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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, SEPTEMBER 1881 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by Cornell University Digital Collections)









VOL. XXXV. NO. 9.

THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

“To the Poor the Gospel is Preached.”

* * * * *

SEPTEMBER, 1881.




_CONTENTS_:


EDITORIAL.

ANNUAL MEETING—FINANCIAL—OUR BROADSIDE 257
THE PLACE OF THE CHURCH IN THE WORK OF MISSIONS 258
HEALING OF THE NATION’S WOUND 260
SUGGESTION WORTH PASSING ALONG 261
BENEFACTIONS—GENERAL NOTES 262


THE FREEDMEN.

OUR CHURCH WORK BROADSIDE.
Washington, D.C.; Hampton, Va. 265
Wilmington, Beaufort, N.C.; Charleston,
Orangeburg, S.C.; First Cong. Ch.,
Atlanta, Ga. 266
Cut First Cong. Ch., Atlanta, Ga. 267
Atlanta Univ., Savannah, Ga. 268
Woodville, Marietta, Cypress Slash, Ga. 269
Belmont and Louisville, Ga.; Talladega,
Mobile, Marlon, Ala. 270
Montgomery, Selma, Ala. 271
Shelby Iron Works, Childersburg, Florence,
Ala.; Tougaloo, Miss.; Cong.
Churches of Louisiana 272
Nashville, Memphis, Tenn. 275
Chattanooga, Tenn.; Berea, Ky.; Little
Rock, Ark. 276
Goliad, Paris, Flatonia, Texas 277
Corpus Christi, Texas 278


THE CHINESE.

JOTTINGS FROM THE FIELD 278


WOMAN’S HOME MISS. ASSOC’N.

MISS WILSON’S WORK IN KANSAS 280


CHILDREN’S PAGE.

PAULPHEMIA’S MA 282


RECEIPTS 284

CONSTITUTION 287

AIM, STATISTICS, WANTS, ETC. 288

* * * * *


NEW YORK:
Published by the American Missionary Association,
ROOMS, 56 READE STREET.

* * * * *

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance.

Entered at the Poet Office at New York, N.Y., as second-class matter.




American Missionary Association,

56 READE STREET, N.Y.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT.

HON. E. S. TOBEY, Boston.


VICE-PRESIDENTS.

Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio.
Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis.
Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass.
Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D.D., Me.
Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D.D., Ct.
WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R.I.
Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D.D., Mass.
Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R.I.
Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D.D., R.I.
Rev. RAY PALMER, D.D., N.J.
Rev. EDWARD BEECHER, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D.D., Ill.
Rev. W. W. PATTON, D.D., D.C.
Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La.
Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D.D., N.H.
Rev. EDWARD HAWES, D.D., Ct.
DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio.
Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt.
Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D.D., Minn.
Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N.Y.
Gen. O. O. HOWARD, Washington Ter.
Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D.D., Iowa.
Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill.
EDWARD SPAULDING, M.D., N.H.
Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D.D., Ct.
Rev. W. L. GAGE, D.D., Ct.
A. S. HATCH, Esq., N.Y.
Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D.D., Ohio.
Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Minn.
Rev. A. L. STONE, D.D., California.
Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D.D., Oregon.
Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D.D., D.C.
Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D.D., Wis.
S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass.
Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass.
Hon. J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa.
Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct.
Sir PETER COATS, Scotland.
Rev. HENRY ALLON, D.D., London, Eng.
WM. E. WHITING, Esq., N.Y.
J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass.
E. A. GRAVES, Esq., N.J.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill.
DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct.
A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass.
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., N.Y.
FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt.
JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R.I.
Rev. E. P. GOODWIN, D.D., Ill.
Rev. C. L. GOODELL, D.D., Mo.
J. W. SCOVILLE, Esq., Ill.
E. W. BLATCHFORD, Esq., Ill.
C. D. TALCOTT, Esq., Ct.
Rev. JOHN K. MCLEAN, D.D., Cal.
Rev. RICHARD CORDLEY, D.D., Kansas.
Rev. W. H. WILLCOX, D.D., Mass.
Rev. G. B. WILLCOX, D.D., Ill.
Rev. WM. M. TAYLOR, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. GEO. M. BOYNTON, Mass.
Rev. E. B. WEBB, D.D., Mass.
Hon. C. I. WALKER, Mich.
Rev. A. H. ROSS, Mich.


CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


DISTRICT SECRETARIES.

REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, _Boston_.
REV. G. D. PIKE, _New York_.
REV. JAS. POWELL, _Chicago_.

H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., _Treasurer, N.Y._
REV. M. E. STRIEBY, _Recording Secretary_.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

ALONZO S. BALL,
A. S. BARNES,
C. T. CHRISTENSEN,
CLINTON B. FISK,
ADDISON P. FOSTER,
S. B. HALLIDAY,
A. J. HAMILTON,
SAMUEL HOLMES,
CHARLES A. HULL,
CHAS. L. MEAD,
SAMUEL S. MARPLES,
WM. T. PRATT,
J. A. SHOUDY,
JOHN H. WASHBURN.


COMMUNICATIONS

relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields to
the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the “American
Missionary,” to Rev. G. D. PIKE, D.D., at the New York Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New
York, or when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XXXV. SEPTEMBER, 1881. NO. 9.

* * * * *




_American Missionary Association._

* * * * *


The Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting of the American Missionary
Association will be held in Worcester, Mass., commencing November
1st, at 3 P. M. For particulars see fourth page of cover.

* * * * *


FINANCIAL.

This month brings around the close of another fiscal year.
Our balances will be struck on the 30th of September, and we
are exceedingly anxious that all parties, either churches or
individuals, who have intended to contribute to our work during
the current year, should do so as early as possible. Our appeal
is that you give to this cause liberally as the Lord may have
prospered you. Our receipts for the nine months to June 30th were
very encouraging, but the receipts for July, the first month of the
last quarter, have not been as large as we had reason to hope. The
increase over July of last year has been only fourteen per cent,
instead of twenty-five per cent., the amount necessary to carry
forward the additional work we have undertaken. But we trust that
our friends will enable us to meet these appropriations without
embarrassing our treasury. Every dollar received during the next
thirty days will help us to meet our pressing demands, and possibly
save us from closing the year with debt.

* * * * *


OUR BROADSIDE.

We give room in this number of the MISSIONARY to a broadside on
Church work. Our object is to present to our patrons, at a view, an
array of the large number of new churches we have established for
the colored people. A majority of the pastors employed by us have
been connected in some capacity with our Institutions, a goodly
number of them having graduated from the theological classes at
Talladega College, Fisk and Straight Universities.

It may be said, with grateful assurance and peculiar emphasis,
that this Association _establishes_ its churches. It prepares
a constituency by its day and Sabbath-schools, and from this
educates a ministry. In this way it develops a demand for a pure
church, and also the possibility of maintaining it when established.

It will be observed that nearly all the churches reported have
been blessed during the year with additions to their numbers,
and that many have made improvements upon their property. The
Sabbath-schools have everywhere received due attention, and much of
the progress in the different churches has been made possible by
the earnest, prayerful and unremitting labors of our missionaries
in this department of religious work. Missionary meetings and
societies have been greatly encouraged and the cause of temperance
widely promoted. Many of the young converts have found their way
to institutions of learning, and many have engaged in teaching and
missionary service.

When it is taken into account that these young churches are
reformed churches, and that their church life is a new experience
among the colored people, where they shine as lights in the world,
it will be readily seen, we think, that this branch of our work
augurs most hopefully a day of better things for the new South, and
that the hearts and hands of these brethren, whose letters will be
found elsewhere, should be strengthened, and their numbers largely
increased.

* * * * *


THE PLACE OF THE CHURCH IN THE WORK OF MISSIONS.

In these days, when science is pushing her inquiries in every
direction with reference to the discovery of new facts, in order
that she may deduce therefrom the course of nature and the system
of the universe, there is danger that we overlook the basis in
man’s moral constitution on which, alone, knowledge can have the
highest significance and value. The drift is seen not merely in the
public schools, but in the college and the professional seminary,
which, more and more, are reducing education to the acquisition of
facts, or to a simple intellectual drill. The scientific method,
so called, has no place for moral agents or moral causes, and so
its account of the world is forever rendered on a physical rather
than on a metaphysical basis. With such a tendency in education,
this Association can have no sympathy. It is the friend of all good
learning, and will do its utmost to advance education; but it does
not believe that a man can be well or symmetrically educated until
his moral faculties are disciplined in advance of, and equally
_with_, his intellectual. For this reason it would put the church
at the center and foundation of all its work. In this respect it
would co-operate with God, accepting His own appointed agency
for the moral instruction of mankind. The church, as the great
moral teacher, bears the stamp of a divine origin and authority.
Its function is to teach divine truth, and to put man into right
moral relations to the deep order of the universe. Any system of
education, then, which ignored the church, or even set her in
the background, would fail in a well rounded development of all
the mental powers. A partial substitute may be found in other
professions and other institutions, but nothing can take the place
of the church as the authoritative teacher of moral and spiritual
truth.

It is well to remember, also, that that which best develops and
educates the moral powers is the best possible discipline for
the mind itself. No subjects require clearer perception, sharper
analysis and more discriminating reason than moral subjects, and
no men show keener minds than those who have been trained to
reason on moral questions. Illustrations of this in ancient times
are found in the Jewish patriarchs, and in modern times in the
people of Scotland and of New England. And yet the common schools
of these latter countries, until within fifty years, were of the
rudest sort, and only taught the simplest elements of an English
education. But their people, trained in the sanctuary, under a
ministry which was able to reason of righteousness, temperance and
a judgment to come, were as strong intellectually as they were
tough and clear-minded morally.

Senator Hoar, in his recent oration before the law school of Yale
College, asserted and proved that the best lawyers of the last
generation were indebted to the strong pulpits of New England more
than to anything else for their intellectual clearness, and for
their judicial discrimination and force.

Let there be a strong pulpit in any community, and there will be
strong men around it, mentally and morally, though the schools are
of the simplest. On the other hand, if the pulpit be weak and the
outcoming moral influences be feeble, though the schools be ever
so well equipped and endowed, the people around will lack high
purpose, and scholarship itself will be frivolous and effeminate,
destitute of the rugged strength which comes to natures fed from
the deep roots of moral earnestness and conviction.

It need hardly be said that the great need of the South, especially
among the colored people, is a _strong_ church and a _pure_ church;
for slavery damaged the colored man morally vastly more that it
did intellectually. Indeed, his intellect was rather sharpened
by the invention and craft on which it was constantly put, while
the forces which strengthened the will and nourished a pure heart
were the weakest possible; and yet nine persons out of ten suppose
the damage was intellectual, and are greatly surprised when our
teachers assure them that colored children are as bright, and learn
as readily, as white children.

A moment’s reflection would satisfy any one that the weakness would
be on the moral side, for the reason that the life of the slave was
so ordered as to ignore all moral distinctions and to violate all
moral obligations. Hence, the building up should be strongest on
the moral side. No greater mistake could be made than to attempt
to graft on to a low moral character a high degree of intellectual
culture. Should we send forth a generation of students, with sharp
wits and dull moral perceptions, we might contribute to the roll of
more adroit villains, but we should add little to the list of good
men.

The church, therefore, should be emphasized at all points and
at all times. It should command for its preachers the best and
the ablest men. Both races need this. Only this can destroy the
conditions which made it possible that white blood should now be
running in the veins of three-fourths of the colored people. The
Southern pulpit has failed to sufficiently enforce either good
morals or practical righteousness. For lack of this, slavery was
possible, and dueling and violence covered the land with blood.
The remedy for this is a new and right system of moral teaching.
This, we repeat, is the peculiar function of the pulpit. That this
may be made _possible_, churches pure and intelligent must be
established all over the South. It should be done now, because we
are laying the foundations and determining the character of the
coming generations. If the first crop of leaders are morally weak,
they will enfeeble their successors, and perhaps vitiate the seed
and the crop for all time to come.

We need to put into the African blood the iron of the Puritan faith
and purpose, so that they may do for the African continent what
our fathers did for America. The first men sent to that dark land
should hold the ideas and principles out of which may be evolved
churches, schools, homes and Christian states, from the mouths of
the Nile and the Congo clear down to the golden Cape. If we cannot
inoculate the colored race with those moral sensibilities and
forces which will render them charitable, humane and just, then we
look to them in vain for help in the salvation of our own land, as
well as in the founding of Christian institutions and Christian
states for the continent of Africa.

* * * * *


HEALING OF THE NATION’S WOUND.

It was a gaping, festering sore that was left by the fratricidal
war. A speedy healing was not to be expected. It took nearly a
century for the mother country and America to get over their
grievance. There is much of encouragement that this later feud will
be more speedily composed. There have been some special influences
at work. The occurrence of the Centennial tended to divert
attention from the old trouble, to arouse the spirit of patriotism
and to abate ill-will. The prevalence of an epidemic at the South
for two seasons gave the North an opportunity to express moral and
material sympathy, which did much to awaken reciprocal good-will on
the part of the people of that section.

When President Garfield was shot, the people of the South rose up
with as much indignation and sympathy as those of the North. It was
a benediction for the Nation to be lifted by such a ground-swell
of emotion, and that the impulse of Christian patriotism. We feel
confident that President Garfield, restored to soundness, will by
this dreadful dispensation be all the more disposed to temper his
administration with fairness and righteousness, such as will carry
on the process of healing in the body politic.

The Peabody fund and its judicious disbursement at the South is
doing its work of palliating feeling. Miss Willard’s tour of
temperance lecturing through the South was a hopeful revelation of
harmonious sentiment. Dr. Mayo’s eminently successful educational
visitation was in the same line.

Then it is also clearly manifest that the scheme of the North
for aiding the South in the education of the colored people is
coming to be recognized there-away as one of pure philanthropy and
patriotism. The testimony of Dr. Haygood in his book, “Our Brother
in Black,” to this effect, is but the expression of not a little
of latent sentiment. He pronounces “immortal honor” upon these
teachers. He says that without such service the South would be
uninhabitable by this time. Our teachers and preachers, dwelling
there from year to year, and returning North betimes, become
interpreters of the mutual and improving good feeling. They command
respect at the South, they retain affectionate regard at the North,
and so become a bond of union between the two sections. More and
more this process will go on with happiest results.

The National Cotton Exposition to be held this fall at Atlanta,
upon a gigantic scale, will be another mighty loom for weaving the
fabric of national good-will.

We be one people, with one English inheritance of language and
history, of character and civilization, with a common possession of
Revolutionary glory and of pride in our national development. We
must let the dead bury their dead. We must push on in all proper
ways to remove prejudice and to restore confidence. Service for our
common country in the way of evangelization and of righteous civil
administration, will be one of the most effective aids in healing
the Nation’s wound.

* * * * *


A SUGGESTION WORTH PASSING ALONG.

After the presentation of the cause of the American Missionary
Association recently to a church in Connecticut, the pastor made
the following suggestion to his people:

“We have now had this great subject before us. We shall never,
probably, see it more clearly. We shall never, probably, feel its
importance more. What shall we do about it? I was going to announce
a contribution for next Sabbath; but perhaps it will rain; perhaps
you will not be here; perhaps you will forget. Besides, I notice
that church plates do not hold a great deal. We make them a small
business. We ought to do more for this cause. We want to do more.
And so, if I can find two or three young ladies ready for the work,
I will send them to your houses. Be ready! Look the matter all
over, and do as good a thing as you can. After that, perhaps, we
will pick up the stray bits when Sunday comes.”

It is pleasant to add that the pastor found canvassers without
difficulty, and that about three times the amount usually given by
plate collections was gathered.

Atlanta University undertakes the work of “head-making” so far
as this means the development of a clear and sensible intellect,
controlled by a good heart. It was, however, “_bread_-making,” and
not “head-making,” which the types in our August number should have
mentioned to the credit of the Atlanta girls, whose loaves, rolls
and Yankee doughnuts so delighted the gentlemen of the examining
committee at the recent anniversary. Plain cooking is a part of the
regular instruction in Atlanta University.

* * * * *


BENEFACTIONS.

—Beloit College, Wis., has received $10,000 from Mrs. J. S.
Herrick, to be applied for a new observatory.

—The bequest of Col. Wm. E. Putnam to Marietta College, Ohio, will
probably amount to $35,000.

—Mr. Reuben J. Flick, a member of the First Presbyterian Church of
Wilkesbarre, has recently given $20,000 to Lincoln University.

—Mr. Geo. I. Seney has recently added $100,000 to his gift to
Wesleyan University, the interest of which is to be given in prizes
to students.

—Mr. A. L. Williston and wife have given $10,000 for a new
observatory at Mt. Holyoke Seminary, in memory of their deceased
son.

—The late Ebenezer Alden, M.D., of Randolph, left a legacy of
$5,000 to Phillips Academy, Andover, for helping students, or
paying for instruction, at the discretion of the tutors.

—A friend of Yale Divinity School has given $10,500 for a new
library building, which is now being erected between Marquand
Chapel and West Divinity Hall.

—Mr. Leander McCormick, of Chicago, has donated his splendid
telescope, costing $50,000, to the University of Virginia, and
offers to build the observatory to receive it.

—Mr. Wm. H. Vanderbilt, of New York, has given $25,000 to the
University of Virginia, and Mr. Lewis Brooks, of Rochester, N.Y.,
has given a splendid museum, costing about $60,000, to the same
institution.

—_Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn., has Jubilee Hall completed
and overflowing with students, and is now erecting Livingstone
Missionary Hall, by the gift of Mrs. Stone; but endowments are the
great necessity. Twenty-five thousand dollars will provide for a
professorship, and there are seven such needing endowment._

* * * * *


GENERAL NOTES.


AFRICA.

—M. Matheis has been sent out by the French Government to explore
the region extending from the bend of the Niger to Lake Tchad.

—The question of the establishment of a small railroad on the
Decanville plan, between Ogooué and Alima, is being considered.

—M. J. Thomson left London the 6th of May to go to Zanzibar, from
whence he will proceed to make the geological exploration of the
Rovouma for the Sultan of Zanzibar.

—Messrs. Demietri and Michieli, agents of the Italian Society of
Commerce in Africa, have set out from Khartoum for the Red Sea at
the head of a caravan of 700 camels, laden with various kinds of
merchandise.

—The Commercial Association of Lisbon has moved a patriotic
subscription, the proceeds of which will be offered to the
Government to co-operate with it in the foundation of civilizing
stations in the Portuguese African colonies.

—An Italian party consisting of an officer and 14 men, while
attempting to penetrate Abyssinia from Assab Bay, have been
massacred in the interior. It is possible that the Italian
Government may send a military expedition to demand redress.

—Until recently there has been no bank in the English colonies
of Western Africa. Many of the merchants have been hindered from
entering into negotiations with these colonies by the difficulty of
obtaining reliable information relative to the state of commerce.
But the Bank of West Africa has now been established, with a
capital of 500,000 pounds sterling, having its centre at London, and


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary — Volume 35, No. 9, September, 1881 → online text (page 1 of 6)