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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, JULY 1887 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
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[Illustration: JULY, 1887.

VOL. XLI.

NO. 7.

The American Missionary]

* * * * *




[Illustration: CONTENTS]


EDITORIAL.

FOURTH OF JULY,—DEATH OF MRS. PARR, 187
PARAGRAPHS, 188
THE JOHN BROWN SONG, 189
AT THE MONUMENT OF LINCOLN, 191
THINGS TO BE REMEMBERED—NO. 2, 192
THE IMPRESSIONS OF TEN YEARS, 193


THE SOUTH.

NOTES IN THE SADDLE, 195
ATLANTA UNIVERSITY, 197
STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY, 198
TWO EXAMPLES OF PERSEVERANCE, 199


THE INDIANS.

CHARGE AT THE ORDINATION OF REV. GEO. W. REED, 201


THE CHINESE.

EVANGELISTIC WORK, 204
MISSIONS IN CHINA, 206


BUREAU OF WOMAN’S WORK.

TEMPERANCE WORK IN OUR SCHOOLS, 206
ENGLISH AS SHE IS _Not_ TAUGHT, 208


FOR THE CHILDREN.

CHILDREN’S TEMPERANCE WORK, 209


RECEIPTS, 209

* * * * *


NEW YORK:

PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION.

Rooms, 56 Reade Street.

* * * * *

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in Advance

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N.Y., as second-class
matter.




AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT, Hon. WM. B. WASHBURN, LL.D., Mass.


_Vice-Presidents._

Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill.
Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass.
Rev. D. O. MEARS, D.D., Mass.
Rev. HENRY HOPKINS, Mo.


_Corresponding Secretary._

Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Associate Corresponding Secretaries._

Rev. JAMES POWELL, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Treasurer._

H. W. HUBBARD, Esq., _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Auditors._

PETER MCCARTEE.
CHAS. P. PEIRCE.


_Executive Committee._

JOHN H. WASHBURN, Chairman.
A. P. FOSTER, Secretary.

_For Three Years._
S. B. HALLIDAY.
SAMUEL HOLMES.
SAMUEL S. MARPLES.
CHARLES L. MEAD.
ELBERT B. MONROE.

_For Two Years._
J. E. RANKIN.
WM. H. WARD.
J. W. COOPER.
JOHN H. WASHBURN.
EDMUND L. CHAMPLIN.

_For One Year._
LYMAN ABBOTT.
A. S. BARNES.
J. R. DANFORTH.
CLINTON B. FISK.
A. P. FOSTER.


_District Secretaries._

Rev. C. L. WOODWORTH, D.D., _21 Cong’l House, Boston_.
Rev. J. E. ROY, D.D., _151 Washington Street, Chicago_.


_Financial Secretary for Indian Missions._

Rev. CHARLES W. SHELTON.


_Field Superintendent._

Rev. C. J. RYDER, _56 Reade Street, N.Y._


_Bureau of Woman’s Work._

_Secretary_, Miss D. E. EMERSON, _56 Reade Street, N.Y._

* * * * *


COMMUNICATIONS

Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretaries; those relating to the collecting fields,
to Rev. James Powell, D.D., or to the District Secretaries; letters
for “THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY,” to the Editor, at the New York
Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

In drafts, checks, registered letters or post office orders may
be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York,
or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 151 Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.


FORM OF A BEQUEST.

“I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of ———— dollars,
in trust, to pay the same in ———— days after my decease to the
person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer of the
‘American Missionary Association,’ of New York City, to be applied,
under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association,
to its charitable uses and purposes.” The Will should be attested
by three witnesses.




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XLI. JULY, 1887. NO. 7.

* * * * *




American Missionary Association.

* * * * *


This year the Fourth of July is on Monday. Last year, being on
Sunday, Dr. Dana’s suggestion to take up a contribution to help
the A. M. A. out of debt was acted upon by many of the churches.
The result was a large increase to our receipts. Why not repeat
the effort this year? It is certainly in order that patriotic
sermons should be preached July 3d. It is just as certain that a
contribution taken in connection with such a service in behalf
of the A. M. A. would be neither burdensome nor inappropriate.
It would be an easy matter certainly for that $5,000 deficiency
that we carry from last year to be provided for. We throw out the
suggestion.

One other thought. Vacation days are now upon us. We make the
request that our friends will bear our work in mind as they visit
the country churches. A little effort to circulate the AMERICAN
MISSIONARY and to make the people acquainted with our work, would
go a great way to help us.

* * * * *

In the June MISSIONARY we mentioned a watch sent us by a widow.
It was a cherished memento. Not being able to make an offering of
money, she gave us that which represented to her more than money.
A reader of the MISSIONARY, noticing the gift, has kindly sent us
more than double its market value in redemption.

* * * * *

We are pained to record the death of Mrs. J. H. Parr, which
occurred in Chicago, April 3d. Mrs. Parr first went South under
appointment of the A. M. A., in November, 1884, to take charge
of the musical department at Tillotson Institute, Austin, Texas.
At the close of that school year, with her husband she went
to Quitman, Ga. The trying experiences in connection with the
persecution of our missionaries, and especially the incendiary
burning of our school-house at Quitman, gave her nerves such a
shock that she never fully recovered from it. The last six months
of her life she seemed to be improving. They were months marked by
special Christian activity, aiding her husband in his work as a
pastor. But death came suddenly, and it was clearly manifest that
her nervous forces, so fearfully overtaxed and shattered by the
experience of that terrible night in Quitman, were very far from
being restored. We commend the bereaved husband to the benediction
of the loving Father who sympathizes with all his children in the
day of their affliction.

* * * * *


The _Herald_, of Greenville, Miss., is responsible for the
statement that a Negro who was serving out a small fine on the
chain-gang at Vicksburg, for refusing to work had $100 added to
his fine. The same paper also states that George Young (white),
convicted of forgery and confined in Kemper Co. jail, was taken
from prison and set at liberty by a party of masked men. This may
be taken as a sample of the difference between the way justice is
meted out to white and black criminals in Mississippi. The color
line is certainly drawn. A good thing for Justice that her eyes are
blinded. The hand in which she holds her sword would certainly move
to smite the discriminators, could she have a sight at the outrage.

* * * * *

A committee of the U.S. Senate, consisting of Senators Platt,
Blackburn and Cullom, have been investigating Indian matters. A
long telegram, every point of which tells against the Indians,
professing to be based on the investigations of this committee, has
been sent out all over the country. Depend upon it, when so lengthy
a telegram is sent over the wires of the Associated Press, there
is an agency behind it that has an axe to grind. The dispatch was
so one-sided that any careful reader could not help seeing that
in so far as it stated facts, they were but partially stated. It
said the committee had witnessed a dance among the Osages, and that
“it was especially sad to learn that two of the sprightliest of
the dancers, covered almost all over with little looking-glasses,
sleigh-bells, rings, feathers and ribbons, were graduates of the
Carlisle Indian School, who have relapsed into shameless savagery.”
If this language, taken in connection with its setting, means
anything, it means a slur at Indian education. But suppose the
telegram had said that there had been connected with the Carlisle
School, in all, eighty-four Osages; that none of them stayed in the
school over _three_ years; that more than a half of them remained
_less than a year_, and that there have been no Osages at the
school since August, 1885; had the telegram made that statement,
there would be nothing “particularly sad” in the discovery that two
out of the eighty-four had yielded to the tremendous temptation to
fall back into ways out of which they had never been lifted. It is
_sad_, of course, that these people are savages, but the spirit
that lurks behind this telegram is far sadder. It is absurd to talk
of these youth as _lapsing_. Indian education is not to be judged
by the conduct of those who have been in school from less than one
year up to three years at most; nor, even had they been in school
for ten or fifteen years, is it to be condemned should it be proved
that two out of eighty-four, yielding to temptation, had fallen.

* * * * *

It will interest the readers of the MISSIONARY to learn that the
Act of Congress for the allotment of lands in severalty to Indians
provides that every head of an Indian family shall be settled on
160 acres; every unmarried person over eighteen years of age,
and every orphan, shall have 80 acres; and every single person
under eighteen born before the President issues the order making
allotments, 40 acres. The allotments so made are to be inalienable
for 25 years, and the lands remaining over are to be bought of the
Indians by the Government and opened to homestead settlement only;
such homesteads in tracts of 160 acres to be inalienable also for
five years. When the allotments have been made, all the Indians are
declared to be citizens of the United States, entitled to all the
rights, privileges and immunities of such citizens.

* * * * *


THE JOHN BROWN SONG.

The claim has been made that the melody of the John Brown song was
the product of the colored people. Our readers will see from the
following article, which we take great pleasure in publishing, that
Mr. Frank E. Jerome, of Russell, Kansas, is the author of this
famous war song. He has written the article, at our request, for
the MISSIONARY, and in a private letter he says that at the time he
composed the song he was only thirteen years of age.

ED.

On the first day of February, 1861, I arrived in Leavenworth,
Kansas, from St. Louis, Mo., and took an engagement in a theatre
there. Leavenworth at that time was under the greatest excitement.
All sorts of rumors of war were coming in, and the soldiers seemed
to be concentrating from all sides. Bonfires and stump speeches
were the nightly occurrences, and stirred up the patriotism of
the people to fever heat. As a boy, I naturally fell into the
excitement, and every chance I had I would attend these public
meetings. At one of them I heard an impassioned orator thunder out:

“For Freedom and Right will surely win the day!”

This sentence remained with me. I pondered over it, and finally got
to singing it in different ways in several songs. Some time after,
I heard a prominent citizen say that “John Brown was dead, but the
rebels would find that his soul would roll on and crush them!”
Before either of these occurrences, I heard a number of soldiers
on a South-bound steamer singing, as they swept by:

“Go tell Aunt Susey! Go tell Aunt Susey!
Go tell Aunt Susey old John Brown is dead!” (_Etc._)

This tune I had picked up and learned thoroughly. One gift of
nature to me has been the art of combining two tunes of different
kinds and thereby producing a new one. I had combined this tune of
“Go tell Aunt Susey” with the old Sunday-school hymn, “I love to go
to Sunday-school,” and the union of these two tunes produced the
air of “John Brown’s Body,” as sung everywhere since that time. I
sang this tune long before I put any words to it. But when I heard
“Freedom and Right will surely win the day,” and that John Brown’s
soul “would roll on and crush them,” I found with delight that I
could fit them neatly into my tune.

The play in which I gave “John Brown’s Body” was designated as
“Jeff. Davis in the Camp.” It represented a number of Northern
Negroes going down to capture Jeff. Davis, and during the march
southward they build a camp fire, and while the bean soup is
boiling the sentinel sings a song, and the rest of the “soldiers”
on the stage join in the chorus. I was the sentinel, and gave
the song at this time. A company of soldiers was present in the
audience, and I was quite startled at the reception my song
received. They hurrahed, yelled, laughed, stamped, and called me
out time and again, until the proprietor of the theatre interposed
and quieted the excitement. But that night, every time I appeared
on the stage another storm of applause would greet me.

After the show was over, the soldiers cheered and went out singing
“John Brown’s Body” in all sorts of ways, and for several days
after I heard it on the street in many different ways. The tune has
always remained as I first composed it, but the soldiers changed
the words to suit their own convenience and ideas. The song as I
sang it was as follows:

John Brown’s body lies slumbering in the grave;
John Brown was noble, loyal and brave;
His mission on earth was to rescue and to save,
And his soul goes rolling on!

CHORUS: Glory, glory, Hallelujah! (_Etc._)

The Rebels in the South can never make it pay
While John Brown’s mission speeds on its way,
For Freedom and Right will surely win the day,
As his soul goes rolling on!

This was all the song—but two verses. A short time after this a
little newsboy stopped me and told me that he had made up a new
verse for my song; and upon asking him to sing it, he sang:

“We’ll hang Jeff. Davis on a sour apple-tree!”

repeating the same line three times. I laughed, and told him I
would think it over.

In the theatre when I gave the song was a Frenchman named C.
Francois, well known to the early settlers of Leavenworth, who
was the leader of a glee club, composed of the actors, who sang
nicely many national airs and ballads. Mr. Francois, about the
time I sang the song, went to New York, and, I learn, returned by
way of Massachusetts, and I am led to believe that it was through
his means that the song reached the Eastern States as quickly as
it did; and I also have good reason for believing that the Seventh
Kansas and Fiftieth Illinois regiments carried the song South a
little later.

These are the facts as they occurred; and I may say, in closing,
that I am pleased to note that the little acorn has developed into
the mighty oak, and John Brown’s name is one of the imperishable
monuments that now adorn a free and united country; and the colored
people of the South and North can unite under the glorious banner
of Liberty in preserving the name and love for him who freely gave
his life for their liberty and freedom.

I have heard severe criticism on the part of Southerners regarding
the illustrious dead, but I often remember the olden story, in the
Holy Book, of similar criticism made by the enemies of Christ, and
I also read that “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man
lay down his life for his friends.”

So, in our homes, in our workshops, in the fields, in the churches
and schools, through the pages of history, and within our own
hearts, we will never forget the boys in blue who saved the Union,
and the glorious hero who laid down his life willingly and freely,
that the curse of slavery should be forever extinguished from
the bright, fair pages of our history. And while we strew bright
flowers over the graves of the departed heroes, we shall always
remember, with swelling heart and deep affection, the great work
accomplished by old John Brown of Ossawatomie.

Russell, Kansas. FRANK E. JEROME.

* * * * *


AT THE MONUMENT OF LINCOLN.

The General Association of Illinois, at its recent meeting in
Springfield, as it had done once before, went in a body to that
shrine of patriotism, the monument to Abraham Lincoln. That
patriotic song, now turned to a Christian psalm, “My country, ’tis
of thee,” was sung by the people, and a prayer of thanksgiving was
offered by Dr. G. S. F. Savage, who has now come to be one of the
veteran ministers of the State.

Words of welcome were offered by the Attorney-General of Illinois,
Mr. Geo. H. Hunt, and these were gracefully responded to by the
Moderator, Rev. W. F. Day. Addresses were also made by Rev. E. K.
Alden, D.D., Hon. Wm. H. Collins, and Rev. Jos. E. Roy.

At the former visit of this body, the Jubilee Singers were present
to voice the gratitude of the emancipated race.

The colored troops, after their muster-out, gave for the monument
more than $50,000, one-fourth of the whole.

The scroll held in the left hand of the bronze statue of Mr.
Lincoln bears on it, in large letters, the word “Emancipation,” and
the pen in his right hand indicates the signing of that talismanic
instrument, while the coat-of-arms, set into the pedestal,
represents the eagle as holding in his beak the broken chain of
slaves.

Of the 178,000 colored soldiers, 80,000 had, with their great
Liberator, laid down their lives for the life of the nation. And
so it seemed well that one who was identified with the work of
supplementing that edict of freedom should stand there to recount
their deeds of valor and to relate with what enthusiasm they
celebrate all over the South not only Emancipation Day and the
Fourth of July, but Decoration Day itself. Who in that Southland
shall be found to offer psalms and prayers, and scatter flowers
over the graves of the 321,369 soldiers buried in the eighty-two
national cemeteries there? As God would have it, the people are
found there, numbered by millions, who delight to render this
service of gratitude and of love—a people whose patriotism has
never been tarnished with a breath of disloyalty.

What shall be done for a people who have been so true to the
nation? Let them be confirmed in all the rights and emoluments of
our Christian citizenship.

* * * * *


THINGS TO BE REMEMBERED—NO. 2.

_The Want_: Nothing so nearly concerns the welfare of this land,
and of all lands, as the thorough merging and assimilating of all
the races here into one Christian commonwealth. This is needed
for the unity and strength of our own nation, and for an example
and influence upon the nations abroad. The despised races, in
particular, need to be thus fused and absorbed, in order that they
may be inoculated and empowered with the spirit of the Republic
to carry its freedom, its learning and light, to the lands in
darkness. They are part and parcel of our people, _fused or not_,
and the character of the nation will be affected by their presence
and influence. The measure with which we mete to them shall be
measured to us again. We are in a partnership which involves common
gains and common losses. What we put into them of intelligence,
piety and moral power, we put into the nation not only, but we put
into the mightiest of the unbaptized races of men. We have little
conception, indeed, of the immense inertia of the heathen races;
or how much sympathy, money and labor, will be needed to move them
into new lines of thought, or of moral action. But it is a work
to which we are specially called, and for which we have special
facilities. It may tax all our patience and charity, and then we
shall barely touch the necessities of the case. The churches, the
school-houses, the intelligence and the character that will be
needed for the uplift of these races, we have only begun to supply.
Indeed it is a question as to whether we have yet formed any
adequate idea of a work, _as for races_, in distinction from a work
which deals merely with individuals. But if we could bear in mind,
in dealing with the Chinaman, the Indian and the Negro, that it is
the races we are after, the turning of single souls to God would
not seem the small thing that it does. We should then comprehend,
perhaps, how much more favorable was a Christian land for the
conversion of men, and for the raising up of broad, intelligent,
and thoroughly equipped teachers and preachers for the benighted
and perishing, than were heathen lands. The activities of our daily
life, the forces of our liberty, learning, piety, government,
_must_ do immensely more for a man in America than the feeble
pulses of gospel life and light can do for him in China and Africa.
How much easier, then, the conversion of heathen under the blaze of
our Christian sky, and how much stronger and better men can we make
of them to undertake the salvation of their own lands!

The great want is the means—both men and money—to throw upon
the Pacific slopes, upon the Indian reservations, the Southern
savannas, a Christian force large enough to put these races under
thorough Christian culture. Anything less than this will fail of
the end. It is an opportunity to lay hold of the unsaved races,
such as is likely never to come again; which it would not only be
unwise to neglect, but deeply criminal not to improve. God sets
before us this open door, and not to enter in is to peril _their_
future as well as our own. A responsibility greater than this could
hardly be given to men, and an eye to see it and a soul to feel it
are what, beyond all things, our people need.

C. L. WOODWORTH

* * * * *


THE IMPRESSIONS OF TEN YEARS.

BY PRESIDENT PATTON OF HOWARD UNIVERSITY.

The present educational year completes the tenth of my connection
with Howard University, and thus with the work of educating the
Negro race. An “Abolitionist” since the spring of the year 1837,
I have ever felt a deep interest in the welfare of this oppressed
people, and the fact of their present freedom has only changed the
direction of my anxiety and effort. For I know that the brightness
of their future depends upon industry, education, morality and
religion. And to this end they must have Christian schools and
churches, and an industrial training in shop and store as well as
in garden and farm. My experience as president of an institution
which in its seven departments—industrial, normal, preparatory,
collegiate, legal, medical and theological—covers well the entire
range of instruction, except the primary branches, has given
opportunity to observe the capacity and the actual progress of the
Negro, and to study the wants of the race in this country.

The result is encouragement not uncoupled with anxiety. A great
work has been accomplished, beyond question—great in immediate
effect, though more so in its prospective bearing. It is rather a
great seed sowing than a great harvest. Thousands have been taught


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary — Volume 41, No. 7, July, 1887 → online text (page 1 of 6)