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The Hill-top online

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THE HILL-TOP.



31



CARRIAGES, HARNESS, etc.-AUTOMOBILES



Original StylfB in VehUlfB; 150 Diflerciit De
Harness Manufartoifis ; \Zr> l>iftVient Styles
Everythinj; Kelicited. P. O. Box. l.tVtU.

OFFICE, Room 4, Centennial Building, 93 Exchange St.,

PORTLAND. MAINE.

GEORGE P. CORNISH,

5 71 1-2 Corig'ress Street.

Fine Tailoring... Portland, me.

GOLF OUTING TENNIS

FINE FOOTWEAR

CENTER ©• McDONVEUU,

„, „ ^.., I 539 Congress Street,

The Footwear Fitters, j pqrtLAND, ME.




^dliiyi^Qiofohtej



Sold by the

Poland Spring House.



Manufactured by

H. D. FOSS & CO., Boston.



32



THE HILL-TOP.



White Mountains




IN THE SADDLE at BRETTON WOODS



PURE HIR



IN THE HEART OF THE^



PURE ^VATER



WMIXE MOUP^XAIINS.

All the famous resurt.s in tin- MoiiiUalns are reaciieil lpy half-day Irip.s frnm l!ri'H..ii \V Is.



THE MOUNT PLEASANT

NOW OPEN.



THE MOUNT WASHINGTON

OPENS JULY 11th.



OPEIN RROJVl JUrSE TO OCTOBER



Nearest Tourist Station to Mount

WasKington
Saddle Horses Driving Horses

Squash Courts Swimming' Pool

Tennis Courts Bowling' Green



Through Cars from New YorK, New
Haven, and Hartford; Spring'field
ancf Greenfield ; Boston. Portsmouth
and Portland; Burling'ton, Quebec,
and Montreal.



OPEN OBSERVATION CARS THROUGH CRAWFORD NOTCH.



Winter Ilotrls:
The OriiMiiiil ill Flt)ri PRICE,

MANAGERS.
BRETTON WOODS,

(Formerly .■MoiiLitrieasant r. (>.), N. H.



>i'n Viirk lloli'l :
Itrcltiin Hull.
I.lh Slrccl and Itroad



f^^ms^^^^^iM^i^)^;^^^m^^ii^^i^i^^^



THE HILL-TOP.



For Camp or Cottage...

We supply tlie best hi lielace.



F>MI L-ADE l_F>MI A :
^•7"\t Chestnut Street.



Vol. pth ^^^ A'Sbunday, July 24, 1904.



No. 4.







PRICE lO CENTS.



THE HILL-TOP.




TflLLI-eO



GINGER ALE,
SARSAPARILLA,
CLUB SODA.




S. S. FIERCE CO.

Largest Importers in New England of

HAVANA CIGARS

SEND ROR RRICE LIST.






Habana










S. S. PIERCE CO.




ESTABLISHED (831 IMPORTERS AND GROCERS, .NCORPORAIEDJSM

^BOSTON



Tremont and Beacon Sts.

Copley Square,

185 Milk St. (Wholesale)



Coolidge's Corner,

BROOKLINE.





Vol. XI.



SUNDAY MORNING, JULY 24, 1904.



No. 4.




"ONCE THERE WAS A JAIL HEKK, A PERFECT LITTLK BASTIEE

PARIS HILL AND MT. MICA.

jjlF yon will take tlie trouble to step out to llie
^ comer ot' the Poland Spring House ami look
almost directly north, you will see a mountain
aliout twenty miles distant whose name indicates
its appearance, for it is called Streaked Mountain,



THIS ABANDOSED



from its bare ledges of rock and lines or streaks of
foliage.

A little to the left, but hidden by Singcpolc and
"No. 4" hills, is Mt. Mica, famous among min-
eralogists as the location of some of tiie finest
tourmalines known.



THEIHILL-TOP.



How to get tliere, that is the question.

Look again. There is the red water tower of
Mechanic Falls away up the valley. To its left
some little distance on a hill is seen a large set of
buildings on Pigeon Hill. They are the fine large
barns belonging to Morey's prosperous Abenaki
Farm and entirely conceal the house itself.



the hill upon which is located the crown jewel of
New England villages, Paris Hill.

If this be not the Lenox of Maine, then Lenox
is the Paris Hill of Massachusetts.

The one who goes to Paris Hill and yearns for
a'summer residence of his own amidst rural per-




)l 1 III I |.N()\ ill M VINK I
KlUS HILL OF MASSACHUSE'



The road to Mt. Mica after passing tiiroiigh
the village of Poland Corner passes up and over
Pigeon Hill and past some exceptionally fine farms
and buildings. The red roofs of Frank D. True's
elegant and flower embowered house are seen from
a distance, soon after passing which, Streaked
Mountain and a plentiful supply of smaller hills
heave into view on the starboard quarter.

Presently the valley of the Little Androscoggin
is presented to view for miles, together with a tine
prospect of Mechanic Falls with its white houses
and shaded streets.

This road over Pigeon Hill is especially delight-
ful for a drive, and is a very good road as well.
It is as near straight all the way to South Paris as
the Czar of Russia wanted his railroad from St.
Petersburg to Moscow.



After descending t
Welchville is entered
is crossed.

Welchville looks



hill, the little village of
the Little Androscoggin



if it had started



to

become a "metrolopus" but lost the receipt. A
long stretch of straight, level, good road is before
you, until you approach a covered bridge, wliich
you do J!0< cross, but swing to the right and .so
onward and into the bustling village of South Paris.
Cross the river again, and through this pretty little
hamlet, bearing to the right past the common,
again crossing the river, and presently ascending



'AND WHOSK WINDOWS



WERK I!AKKf;r) WITH IllJtiK SIRAI'S
OF IKON."



fection, magnificent view, good clean, prosperous,
wholesome surroundings, will shout Eureka ; veni,
vidi, vici; e.xcelsior, sic semper tyrannis, and as
much more resembling college yells and Zulu war
cries as he may have concealed about his person at
the time.

The Hubbard House is recommended as a rest-
ing and dining hostelry, but look about this most
elevated town in Maine.

Note the square about which group the former
county buildings, the court-house where famous
trials have been held, and then visit the Library —
but wait, I must explain.

Once there was a jail here, a perfect little
Bastile, whose walls were thick with massive
granite blocks, and whose windows were barred
with straps of iron. It was a tiny little place,
about what Roslyn Chapel would be compared witli
York Minster. It rests upon the everlasting rock,
and its door now swings open and offers free ingress
and egress. Its walls are pure and white as snow
and light floods the place that once was dark and
close.

It is through Dr. Hamlin that this abandoned
jail is now a library and museum.

Enter. There is a fine collection of minerals.



THE HILL-TOP.



iiiid especially touniialiiies, the product of Mt.
Mica near by.

To visit Mt. Mica is well worth the journey.
It lays a mile and a half out on the Buckfield road,
past the Paris Hill Golf Links.

On arriving at a ])rosperous red house, drive
into the yard and on up into the field. A large
derrick may be seen ahead, and there is the location
of the ledge where so many beautiful gems have
been found.




A.ND TUEUE Is lUK LOCATION OF I UK Milnjli WIIKUE SO MANY
BEAUTIFUL GKMS HAVE llEEN FOUND."

Mr. Loren Merrill is the gentleman in charge.
He may be in his work-a-day clothes, but let me
tell you he is the genus of the mountain.

In his pocket he carries a tourmaline found
there worth $2,000. In his shop is the ingenious
mechanism invented by himself, by which he cuts
and polishes the finest gems. In his house is a
cabinet of rare specimens to delight the mineralo-
gist or the layman.

In 1820 the first discovery was made, by a
brother of Hannibal Hamlin, but a Itttle later
Hannibal and Cyrus, another brother, went at it
enthusiastically. Some of their findings are to be
seen in the museum at Paris Hill. In the Maine
State Building at Poland Spring, hangs a perfect
representation, in all their beautiful colorings, of
over forty of the more important tourmalines found
here, the gift of Mr. E. R. Chadbourn.

Aside from the interest in Mt. Mica as a mine
of wealth, the view is not to be neglected, for it is
one of great beauty and extent.

Small wonder that numerous men who have
risen to fame, either selected Paris to l)e born in,
or had their parents move there as soon as possible,
notably Hannibal Hamlin, a Vice-President of the
United States and United States Senator; Sidney
Perham, six years in Congress and three years
Governor of Maine ; six other members of Con-
gress, Levi Hubbard, Albion K. Parris, Enoch



Lincoln, Timothy J. Carter, Rufus K. Goodeuow
and Charles Andrews ; Horatio King, postmaster-
general under Buchanan. Parris was a senator
and also Governor, Lincoln, too, enjoying the latter
distinction.

This is one of the finest day's drives possible,
with good roads, fine views, picturesque bits of
scenery, easy to locate, and much to interest one.

One who misses Paris Hill, misses one of New
England's chiefest charms, the best of Maine's
boasted villages.



Mr. F. A. Norris of New York joined his
father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Norris,
at Poland Spring for over Sunday. Mr. F. A.
Norris is soon to start on the Princeton Exploring
Expedition to Arabia and Syria.



\ily 1 to September 1, Residence at Poland
Spring House. SoiAth Poland. Me.



DR. MILTON C. WEDGWOOD,



lOl Pine Stre



LEV7ISTON. Me.



OWEN, MOORI & GO.

Portland. Me.

(HKSTS AT 1'01.AM> SlMllXti

ARE RESPECTFULLY KEMINDED THAT ORDERS
FOR ALL ARTICLES OF WBARINO APPAREL,
FOR HIGH -CLASS HABKHDASHERV, GLOVES,
UNDERCLOTHING, SHIRT WAISTS, HOSIERY',
MATERIALS FOR ART NEEDLE-WORK, GOLF
CLUBS AND BALLS, TOILET ARTICLES, JEW-
ELRY, JAPANESE WARE, PRIZES FOR ALL
SPORTING AND CARD CONTESTS, ETC., MAY
BE SENT TO OVVEN, MOORE & CO. (PORT-
LAND) IN THE MORNING, AND THE GOODS
HECEIVKl) IN THE EVENING OF TIIK SAME
DAT. OKIIKKS BY TELEGRAPH OR TELE-
PHONE WILL BE PROMPTLY E.XECUTBD : : : :



THE HILL-TOP.



-4>'lGSi




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All the charm of primeval pine forests, rugged rocks and
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Muskoka is easy of access from all American points, via
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HAY FEVER UNKNOWN

Ha?idsome!y iUuitrated descriptive matter free. Apph to



G. T. BELL,

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ALAN F. CAMPBELL,
OR Mgr. "Royal Muskoka" Hotel,

Muskoka Navigation Co.,



Gravenhurst, Ont



M



"The land of lakes and islands— the Kiilarney of America."



lUSKOK/^



THE HILL-TOP.



THE ART EXHIBITION.

In previous issues i)t'Tiin IIili.-Top we have
given extracts from tlie Boston Transcript and
Globe, which may now be followed up by the
opinion of the Boston Hi'rriJd's art critic who also



position. "Ognnquit," also by him, is an unusual
study of the turbulent sea near the shore.

" Madonna," by Mary L. Macomber, is a sur-
prising picture for a modern New England woman
to have painted. It is full of the religious fervor



m^'






LANDSCAPE— H. H. GALLISON.



made a close study of the exhibition, and very fully
records the impression made.

The place of honor in the gallery is given to a
large painting by H. H. Gallison of the sandy
country of Cape Ann. This impressive canvas
holds its place by reason of its truthfulness to
nature, as well as its strength in composition and
color. The effect of atmosphere and space is won-
derfully well represented.

Ciiarles H. Woodbury's wonderful painting
called "After the Equinox" is the biggest kind of
a picture— big in feeling, in treatment and in com-



of the middle ages and as far removed as possible

from any suggestion of the every-day life of to-day,

yet Miss Macomber is a native of Fall River and

[CoDtinued on page 7.j

Gold Picturk Fl^AMES

EscclMSive Designs.



THE SPR-AGUE (f HATHAWAY CO.,

3(5 Bromfield Street.

Boston.



ifKENNEy&^EFBURyftMPANY.




p"' Designers. Kanufacturers and Jol»s's (
ELEClKtCGfLS ana Oil, "h




%SsS\S^.^ostoiv,Mass.::3



THE HILL-TOP.









CHICAaO
TO

Pacific
Coast.




^^


^




EVERr INCH

OF THE WAY

IS

Santa fe.


1


Santa


lie






^_


P'


r


California and back
Rate cut in two

The summer in California is just as attractive as the winter.
The Southern Coast resorts are all-the-year-rouud resorts —
enjoyable at any time.

Have you tasted the delicious life-giviug air of New Mexico
and viewed that greatest of all Earth's wonders — the
GRAND CANYON OF ARIZONA ?

The SANTA FE will give you a chance to do tliis and
include practically the entire state of California, returning
by way of the

ST LOUIS EXPOSITION

for less than the usual cost of a one-way tici;et.
Santa Fe all the way— Harvey meals.

Tickets, resei-vatious, iunl all detiiils from

S. W. MANNING, Gen. New England Agent,

The AtchiBoii, Top.-ka & Santa Fe Ilailway ^jstem,

332 Washington Street, BOSTON.



THE HILL-TOP.



THE ART EXHIBITION.— Continuertfrom pages.



secured her artistic trainiii'r ia Boston. This can-
vas was first shown in the National Academy about
eio-ht years ago. and is almost the only one of her
paintings Miss Macomber has held for herself.

Mrs. Marcia Oakes Woodbury's well known
painting, called "Mother and Daughter," is seen
to particular advantage in this exhibition. The
picture tells the story of the patient, hard-working
life of the Dutch peasant woman. It was awarded
a prize at the Boston Art Club a few years ago.

Among other paintings by well known women
artists of New England may be mentioned the
interesting and distinctive ones by Mrs. Lillian
Taylor Watson, Mrs. Mary Fisher Watson,
Miss Marv Hazleton and Miss Pauline McKay.
These young painters are all products of the Bos-
ton Art Museum school, and are a credit to their
training. Miss McKay's "Potrait" is noticeably
interesting and distinguished by reason of its color
and grace of pose.

L. P. Tonipson is a new comer and a recent
winner of the Paige traveling scholarship. He
paints with considerable freedom and shows always
a discriminating sense of color relation. The figure
study called " Dorothy" is most attractive.

"■ Summer Sunlight" is the appropriate title of
Frank W. Benson's very out of doors picture,
which is of a charming blonde child standing in the
full light. The composition is unusual, for at
one side a slice of another figure is seen, showing
only about one-quarter of the face, but the effect of
sunlight is so true and the color so beautiful that
any awkwardness of construction is easily over-
looked.

In "Autumn" and "The White Poppy" I. H.
Caliga shows two decorative compositions of unus-
ual excellence, refined in sentiment and graceful in
drawing.

Miss Mary L. Richardson, the portrait painter,
sends a picture rather out of her usual line of work.
It is a full length figure, half the size of life, a
Persian merchant in the picturesque garb of his
country, and is well and strongly painted.

Walter L. Dean's contribution consists of two
paintings, "Gloucester Harbor" and "Lost,"
which are fairly representative of him at his best.
He has caught the true spirit of Gloucester.

W. H. Churchill has two portraits which at
once attract attention. They are painted in a
strong, broad manner, yet most refined in feeling
and are evidently good likenesses as well as good
pictures.

Frank H. Tompkins' portrait of a brother
artist, J. J. Enneking, is interestingly painted.
He has evidently approached the subject with a
knowledge of the man, and an understanding of his
Strongest points, and the result is



Online LibraryW. Somerset MaughamThe Hill-top → online text (page 13 of 42)