try to find out the puzzles. I have a pet
dog named Rover. He plays hide-and-seek with me; and he will eat
corn like a dog I read about in the Post-office of No. 18. My
little sister has a pet hen named Tansie, and a boy who lives next
door has two guinea-pigs.

WILLIE H. C.

* * * * *

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.

I was nine years old last October. Papa subscribed for YOUNG
PEOPLE for my New-Year's gift for 1880, and I like it so much! The
puzzles are very interesting, and make many a pleasant evening for
us children. I think the story of "A Boy's First Voyage" is grand.
I have had two pets this winter - a beautiful English rabbit and a
very handsome kitty. Kitty can open any of the doors in the house
that has a latch, and walk in as independent as you please. Bunny
was very jealous of her, and would chase her and tease her so that
I gave him to Cousin Georgie, for kitty had the oldest right. Now
she has three of the fattest little baby kittens you ever saw.
When they begin to run around, they will make lots of sport for
us. Old kitty has to give them several boxings a day with her paw.

STIMMIE H. C.

* * * * *

FAIRFIELD, NEW YORK.

I am eight years old. My sister Fannie and I have a pet cat. We
were all at tea one evening, when we heard the piano in the other
room. We ran in there, and kitty was sitting on the stool playing
her best piece.

JESSIE V. W.

* * * * *

FARMINGTON, MAINE.

I am a little girl eleven years old. I have a cat named P. T.
Barnum. He always knows when the meat-man comes. Even if he is
asleep, he will wake up, and begin to cry until he gets a piece of
meat. He is a very handsome Maltese. I call him P. T.

MABEL S.

* * * * *

EDGEWOOD PLANTATION, LOUISIANA.

I am a little girl eight years old, and I live on the banks of the
Mississippi River. My mamma takes YOUNG PEOPLE for me. I ride a
pony to school every day. I wanted to tell you about my pets, and
my dolls too, but I must not make my first letter too long.

LIZZIE C. M.

* * * * *

The two following communications were written in big capitals:

NEW YORK CITY.

There was a little girl who had four dolls. One of them was
French; the other three were wax. There was a parrot in the house
where the little girl lived. This little girl had a nurse she
loved very much. The little girl had a brother whose name was
Harry. He had a little boat that went by steam. He sailed it in
the bath-tub.

BESSIE HYDE.

* * * * *

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

I have two canary-birds, but one of them will not sing. I had two
pretty little guinea-pigs, but a big dog killed one of them, and
ate it up. I am glad when the newsman brings YOUNG PEOPLE. Mamma
reads all the stories to me.

NANNIE HAYES.

* * * * *

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.

I am eight years old. I am sick now with the measles, and mamma
has read all the stories in the last YOUNG PEOPLE to me. I wish
the next one would come. I have a little dog named Frolic. He will
sit up, and turn over, and speak for something to eat.

NED BISHOP.

* * * * *

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

My name is "Wee Tot." My papa writes this letter for me. By-and-by
I will write myself. I have shells, and ocean mosses, and stuffed
birds that don't sing, and a big owl, and some alligators,
and - oh! I don't know - lots of things. I wish some little boy or
girl would send me some pressed flowers and grasses, and some
pretty stones and leaves. Then I will send them some of my pretty
things. I will put them in a tin case, and papa will send them in
the Post-office.

"WEE TOT" BRAINARD,
257 Washington Street (Room 20), Boston.

* * * * *

I see the children telling about their pets. I have a little dog
that can turn somersaults. He shuts doors when you tell him to,
and gives you his paw if you ask him in French. He is a black and
tan. Then I have a pet kitten, and I tie a blue ribbon round its
neck. It jumps through my arms; but it is too fond of staying out
all night on the fences. I have seventeen dolls. The largest is a
Japanese baby, and is as large as a live one. Another doll is nine
years old, and is named Shawnee. I have a very large baby-house. I
wrote to Mamie Jones, and sent her some flower seeds to exchange.
Will some other little girl exchange some with me?

GUSSIE SHARP,
438 Grand Avenue, Brooklyn, New York.

* * * * *

I live in Springwells, Detroit, Michigan. I have a little dog
named Phanor. He is not as big as a rabbit. Je parle Fran├žais
aussi bien que l'Anglais.

MARCEL FERRAND.

* * * * *

If "Genevieve" will wait until summer, I will be very glad to
exchange some of our pressed flowers for hers.

BESSIE BARNEY,
142 Lake Street, Cleveland, Ohio.

* * * * *

If "Genevieve," of Galt, California, will send me her address, I
will be pleased to exchange specimens of pressed flowers with her.

LOU PORTER,
Corry, Erie Co., Pennsylvania.

* * * * *

Miss Rosenbaum, of Raleigh, North Carolina, wishes for "Genevieve's"
address, for the purpose of exchanging pressed flowers with her.

* * * * *

If "Genevieve" will send me her address, I will send her a bouquet
when our flowers bloom.

MAGGIE E. DEARDORFF,
Canal Dover, Ohio.

* * * * *

_April 8, 1880_.

I am a little girl eleven years old. I was out in the woods
to-day, and I found this little hepatica which I send you.
Although I live farther north than many of the children, I have
found a spring flower as early as most of them. If that little
girl named Genevieve, in California, will send me her address, I
will be very glad to exchange pressed flowers with her.

JESSIE KILBORN,
Petoskey, Michigan.

* * * * *

DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

I thought I would tell you about our goat Minnie. She is one year
and a half old, and is pure white. In the winter we hitch her to a
little sleigh, and she pulls us all around. She runs on the
curb-stone very fast, and does not fall off, and what we think
very strange is that she will come to no one but me. She plays
cross-tag with us, and when she is "it," no one can tag her back.
Will you please tell me in what month the crow builds its nest?

JOSEPH E. G.

The crow makes its nest at the beginning of warm weather. In England it
is often at work collecting sticks by the first of April, but in this
country, especially in the northern portion, it rarely begins its labors
before the last of May. Its nest is in the top of very high trees, and
when viewed from below resembles a shapeless bundle of sticks, but the
inner nest, which is made of hair and wool, is a beautifully smooth and
soft resting-place for the five green, spotted eggs. Young crows are
very ugly and awkward, and make a singular noise like a cry, but they
are very easily tamed, and make very affectionate although mischievous
pets.

* * * * *

W. M. CHAPMAN. - "_Zoe mou, sas agapo_" the refrain of Byron's poem to
the "Maid of Athens," means "My life, I love you."

* * * * *

ERNEST K. - The letter you inquire about is genuine, as are all the
others we print.

* * * * *

MABEL G. H. - You will find the recipe of a pot-pourri in the BAZAR for
February 2, 1878.

* * * * *

EMMA S. and LYMAN C. - A pretty ornamental cover for YOUNG PEOPLE will be
ready on the conclusion of the first volume.

* * * * *

LILY B. - If your poor canary allows you to handle it, you can hold it
for a moment in tepid water, which will refresh it very much.

* * * * *

TECUMSEH, MICHIGAN.

I like to draw the "Wiggles" in YOUNG PEOPLE. We have a little
black pony, and we call him "Nig." When he is hungry, he paws with
his foot. I am twelve years old. Will you please tell me what
fid-dle-de-dee is in French?

NELLIE M. C.

There is no French translation of that word. If a Frenchman wished to
express the same idea, he would probably shrug his shoulders and say,
"Bah!"

* * * * *

Favors are acknowledged from Charlie Markward, Bessie H. S., Johnnie S.,
K. V. L., Perley B. T., R. Crary, Charles W. L., James B. E., Marion
King, Bessie Longnecker, T. Horton, Lourina C., George Paul,
T. H. V. T., Willie, Tom W. S., Miss E. P., Carrie Rauchfuss, Ida King,
Willie Orcutt, M. L. Cornell, Mamie H., Elvira D. H., Rita F. Morris,
Carrie H. and Olive R., Carrie Pope, E. M. Rosenberg, Louie, Edith W.

* * * * *

Correct answers to puzzles are received from Frank MacDavitt, Louisa
Gates, William S., T. K. Durham, H. F. Phillips, Emma L. C., W. G.
Warner, Willie H. Lane, "Tout ou rien," John Inghram, Jun., Mary
Kingsbury, Jennie, George Fisher, Reginald F., "Hope," Lloyd Clark,
Marion Norcross, Rosie Macdonald, Marie M., Jennie Yatman, Mary Randol,
Emma Schaffer, Katie Gould, Emily Theberath, L. Mahler, Cora Frost, W.
Kenney, Lizzie Chapman, Nellie W. and Birdie S., J. B. Whitlock, William
and Mary Tiddy, W. S. Naldrett, J. R. Glen, E. A. Cushing, Gertrude R.

* * * * *

PUZZLES FROM YOUNG CONTRIBUTORS.

No. 1.

ENIGMA.

My first is in run, but not in walk.
My second is in shout, but not in talk.
My third is in barn, but not in house.
My fourth is in pheasant, and also in grouse.
My fifth is in April, but not in May.
My sixth is in night, but not in day.
My seventh is in bud, but not in flower.
My eighth is in rain, and also in shower.
My ninth is in flute, but not in fife.
My tenth is in cousin, but not in wife.
My eleventh is in circle, but not in ring.
My whole was the name of a Scottish king.

W. K.

* * * * *

No. 2.

RIDDLE.

What familiar motto is composed of four E's, three M's, two R's, and one
B?

C. L. S.

* * * * *

No. 3.

NUMERICAL CHARADE.

I am composed of 14 letters.
My 13, 14, 12, 10 is seen at night.
My 9, 11, 8 is a resting-place.
My 10, 12, 14 is a troublesome animal.
My 3, 12, 1, 2, 5 is a title.
My 3, 6, 4, 5, 7 is a word often applied to the sea.
My whole is a sweet name for a bird.

REBECCA.

* * * * *

No. 4.

RHOMBOID.

Across - A tree; adjacent; a peculiar pace; a boy's name. Down - In pint;
a preposition; a snare; a title; a species of deer; a preposition; in
pint.

RIP VAN WINKLE.

* * * * *

No. 5.

ANAGRAMS.

[The letters contained in each of these sentences, if correctly
arranged, spell one word.]

1. Pin a poor bat. 2. There we sat. 3. Trust in coin. 4. Pear root. 5.
Rome's gate. 6. Go, let a cat run.

C. P. T.

* * * * *

No. 6.

ENIGMA.

My first is in fame, but not in glory.
My second is in lie, but not in story.
My third is in aged, but not in old.
My fourth is in heat, but not in cold.
My fifth is in boy, but not in child.
My sixth is in rampant, but not in wild.
My seventh is in sane, but not in fool.
My whole is much studied in college and school.

N. L. C.

* * * * *

ANSWERS TO PUZZLES IN NO. 23.

No. 1.

Sapphire.

No. 2.

N O N E
O V E N
N E E D
E N D S

No. 3.

H
Y O U
H O U S E
U S E
E

No. 4.

A r T
T a R
L y E
A n N
N u T
T w O
A mazo N

Atlanta, Trenton.

No. 5.

Christopher Columbus.

No. 6.

N A I L S
A N N I E
I N M A N
L I A R S
S E N S E




ADVERTISEMENTS.




HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE.

HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE will be issued every Tuesday, and may be had at
the following rates - _payable in advance, postage free_:

SINGLE COPIES $0.04
ONE SUBSCRIPTION, _one year_ 1.50
FIVE SUBSCRIPTIONS, _one year_ 7.00

Subscriptions may begin with any Number. When no time is specified, it
will be understood that the subscriber desires to commence with the
Number issued after the receipt of order.

Remittances should be made by POST-OFFICE MONEY ORDER or DRAFT, to avoid
risk of loss.

ADVERTISING.

The extent and character of the circulation of HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE
will render it a first-class medium for advertising. A limited number of
approved advertisements will be inserted on two inside pages at 75 cents
per line.

Address
HARPER & BROTHERS,
Franklin Square, N. Y.




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[Illustration]

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doz., $1.00; complete Catalogue Free.

PECK & SNYDER, Manufacturers,
124 and 126 Nassau St., N. Y.




FREE BY MAIL.

[Illustration]

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Duchess of Edinburgh, Nephetos
or Cornelia Cook, $1.00
13 Geraniums, including New Life and
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16 Tube Roses, 1.00
16 Gladiolas, all flowering bulbs, 1.00
8 Of each of the above two, 1.00
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10 Ferns, all different, 1.00
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Our =$5.00 Collection= of Fancy Plants for the Conservatory is
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To clubs we make special rates. =6= of the above collections for
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197 West Fourth St., Cincinnati, Ohio.




FISHING OUTFITS.

CATALOGUE FREE.

R. SIMPSON, 132 Nassau Street, N. Y.




The Child's Book of Nature.

* * * * *

The Child's Book of Nature, for the Use of Families and Schools:
intended to aid Mothers and Teachers in Training Children in the
Observation of Nature. In Three Parts. Part I. Plants. Part II.
Animals. Part III. Air, Water, Heat, Light, &c. By WORTHINGTON
HOOKER, M.D. Illustrated. The Three Parts complete in One Volume,
Small 4to, Half Leather, $1.31; or, separately, in Cloth, Part I.,
53 cents; Part II., 56 cents; Part III., 56 cents.

* * * * *

A beautiful and useful work. It presents a general survey of the kingdom
of nature in a manner adapted to attract the attention of the child, and
at the same time to furnish him with accurate and important scientific
information. While the work is well suited as a class-book for schools,
its fresh and simple style cannot fail to render it a great favorite for
family reading.

The Three Parts of this book can be had in separate volumes by those who
desire it. This will be advisable when the book is to be used in
teaching quite young children, especially in schools.

* * * * *

Published by HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.

_Sent by mail, postage prepaid, to any part of the United States, on
receipt of the price._




Old Books for Young Readers.

* * * * *

Arabian Nights' Entertainments.

The Thousand and One Nights; or, The Arabian Nights'
Entertainments. Translated and Arranged for Family Reading, with
Explanatory Notes, by E. W. LANE. 600 Illustrations by Harvey. 2
vols., 12mo, Cloth, $3.50.

Robinson Crusoe.

The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York,
Mariner. By DANIEL DEFOE. With a Biographical Account of Defoe.
Illustrated by Adams. Complete Edition. 12mo, Cloth, $1.50.

The Swiss Family Robinson.

The Swiss Family Robinson; or, Adventures of a Father and Mother
and Four Sons on a Desert Island. Illustrated. 2 vols., 18mo,
Cloth, $1.50.

The Swiss Family Robinson - Continued: being a Sequel to the
Foregoing. 2 vols., 18mo, Cloth, $1.50.

Sandford and Merton.

The History of Sandford and Merton. By THOMAS DAY. 18mo, Half
Bound, 75 cents.

* * * * *

Published by HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.

_Sent by mail, postage prepaid, to any part of the United States, on
receipt of the price._




CHILDREN'S

PICTURE-BOOKS.

Square 4to, about 300 pages each, beautifully printed on Tinted
Paper, embellished with many Illustrations, bound in Cloth, $1.50
per volume.

The Children's Picture-Book of Sagacity of Animals.

With Sixty Illustrations by HARRISON WEIR.

The Children's Bible Picture-Book.

With Eighty Illustrations, from Designs by STEINLE, OVERBECK,
VEIT, SCHNORR, &c.

The Children's Picture Fable-Book.

Containing One Hundred and Sixty Fables. With Sixty Illustrations
by HARRISON WEIR.

The Children's Picture-Book of Birds.

With Sixty-one Illustrations by W. HARVEY.

The Children's Picture-Book of Quadrupeds and other Mammalia.

With Sixty-one Illustrations by W. HARVEY.

* * * * *

Published by HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.

_Sent by mail, postage prepaid, to any part of the United States, on
receipt of the price._




SOLUTION OF THE BOSSY PUZZLE.


[Illustration: Fig. 1.]

The Bossy Puzzle given in No. 23 of YOUNG PEOPLE is solved by relieving
the Bossy of her disfiguring black patches, and arranging them as in
Fig. 1. Fig. 2 shows the rustic group that the artist had in his mind
when he invented the puzzle. The only correct solution to this puzzle
that we have received was sent in by Eddie S. Hequembourg.

[Illustration: Fig. 2.]




OPTICAL TESTS.


[Illustration: Fig. 1.]

The eye is an organ which is very easily deceived, and needs constant
training to enable it to judge correctly of the relative proportions of
objects of different forms. Most of our readers are probably familiar
with the optical test of guessing the height of an ordinary stove-pipe
hat by measuring off the supposed height on the wall of a room. Those
who have not heard of it will find it interesting to try the experiment.
Take a stick, or walking-cane, and measure off on the wall of a room a
height to which you suppose a stove-pipe hat would reach if placed on
the floor immediately underneath, as represented in Fig. 1. Nine times
out of ten the point selected will be a great deal too high.

Another point in which the proportions of a hat are very deceptive is
this: The diameter, or distance across the crown, of a silk hat is
greater than the height of the crown of the hat from the brim. Most
people will be very positive that just the reverse is the case. We have
all heard that a horse's head is as long as a flour barrel, and felt
very much inclined _not_ to believe it, though such is the fact.

[Illustration: Fig. 2.]

[Illustration: Fig. 3.]

There is also an optical test which is little known, and far more
surprising: Take three tumblers of the same size, and place them in a
row on the table, as represented in Fig. 2; then withdraw the middle
tumbler, and request any one present to place it at such a distance on
the table from the other two tumblers - as represented in Fig. 3 - that
the measurements from C to D and from E to F shall be the same as from A
to B. This test will prove very amusing at any small gathering. Each
person in turn tries his hand; the distance he guesses is marked off on
the table. Then the real distance is measured off, and the tumbler put
in its right place, when it will probably be found that every one has
fallen far short of the right measurement. In Fig. 3 we have only
represented the relative positions of the tumblers; the correct distance
is not given. Try it before you measure.




AUNT FLORA.

A BROKEN RHYME.


Aunt Flora was a precious ____
Her sympathies were ever ____
Her cranberry pies were always ____
Aunt Flora.

Her homespun dress was neat and ____
Her favorite conversation ____
Kept her employed like Solomon's ____
Aunt Flora.

I do not think she had a ____
But everything she did was ____
How much I've felt her blessed ____
Aunt Flora.

Her heart was sweet and warm as ____
And you would know from any ____
Among the wise she was not ____
Aunt Flora.




[Illustration: A BOY'S POCKETS.]

SCHOOL-MASTER. "Are you quite sure you have got nothing more in your
Pockets?"

BOY. "I've got a Hole in my Vest Pocket, Sir."

SCHOOL-MASTER (_sternly_). "Take your seat, Sir."







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Online LibraryVariousHarper's Young People, April 27, 1880 → online text (page 4 of 4)