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Notes and Queries, Number 181, April 16, 1853 online

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and beauty of the comparison depend on it.

B. R. I.


{391}
_Annuellarius_ (Vol. vii., p. 358.). - _Annuellarius_, sometimes written
_Annivellarius_, is a chantry priest, so called from his receiving the
_annualia_, or yearly stipend, for keeping the anniversary, or saying
continued masses for one year for the soul of a deceased person.

J. G.

Exon.


_Ship's Painter_ (Vol. vii., p. 178.). - Your correspondent J. C. G. may
find a rational derivation of the word _painter_, the rope by which a
boat is attached to a ship, in the Saxon word _punt_, a boat. The
corruption from _punter_, or boat-rope, to _painter_, seems obvious.

J. S. C.


_True Blue_ (Vol. iii., _passim_). - The occurrence of this expression in
the following passage in Dryden, and its application to the Order of the
Garter, seem to have escaped the notice of the several correspondents
who have addressed you on the subject. I quote from _The Flower and the
Leaf_, Dryden's version of one of Chaucer's tales:

"Who bear the bows were knights in Arthur's reign,
Twelve they, and twelve the peers of Charlemain;
For bows the strength of brawny arms imply,
Emblems of valour and of victory.
Behold an order yet of newer date,
Doubling their number, equal in their state;
Our England's ornament, the Crown's defence,
In battle brave, protectors of their prince;
Unchang'd by fortune, to their sovereign _true_,
_For which_ their manly legs are bound with _blue_.
These of the Garter call'd, of faith unstain'd.
In fighting fields the laurel have obtain'd,
And well repaid the honors which they gain'd."

HENRY H. BREEN.

St. Lucia.


"_Quod fuit esse_" (Vol. vii., pp. 235. 342.). - In one of Dr. Byrom's
Common-place Books now in the possession of his respected descendant,
Miss Atherton, of Kersal Cell, is the following arrangement and
translation of this enigmatical inscription, probably made by the Doctor
himself:

"Quod fuit esse quod est quod non fuit esse quod esse
Esse quod est non esse quod est non est erit esse.
Quod fuit esse quod,
Est quod non fuit esse quod,
Esse esse quod est,
Non esse quod est non est
Erit esse.

What was John Wiles is what John Wiles was not,
The mortal Being has immortal got.
The Wiles that was but a non Ens is gone,
And now remains the true eternal John."

I take this opportunity of mentioning that my friend, the Rev. Dr.
Parkinson, Canon of Manchester, and Principal of St. Bees, is at present
engaged in editing, for the Chetham Society, the Diary and unpublished
remains of Dr. Byrom; and he will, I am sure, feel greatly indebted to
any of your correspondents who will favour him with an addition to his
present materials. O. G. ("N. & Q.," Vol. vii., p. 179. art. Townshend)
seems to have some memoranda relating to Byrom, and would perhaps be
good enough to communicate them to Dr. Parkinson.

JAMES CROSSLEY.

I have seen the above thus paraphrased:

"What we have been, and what we are,
The present and the time that's past,
We cannot properly compare
With what we are to be at last.

"Tho' we ourselves have fancied Forms,
And Beings that have never been;
We into something shall be turn'd,
Which we have not conceived or seen."

C. H. (a Subscriber.)


_Subterranean Bells_ (Vol. vii., pp. 128. 200. 328.). - In a most
interesting paper by the Rev. W. Thornber, A.B., Blackpool, published in
the _Proceedings of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire_,
1851-2, there is mention of a similar tradition to that quoted by your
correspondent J. J. S.

Speaking of the cemetery of Kilgrimol, two miles on the south shore from
Blackpool, the learned gentleman says:

"The ditch and cross have disappeared, either obliterated by the
sand, or overwhelmed by the inroads of the sea; but, with
tradition, the locality is a favourite still. The _superstitio
loci_ marks the site: 'The church,' it says, 'was swallowed up
by an earthquake, together with the Jean la Cairne of Stonyhill;
but on Christmas eve every one, since that time, on bending his
ear to the ground, may distinguish clearly its bells pealing
most merrily.'"

BROCTUNA.

Bury, Lancashire.


_Spontaneous Combustion_ (Vol. vii., p. 286.). - I presume H. A. B.'s
question refers to the human body only, because the possibility of
spontaneous combustion in several other substances is, I believe, not
disputed. On that of the human body Taylor says:

"The hypothesis of those who advocate _spontaneous_ combustion,
is, it appears to me, perfectly untenable. So far as I have been
able to examine this subject, there is not a single
well-authenticated instance of such an event occurring: in the
cases reported which are worthy of any credit, a candle or some
other ignited body has been at hand, and the accidental ignition
of the clothes was highly probable, if not absolutely certain."

He admits that, under certain circumstances, the human body, though in
general "highly difficult of combustion," may acquire increased
combustible properties. But this is another question {392} from that of
the possibility of its purely spontaneous combustion. (See Taylor's
_Medical Jurisprudence_, pages 424-7. edit. 1846.)

W. W. T.


_Muffs worn by Gentlemen_ (Vol. vi., _passim_; Vol. vii., p. 320.). - The
writer of a series of papers in the _New Monthly Magazine_, entitled
"Parr in his later Years," thus (vol. xvi. p. 482.) describes the
appearance of that learned Theban:

"He had on his dressing-gown, which I think was flannel, or
cotton, and the skirts dangled round his ankles. Over this he
had drawn his great-coat, buttoned close; and his hands, for he
had been attacked with erysipelas not long before, were kept
warm in a _silk muff_, not much larger than the poll of a common
hat."

In an anonymous poetical pamphlet (_Thoughts in Verse concerning
Feasting and Dancing_, 12mo. London, 1800), is a little poem, entitled
"The Muff," in the course of which the following lines occur:

"A time there was (that time is now no more,
At least in England 'tis not now observ'd!)
When muffs were worn by _beaux_ as well as belles.
Scarce has a century of time elaps'd,
Since such an article was much in vogue;
Which, when it was not on the arm sustain'd,
Hung, pendant by a silken ribbon loop
From button of the coat of well-dress'd beau.
'Tis well for manhood that the use has ceased!
For what to _woman_ might be well allow'd,
As suited to the softness of her sex,
Would seem effeminate and wrong in _man_."

WILLIAM BATES.

Birmingham.


_Crescent_ (Vol. vii., p. 235.). - In Judges, ch. viii. ver. 21., Gideon
is recorded to have taken away from Zeba and Zalmunna, kings of Midian,
"the ornaments that were on their camels' necks." The marginal
translation has "ornaments like the moon;" and in verse 24. it is stated
that the Midianites were _Ishmaelites_. If, therefore, it be borne in
mind that Mohammed was an Arabian, and that the Arabians were
Ishmaelites, we may perhaps be allowed to infer that the origin of the
use of the crescent was not as a symbol of Mohammed's religion, but that
it was adopted by his countrymen and followers from their ancestors, and
may be referred to at least as far back as 1249 B.C., when Zeba and
Zalmunna were slain, and when it seems to have been the customary
ornament of the Ishmaelites.

W. W. T.


_The Author of "The Family Journal"_ (Vol. vii., p. 313.). - The author
of the very clever series of papers in the _New Monthly Magazine_, to
which MR. BEDE refers, is Mr. Leigh Hunt. The particular one in which
Swift's Latin-English is quoted, has been republished in a charming
little volume, full of original thinking, expressed with the felicity of
genius, called _Table Talk_, and published in 1851 by Messrs. Smith and
Elder, of Cornhill.

G. J. DE WILDE.


_Parochial Libraries_ (Vol. vi., p. 432. &c.). - I fear that there is
little doubt that these collections of books have very often been
unfairly dispersed. It is by no means uncommon, in looking over the
stock of an old divinity bookseller, to meet with works with the names
of parochial libraries written in them. I have met with many such: they
appear chiefly to have consisted of the works of the Fathers, and of our
seventeenth century divines. As a case in point, I recollect, about ten
years since, being at a sale at the rectory of Reepham, Norfolk,
consequent upon the death of the rector, and noticing several works with
the inscription "Reepham Church Library" written inside: these were sold
indiscriminately with the rector's books. At this distance of time I
cannot recollect the titles of many of the works; but I perfectly
remember a copy of Sir H. Savile's edition of _Chrysostom_, 8 vols.
folio; _Constantini Lexicon_, folio; and some pieces of Bishop Andrewes.
These were probably intended for the use of the rector, as in the case
reported by your correspondent CHEVERELLS (Vol. vii., p. 369.).

I may also mention having seen a small parochial library of old divinity
kept in the room over the porch in the church of Sutton Courtenay, near
Abingdon, Berks. With the history and purpose of this collection I am
unacquainted.

NORRIS DECK.

Great Malvern.


_Sidney as a Christian Name_ (Vol. vii., pp. 39. 318.). - Lady Morgan the
authoress was, before her marriage, Miss _Sidney_ Owenson. See Chambers'
_Encyclop. of Eng. Lit._, ii. 580.

P. J. F. GANTILLON, B.A.


_"Rather"_ (Vol. vii., p. 282.). - The root of the word _rather_ is
Celtic, in which language _raith_ means "inclination," "on account of,"
"for the sake of," &c. Thus, in the line quoted from Chaucer,

"What aileth you so _rathè_ for to arise,"

it clearly signifies "what aileth you that you _so incline_ to arise,"
and so on, in the various uses to which the comparative of the word is
put: as, I had rather do so and so, _i. e._ "I feel _more inclined_;" I
am rather tired, _i. e._ "I am fatigued _on account of_ the walk," &c. I
am glad that you are come, the rather that I have work for you to do,
_i. e._ "_more on account of_ the work which I have for you to do, or
_for the sake_ of the work," &c. Any obscurity that is attached to the
use of the word, has arisen from the abuse of it, or rather from its
right signification being not properly understood.

FRAS. CROSSLEY.


{393}
_Lady High Sheriff_ (Vol. vii., pp. 236. 340.). - Another instance may be
seen in Foss's _Judges of England_, vol. ii. p. 51. - In speaking of
Reginald de Cornhill, who held the Sheriffalty of Kent from 5 Richard I.
to 5 Henry III., he says:

"His seat at Minster, in the Isle of Thanet, acquired the name
of 'Sheriff's Court,' which it still retains; and he himself,
discontinuing his own name, was styled Reginald le Viscount,
even his widow being designated Vicecomitessa Cantii."

D. S.


_Nugget_ (Vol. vi., p. 171.; Vol. vii., pp. 143. 272.). - Nugget _may_ be
derived from the Persian, but it is also used in Scotland, and means a
lump, - a nugget of sugar, for instance. And as Scotchmen are to be found
everywhere, its importation into Australia and California is easily
accounted for.

R. S. N.


_Epigrams_ (Vol. vii., p. 180.). - I beg to confirm the statement of
SCRAPIANA as to the reading John instead of Thomas in the line

"'Twixt Footman John and Dr. Toe."

It may not be generally known that this epigram came from the pen of
Reginald Heber, late Bishop of Calcutta, who was then a commoner of
Brazenoze College, and who wrote that extremely clever satire called
_The Whippiad_ of which the same Dr. Toe (the Rev. Henry Halliwell, Dean
and Tutor) was the hero. _The Whippiad_ was printed for the first time a
few years ago, in _Blackwood's Magazine_.

I fancy the other facetious epigram given by SCRAPIANA has no connexion
with this, but was merely inserted on the same page as being "similis
materiæ."

B. N. C.


_Editions of the Prayer-Book_ (Vol. vii., p. 91.). - The following small
addition is offered to MR. SPARROW SIMPSON's list:

1592. fol. Deputies of Chr. Barker. Trinity College, Dublin.
1607. 4to. Robert Barker. Trin. Coll., Dublin.
1611. folio. Robert Barker. Marsh's Library, Dubl.
1632. 8vo. R. Barker and the assignes of John Bill. Trin. Coll.,
Dublin.
1634. 4to. Same Printers. Trin. Coll., Dublin.
1634. 12mo. Same Printers. Marsh's Library.
1638. 4to. Same Printers. Trin. Coll., Dublin.
1639. 4to. Same Printers. Trin. Coll., Dublin.
1616. There is a Latin version, in Dr. Mockett's _Doctrina et
Politeia Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ_. 4to. Londoni. Marsh's
Library, Dublin.

H. COTTON.

Thurles.


_Portrait of Pope_ (Vol. vii., p. 294.). - Dr. Falconer's portrait of
Pope could not have been painted by _Joseph_ Wright of Derby, as that
celebrated artist was only fourteen when Pope died; consequently, the
anecdote told of the painter, and of his meeting the poet at dinner,
must apply to the artist named by Dr. Falconer, and of course correctly,
_Edward_ Wright.

S. D. D.


_Passage in Coleridge_ (Vol. vii., p. 330.). - The paper referred to by
Coleridge will be found in the _Transactions of the Manchester Literary
and Philosophical Society_, vol. iii. p. 463. It is the "Description of
a Glory," witnessed by Dr. Haygarth on Feb. 13th, 1780, when "returning
to Chester, and ascending the mountain which forms the eastern boundary
of the Vale of Clwyd." As your correspondent asks for a copy of the
description, the volume being scarce, I will give the following extract:

"I was struck with the peculiar appearance of a very white
shining cloud, that lay remarkably close to the ground. The sun
was nearly setting, but shone extremely bright. I walked up to
the cloud, and my shadow was projected into it; when a very
unexpected and beautiful scene was presented to my view. The
head of my shadow was surrounded, at some distance, by a circle
of various colours; whose centre appeared to be near the
situation of the eye, and whose circumference extended to the
shoulders. The circle was complete, except what the shadow of my
body intercepted. It resembled, very exactly, what in pictures
is termed a _glory_, around the head of our Saviour and of
saints: not, indeed, that luminous radiance which is painted
close to the head, but an arch of concentric colours. As I
walked forward, this _glory_ approached or retired, just as the
inequality of the ground shortened or lengthened my shadow."

A plate "by the writer's friend, Mr. Falconer," accompanies the paper.

In my copy of the _Transactions_, the following MS. note is attached to
this paper:

"See Juan's and De Ulloa's _Voyage to South America_, book vi.
ch. ix., where phænomena, nearly similar, are described."

I. H. M.


_Lowbell_ (Vol. vii., pp. 181. 272.). - This is also surely a Scotch
word, _low_ meaning a light, a flame.

"A smith's hause is aye lowin." - _Scots. Prov._

R. S. N.


_Burn at Croydon_ (Vol. vii., p. 283.). - This seems to be of the same
nature as the "nailburns" mentioned by Halliwell (_Arch. Dict._). In
Lambarde's _Perambulation of Kent_, p. 221., 2nd edit., mention is made
of a stream running under ground. But it seems very difficult to account
for these phenomena, and any geologist who would give a satisfactory
explanation of these _burns_, _nailburns_, subterraneous streams, and
those which in Lincolnshire are termed "blow wells," would confer a
favour on several of your readers.

E. G. R.

* * * * *{394}


MISCELLANEOUS.


NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC.

Our learned, grave, and potent cotemporary, _The Quarterly Review_, has,
in the number just issued, a very pleasant gossiping article on _The Old
Countess of Desmond_. The writer, who pays "N. & Q." a passing
compliment for which we are obliged, although he very clearly
establishes the fact of the existence of a Countess of Desmond, who was
well known and remarkable for her _extreme_ longevity, certainly does
not prove that the old Countess actually lived to the great age of 140
years.

The publisher of _Men of the Time, or Sketches of Living Notables_, has
just put forth a new edition of what will eventually become a valuable
and interesting little volume. There are so many difficulties in the way
of making such a book accurate and complete, that it is no wonder if
this second edition, although it contains upwards of sixty additional
articles, has yet many omissions. Its present aspect is too political.
Men of the pen are too lightly passed over, unless they are professed
journalists; many of the greatest scholars of the present day being
entirely omitted. This must and doubtless will be amended.

It is with great regret that we have to announce the death of one whose
facile pen and well-stored memory furnished many a pleasant note to our
readers, - J. R. of Cork, under which signature that able scholar, and
kindly hearted gentleman, MR. JAMES ROCHE, happily designated by Father
Prout the "Roscoe of Cork," was pleased to contribute to our columns.
_The Athenæum_ well observes that "his death will leave a blank in the
intellectual society of the South of Ireland, and the readers of 'N. &
Q.' will miss his genial and instructive gossip on books and men."

_The Photographic Society_ is rapidly increasing. The meeting on the 7th
for the exhibition and explanation of cameras was a decided failure,
from the want of due preparation; but that failure will be fully
compensated by the promised exhibition of them in the rooms of the
_Society of Arts_. While on the subject of Photography, we may call the
attention of our readers to a curious paper on Photographic Engraving,
in _The Athenæum_ of Saturday last, by a gentleman to whom the art is
already under so much obligation, Mr. Fox Talbot.

BOOKS RECEIVED. - _Wellington, his Character, his Actions, and his
Writings_, by Jules Maurel, is well described by its editor, Lord
Ellesmere, as "among the most accurate, discriminating, and felicitous
tributes which have evaluated from any country in any language to the
memory of the great Duke." - _Temple Bar, the City Golgotha, a Narrative
of the Historical Occurrences of a Criminal Character associated with
the present Bar_, by a Member of the Inner Temple. A chatty and
anecdotical history of this last remaining gate of the city, under
certainly its most revolting aspect. The sketch will doubtless be
acceptable, particularly to London antiquaries.

* * * * *


BOOKS AND ODD VOLUMES

WANTED TO PURCHASE.

ARCHÆOLOGIA. Vols. III., IV., V., VI., VII., VIII., X., XXVII., XXVIII.
Unbound.

- - Vols. III., IV., V., VIII. In Boards.

BAYLE'S DICTIONARY. English Version, by DE MAIZEAUX. London, 1738. Vols.
I. and II.

GMELIN'S HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY. Inorganic part.

LUBBOCK, ELEMENTARY TREATISE ON THE TIDES.

SANDERS (REV. H.), THE HISTORY OF SHENSTONE. 4to. Lond. 1794.

SWIFT'S (DEAN) WORKS. Dublin: G. Faulkner. 19 Volumes. 1768. Vol. I.

TODD'S CYCLOPÆDIA OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY.

TRANSACTIONS OF THE MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. Vols. I. and II.

ARCHÆOLOGIA. Vols. III., IV., V., VIII. Boards.

MARTYN'S PLANTÆ CANTABRIGIENSES. 12mo. London, 1763.

ABBOTSFORD EDITION OF THE WAVERLEY NOVELS. Odd Vols.

THE TRUTH TELLER. A Periodical.

SARAH COLERIDGE'S PHANTASMION.

J. L. PETIT'S CHURCH ARCHITECTURE. 2 Vols.

R. MANT'S CHURCH ARCHITECTURE CONSIDERED IN RELATION TO THE MIND OF THE
CHURCH. 8vo. Belfast, 1840.

CAMBRIDGE CAMDEN SOCIETY'S TRANSACTIONS. Vol. III. - ELLICOTT ON
VAULTING.

QUARTERLY REVIEW, 1845.

GARDENERS CHRONICLE, 1838 to 1852, all but Oct. to Dec. 1851.

COLLIER'S FURTHER VINDICATION OF HIS SHORT VIEW OF THE STAGE. 1708.

CONGREVE'S AMENDMENT OF COLLIER'S FALSE AND IMPERFECT CITATIONS. 1698.

FILMER'S DEFENCE OF PLAYS, OR THE STAGE VINDICATED. 1707.

THE STAGE CONDEMNED. 1698.

BEDFORD'S SERIOUS REFLECTIONS ON THE ABUSES OF THE STAGE. 8vo. 1705.

DISSERTATION ON ISAIAH, CHAPTER XVIII., IN A LETTER TO EDWARD KING, &c.,
by SAMUEL HORSLEY, Lord Bishop of Rochester. 1799. First Edition, in
4to.

BISHOP FELL'S Edition of CYPRIAN, Containing BISHOP PEARSON'S ANNALES
CYPRIANIA.

*** _Correspondents sending Lists of Books Wanted are requested to send
their names._

*** Letters, stating particulars and lowest price, _carriage free_, to
be sent to MR. BELL, Publisher of "NOTES AND QUERIES," 186. Fleet
Street.

* * * * *


NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS


CANTAB. _The line_

"Music has charms to soothe a savage breast,"

_is from Congreve's _Mourning Bride_, Act I. Sc. I._

J. L. S. _We will endeavour to ascertain the value of the copy of
_Naunton_, and tell our Correspondent when we write to him._

C. GONVILLE. _We hope this Correspondent has received the letter
forwarded to him on Saturday or Monday last. His letter has been sent
on._

E. P., Jun. _The best account of Nuremburg Tokens is Snelling's _View of
the Origin, Nature and Use of Jettons or Counters_. London, 1769,
folio._

NEMO. _Thanks to its excellent Index, we are enabled, by Cunningham's
_Handbook of London_, to inform him that Vanburgh was buried in the
family vault of the Vanburghs in St. Stephen's, Walbrook._

C. M. J. _will find the reference to "Language given to man," &c., in
_Vol. vi., p. 575._, in an article on South and Talleyrand._

PHOTOSULPH, _who asks whether, when using the developing solution, it is
necessary to blow upon the glass, is informed that it is not necessary;
but that, when there is a hesitation in the flowing of the fluid,
blowing gently on the glass promotes it, and the warmth of the breath
sometimes causes a more speedy development._

X. A. _We cannot enter into any discussion respecting lenses. We have
more than once fully recognised the merits of those manufactured by Mr.
Ross: but never having used one of them, we could not speak of them from
our own experience. We do not hold ourselves responsible for the
opinions of our Correspondents._

"NOTES AND QUERIES" _is published at noon on Friday, so that the County
Booksellers may receive Copies in that night's parcels, and deliver them
to their Subscribers on the Saturday._

* * * * *{395}

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Instantaneous Views, and Portraits in from three to thirty seconds,
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Also every description of Apparatus, Chemicals, &c. &c. used in this
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* * * * *

TO PHOTOGRAPHERS. - Pure Chemicals, and every requisite for the practice
of Photography, according to the instructions of Le Gray, Hunt,
Brébisson, and other writers, may be obtained, wholesale and retail, of
WILLIAM BOLTON, (formerly Dymond & Co.), Manufacturer of pure Chemicals
for Photographic and other purposes. Lists may be had on application.

Improved Apparatus for iodizing paper in vacuo, according to Mr.
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* * * * *

TO PHOTOGRAPHERS. - MR. PHILIP DELAMOTTE begs to announce that he has now
made arrangements for printing Calotypes in large or small quantities,
either from Paper or Glass Negatives. Gentlemen who are desirous of
having good impressions of their works, may see specimens of Mr.
Delamotte's Printing at his own residence, 38. Chepstow Place,
Bayswater, or at

MR. GEORGE BELL'S, 186. Fleet Street.

* * * * *

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* * * * *

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