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MY
PET RECIPES
TRIED and TRUE

CONTRIBUTED BY THE LADIES AND FRIENDS
OF ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH
QUEBEC


* * * * * *


BY APPOINTMENT FURRIERS TO THE QUEEN.

HOLT, RENFREW & Co.

QUEBEC and TORONTO.

THE ..
LARGEST

Manufacturers of
FINE FURS in Canada

Exclusive Designs in Ladies' Persian
Lamb and Sealskin Coats

FINE HUDSON BAY AND
RUSSIAN SABLE SKINS,
SILVER, WHITE AND
BLUE FOX SKINS.




RECIPES
ARE USELESS

Unless you have the ingredients to
demonstrate them.

This Is Where We Shine

We carry the very best of groceries
in Quebec. We make a specialty
of the choicest goods. Everything
is fresh and appetizing. If you are
among our customers you are aware
of these facts. If not give us a
trial order.

A. GRENIER

Family Grocer and Wine
Merchant

92 & 94 St. John Street

.. TELEPHONE 241 ..




ESTABLISHED 1842

GLOVER, FRY & CO.

... IMPORTERS OF ...

FANCY DRY GOODS

NOVELTIES RECEIVED WEEKLY

DRESS AND MANTLE DEPARTMENTS Under
First Class Modistes. Special Orders
Executed Promptly

LATEST NOVELTIES IN MILLINERY,
STRAW, CHIP and FELT HATS
... NEW SHAPES.

GENTLEMEN'S CLOTHING Made To Order Within
12 Hours. First Class Fit and Workmanship
Guaranteed

All Goods Marked in Plain Figures.

One Price Only.

GLOVER, FRY & Co.

24 & 26 Fabrique Street,

Quebec.




Under the distinguished patronage of H. R. H. Princess Louise,
H. E. Lady Stanley of Preston, also Her Excellency Lady Aberdeen.
For Ladies Tailor made Garments.

D. MORGAN,
PLACE D'ARMES - QUEBEC.

Ladies Costumes

Of all descriptions in Cloth made to order on short
notice, also Cloaks, Ulsters, etc., etc.




Medicine ..

When you need medicine you want the best.
That is natural. A man may be contented
with an $18.00 overcoat even though he knows
some other men wear coats that cost $45.00.
A woman may wear $1 gloves and see the $2
kind without being disturbed. IT IS DIFFERENT
WITH MEDICINE. Everyone wants the
highest quality; and that is the only kind
we keep. We are particular in selecting and
buying our drugs; careful in making our
medicines and exact in compounding prescriptions.

WE SOLICIT YOUR TRADE ON THESE ASSURANCES.

HENRY WILLIS,
CHEMIST and DRUGGIST
4 St. John Street, - - - Quebec.




S. J. SHAW & Co.

13 St. John Street,

... AND ...

Corner Mountain Hill
and Notre-Dame St.

House Furnishing
HARDWARE
FANCY MOULDS
AND SLICERS.

Telephones {UPPER TOWN, 573
{LOWER TOWN, 44





[Illustration: M. TIMMONS & SON
MANUFACTURERS OF
GINGER ALE
SODA WATER &c.
QUEBEC]

THE BEST IN THE UNIVERSE.

THE ...

MAGI CALEDONIA
MINERAL WATERS

Are famous for the relief afforded in Rheumatism,
Indigestion, Dyspepsia, Liver, Kidney and Bladder
troubles, Blood and Skin diseases, Female Complaints,
etc. Surpassing in the cures the most
celebrated European Spas. At the World's Columbian
Exhibition, the highest distinction was
awarded the

MAGI CALEDONIA SPRINGS WATERS

over all competitors - Medal and Diploma.


M. TIMMONS & SON,

SOLE AGENTS & BOTTLERS,

90-92 COTE D'ABRAHAM, QUEBEC.


* * * * * *


MY
PET RECIPES
TRIED and TRUE

CONTRIBUTED BY THE LADIES AND FRIENDS
OF ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH
QUEBEC







"We may live without poetry, music and art;
We may live without conscience, and live without heart;
We may live without friends; we may live without books;
But civilized man cannot live without cooks."
- OWEN MEREDITH.


Quebec
"Daily Telegraph" Printing House
1900




Rhymes to Remember...


"_Always have lobster sauce with salmon,
And put mint sauce your roasted lamb on.
In dressing salad mind this law
With two hard yolks use one raw.
Roast pork, sans apple sauce, past doubt
Is Hamlet with the Prince left out.
Broil lightly your beefsteak - to fry it
Argues contempt of christian diet.
It gives true epicures the vapors
To see boiled mutton minus capers.
Boiled turkey, gourmands know, of course
Is exquisite with celery sauce.
Roasted in paste, a haunch of mutton
Might make ascetics play the glutton.
To roast spring chickens is to spoil them,
Just split them down the back and broil them,
Shad, stuffed and baked is most delicious,
T'would have electrified Apicius.
Roast veal with rich stock gravy serve,
And pickled mushrooms too, observe,
The cook deserves a hearty cuffing
Who serves roast fowl with tasteless stuffing.
But one might rhyme for weeks this way,
And still have lots of things to say;
And so I'll close, for reader mine,
This is about the hour to dine._"




SOUP.


"The best soups are made with a blending of many flavors. Don't be
afraid of experimenting with them. Where you make one mistake you will
be surprised to find the number of successful varieties you can produce.
If you like a spicy flavor try two or three cloves, or allspice, or bay
leaves. All soups are improved by a dash of onion, unless it is the
white soups, or purées from chicken, veal, fish, etc. In these celery
may be used. In nothing as well as soups can a housekeeper be economical
of the odds and ends of food left from meals. One of the best cooks was
in the habit of saving everything, and announced one day, when her soup
was especially praised, that it contained the crumbs of gingerbread from
her cake box! Creamed onions left from a dinner, or a little stewed
corn, potatoes mashed, a few baked beans - even a small dish of apple
sauce have often added to the flavor of soup. Of course, all good meat
gravies, or bones from roast or boiled meats, can be added to your stock
pot. A little butter is always needed in tomato soup. In making stock,
use a quart of water for every pound of meat and bone. Cut the meat in
pieces, crack the bones, place all in the kettle, pour over it the
proper quantity of cold water; let it soak a while on the back of the
range before cooking. Let soup boil slowly, never hard, (an hour for
each pound of meat) strain through a sieve or coarse cloth. Never let
the fat remain on your soup. Let get cold and lift it off, or skim it
off hot."


BROWN STOCK.

MRS. W. COOK.

Four pounds shin of beef, or other meats and bones - four carrots, four
onions, one turnip, one small head of celery, one half tablespoonful of
salt, one half teaspoonful of peppercorns, six cloves, five pints of
cold water. Cut up the meat bone and place it in a large saucepan, pour
over the water, skim when boiling, prepare the vegetables, add them to
the saucepan; cover closely and boil slowly four hours. The spice should
be added with the vegetables.


CREAM OF CELERY SOUP.

MRS. ERNEST F. WURTELE.

One quart chicken or veal broth; one quart milk; one half cupful rice;
one teaspoonful salt; one head celery; seasoning. Use for this soup a
quart of chicken or veal broth and about a quart of milk; pick over and
wash the rice, rinse it well in cold water, and put it in a thick
saucepan over the fire with a pint of milk and a teaspoonful of salt;
wash a head of celery and grate the white stalks, letting the grated
celery fall into milk enough to cover it; put the grated celery with the
rice and gently simmer them together until the rice is tender enough to
rub through a sieve with a potato masher, adding more milk if the rice
absorbs what has first been put with it. After the rice has been rubbed
through the sieve, return it to the saucepan, place it again over the
fire, and gradually stir with it the quart of stock or broth; if this
quantity of stock does not dilute the soup to a creamy consistency, add
a little milk; let the soup get scalding hot, season it with salt, white
pepper, and a very little grated nutmeg, and serve at once.


CELERY SOUP.

MRS. STOCKING.

Four large potatoes, three large onions, six or eight stalks of celery.
Chop all the vegetables very fine, and place in an earthern kettle and
cover with boiling water, stir often till cooked, then add one quart of
milk and let boil; add butter, pepper and salt to taste. This receipt
will serve six persons.


CHICKEN CREAM SOUP.

MRS. DUNCAN LAURIE.

Take the carcase of a roast chicken or turkey, break the bones, and
cover with a quart of cold water and simmer for two hours adding
boiling water, to keep the original quantity. Strain and return to
kettle, add one chopped onion, two grated raw potatoes, one half small
turnip grated, and one half cup rice. Boil until rice is very soft.
Strain again, and return to kettle and let boil, and add one pint milk,
one teaspoon cornstarch rubbed smooth in a tablespoon butter and a
little salt and pepper, serve hot.


CONSOMME À LA TOLEDO - CLEAR SOUP.

MISS STEVENSON.

One quart stock, two eggs, two gherkins, a little red and green
colouring, two tablespoonfuls cream, whites and shells of two eggs, one
wine glass of sherry, and a little nutmeg. Beat the two whole eggs, pour
over them the cream (hot.) Season the custard with pepper, salt and
nutmeg, colour half red and half green, pour both parts into buttered
tins, poach in hot water until firm. Beat the whites and shells of eggs
with a little cold water, add them to the stock, pour it into a saucepan
and whisk over the fire till boiling; draw on one side and simmer ten
minutes. Cut the custard in shapes, rinse then in warm water, shred the
gherkins, strain the soup, add the wine and garnishing just before
serving.


CAULIFLOWER SOUP.

One cauliflower, two yolks of egg, one half pint of cream, one quart
chicken stock. Boil together the stock and cauliflower, for twenty
minutes, take out the cauliflower, put aside some of the best parts,
pass remainder through a sieve, mix together the yolks and cream, add
them to the soup, put all in a saucepan and stir over the fire until it
begins to thicken, put the pieces of cauliflower into a tureen and pour
the soup over them; the stock used in this soup is better without any
other vegetables.


FISH SOUP.

Two pounds of raw fish, one tablespoonful parsley, one and one half
ounces butter, one ounce flour of rice, one half pint milk, one quart of
water, pepper, and salt. Boil together the bones and skin of fish for
half an hour. Strain, melt butter in a saucepan, stir into it the flour,
add strained water from the pan. Cut up the fish into small pieces, add
it, also salt and pepper, boil slowly ten minutes, add parsley at last
minute.


GIBLET SOUP.

MISS BEEMER.

Giblets from two or three fowls; two quarts of water; one of stock; two
tablespoons of butter, ditto of flour; salt, pepper, and onion if
desired. Put giblets on to boil in the water and boil gently till
reduced to one quart (about two hours); take out the giblets, cut off
tough parts and chop fine the remainder. Return to the liquor and add
stock. Cook butter and flour together until a rich brown, and add to
the soup; season, cook gently half an hour; stir in half a cup of bread
crumbs and in a few minutes serve hot.


KIDNEY SOUP.

MISS STEVENSON.

One ox kidney, one quart second stock or water, one tablespoon Hardy
sauce, one tablespoon mushroom ketchup, one ounce butter, one ounce rice
flour, pepper, salt and cayenne. Wash and dry the kidney, cut into thin
slices; mix together the flour, pepper and salt and roll the kidney in
it. Brown them quickly in the butter, pour over the stock, skim when
boiling. Add sauce and simmer slowly two hours.


LENTIL SOUP.

MRS. THEOPHILUS OLIVER.

One half pound of lentils, one carrot, one onion, one ounce dripping,
salt, pepper corns, one quart of water, one tablespoon of flour. Soak
the lentils all night, wash well, scrape carrot, and onion cut up. Put
the dripping into a saucepan, when warm, put in vegetables, lentils and
flour. Stir for five minutes until all fat is absorbed, add the water
warm, some herbs tied in a bit of muslin. Boil for an hour or more. Rub
through a sieve, return to saucepan. Reheat and serve.


OX TAIL SOUP.

MRS. W. COOK.

Divide an ox tail into lengths of an inch and a half; melt an ounce of
butter in a stew pan and fry the pieces in this, turning them about for
five minutes. Add two quarts of stock or water and bring gently to a
boil. Throw in a teaspoonful of salt, and carefully remove the scum as
it rises. Add a carrot, a turnip and an onion with two cloves stuck in
it, a little celery, a blade of mace and a small bouquet of garum. Stew
gently two and one half hours. Strain the soup and put the pieces of ox
tail in cold water to free them of fat. Mix an ounce and one half of
flour smoothly with a little cold water, add to the stock and simmer for
twenty minutes. Add a little cayenne, a few drops of lemon juice and a
glass of port wine if liked and serve.


OYSTER SOUP.

MISS MIRIAM STRANG.

One quart boiling water, one quart milk, stir in one teacup rolled
cracker crumbs, season with pepper and salt to taste. When all come to a
boil add one quart of oysters; stir well so as to keep from scorching,
then add a piece of butter size of an egg; let it boil up just once,
then remove from the fire immediately.


CREAM OF PEA SOUP.

MISS RUTH SCOTT.

One tin of peas and one pint of water, a very small piece of onion, let
it boil about twenty minutes, strain and mash through sieve. Two
tablespoonfuls of butter, and one of flour, well blended together. Add
that to the peas. Last of all add a pint or _more of boiling milk_. Put
on the stove till it thickens, but be careful not to let it boil.


PALESTINE SOUP.

MRS. W. COOK.

Wash and pare two pounds of artichokes and put them in a stewpan with a
slice of butter, two or three strips of bacon rind, which have been
scalded and scraped and two bay leaves. Put the lid on the stew pan and
let the vegetables "sweat" over the fire for eight or ten minutes,
shaking the pan occasionally to keep them from sticking. Pour on water
to cover the artichokes and stew gently till soft. Rub them through a
sieve, mix the liquor they were boiled in with them, make the soup hot
and add boiling milk until it is as thick as double cream. Add pepper
and salt to taste. Just before serving, mix with the soup a quarter of a
pint of hot cream. This addition will be a valuable one, but may be
dispensed with.


PUREE DE PETIT POIS.

MISS STEVENSON.

One pint green peas, two yolks of egg, one gill cream, one and one half
pints stock, salt and pepper. Strain the liquid from the peas, put them
with the stock in a saucepan and simmer twenty minutes; pass them
through a sieve, pour back to the pan, add yolks, cream, pepper and
salt, and stir over the fire until it begins to thicken; do not allow it
to boil. A spray of mint boiled with the peas is a great improvement.


PUREE DE VEAU.

Four ounces pounded veal, one pint stock, one ounce butter, one ounce
flour, yolks of two eggs, few drops of lemon juice, one half pint
whipped cream. Mix veal and butter together in a saucepan, add flour,
then by degrees the stock (hot) just boil up. Mix yolks and add little
by little the cream, a few drops of cochineal, salt and pepper, pour
over this the contents of the saucepan very carefully.


TOMATO SOUP.

MRS. HENRY THOMSON.

One pint of stewed tomatoes, add a pinch of soda, stir till it ceases
foaming, then add one pint boiling water and one pint of milk, strain
and put on the stove and when near boiling, add a tablespoonful of
cornstarch, wet it with a little cold milk, one tablespoon butter, a
little pepper and salt to taste.


TOMATO SOUP.

MISS EDITH HENRY.

Take a tin of tomatoes and add half a pint of water. Let this boil for
half an hour till the tomatoes are well broken. Add a tablespoonful of
cornstarch, dissolved in a little cold water and mix well. Flavor with
salt and pepper to taste, and half a small onion. Then add a quart of
milk. Let this boil and stir well, so that it will mix, and be careful
that it does not burn on the bottom of the pan.


TURKISH SOUP.

MRS. W. COOK.

One quart of white stock, one half teacupful of rice, yolks of two eggs,
one tablespoon cream, salt and pepper. In preparing this soup boil first
the rice in the stock for twenty minutes. Then pass the whole through a
wire sieve, rubbing through such of the rice as may stick with a spoon,
then stir it thoroughly to beat out such lumps as the rice may have
formed and return all to the saucepan. The yolk of egg, cream, pepper
and salt, must now be well beaten together and added to the stock and
rice, the whole stirred over the fire for two minutes, care being taken
to prevent boiling after the eggs are put in, or they will curdle. This
soup should be served very hot and is excellent.


TURTLE BEAN SOUP.

MISS FRASER.

One pint of black beans, boil in two quarts of water, one onion, two
carrots, small teaspoon of allspice, five or six cloves, a small bit of
bacon or ham. A good bone of roast beef or mutton, let all boil till
quite tender perhaps two hours. Then turn into a colander, take out the
bone and rub all the rest with a wooden spoon through the colander, if
this is too thick add some stock or water. Some meat balls can be
added.




FISH AND OYSTERS.


"Now good digestion wait on appetite,
And health on both." - MACBETH.


RULE FOR SELECTING FISH.

If the gills are red, the eyes full, and the whole fish firm and stiff,
they are fresh and good; if on the contrary, the gills are pale, the
eyes sunken, the flesh flabby, they are stale.


BAKED CODFISH.

MRS. DAVID BELL.

Choose a good sized fresh codfish, prepare it for cooking without
beheading it, fill the inside with a dressing of bread crumbs, a finely
chopped onion, a little chopped suet, pepper and salt and moisten all
with an egg. Sew up the fish and bake, basting with butter or dripping.
If butter, beware of too much salt.


BAKED CODFISH.

MRS. R. M. STOCKING.

Pick very fine one cup of codfish; soak several hours in cold water;
have ready two cups of mashed potatoes and mix well with one egg, a cup
of milk, one half cup of butter, little salt and pepper; put this in a
baking dish and cover the top with bread crumbs; moisten with milk; bake
one-half hour.


CURRIED FISH.

MRS. W. COOK.

One pound cooked white fish, one apple, two ounces of butter, one onion,
one pint of fish stock, one tablespoon curry-powder, one tablespoon
flour, one teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar, salt and pepper, six ounces
of rice. Slice the apple and onion, and brown them in a pan with a
little butter, stir in them the flour and curry powder, add the stock by
degrees; skim when boiling and simmer slowly one half hour, stir in them
the lemon juice, also a very small teaspoon sugar; strain and return to
the saucepan, cut up the fish into neat pieces, and put them into the
saucepan also, when quite hot dish with a border of rice.


FISH CREAM.

MRS. J. G. SCOTT.

One can of salmon, one quart of milk, one cup of flour, one cup of
butter, three eggs, one cupful of bread crumbs, one half cupful grated
cheese, one onion, one bunch of parsley, two bay leaves. Take the canned
salmon, or boil a fish, and when cool take out the bones and break the
fish in small pieces. Put on to boil one quart of milk, an onion, a
bunch of parsley, and two bay leaves; after boiling strain through a
colander, then add a cup of flour mixed smooth with cold milk and a cup
of butter; beat up three eggs and pour into the mixture. Put in a baking
dish alternate layers of fish and cream until the dish is full, putting
cream top and bottom. Place on top one cup of bread crumbs and one half
cup of grated cheese. Salt to taste, and cayenne pepper. Bake twenty
minutes.


FISH MOULD.

MRS. A. COOK.

Boil a fresh haddock, remove the bones and pick it in pieces, soak some
bread in milk; put the fish, bread, a small piece of butter, one or two
eggs, pepper and salt together in a bowl and beat them well together.
Put the mixture in a mould and steam, turn out, and garnish with
parsley. Tomato sauce is nice poured round the mould when turned out.
The fish should be about twice the quantity of the bread.


TOMATO SAUCE.

Six tomatoes, two ounces butter, one half ounce flour, one half pint
stock, one teaspoon of salt, one fourth teaspoon of pepper. Place the
tomatoes in a pan and pour over them the stock, add salt and pepper.
Place the pan over the fire and cook all slowly for half an hour. Place
a wire sieve over a basin and rub the tomatoes and stock through the
sieve. Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the flour stir well together,
pour over the tomatoes and stock and stir all over the fire till
boiling, when the sauce is ready for use. Tinned tomatoes do not take so
long to boil.


FISH SCALLOP.

MISS RUTH SCOTT.

Remains of cold fish of any sort, one half pint of cream, one half
tablespoonful anchovy sauce, one half teaspoonful made mustard, one half
teaspoonful walnut ketchup, pepper and salt, bread crumbs. Put all the
ingredients into a stew pan, carefully picking the fish from the bones;
set it on the fire, let it remain till nearly hot, and stir
occasionally. Then put in a deep dish, with bread and small bits of
butter on top; put in the oven till nearly browned. Serve hot.


FISH PIE.

MRS. ANDREW THOMSON.

Boil one haddock, take the best part of the fish, one pint of milk and a
piece of butter as large as an egg, half a cup of flour, two yolks of
eggs, stir together, and then mix well with the fish. Put in a pudding
dish, and take a half cup of bread crumbs, half a cup of grated cheese,
put in the oven for ten minutes, salt and pepper to taste.


POTTED HERRINGS.

MRS. DAVID BELL.

Scale and clean fresh herrings, then taking the fish by the tail you can
easily remove the backbone drawing it towards the head. The smaller
bones will melt in the vinegar; remove the heads and roll each fish up,
tail end inside, and wind a thread round each roll, lay them in the
vessel they are to remain in till used, a stone earthernware crock is
best. Make scalding hot with spices as much vinegar as will cover them,
pour it over the fish and keep them hot about the stove for about an
hour, when they will be well cooked through; do not let them boil or
they will break. Keep in a cool place. Spices: whole white pepper, whole
allspice, and a blade of mace if it is liked.


LOBSTER CUTLETS.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

Mince the lobster fine, and season with pepper and salt, make good and
thick with drawn butter. Mix with the lobster enough to make it stick
together. Shape with the hands into cutlets, roll in bread crumbs and
fry in hot lard.

_The Sauce:_ - Make rather a thin custard, season with pepper, salt and a
little nutmeg and chopped parsley, place over the cutlets.


LOBSTER STEW.

MRS. ERNEST F. WURTELE.

Take a boiled lobster and split it open, cut the meat into small pieces
and put into a saucepan with one pint of milk; when boiling add two
tablespoons of flour dissolved in a little water, and boil ten minutes.
Season with salt, pepper and a small piece of butter. Just before


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