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Rising from the center of this triangle are
ricinus Zanzibarensis with enormous, various
colored leaves, surrounding which, ricinus gibsoni,
a step lower, then follows two rows of cannas and
one of caladiums, the whole bordered by dwarf
ageratum, making a notably efl^ective combination,
most skillfully planned.

On the opposite side of the drive is a long bed
of about five feet in width, of octic-circular shape,
and with diamond designs of verschafletii, of rich
cardinal color, filled in with brilliant golden bedder
coleus, a particularly brilliant efl'ect.

In the drive opposite the south front of the
Poland Spring House, is an oblong "island"
arranged with tropical plants very diversified.
It contains ficus (rubber plant), palms, cacti,
dracajnas and lantanas. The yucca laceata, or
Spanish bayonet, so common in Florida, is notice-
able in this group.

There is an immense bottle near the spring
house bedded with pink and white begonias, and at
many other points, circles of cuphea, geraniums,
begonias, ricinus, white balsams, bordered variously
with Madame Celroy and caladium borders.

Two very perfectly designed and distinct mark-
ings of color, are circular shaped, with raised stars
in the center, the support being echeverius, and the
stars of alternantheras, rosea and aurea with mul-
ticolor in center of circle, between the points of star
being dark alternanthera,with aurea in center of that.



A handsome bed is a heart of pansies, and still
another with the square and compass of dwarf
sweet alyssum and eedium supported with echeverius.

Some of the square beds are composed of
browallia, phlox drummondii, acliyranthus (dark
or variegated) with coleus for center and blue
ageratum for border.

There are many other floral specimens in huge
vases, tubs or pots ; century plants, bay trees and
others of greater or less extent, while eacii year
sees additions to the lengthening list.

Everything is started in the conservatory or
under glass in the extensive gardens nearby, over
which, and all that I have described, Mr. William
Butler presides. It is to this quiet man we owe so
much that is ornamental and artistic about the
grounds at Poland Spring. His work is a delight
to the eye, while the charm of it all but harmon-
izes with the other delights of this fumed resort
where it is a well known fact that the best in
everything known to hotel life is to be found.

" Yet still tlie thorouglifare of life continuously tliey gem,
And weary spirits grow refreshed while recognizing them.
Nurtured in dry and sterile spots, by sunshine and by

showers,
These daily mercies springing up to cheer this world of
ours."



SUNDAY SERVICES.

The Rev. Dr. Lewis made an address in the
Dining-Room on Sunday evening. The subject
was— The Simplicity of the Illustrations used by
Our Lord in His teaching. He referred to the fol-
lowing passages: St. Luke 12:35, 7:31, 5:36;
St. Matthew 13:33.

Rev. Father J. A. Hayes of Lewiston celebrated
mass at the Poland Spring House on Sunday,
August 21st.

The Venerable Archdeacon H. P. Seymour of
the Episcopal Diocese of Maine held divine service
in the Music Hall, Poland Spring House, at 11
o'clock on Sunday, August 21st. His text was
from St. Matthew 20:16 — "So the last shall be
first, and the first last : for many be called, but few
chosen."



It is the chief aim of the Willard School, whose
card appears elsewhere in our columns, to provide
an attractive home for American girls, who may
wish to make foreign travel and an intimate
acquaintaince with foreign life take the place,
wholly or in part, of a college course in America.
In such a school, they may, for one or two years,
share the life of a cultivated Germau home under
the most favorable conditions. Here they may not
only receive thorough training under native teach-
ers, in modern languages, in art, music, literature
and history, but they may thus prepare themselves,
in the most natural way, for intelligent travel.



THE HILL-TOP.



Ctb^Btts.



J. C. Hilliard of Boston returned Thursday.

W. T. Maginnis of New Orleans has returned.

From Salem are C. A. Evans and William
Perry.

Mr. J. L. Little of Atlanta, was among Thurs-
day's arrivals.

Mr. H. B. Goodwin of New York, arrived on
August '2.5th.

Mrs. W. S. Irelan of Baltimore is at the Poland
Spring House.

John C. McCurdy of Rochester, N. Y.,
arrived the '25th.

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Sandford arrived from
New York the 25th.

From Philadelphia are Mr. and Mrs. I. L.
Hodge and Miss Boggs.

Mrs. Samuel Moody of Harwich, Mass., is at
the Poland Spring House.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Q. Porter of New York are
at the Poland Spring House.

Mrs. A. R. Frank and Miss Ethel M. Frank
of Boston, arrived on Wednesday.

Mrs. C. E. Longley and Miss Longley of
Pawtueket, R. I., have returned.

Mr. Lewis W. Campbell with Mrs. Campbell
of Minneapolis are registered here.

Miss Anna H. Niles and Miss Sarah F. Niles
of Boston arrived on August 19th.

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander J. Howell of New
York City returned on August 19th.

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Van Rensselaer and son
were registered the evening of the 25th.

Mrs. W. B. Thompson and Miss Margaret
Thompson of Boston registered Thursday evening.

Dr. and Mrs. S. S. Stryker of Philadelphia
registered at the Poland Spring House Thursday.

Mr. C. S. Shewmake of Atlanta, Ga., regis-
tered at the Poland Spring House on August 24th.

From Morristown, N. J., are Miss Mary E.
Starr and Miss Ameline B. Hull and Mr. H. T.
Hull.

Mr. .]. P. H. de Wint of New York, has
joined his mother, Mrs. de Wint, at the Mansion
House.

Mrs. J. H. Werkheiser and Miss M. E. Werk-
heiser of Denver, Col., are at the Poland Spring
House.

The illustration on the first page shows the
triangle and opposite border near the Maine State
Building.



BASE.BALL.

We have met the enemy and we are his'u.
The Summit Spring Hotel boys were two much for
we uns on Wednesday afternoon. Ten to eight is
not long to wait when it is to be hung, but '\vhen
it's for money it is an eternitv. Here are two
scores, but they do not make forty.
Summit Spring Hotel. Poland Sprino Hotkl.



Walsh, l.t., . . .
G. S. Chauncey, s
Tyler, p.,
Carey, 2b.,
Clifford, c,
Rvan. c.f.,
F. Galey, 3b
Shunner, r.t,
W. Galey, lb



5



10 :



Geo. Elkin.s, c.f.,
H. Ingalls, l.f.,
Lewis, p., . .
Wm. Klkiiis, c,
Geo. Tyler, 2b.,
Lockwood, 3b.,
Holtoii, S.S.,

Fay, lb

Vose, r.f.. . .



Innings 123456789

Summit Spring Hotel, ..51002000 2—10
Poland Spring Hotel, ..01000104 2— 8



Poland Spring and About There ; 48 fine views,
50 cents.



From Jvaly I to September 1. Residence at Poland
Spring House. South Poland, Me.

DR. MILTON C. WEDGWOOD,

lOl Pine Street. LeWISTON. ME.



OWEN, MOORE & GO.

Portland. Me.

(UKSTS AT P01,.\M» SPlllMi

ARE RESPECTFULLY REMINDED THAT ORDERS
FOR ALL ARTICLES OF WKARINO APPAREL,
FOR HIGH-CLASS HABERDASUERr, GLOVES,
UNDERCLOTHING, SHIRT WAISTS, HOSIERY,
MATERIALS FOR ART NEEDLE-WORK, GOLF
CLUBS AND BALLS, TOILET ARTICLES, JEW-
ELRY, JAPANESE WARE, PRIZES FOR ALL
SPORTING AND CARD CONTESTS, ETC., MAT

BE SENT TO OWEN, MOORE & CO. (Port-
land) IN THE MORNING, AND THE GOODS
RECEIVED IN THE EVENING OF THE SAME
DAT. ORDERS BY TELEGRAPH OR TELE-
PHONE WILL BE PBOMPTLT EXECUTED : : : :



THE HILL-TOP.



dtSS)^



\




ROYAL MUSKOKA" HOTEL

MUSKOKA LAKES. CAN/\DA



— for your vacation

Come to "beautiful Canada" — among the Muskoka
Lakes — to the loveliest spot you have ever seen.

New scenes, new sports and new associations — a new
sense of life in the cool, bracing air.

All the charm of primeval pine forests, rugged rocks and
sparkling waters — with the luxury and comfort of the best
American hotel.

Muskoka is easy of access from all American points, via
Niagara Falls, Detroit and Chicago.

HAY FEVER UNKNOWN

Handsomely illustrated descriptive matter free. Apply to



G. T. BELL,
Gen'l Pass'r & Ticket Agt.,

Grand Trunk Railway System,

Montreal, Canada.



ALAN F. CAMPBELL,



Mgr. "Royal Muskoka" Hotel,

Muskoka Navigation Co.,



enhurst, Ont.



M



"The land of lakes and islands— the Killarney of America.



USKDK^^



THE . HILL-TOP.



A TROUT STORY.

"Allow me to illustrate the ideal sportsman by
an incident in his career," said Senator Frye in a
recent article in The Independent, on the subject of
fishing. "He was sitting on the piazza of his
camp in the morning smoking a choice cigar.
Around him were mountains, hills, bountifully
clothed to their very tops, sparkling water, sun-
shine, singing birds — everything to make one love
to live and thank the dear Lord for the living.
Opposite to him, twenty rods away, was an island
— front of it bashes, snags, burned stumps.
A magnificent trout rose, broke the water and dis-
appeared. He knew that the fish, undisturbed,
would stay in his chosen haunt for days, that no
fly would tempt him while the sun was shining,
that no troUer would venture near his lurking
place. Like a true sportsman he was silent and
thoughtful. He had a rod of split bamboo, made
by an amateur, every piece carefully selected, the
whole hand made — a rod no fish could break.
He selected a salmon leader, tested to eight pounds.
His guide was sent two miles away with orders to
have a double sized brown hurdle made, to return
by sunset. He was a patient waiter until twilight,
then ordered the guide to paddle him to within
sixty feet of the island, with directions, if a trout
was struck, to pull at once for deeper water.
He then got out about sixty feet of line to his right,
then made one cast, the fiy lighting beautifully
right over the fish, when, like a flash of lightning,
the trout rose, was struck and the battle was on.
How was it to be fought with the greatest hope of
victory to the sportsman? The rod, the line, the
leader, the fly were absolutely safe — how about the
trout's mouth? The longer the fight the greater
the risk of this. So he determined to give him a
fight from the beginning and no more line. The
contest was a lively one. Three times the fisher-
man, holding his rod nearly upright, saw its tip on
the other side of the boat from him — but no sur-
render, and in twenty minutes he had the beauty
in his arms, and there never was a prouder or



happier sportsman in the world. He placed him
alive in a car, where he held receptions, hundreds
visiting him. Occasionally large trout are ugly,
deformed, but this one was absolutely perfect in
spots, coloring and form. He was the speckled
brook trout, the saline finhonalis, and, so far as
reported, the largest ever taken with a fly in the
world. His weight was just a bit over ten pounds.
This man was to me an ideal sportsman. He was
patient, could wait, knew the habits of the fish so
far as they could be learned by experience, was
careful of his fishing outfit, bound not to suflfer
defeat from any negligence of his own, was content
with even only one in a day. I knew him well.
He never fished to kill, generally returning his
captive to the water unhurt and unpained. I com-
mend him and his conduct to all who love the
gentle sport."

From Dover, N. H., are Mr. and Mrs. ¥. B.
Williams, Miss M. L. Williams, Miss D. L.
Williams, and Mr. E. N. Hliss.

Miss Florence Berry of Portland, Miss Eliza-
beth Ball and Miss Elvina Ball of Holyoke, Mass.,
were here for the day on Saturday, August 20th.

Among the arrivals at the Poland Spring House
on Monday were Mr. Charles Russell of Water-
town, and Mr. F. J. Barllett and Mr. E. Randolph
Bartlett of Maiden, Mass.



Do not forget to remember the Poland Spring
book of views. At the Samoset or Poland Spring
House news stand, also the library, 50 cents.



Gold Picture Frames

E3ccl\asive Designs.

THE SPR,ACiUE fc" HATHAWAY CO.,

3G Bromfield Street,
BOSTON.



fKENNIY^lWArERBUlQrftMPANY.



"Designers. Kanufacturers and JoM>ers_(
DLECXKICCAS^zn^QlI/ "^




mSo"My^3S...^Bostoa;Mass.^'



THE HILL-TOP.



Every iNCh



Santa fe.



S ant ape



California and back
Rate cut in two



The summer iu Califoruia is just as attractive as the wiuter.
The Soutlieru Coast resorts are all-tlie-year-rouud resorts-
enjoyable at any time.

Have you tasted the delicious life-giving air of New Mexico
and viewed that greatest of all Earth's wonders — the
GRAND CANYON OF ARIZONA?

The SANTA FE will give you a chance to do this aud
include practically tlie entire state of California, returning
by way of the

ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION

for less than the usual cost of a one-way ticket.
Santa Fe all the way— Harvey meals.

Tickets, reservatious, ami all detiiils fi-om

S. W. MANNING, Gen. New England Agent,

The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway System,

332 "Washington Street, BOSTON.



THE HILL-TOP.




GOLF.

On Friday, August 19th, A. H. Feun went to
Rockland, Me., and played an exhibition match
with the professional of the Samoset Hotel. The
match was 36 holes ; 18 holes were played Friday
afternoon and the match was all even. The last
18 holes were played Saturday morning, Fenn
winning, 4 up, 3 to play. The scores by holes
were :

A. H. Fenn, 5-5-3-fi-f)-5-(i-4-5— 43

4-4-5-6-5-5-G-4-4— 43— 86
4-4-6-6-3-4-5-4-4—40
5-4-3-5-4-4-5-4-5—39— 79



Wm. Cooper, 3-5-5-6-5-4^-4-6—42
5-4-()-7-4-5-5-2-7— 45-
5-4-6-5-5-5-6-4-5-45
4-4-3-5-5-4-6-4-6—41-



On Saturday, August 20th, Harris B. Fenn
won the Maine State Championship, at Portland,
by beating B. B. Sanderson in the final 1 up in 37
holes. The last 18 holes were played in a pouring
rain. Mr. Fenn has now won the championship
twice and has to win it once more to hold the cup
permanently.

On Tuesday, August 23d, there was a ladies'
handicap tournament for two cups, presented by
the hotel. One for the lowest gross score and one
for lowest net score. Miss Helen Ballard, who
played from scratch, lowered the ladies' record 4
strokes and had both lowest gross and net scores.
Her score by holes was as follows :

Miss Ballard, 5-6-6-7-4-6-6-5-0—51
5-5-5-5-2-5-5-5-4—41

92
Other scores :

Out In Gross Hrtp Net

Mrs. H. Jackson 54 55 109 12 97

Miss Emily Loikwood, ... 50 48 98 98

Miss Mabel Chick 52 51 103 3 100

Miss Constant Johnson, .. 52 54 106 5 101

Miss Helen Hishie 64 60 124 18 106

Miss Mav Peterson 56 54 110 4 106

Mrs. W."H. Lord 55 57 112 6 10(>

Miss .Marguerite Pettit, . . 60 65 125 18 107

Mrs. H. P. Dixon 58 61 119 12 107

Miss M. Hallock 63 CO 123 15 108

Miss Louise Kinsey, Miss Helen Fay, Miss Irma Love-
man, withdrew.

On Wednesday, August 24th, A. H. Fenn
played the best ball of Dr. W. S. Harban and
W. C. Chick, the match ending all even. The
scores follow.



A. H. Fenn, 4-,')-,''i-4-l-4-4-5-5— 40
S-l^-M -4-4-5-3— 35



Best Ball, 4-5-5-4-4-4-4-5-4—39
4^1-4 -4-3-4 -4 4>-.3— 36



Wednesday, August 24tli, A. H. Fenn was
playing a match with his sou and bad the best
score he has had this season for eight holes as
follows :

3-5-4-4-3-3-4^—30

When playing the ninth hole, after a good drive,
he took his inid-iron to approach the green. After
making the stroke the ball hit a sparrow that was
flying across the links, killing it instantly. It also
killed his score as it stopped his ball, costing him
an extra stroke for the hole.



Mrs. C. N. Bov^e, Miss Gertrude H. Bov^e
and Miss Mary Isable Bo%-^e of New York,
returned to the Mansion House on Thursday, for
several weeks.

Col. Cilley gave, in honor of his daughter and
sonin-law. Dr. and Mrs. Weist, a most enjoyable
brake ride to Upper and Lower Gloucester, and
through Peterson's Woods, on Wednesday after-
noon. The invited guests were : Capt. Bucking-
ham and Mrs. Buckingham, Mrs. Inman, Mrs.
Irelan, Miss Emily Lockwood, Miss Fay, Miss
Mary Carpenter, Miss Kinsey, Miss Alice Peter-
son and Mr. Carpenter.



The point of view, is Poland Spring and About
There ; 48 views, 50 cents.



The Answer is, —

Yes, it MAS,—

Every COMFORT; — Comfort of Rooms, Baths,
Food, Spring Water, Spaciousness.

It HAS fishing unsurpassed, cool healthy cli-
mate, golf links, drives.

There IS freedom from pests, at an altitude of
1500 feet, and from malaria and hiiy fever.

There ARE^ scores of other attractions. Ask
anyone who has been there, or write for booklet and

JOHN B. MRRBLE.

Prest. The Rangeley Lakes Hotel Co., Rangeley. Me.



THE HILL-TOP.




FRANK CARLOS GRIFFITH, i Editors and
NETTIE M. RICKER, * Proprietors.

PUBLISHED SUNDAY MORNINOS FOE TEN WEEKS, DURING THE

MONTHS OF JULY, AUGUST, AND SEPTEMI5ER, IN

THE INTERESr OF

POLAND SPRING VISITORS.

Contributions from the guests of Poland Spring will be
cheerfully received.

To insure publication, all communications should reach the
editors not later than Wednesday preceding day of issue.

All parties ilesiring rates for advertising iu the Hill-Top
should write the editors for same.

The subscription price of the Hill-Top is $1.00 for the
season of ten weeks, post-paid. Single copies will be mailed at
10c. each.
Address,

Editors "HILLTOP,"

Office, Maine State Building,

South Poland, Maine.



Printed at the Journal Office, LewiBton, Me.



3ttn(la^, Aagtt^t 2^S, 1^04..



®



(Sbitortal.

HERE is a book in the Poland Spring Library
tliat was returned by one youthful reader, a
few years since, with a remark to the effect that it
was not liked because the hero of the tale was too
egotistical, always talking about himself; and the
title of the book was Robinson Crusoe.

Possibly there are times when one is entitled to
talk about himself, and after talking of everything
else but ourselves for eight consecutive weeks.
The Hill-Top ventures to rise to remark, that
eleven years ago we were launched, and while we
were bowing acknowledgments, a bottle of Poland
Water was broken across our bows.

Christened with such purity, the infant thrived,
and to-day is what success has made us.

The Hill-Top was the experiment of two
young men, an ambitious pastime, and it was the
pioneer in individual hotel journalism. Eor four
years it held its own and became established as a
success, and passed the experimental stage.

The fifth year it leaped forward with bounds, and
since that time has grown to plethoric dimensions.



Success stimulates imitation and to-day the
number of individual hotel papers or magazines is
legion, several of which are most pretentious and
of great merit. Yet, for all that, like Poland
Water itself. The Hill-Top of Poland Spring
takes the lead, and distances all competitors.

The clientale of this resort is of a class of loyal
guests, unlike most others, and it is them we have
to thank for their encouragement and their words
of praise.

As evidence of the quality of its esteem, one
has but to glance at the advertisements it contains,
and find other resorts of the highest merit only,
upon its pages ; transportation lines also of the
highest grades ; tradesmen of the utmost reliability,
and if one is judged by the company he keeps,
every interest here represented may feel proud of
his associates.

We are proud to entertain them with what we
have to offer, and while the reader of The Hill-
Top who has never visited Poland Spring may
wish for some other forms of literary food for his
mental palate, he must remember that we are
first and foremost for the Poland guest, that certain
subjects are forever barred, and thus the visitor
here may fear no jests at his expense ; religion,
politics, death and gossip are to us unknown.

This is a resort for pleasure and for health and
The Hill-Top is the medium that gives each
pleasant, healthful thought an utterance.

Expansion being now the one controlling
thought that permeates all channels, and not to be
outdone by Imperialistic brains. The Hill-Top
has branched out as well, and had culled from its
decade of illustration, a half huiidrcd of its choicest
plates, and made into a book.

These, all loyal Poland guests have sought for
eagerly, and thus we learn that all the labor we
have performed has not been done in vain.



Mrs. R. Dornan gave on Friday, August
19th, a most enjoyable brake ride to Gloucester,
through Peterson's Woods, and to the .Summit
Spring Hotel, where afternoon tea was served.
The invited guests were Mrs. F. T. Huffman,
Mrs. C. L. Holbrook, Mrs. S. P. Holton, Mrs.
R. F. Taylor, Mrs. M. J. Pettit, Mrs. H. Coffin,
Mrs. J. Green, Mrs. C. Bartlett, Mrs. G. A. Brooke,
Mrs. F. Sterling, Miss L. Kauffmann and Mrs.
R. Dornan.



THE HILL-TOP.



PROGRESSIVE EUCHRE.

In the Amusement Room of the Poland Spring
House on Friday evening, Auj;;u.st I'.tth, was held
the usual progressive euchre party.

Mrs. Lees and Mrs. Hiram W. Ricker each
had a score of 64 points and cut for the first prize.
Mrs. Ricker received the first prize, a card bag,
and Mrs. Lees, the second, a gilt picture frame ;
]\Irs. Moulton had 63 points and won the third
prize, a case filled with baby ribbon. The conso-
lation, a pin cushion, went to Mrs. N. Huggins.

Mrs. E. M. Campbell had the highest score,
71, for the gentlemen and received the first prize,
an ivory paper knife with silver handle ; Col. Tal-
bot and Mr. S. Goulding each had 63 points and
cut for second. Mr. S. Goulding won the second,
a Dolton candle stick, and Col. Talbot, the third,
a cup and saucer. The consolation, a Toby pitcher,
went to Mr. Atwood.



Send me your Broken Glasses. I will repair
and return them on the next mail.

A complete stock of Photographic Supplies.

H. E. MURDOCK,

Optician ,

Portland, Maine.



Los Angeles'
Famous New Hotel




THE ANGELUS

Now^ Under Nevf Management.

LOCATION.

EQUIPMENT,



SERVICE



The Best in the VJest.

LOOMIS BROS., PKOr'KS.



TKe Heart of the Berkshire Hills

is penetrated by the Boston & Albany Railroad, and a dozen trains a day leave Boston,

Mass., from the East, and Albany, N. Y., from the West, and several trains a

day from New York City over Harlem Division N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R.

for Pittsfield, Mass. and other points in the central

district of these hills.

''Simnnei Homes on tHe Boston &n!lB-r

Is the title of a 40-page illustrated and descriptive folder issued by the Passenger Depart-
ment of the Boston & Albany Railroad, containing a complete list of Hotels and Snmmer
Boarding Houses along the line of that Road in the BERKSHIRE HILLS DISTRICT.
It is richly illustrated with half-tone cuts of mountains, lakes, waterfolls, stage-roads,
etc., and all prospective summer tourists will find it most interesting. A copy may be
secured by addressing

A. S. HANSON, General Passenger Agent, Boston, Mass.



10



THE HILL-TOP.



From the Four-Track News



««



99



OUR LEADING CARDS

No. lO-THE SIX SPOT




Hei-e ai-f six delights that we otter _y(ju, and you miglit imiltiply t'l 'se by six luiudriMl
and you would not exhaust the attractions of the Xew York Central Lines.

The Four-Track News, an illustrated monthly magazine of travel and education —
152 or more pages, every one of which is of human interest. Subscriptions, 50 cents a
year; foreign countries one dollar — single copies 5 cents. Sold by news dealers.

George H. Daniels, Publisher, Eoom 58 A, 7 East 42d Street, Xew York.



Send a two-cent stamp for n fifty.two page Illustrated Catalogue of the "Four-Track Serlet"



THE HILL-TOP.



11



GRANDFATHER'S STORY ABOUT GRANDMOTHER.

j^ffY little irrund-daiigliter Grucie was visiting
jjl^ us, ami one day the little puss came and
plumped down ou the rug at my feet, and
grasping my hand, looked up and incpiired :

"Grandfather dear, would it he right to marry
a man a girl met on the«iyjks at the Springs this
summer? We were not introduced — "

"We?"

"Oh, I forgot; well, yes, we. We got to be
real good friends, and he asked if he might call."

This was all news to me, and in some surprise,
and with a desire to be firm, I told her 1 thought
she had a greater sense of propriety, and inquired
his name, to which she replied that it was Frank-
lin Monroe.

"Well, my child, forget all about it, for it will
not do at all." Whereupon the minx put her arms
about my neck and said :

"Grandfather, please tell me huw you met grand-
mother." So, of course, I had to tell her the story.

"About forty years ago while my father was
mayor of Butfalo, we were invited to visit New
York City wlien there was to be a grand parade,
in honor of some war event, and to he the guests
of the Mayor.

We, of course, accepted, and after participating
in all the pleasures and duties of the day, the
INIayor took my father home with him, and directed
the coachman to drive me about and let me see



Online LibraryW. Somerset MaughamThe Hill-top → online text (page 34 of 42)