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miLK CHOCOLATE in your pocket.

Finest in the world for pic-nics,

yachting parties, and all out-door

excursions.

Carry Peter's with you on the Poland

Links!




FOR EATING ONLY

LHMONT, CORLISS & CO.

U. S. Selling Bgenta,
7B Hudson Street.



16



THE HILL-TOP.



THE MINERALS.

For the sixth season an attractive collection of
minerals finds space in the Maine State Building.
These specimens, unlike the odds and ends usually
gathered at summer resorts, have been carefully
sought out, brought together from the leading
localities of the State and the world at large, and
they represent choice and rare crystallizations,
beautiful colors, valuable ores and gem material,
and the curious and remarkable characteristics of
the mineral kingdom. The labelling is scientific
and accurate, in accordance with the most advanced
usage of the great museums.

Most of the specimens have not been displayed
in these cases before. Among the interesting
additions from Maine is a magnificent matrix spec-
imen of Aquamarine, one of the finest of the kind
ever found, showing two terminated bluish-green
crystals — of about 5J and 4 inches in length and
f inches in diameter — on a matrix of white Albite.
A single crystal so choice, in such exquisite set-
ting, would be the delight of any collector; two
such crystals together are a dream of joy almost
beyond hope of realization. One mineral eagerly
sought by the world's museums is Herderite, a
glucinum-calcium flnophosphate, which for nearly
a century, has not been found outside of Maine,
and our extraordinary specimen shows a large and
perfect crystal in the center of a mass of feldspar
and surrounded by smaller crystals and a dusky
coating. This is one of the rarest of rarities,
though not showy. A beautiful little Maine
specimen is a crystal of purple Apatite on a white
Quartz crystal, and a nineteen-pound doubly
terminated Smoky Quartz crystal — mostly trans-
parent — is pronounced by museum collectors the
choicest of the kind ever seen from the State.
The large ball from Smoky Quartz of the town of
Poland has probably never been duplicated in New
England. Other home specimens are of unusual
interest, and the cut Tourmalines and Beryls are
gems eagerly sought everywhere. The Yellow
Beryl of 34|i carats is one of the largest and
finest of the fine gems Maine has produced.

In foreign specimens the novelties are too
numerous to mention. Especially notable is an
extraordinary mass of Australian Opal, from
which a whole necklace of beautiful stones could
be cut ; and there are several choice examples of
the marvellous pink Tourmaline crystals lately
discovered in California. A mass of Gold from
Transylvania arouses the enthusiasm of those to
whom the beauty of minerals is the value in dollars
and cents. There are also umisually fine specimens
of Silver and Copper, and ores of lead, zinc, etc.,
in their most perfect crystallized forms. One of the
wonders is a Uruguay water geode — a natural sealed
vessel of Chalcedony partly filled with water.



The gems and cabinet specimens are for sale,
and guests seeking attractive ornaments, choice
cabinet specimens, or novel bric-a-brac will find
something worthy of attention in the mineral cases.
Our mineral collector, E. R. Chadbourn, of Lew-
iston, will be here on Thursday, and will be glad
to show specimens to persons who are interested,
whether thinking of purchasing or not.



Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Ruhe, Mr. W. F. Ruhe,
Master Carlton Ruhe and Miss Helen Ruhe of
West Newton and Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Downs
and Miss K. T. Ballantyre of Tilton, N. H., are
registered here.

Mrs. E. H. MacLaren, Miss .Janet H. Mac-
Laren and Miss M. L. Halstead of New York
City will again make the Mansion House their
summer home. They arrived Wednesday morning.
Miss MacLaren is of the Class of 1907, Wells
College.



Corde'8 Vienna Cafe

489 Congress Street, PORTLAND, ME.

The Finest Eiiuippetl Itestaurant East of Boston.
Private Dining Kooms on Second and Tliird Floors.

L.'!;,".'f"l'l'.f„'Ma'l'°!'m,"' W. W. TIBBETTS, PROP.



This Space Reserved for

W. W. MANSFIELD & CO.,

Wholesale Jewelers

and Importers,

241 Middle Street,

PORTLAND, ME.



THE HILL-TOP.



17



The ST. CHARLES

ATI^ANTIC CITY, N. J.



THE RINEST HOTEL ON THE COHST.

HOT AND COLD SALT AND FRESH WATER IN EVERY BATH.
Situated in the Most Fashionable Section.

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Bell Telephones in Rooms. Ooif Privileges.

NEWLIN HAINES.



B



efore making your arrangements
for a tour next winter,



Florida, Californiat and Mexico*

Around the World Party, Early in September.



RAYMOND & WHITCOMB CO.,

306 Washington St., next to Old South Church,
BOSTON.
25 Uniou Square, New York.

inor. Chestnut Street, I'liiLADELriiiA.

2:52 South Cliirk Street, Chicago

WORLD'S FAIR LINE,

TEe Wabash Railroad

i.s the only line liaviiij; trades ami depot at main eutrame
World's t'air Grounds, St. Louis. Tracks with .sanitary
facilities at this depot for storing special trains or private
cars. Tickets, New York to St. Louis and return, .BIS.
Boston to St. Louis and return, S24. Philadelphia and
return, $17. Correspondingly low rates from other East-
ern points. Privilege of stojipiug oft at Niagara Kails,
Detroit, and Chicago. Apply to nearest ticket agent for
tickets via the "Wabash." On application to

H. B. McCLELLAN, Gen1 Eastern Agt., 387 Broadway, New York,

or. I. 1). McliEATH, N. E. r. A., 17ii Washington Street, lio



Holders giving tweuty-four hulf-toni
Iniildinga and grounds will be sent FREE.



of the World'.-



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A Pound of Pleasure.



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BOSTON CHOCOLATES

A fresh supply al'ways
on sale at tir\G

POLAND SPIKING HOUSE.

Arli.-.lic. I>elii-.ile. Pure.



J



18



THE HILL-TOP.




LAMISCAPE liV JOHN W. AI.EX ANUl!!!.

THE POLAND SPRING EXHIBITION.

No exliibitioii that has yet been licld at Poland
Spring has attracted tlie attention that this season's
has.

The inqniries and the favorable comments are
beyond all precedent, which must lead to the
inference that it is not only superior, but that the
knowledge of its existence and excellence is far
better known than formerly.

On June LSth there were four leading Hoston
newspapers and one magazine represented at Poland
Spring by their art editors, to personally view the
offerings of the New York and Boston artists in
this, the tenth annual exhibition here.

Tiie Boston Transcript, through the noted art
critic, Wm. Howe Downes, devoted a column to
its favorable discussion.

It is to be noted that he says, " Since the lirst
exhibition of the series, there has been a steady
improvemeut in the quality of tlie collections from



year to year, and more first class things by promi-
nent artists are to be seen iti this exhibition than
ever before."

There are pictures in this exhibition that have
already graced the wallsof the famous Paris Salon,
and those of the most prominent American
exhibitions ; pictures that have won or added to
tlie renown of the artist who painted them.

The fact that this annual affair has been con-
tinued into its tenth year should cause every
Poland guest to make the effort to visit the third
floor of the Maine State Building with the assur-
ance of being well repaid.

It is difficult to single out a few artists from
nearly a hundred, to call attention to, and it is the
belief of the writer that in scarcely any exhibition
in this country, have the critics who have written
on the subject, found it necessary to individualize
so large a proportion of the artists as in this one.

The exhibition and catalogue are free to all,
and the paintings are for sale.



Mr. John Pickering of Salem, Mass., has
joined his family at the Mansion House.

Mrs. F. J. Tracy and Mrs. E. A. Tracy of
South Coventry, Conn., are at the Mansion House.

Mr. H. M. Sherman and Mrs. Sherman, Mr.
and Mrs. P. M. Beers of Bridgeport, Conn., are
recent arrivals.

Mrs. J. V. Painter, accompanied Ijy her son,
Mr. K. V. Painter of Cleveland, Ohio, arrived at
the Poland Spring House on July Gtii.

Mr. Sidney F. Tyler of Elkins Park, Pa.,
joined his son, Mr. George F. Tyler, at the
Poland Spring House, July the seventh.

Mr. Frederick M. Thompson is spending a
few days at tiie Mansion House. Mr. Thompson
is a member of the firm of The Fessenden News
Company, Portland, Maine.

Mr. D. B. Bourdon and Mr. O. H. Bourdon
of Newton, Mass., arrived on July 6th. Mr.
Bourdon's work in the photographic world takes
highest rank, and socially the Bourdons are wel-
comed by all who know them.

Mr. and Mrs. Carberry Ritchie of Pliiladel-
phia, have been spending some time at the Poland
Spring House. Mrs. Ritchie is the daughter of
Mr. Rlartin Maloiiey of Philadelphia who not long
ago was created a count by the Pope. Mr. and
Mrs. Ritchie were recently married at Spring
Lake, N. J. Cardinal SatoUi was one of the
distinguished dignitaries of the church at the cer-
emony, with archbishop Ryan and twelve priests
ofliciating. Mr. and Mrs. Ritchie left on July
5th for The Samoset, Rockland.



THE HILL-TOP.



19



Rev



SUNDAY SERVICE.

Cliarles D. Crane of Waterville, Me.,



]ireacheepHrln>cnl (,;;alhTy) arc atlraclivi' ilcsifiis



Online LibraryW. Somerset MaughamThe Hill-top → online text (page 7 of 42)