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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, DECEMBER 1880 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by Cornell University Digital Collections)









VOL. XXXIV. NO. 12.


THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

“To the Poor the Gospel is Preached.”

DECEMBER, 1880.




_CONTENTS_:


EDITORIAL.

PARAGRAPHS 385
DR. MCKENZIE’S SERMON - POWER OF RIGHT PRINCIPLES 386
THE CALL FOR ENLARGEMENT - SHALL IT BE HEEDED? 387
HOLIDAY GIFTS 388
REVIEW AND OUTLOOK: Rev. M. E. Strieby, D. D. 389
WHAT OUR AFRICAN METHODIST FRIENDS THINK 395
GENERAL NOTES - Africa, Indians, Chinese 396
CENTRAL SOUTH CONFERENCE 398
ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 399


THE FREEDMEN.

GLEANINGS 400
GEORGIA - Atlanta University - Extract from Report
of Board of Visitors 400
ALABAMA, ATHENS - Church, School, and Brick-making 401
MISSISSIPPI, TOUGALOO - Patient Work 402
LOUISIANA, NEW ORLEANS - Revival Meetings 403
TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE - Fisk University 404
MEMORIAL SERVICES 405


THE INDIANS.

INDIAN EDUCATION IN THE EAST: Gen. S. C. Armstrong 406


THE CHINESE.

CHAPTER OF GOOD THINGS: Rev. W. C. Pond 408


CHILDREN’S PAGE.

A SLAVE-GIRL’S FAITH 410


RECEIPTS 412


CONSTITUTION 415


AIM, STATISTICS, WANTS, ETC. 416

* * * * *


NEW YORK

Published by the American Missionary Association,

ROOMS, 56 READE STREET.

* * * * *


Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance.

Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter.




American Missionary Association,

56 READE STREET, N. Y.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT.

HON. E. S. TOBEY, Boston.


VICE-PRESIDENTS.

Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio.
Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis.
Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass.
Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D. D., Me.
Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct.
WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. I.
Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D. D., Mass.
Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I.
Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I.
Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. J.
Rev. EDWARD BEECHER, D. D., N. Y.
Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D. D., Ill.
Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C.
Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La.
Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D. D., N. H.
Rev. EDWARD HAWES, D. D., Ct.
DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio.
Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt.
Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Minn.
Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N. Y.
Gen. O. O. HOWARD, Washington Ter.
Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa.
Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill.
EDWARD SPAULDING, M. D., N. H.
Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct.
Rev. W. L. GAGE, D. D., Ct.
A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D. D., Ohio.
Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Mass.
Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California.
Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon.
Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D. D., D. C.
Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis.
S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass.
Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass.
Hon. J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa.
Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct.
Sir PETER COATS, Scotland.
Rev. HENRY ALLON, D. D., London, Eng.
WM. E. WHITING, Esq., N. Y.
J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass.
E. A. GRAVES, Esq., N. J.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ill.
DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct.
A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass.
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. Y.
FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt.
JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I.
Rev. E. P. GOODWIN, D. D., Ill.
Rev. C. L. GOODELL, D. D., Mo.
J. W. SCOVILLE, Esq., Ill.
J. W. BLATCHFORD, Esq., Ill.
C. D. TALCOTT, Esq., Ct.
Rev. JOHN K. MCLEAN, D. D., Cal.
Rev. RICHARD CORDLEY, D. D., Kansas.
Rev. W. H. WILLCOX, D. D., Mass.
Rev. G. B. WILLCOX, D. D., Ill.
Rev. WM. M. TAYLOR, D. D., N. Y.
Rev. GEO. M. BOYNTON, Mass.
Rev. E. B. WEBB, D. D., Mass.
Hon. C. I. WALKER, Mich.
Rev. A. H. ROSS, Mich.


CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D., 56 _Reade Street, N. Y._


DISTRICT SECRETARIES.

REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, _Boston_.
REV. G. D. PIKE, D. D., _New York_.
REV. JAS. POWELL, _Chicago_.

H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., _Treasurer, N. Y._
REV. M. E. STRIEBY, _Recording Secretary_.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

ALONZO S. BALL,
A. S. BARNES,
C. T. CHRISTENSEN,
H. L. CLAPP,
CLINTON B. FISK,
ADDISON P. FOSTER,
S. B. HALLIDAY,
A. J. HAMILTON,
SAMUEL HOLMES,
CHARLES A. HULL,
EDGAR KETCHUM,
CHAS. L. MEAD,
SAMUEL S. MARPLES,
WM. T. PRATT,
J. A. SHOUDY,
JOHN H. WASHBURN.


COMMUNICATIONS

relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields to
the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the “American
Missionary,” to Rev. C. C. PAINTER, at the New York Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New
York, or when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XXXIV. DECEMBER, 1880. No. 12.

* * * * *


American Missionary Association.

* * * * *

The publications provided for a household do much to mould the
character of its inmates. If a right proportion of these are
religious and missionary, good results are sure to follow. As at
this season many determine what periodicals they will take for
the coming year, we beg leave to suggest the wisdom of families
subscribing for and perusing the AMERICAN MISSIONARY. By this
means foundations for right thinking and right doing will be laid,
and the way prepared for the exercise of Christian patriotism and
philanthropy, so needful in the present condition of our country.

* * * * *

We have word from Hampton that the tide of negro students never
set in so promptly and strongly as since October 1st of this year.
For the second time in the history of the school, tents have been
erected on the campus and occupied by the colored boys.

* * * * *

Dr. Alexander, President of Straight University, is much encouraged
by the fact that white students are ready to avail themselves
of the advantages of the Law Department of the University. This
department is entirely self-sustaining, and conducted with rare
ability, one of the professors having served on the Supreme Bench
of the State. Of twenty-three students, nineteen are white.

* * * * *

The number of students in attendance at Fisk University for the
first two months of this year is much greater than that of any
previous year since Jubilee Hall was occupied. A communication
from Pres. Cravath, published elsewhere, states at length some of
the unusually hopeful aspects of the work, and indicates that the
University is entering upon a larger career of usefulness than it
has ever experienced.

The American Bible Society offers to its Life Members an annual
grant of one dollar’s worth of Bibles or Testaments; its benevolent
intention being to supply them with the means of distributing the
word of God among the needy. This perquisite is transferable at
the written request of the Life Members. A lady, once a teacher
in our schools at the South, and who has a great interest in the
welfare of the colored children, suggests that in this way the
pupils of our day and Sunday-schools may be supplied with the
sacred Scriptures. We cordially second the suggestion, and will
be glad to receive the written authorization of any of the Life
Members of the Bible Society for the use of their current gift for
the purpose above indicated. The officers of the Bible Society, as
we understand, acquiesce in this plan so far as it may seem wise to
the Life Members to co-operate with us.

* * * * *


DR. McKENZIE’S SERMON.

The sermon preached at our Annual Meeting by Dr. McKenzie, related
to our duty to Africa, and was one of rare excellence and beauty.
It was printed in the _Advance_, Oct. 28th, and a limited number
can be supplied to persons sending us a postal requesting it, with
their address. The closing words of the sermon, which we append,
not only sound a note of cheer, but are fitted to awaken the hope
and courage of earnest Christian workers everywhere.

“The day of the Lord is coming. The light is on the hills and along
the coast of all the lands. The nations are coming to the King. The
continents and the islands begin to hear His voice. The tongues of
men shall be filled with praise. It is not long; a few days more
of work and prayer; a few more deeds of sacrifice and love; a few
more lives given; a few more men gilded with the towel and with the
basin in their hands; a few more repetitions of that strange and
sacred deed, Jesus washing the feet of Judas. Then the glory and
the rejoicing. A little while and the day shall dawn. We may see
the hastening light as we face the East,

“Where, faint and far,
Along the tingling desert of the sky,
Beyond the circle of the conscious hills,
Were laid in jasper-stone as clear as glass
The first foundations of that new, near Day
Which should be builded out of heaven to God.”

* * * * *


POWER OF RIGHT PRINCIPLES.

From the beginning this Association was wedded to right principles.
It recognized their latent power. It took it for granted that
right was expedient - that right would triumph. It did not ask if
right thinking and right doing was the way of the multitude, even
of the multitude of professing Christians. Its inquiry was simply
for the way of righteousness. That way it strove to tread. It was
called narrow - captious. Its leaders were sometimes stigmatized
as men of one idea - disturbers of the people - fanatics. They were
not time-servers, however. They had the martyr spirit and toiled
on, waiting for the morning; and the morning came. What was once
questioned if not ridiculed, is now accepted and honored.

The elements that entered into their early labors are needful
still. They had courage. They dared to do right in the face of
opposition. If mobbed and mobbed again, the oppression only served
to fill the country with the fragrance of their good deeds. It was
but the torch that kindled the incense. They were never drawn from
a righteous purpose. God was present in the shadows, keeping watch
above his own. They had the spirit of sacrifice. They were ready to
go to the lost sheep - to the despised. They passed not by him who
fell among thieves. They achieved distinction by their readiness
to endure hardness - to submit to insult - to be counted among the
few - to toil with but little appreciation and for meagre rewards.
They also bore about with them a rich and beautiful charity, first
pure, then peaceable, full of mercy and good fruits. It was the
combination of these elements in active operation for a score of
years that served largely to revolutionize public sentiment, and
especially the sentiment in our churches, until the principles
of this Association are accepted and acceptable. The change
was wrought by the power of pure motives applied to aggressive
religious work in behalf of a needy and wronged people.

This change is sure to come in every quarter of our land, by
sufficient application of the power of right principles. Every
mission station of this Association is a centre from which a pure
light radiates. Every graduate from our schools is a torch-bearer
flaming this light over the land. It is a question of time - of a
score of years perhaps - and there will be no ostracism experienced
by our teachers South. If they can be sustained in the field,
toiling in righteousness; if their numbers can be multiplied
to meet the demand; if the churches will make it possible to
continue the work; the victory of right principles South will
be as certain and speedy as it was at the North, and much more
may be hoped for. North and South will clap their hands together
in hearty co-operation, shouting their choruses in one grand
anthem, and entering in company upon the enlarged work of carrying
right principles to the domain of final victory - the Freedmen’s
fatherland. To gird ourselves for that to-day is the duty which
calls the servants of the Master, East, West, North and South.

* * * * *


THE CALL FOR ENLARGEMENT - SHALL IT BE HEEDED?

At no time has the call for enlargement been more urgent. It is
strikingly providential also. The political, moral and religious
atmosphere is charged with forces, prophetic of unparalleled
progress in our Southern work. Questions relative to the policy of
government are measurably settled for four years. We can lay our
plans with encouraging assurances. Sound and practical views on
all that pertains to permanent prosperity are dominant. It is not
likely they will be materially modified, save for the better. Our
statesmen and philanthropists are coming to prize more and more
those forces in man which are developed by a Christian education.
The _want_ that is looming up before them, is good schools for
the masses in every section of the country. They voice this want
in their public utterances, and the sound thereof is echoing and
re-echoing over the land. It has in it the promise of expansion
and universal application. Its adoption and elaboration mean
increase of every laudable industry, the development of commerce,
art, science, literature, wealth, beauty, happiness. They mean the
leveling up of humanity heavenward. The tone and temper of our best
men was never more auspicious than now - never more favorable to the
work of this Association.

There never was so strong conviction in the South as now of the
wisdom of Christian education for the Freedmen. The worth of it
cannot be hidden. It is as evident as the sheen of an electric
light. There is a capacity in the heart of man, by which he is
able to recognize it. He comes to do so gradually, inevitably, as
the flower unfolds from the bud, and as the fruit matures from the
blossom. Many of the best in the world started wrong, but turned
about and out-stripped their fellows in well doing. The South has
been wrong, but pour in sufficient light and it will turn about.
We have a right to hope and pray for such consummation. The aim
of our work is to hasten it. When the South turns, it will not be
by halves, - that is not her method. She is already rising for the
emergency. The signs of it are apparent. It is but a question of
time, and the time is at hand.

Legislatures have appropriated money for our work, and are doing
so heartily still. They act as statesmen, with a view to the
best interests of the State. In Texas, there is a tidal wave
setting strongly in favor of popular education, impelled by the
far-sightedness which discerns that the flow of emigration of the
best sort trends away from territory, however rich and inviting,
where free schools for all classes are not abundant. The value of
inaugurating school work through the agency of Christian teachers,
need not be argued. The call for these teachers is sure to be more
urgent than ever. Shall we provide for the immediate and coming
want? God seems to have said so. We have received $150,000 for
new buildings, in which to train teachers. New buildings mean
enlargement - enlargement means more missionaries, more prayer, more
money. Will not the friends of Christ heed this call prayerfully,
promptly, efficiently?

* * * * *


HOLIDAY GIFTS.

In December, 1869, the late Henry P. Haven, of New London, Ct.,
proposed to his Sunday-school that instead of receiving gifts they
remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how He said: “It is more
blessed to give than to receive.”

The proposition met with favor, and a Christmas service of
worship with a Christmas offering to some deserving cause became
incorporated in the annual school plans. It occurs to us that such
holiday gifts by Sabbath-schools and households have the following
advantages:

One is, they afford the young people more real pleasure. The
happiness from rejoicing over the good of others is an exercise of
the purest affection and the finest feeling of the human heart. It
is akin to the blessedness and happiness of God himself. However
gratifying a gift may be to the receiver, nevertheless it puts him
to a disadvantage. The gift-taker becomes under obligation to the
gift-maker. The receiver’s joy in a gift terminates in himself. It
has a mixture of dependence and submission in it. But the giver is
placed under no obligation to the receiver. Moreover, he inevitably
ministers to his own well-being, though it may be unconsciously.
“Every man is a friend to him that giveth gifts.”

Another advantage is that there is more virtue in giving than in
receiving. The virtue of receiving consists in regard for one’s
self; the virtue of giving in a proper regard for others. There is
also more self-denial in giving than in receiving, and self-denial
is the essence of virtue. The receiver has no natural habit or
inclination to counteract, but the giver must overcome many
obstacles which require superior virtue. The more young people do
to develop the attribute of virtue, the more real pleasure they are
sure to experience.

And then again, God promises to reward the giver but not the
receiver. This is a great consideration, and may well be taken into
account by all teachers and parents. It is a good thing to make the
holidays memorable and happy by giving tokens to young people, but
not so blessed as to bring them into an attitude where they will be
sure of Heavenly rewards. Of the few things which God has promised
to reward men for in this life, giving is one. “Blessed is he that
considereth the poor * * * he shall be blessed upon the earth.” “He
that hath mercy on the poor, happy is he,” and best of all, God
means to reward the liberal giver more fully at the resurrection of
the just.

By the favor of Providence we have ample opportunity to give to
humane and missionary enterprises.

At this season, when plans for celebrating the holidays are being
matured, would it not be wise for those having responsibility for
training the young, to embrace the time to teach them in their
abundance of gift-taking and gift-making to provide for themselves
“bags that wax not old, a treasure in the Heavens that faileth not.”

* * * * *


REVIEW AND OUTLOOK.

A Paper read at the National Council at St. Louis, Nov. 13th.

BY REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D.

I intend, without preface, to review the work of the American
Missionary Association for the last three years, and to give an
outlook on its future duties.


I. The Review.

1. We have paid our great debt. This had clung to us for years,
like the shirt of Nessus, scorching while it clung. At the last
Council we were enabled to announce that we had rent away about one
third of the hateful garment, during the next two years we tore off
the remainder, and since then we have walked forth, financially,
“Clad in raiment pure and white,” as becometh saints who should
“Owe no man anything.” It may happen to us in the future that our
books will sometimes show a balance on the wrong side; but we
hope never again to be beguiled into putting on one of the large,
iron-clad garments we had so long and sadly worn.

2. We have received the munificent gift of $150,000 from Mrs.
Stone. Not long since, our elder and honored sister, the American
Board, had laid on her table a loaf so large that there was
danger that it might be like the “Cake of barley bread” which the
Midianite saw in his dream, that “tumbled into the host and came
unto a tent and smote it that it fell, and overturned it that the
tent lay along.” But with the whole church, we rejoice that the
loaf has been to the Board, by its great wisdom and God’s blessing,
not as the cake of the Midianite, but as his dream, an augury of
victory and enlargement! Our gift, great as it was, is only as one
of “the crumbs that fall from the Master’s table,” most gratefully
received and all needed at once, with no danger of surfeit. Our
children are not only hungry - they are crowded into close quarters,
and some of them have to be turned out of doors. At the Atlanta
University, with accommodations for only 40 girls, 62 are packed
in. At Tougaloo, barracks of slabs are erected, and outbuildings
and garrets are turned into dormitories, and still the pupils come,
so that the teachers inquire if they may put three in a bed and
twelve in one large room. Our reply is: “Take all that you can
accommodate consistently with good health and morals, and send
the rest away.” These are specimens, perhaps the most striking,
but from nearly every school comes the call for more room. Never
before have we had such overcrowding; never before have we been
obliged to turn away so many. Mrs. Stone’s great gift will meet
the want in five of our larger institutions and no more; and that
only for shelter, while the increased number will make an enlarged
call for bread. Mrs. Stone provides the homes: who will furnish the
endowments for more teachers and the scholarships for more pupils?

3. We are just completing the Tillotson Institute, Austin, Texas,
with its large and commodious building and beautiful campus of
eight acres, near the capitol - an outpost in that vast State of the
Southwest; thus extending our permanent institutions from Hampton
Roads, Va., to the banks of the Colorado, Texas, and supplying
eight of the largest Southern States with schools of higher grade,
each of which sends out annually its score or fifty well-trained
teachers.

4. It is a matter of much gratification to us that while we have
been paying our debt and extending our lines, we have been able to
maintain, and even to enlarge, the work already in hand among the
Freedmen. Three years ago our teaching force in the South numbered
150; now there are 200. Then our pupils were 5,404; now 8,052.

One illustration of the usefulness of these schools is seen in
the great army of scholars taught in them and by their pupils. We
believe, from a safe estimate, that _half a million_ of names have
been enrolled, in the aggregate, in our schools and the schools
of our pupils, since this Council last met, and still the cry is
for more teachers. This roll-call of the school-room gives no idea
of the added work in the Sunday-school, the temperance cause, the
prayer meeting and in the homes of the people. As to the kind of
work done in our schools, and Theological departments, I point
to the modest and gentlemanly Second Assistant Moderator of this
National Council.

Our church work has grown slowly, but steadily and safely. Three
years ago our churches in the South numbered 59, now there are
73. When we began our labors among the Freedmen there was not one
Congregational church in the old South. The famous Central Church
in Charleston, S. C., was not really Congregational, and that in
Liberty Co., Ga., had become Presbyterian. It is said that the soil
in the South is not congenial to our churches. It must be admitted
that they will not flourish in the same soil with slavery, nor


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary, Volume 34, No. 12, December 1880 → online text (page 1 of 7)