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The American Missionary — Volume 41, No. 10, October, 1887 online

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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, OCTOBER 1887 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by Cornell University Digital Collections)









[Illustration: OCTOBER, 1887.

The American Missionary

Vol. XLI.

No. 10.]




[Illustration: CONTENTS]

* * * * *


EDITORIAL.

ANNUAL MEETING, 279
END OF THE FISCAL YEAR, 279
PARAGRAPHS, 280
THE GLENN BILL, 281
THE INDIAN LANGUAGE IN MISSION WORK, 282
MEMORIAL ON INDIAN EDUCATION, 283
OUR INDIAN WORK AT OAHE, 285
CANADIAN INDIANS, 289
BREADTH OF THE A. M. A. WORK, 290
A CENTENARIAN, 292


THE SOUTH.

NOTES IN THE SADDLE, 293
CHARLESTON, S.C., 294
SHOTGUN IN LOUISIANA, 295
DEATH OF REV. WILLIS POLK, 296


THE INDIANS.

THE MANDAN INDIANS OF NORTHERN DAKOTA, 297


THE CHINESE.

FRUIT AT PETALUMA, 298


BUREAU OF WOMAN’S WORK.

LADIES’ MISSIONARY SOCIETIES AND OUR ANNUAL MEETING, 300
MISSIONARY WORK—WHAT CAN BE ACCOMPLISHED, 300
NEED OF CONTINUED WORK OF THE A. M. A., 301


FOR THE CHILDREN.

LETTER FROM A YOUNG SANTEE, 302


RECEIPTS 302

* * * * *


NEW YORK:

PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION.

Rooms, 56 Reade Street.

* * * * *

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in Advance.

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N.Y., as second-class
matter.




American Missionary Association.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT, HON. WM. B. WASHBURN, LL.D., Mass.


_Vice-Presidents._

Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill.
Rev. D.O. MEARS, D.D., Mass.
Rev. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo.


_Corresponding Secretary._

REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Associate Corresponding Secretaries._

Rev. JAMES POWELL, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Treasurer._

H. W. HUBBARD, Esq., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Auditors._

PETER MCCARTEE.
CHAS. P. PEIRCE.


_Executive Committee._

JOHN H. WASHBURN, Chairman.
A. P. FOSTER, Secretary.

_For Three Years._
S. B. HALLIDAY.
SAMUEL HOLMES.
SAMUEL S. MARPLES.
CHARLES L. MEAD.
ELBERT B. MONROE.

_For Two Years._
J. E. RANKIN.
WM. H. WARD.
J. W. COOPER.
JOHN H. WASHBURN.
EDMUND L. CHAMPLIN.

_For One Year._
LYMAN ABBOTT.
A. S. BARNES.
J. R. DANFORTH.
CLINTON B. FISK.
A. P. FOSTER.


_District Secretaries._

Rev. C. L. WOODWORTH, D.D., _21 Cong’l House, Boston_.
Rev. J. E. ROY, D.D., _151 Washington Street, Chicago_.


_Financial Secretary for Indian Missions._

Rev. CHARLES W. SHELTON.


_Field Superintendent._

Rev. C. J. RYDER, _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Bureau of Woman’s Work._

_Secretary_, Miss D. E. EMERSON, _56 Reade Street, N.Y._

* * * * *


COMMUNICATIONS

Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretaries; those relating to the collecting fields,
to Rev. James Powell, D.D., or to the District Secretaries; letters
for “THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY,” to the Editor, at the New York
Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

In drafts, checks, registered letters or post office orders may
be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York,
or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 151 Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.


FORM OF A BEQUEST.

“I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of ———— dollars,
in trust, to pay the same in ———— days after my decease to the
person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer of the
‘American Missionary Association,’ of New York City, to be applied,
under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association,
to its charitable uses and purposes.” The Will should be attested
by three witnesses.

* * * * *




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XLI. OCTOBER, 1887. No. 10.

* * * * *




American Missionary Association.

* * * * *


For notice of Annual Meeting see last page of cover. An excellent
opportunity for a healthful sea voyage.

* * * * *


END OF THE FISCAL YEAR.

With this month our fiscal year ends. At this writing we are very
anxious about the outcome. As we noticed last month, July receipts
this year fell off, as compared with last year, $17,000, and in
August they fell off, as compared with last year, about $3,000.
This puts a heavy strain upon September. When this magazine reaches
our readers there will still be a few days in September left.
They ought to be golden days for our treasury. The thought that,
if every one will do his duty, it is possible for all deficit
to be overcome and all debt to be wiped out, makes us urgent to
make yet one more plea before our books are closed. The time for
hand-to-hand action has come. Reader, can _you_ not do something?
Do you not know some individuals and churches that have given
us nothing the past year? There are a great many of them in the
country. Can you not, by a little personal effort, induce them to
do something before September ends? A little effort all round, and
God will bless it to our complete deliverance.

* * * * *

A friend of our work sends us word that in his judgment the
Association should not only be speedily relieved of its debt, but
that a good balance should always be in hand to meet emergencies.
He therefore makes a proposition that he will be one of a hundred
who shall give $1,000 each to secure this most desirable end. But
where are the ninety and nine? We lay the suggestion before our
readers. We believe that among the constituents of the A. M. A.
there are a great many more than the required number possessing
means in over-abundance to meet the call. We appeal to all such to
take the suggestion under consideration and let us hear from them
at their earliest convenience.

* * * * *

Our Indian boys are interested in the Association’s closing the
year free from debt. A teacher in the Santee school writes: “Some
of the young men who live in the Young Men’s Hall wish to help
the Association pay its debt.” Here follow the names of eight
young men who contribute $9.25 for this purpose. The teacher adds:
“This is money that the boys have earned besides paying for their
clothing and making other contributions.” Were the church members
in the country to do proportionately as well as these Indian youth,
there would not only be no debt threatening, but the new fields
so urgently calling for cultivation would be entered and our work
greatly enlarged.

* * * * *

The editor of the MISSIONARY rejoices in having such a little
friend as the writer of the following letter, and he greatly
desires that her tribe may increase:

“_Dear Friend_—I learned from a friend, one of our late
missionaries, that you was in debt, and as I am a little girl and
interested in it, I will give one dime toward the debt.”

M. G.

* * * * *

The field is the world, and the work is one. Frequently we have
occasion to realize this blessed truth. Two contributions just
received bring it up with fresh emphasis. One is from a home
missionary who sends us a generous contribution for our work, and
the other is from a former foreign missionary, who in sending
his gift from over the sea, accompanies it with these inspiring
words: “Your grand work still broadens out on all sides. God give
his people hearts to devise and execute liberal things. The light
surely is increasing and hope grows stronger as your work rolls
onward with its mighty power—the power with which alone the spirit
of God can endue it—is enduing it.”

* * * * *

The questions with which we have to do are inseparably connected
with the welfare of our beloved land. They strike deep at the
roots of the life of the churches. They touch the mission work
in which the churches are engaged all along the line. Both home
and foreign missions will languish if they are prosecuted at the
neglect of just the work which the American Missionary Association
is doing. The heathen world is a common object for the prayer,
thought, sacrifice and effort of the churches of Christendom.
But the heathenism of the neglected classes of America must be
reached by the churches of America. Over that heathenism we cannot
spring; past that heathenism we must not go without giving faithful
attention to it on the way.

* * * * *


THE GLENN BILL.

HAS A WHOLE STATE LOST ITS POISE?—It would seem as if the white
people of Georgia had done this in so far as they are represented
by their Legislature in its action on the Glenn Bill. The sentiment
of the civilized world is against them. Of this they might easily
satisfy themselves; yet it is reported that Mr. Glenn, during one
of his speeches in favor of his infamous chain-gang bill, cried
out: “What do the people of Georgia care for the sentiment of the
world?” There is evidence, however, Mr. Glenn to the contrary
notwithstanding, that Georgia does care for the sentiment of the
world. In the Senate the bill has been called to a halt, and
several attempts have been made to modify it. Here is a bill that
has been passed by the Assembly about as unanimously as was the
Glenn Bill:

“_Resolved_ by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring:
That in future the Governor be directed not to draw his warrant
for the annual appropriation of $8,000 to Atlanta University,
under the act of March 3d, 1884, until such a plan of expenditure
as will secure the exclusive use of the same for the education
of the colored children, in accordance with the declared and
settled policy of the State on the subject of the co-education
of the races, has been submitted and approved by the Commission
constituted in said act for the supervision of the expenditure of
said appropriation.

“_Resolved_ further: That said Commission be directed to see
that said fund is faithfully applied according to said plan of
expenditure, and in no other way.”

This bill is practically as wicked as the one for which it is
offered as a substitute. As the New York _Independent_ says,
it “imposes a fine of $8,000 per year upon an institution for
permitting the child of a teacher to recite to his own father.”
Such legislation is a disgrace to the century. Private and
missionary schools should have the fullest liberty in this Republic
to teach whom they will. A missionary school opens its doors and
says, in the language of the gospel whose teachings it is bound
to follow, Whosoever will, may come. The Georgia Legislature sets
itself up above the gospel, and says, Whosoever will, may _not_
come. Shame upon the State that, while calling itself Christian,
dares to legislate in violation of Christian principle. It will
not, it cannot prosper, till it changes its course. What the
final outcome will be we cannot yet say; but this is certain, the
legislation will be against our principles and our work. In the
meantime, it is pertinent for us to ask the churches if they intend
to stand by us as we attempt to stand for the principles on which
as an Association we rest—principles that we believe to be the
very essence of the gospel? To close this year with a debt would
certainly be a great discouragement in our work. Friends, bend to
the rescue with a will.

* * * * *


THE INDIAN LANGUAGE IN MISSION WORK.

There has been severe and just criticism on the policy of the
Indian Commissioner prohibiting the use of the vernacular in the
schools among the Indians, not only in those sustained by the
Government, but in those supported wholly by private contributions.
We wish to give due credit to the Commissioner. He is honest in
his purpose, and his general aim is good. He is right in wishing
to make the Indian a civilized _man_, and not a civilized Indian.
The Indian dross must be taken out and the manhood-gold polished.
A man’s language is a part of himself, and the language of the
Indian, while it is rich in metaphors relating to natural scenery,
comparatively pure in reference to the social virtues, and exalted
in its conception of the Great Spirit, yet, in many respects, it
holds him to his old life, with its cruelties and superstitions. It
is true that as the Roman and Greek languages, conveying originally
only human and mythological ideas, came at length to be the vehicle
for Christian meanings, so may the Indian’s vernacular. But the
process is long and tedious, and the number of Indians who use it
is so small and its vocabulary is so meagre, that the effort to
make it a permanent vehicle for thought and speech is not worth
making, especially as there is a language so much better just at
hand. The only question relates to the mode of transition from the
one to the other, and how far the Indian tongue can be made a means
of more speedily and accurately teaching the English; or, rather,
how far the Indian language can be used to help the Indian into a
Christian civilization.

Here is the Commissioner’s great mistake. No square rule is wise.
It depends on persons, locations and surroundings. For example:

1. The Indian pupil at Hampton or Carlisle is surrounded by
English-speaking people, and he will learn English perforce, as
an Englishman learns French in France, or German in Germany. Yet
even here the process is slow. The Indian youth is so bashful that
he makes reluctant use of his opportunities, so that it requires
three or four years to acquire the English language at Hampton; and
withal, an interpreter is an essential helper there.

2. The Indian boy at the Santee Normal School has only the teachers
as his English-speaking associates; the rest are Dakotas. He must
spend toilsome years in getting a little knowledge through a dense
medium, when an occasional Dakota word would at once illuminate
the meaning of the English. What the pupil wants is English ideas,
rather than English words. Whatever will give this should be used.

3. But the greatest difficulty is in the schools at out-stations,
which have a _missionary_ aim. Here the idea is mainly the making
of Christian character and life. The teacher is usually a native,
a pupil from the Santee or Oahe schools. He has some knowledge of
English, enough to enable him to give more precise and better
meaning to the Dakota, but not enough to enable him to teach or
preach in it, and if he could his hearers would not understand
him. He must use his native tongue mainly, or not work at all.
The Missionary Societies would find their work ruinously crippled
if these out-stations were cut off. They are the pioneers of
missionary work.

4. Then, again, there is the mass of the adult Indians that can
never learn a new language. They must hear the gospel in their
native tongue, or never hear it. The President of the United
States, Secretary Lamar and Commissioner Atkins have all committed
themselves to the value—nay, the necessity—of religion as a lever
for the elevation of the Indian. Do they mean now to forbid the
Missionary Societies from training teachers and preachers for these
people? This is an assumption of authority that befits Russia, and
we are sure the people of these free United States will submit to
no such Star-Chamber dictation.

* * * * *


MEMORIAL ON INDIAN EDUCATION.

ADOPTED BY THE CHICAGO MINISTERS’ MEETING.

_To his Excellency the President of the United States:_

The Congregational ministers of Chicago and vicinity, in their
weekly session at the Grand Pacific, September 5th, to the
number of thirty-five, desire to memorialize you in behalf of
a modification of the recent orders of the Indian Department,
whereby the use of the native language is interdicted in all Indian
reservation schools, not only those that are under Government
patronage, in whole or in part, but also those that are private or
are under missionary societies.

From the first we have favored the policy proposed by missionaries
among the Indians, now adopted by the Government, and heartily
approved by yourself, of bringing these aborigines into American
citizenship and of securing them land in severalty, with the
surplus turned into a school fund.

Nor do we question the motives of the heads of the Indian
Department. Indeed this is forefended by the fact, as semi-officially
stated, that “the question of the effect of the policy of the
office upon any missionary body has never been considered;” and
this fact gives us the more assurance in soliciting you, that the
missionary view may yet receive a due consideration.

We are clear, with the Indian officials, that in the effort to
Americanize these natives, the English language must be introduced
as fast as possible. But we would not do this to the total
exclusion of the native tongues in the missionary and interior
station schools, being confident that the final result will be more
speedily secured by the use, in part, of the Indian language.

We are confident that the greatest civilizing power among any pagan
people will be that which comes from the ideas and the influence of
the Christian religion; and that these can be made most effective
through the Bible of that religion in the native tongue. This has
been the wisdom of missions in all times and countries, and none
the less in those to the Indians of America. By this process alone
have we secured the civilized “nations” we now have in the Indian
Territory, in New York, in Wisconsin and in other parts of our
country. So the missionaries to the Sioux gave them the Bible, the
catechism, Pilgrim’s Progress, spelling-books and readers in their
own dialect, and in this way gave them the really American ideas,
as well as the religion of Christ. And what is the result? Two
thousand of them gathered into the Christian church and twice that
number civilized.

Of the people it is not possible that any but the children will
be taught English, and of these, for a long time, only a small
portion. For the adult people and even for the young, as for the
process of helping them to heaven, “one hour of their vernacular
is worth a cycle of any other tongue,” and this must be from the
native’s Bible in hand. The new order will close eighteen schools
and stations of our missionary body, and as many more under the
care of the Episcopalians and Presbyterians. It will deprive seven
or eight hundred children of the instruction they are fitted to
receive, and will prevent access to about 6,000 who are near these
schools, but not yet reached. Principal Belfield of our Chicago
Manual Training School, after a recent visit to the Normal and
Industrial Training School of the Santee Agency, under Rev. Alfred
L. Riggs, reported in one of our dailies, in terms of the warmest
admiration and commendation, of the comprehensive system of manual,
industrial and moral training of that school, which he declared was
working a wonderful transformation among the Indian youth of both
sexes. And yet it is against this school in particular that the new
orders are aimed. And this, not because the English language is not
chiefly used there, but solely because the Dakota, in connection
with the English, is used at school in reading the Bible and
singing gospel hymns.

The station schools back in the interior of the Sioux Reservation,
under native teachers only, having no connection with the
Government, are also ordered closed. But these teachers have been
trained at the Santee and Oahe schools, to which some of their
pupils have been brought forward; and these again furnish the
scholars who are secured for the institutions at the East where
the English is exclusively used. This process shows the relation
of the vernacular schools to those of the advanced English. It
also shows how unfair it is to decide the whole case of teaching
exclusive English by the selected specimens to be found at Hampton
and Carlisle.

This plan keeps up a connection between the young and the old,
between the raw interior and the more civilized front. It agrees
with the established policy for assimilating people of foreign
tongues in our country—that of using both the vernacular and the
English in their public worship. It would be a gross usurpation for
our country to interdict such peoples from thus using their native
language in parish schools for imparting their own religious views
of truth and duty.

We feel sure that to insist that these new candidates for
citizenship, in addition to all the other new things implied in
this revolution of their old ways, shall be tied up in all their
schools to a new language, will be a disheartenment that will
defeat the desired result.

Our petition is, that you will secure such a modification of the
recent orders as will allow, in private and mission schools, a
discretionary use of the native along with the English language,
and all this in order, as we think, to a more speedy extinction
of the one, and the prevalence of the other, among all the Indian
tribes.

And so we respectfully appeal.

(Signed) J. D. MCCORD, Pres.
(Signed) F. D. ROOD, _Sec._

* * * * *


OUR INDIAN WORK AT OAHE.

AN ILLUSTRATION OF WHAT THE U. S. GOVERNMENT _proposes_ TO KILL.

It was my privilege to attend the closing exercises of our Indian
school at Oahe, in Dakota, which is under the direction of Rev.
T. L. Riggs. About forty children have been in school during
the winter, and now in mid-summer they return to their homes to
spend two months. Mr. Riggs has sent word to all the out-stations
that the parents and relatives of the children were expected to
come here for their children at that time. As school closed on
Wednesday, those living at a distance of ninety miles started the
Saturday previous. Many of them reached Oahe on Tuesday, and on
Wednesday morning we watched them coming in in their white covered
wagons and on their ponies. Stopping near the river they pitched
their tents, and thus had temporary homes. There were here then
one hundred and fifty in number who came from all parts of the
“Cheyenne River Agency Reservation,” and some from the “Spotted
Tail Agency.” The mission house was open to all, and not a few came
at once to pay their respects, staying only a few moments. The
school exercises were intensely interesting. The delighted parents
in their blankets and with feathers in their hair, looking uncouth
enough to please the most fantastic taste, themselves satisfied
beyond qualification, seated and standing, filled every available
space when the exercises began. These were recitations and songs,
etc., which made even the phlegmatic red people smile audibly. One
little fellow named Mark “spoke his piece” as follows:

“I am a little boy


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary — Volume 41, No. 10, October, 1887 → online text (page 1 of 6)