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Walter Arthur Copinger.

History of the parish of Buxhall in the county of Suffolk; with twenty-four full-plate illustrations and a large parish map (containing all the field names) specially drawn for the work online

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Online LibraryWalter Arthur CopingerHistory of the parish of Buxhall in the county of Suffolk; with twenty-four full-plate illustrations and a large parish map (containing all the field names) specially drawn for the work → online text (page 18 of 32)
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1 78 History of the Parish of Buxhall

daughters of Thomas Bull of Flowton, co. Suffolk, covenanted to suffer a recovery
of the Manor and the tenement Gunnels to provide a jointure for Mary Bull, and
by indenture 20 Jan., 10 Car. I., after reciting that this recovery had not been
suffered and could not be without inconvenience to the estate of Charles Vesey,
certain other property known as Gosling in Hintlesham was assured to trustees by
way of substitution and in order to secure the jointure. Charles Vesey died in
1657, and was succeeded by his son Thomas, whose will is dated Feb. 20, 1678
(proved Nov. 20, 1679). Thomas Vesey, of Hintlesham, was succeeded at
Cockerells Hall by his son, Charles Vesey. Charles Vesey lived at Hintlesham
and married Frances, daughter of Sir George Wenyeve, of Brettenham Park, and
of Christian, daughter of Sir Dudley (afterwards Lord) North. His will is dated
May 26, 168 1, and was proved July i, 1685. He left an only son, Dudley
Vesey (so called after his great-grandfather, Lord North), who became lord of the
manor on the death of his father, but died an infant about 1700, when the
property passed to his uncle, William Vesey, of Elmsett, who was the last of the
Veseys who could claim the position of lord. In 17 10 he sold the Manor and the
demesne lands and a messuage called Waspes or Gunnells to Gregory Copinger, then
living at Norton in the county of Suffolk. The deed is dated the 20th of April,
1 7 10, and is in the writer's possession. The widow of Charles Vesey, who
evidently was entitled to dower out of the property, and who had married
John Tudman, of Hammerwich, Doctor of Physic, sold all her right in con-
sideration of an annuity, and her interest was vested in Gregory Copinger by a
deed dated March 2, 1709. This John Tudman had been the guardian of the
infant Dudley, but whether before he married Dudley's mother or after does not
appear. The deed of conveyance to Gregory Copinger Is sealed with a seal bearing
the leg in armour.

Gregory Copinger resided mostly at Bromehill House, in the county of
Norfolk. In the chancel of the Church of Weting St. Mary in that county,
at the east end on brickwork, is a stone bearing this inscription : —

" Gregory Copinger of Broomehill House,
who dy'd the 10"' P'eb. 1724 aged 65 years,
Elizabeth his wife, bury'd the 19 of July 1702
aged 40 years."

The arms on the tomb are Copinger, Bendy of 6 or. and gu. on a fesse az.,
3 p!ates in a border arg., impaling Kirkham on a bend three cinquefoils.



The three other Manors in Buxhall lyg

By his will dated Oct. i8, 1724, Gregory devised his "manner or lordship of
Cockerells with all the lands tenements and hereditaments and capital messuage
and scite of the said mannor of Cockerells with their and every of their appur-
tenances, and also his messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever
being freehold or charterhold, with their and every of their appurtenances scituate
lying and being in Buxhall in the county of Suffolk " unto his son Gregory for life
with remainder to Gregory, testator's grandson, in tail male, with remainder to his
nephew, Thomas Copinger, in fee.

Gregory Copinger, son of the above Gregory, was High Sheriff for Suffolk in
1724. He was also for many years Churchwarden of Buxhall Church, namely, from
17 1 9 to 1740. He seems to have resided at Cockerells Hall, and dying in 1743
was buried at Buxhall on October ist in that year. By his will, which is
dated Dec. 22, 1739, and in which he is described as of Buxhall, Gregory, the
son, devises to his wife his manor or lordship of Cockerells, and all his freehold
hereditaments in Buxhall for life, and after her decease he devises the same to his
daughter Sarah in fee. He gives all his copyhold tenements in Buxhall to his said
daughter subject to an annuity of ^12 to his wife, payable "at the South Porch of
the Parish Church of Buxhall."

It is evident from this will that he had in some way become seised in
fee of the Manor, for it will be remembered that under his father's will this
was settled, and he, the son, took a life estate only. There are but two
modes in which he could have become entitled to deal thus absolutely with
the property by his will. Either his son Gregory had lived to attain 21, and
the estate tail had been barred, or he, the grandson, having died (as was the
fact) in his father's lifetime without issue male Thomas Copinger had become entitled
in fee and had either conveyed or devised by will the estate in remainder to
Gregory.

In 1745 Sarah Copinger (the daughter of Gregory Copinger, the son), who had
been baptized at Buxhall Oct. 5, 1724, married Thomas Moyle, of Bury St.
Edmunds, and by the settlement made on such marriage dated Dec. 8, 1745, the
Manor of Cockerells, and all others the properties which Gregory Copinger the elder
had purchased from the Veseys and others, were conveyed in strict settlement subject
to Sarah Copinger, the widow's life interest. Sarah Moyle died June 17, 1764,
aged 39, and her husband, Thomas Moyle, May 4, 1764, aged 44. They left
issue, three children, one son, Thomas Copinger Moyle, and two daughters, Mary
and Isabella.



i8o History of the Parish of Buxhall

On a stone lying even with the ground west of the steeple in the churchyard
of Redenhall in Norfolk is the following inscription : —

In memory of Sarah, Wife of

Thos. Moyle Esq.,

And daughter of Gregory

Coppinger of Buxhall,
Who died y" 17 of June

Aged 39 years ;

Also of Thos. Moyle, Esq''*'

Who died ye 4th of May, 1765

Aged 44 years.



lemi-



Arms above Moyle — a mule — on an escutcheon Copinger, crest — two de
dragons, sans wings, indorsed, and their necks interwoven.

The son Thomas Copinger Moyle became entitled under the entail created by
his mother's marriage settlement expectant on the decease of his grandmother, Sarah
Copinger, and the entail was barred in Jan., 1769.

In 1772 Sarah Copinger, the widow of Gregory, died, being buried at Buxhall
Feb. 14, 1772 ; and Thomas Copinger Moyle on May 26, 1772, sold the manor
and the estate to Thomas Garner, of Eldon, in the county of Suffolk.

Thomas Garner died March 13, 1803, having by will dated Jan. 9, 1800,
appointed all his property to be sold by his executors, who effected a sale to James
Webster, formerly of the Island of New Providence in North America, but then of
Powis Place, Great Ormond Street, London, on Nov. 5, 18 12.

In 1832 James Webster sold the manor and estate to the Hon. and Rev. Henry
Leslie, of Wetherden, in the county of Suffolk, afterward Sir Henry Leslie, Bart.,
who on April 20 in that year became Lord of the Manor.

Sir Henry Leslie dying Dec. 9, 1849, '^he trustees of his will dated
August 20, 1840, sold the manor and estate to Edward Bennett, who on
Dec. 17, 1853, accordingly became Lord of the Manor. Mr. Edward Bennett on
June 23, 1855, conveyed the same to Messrs. Frederick Harrison and G. Alderson,
the trustees of his marriage settlement, who on Feb. i, 1869, sold to Mr. Thos.
Jonathan Lock, who sold the manor and estate to the Rev. Henry Hill, of Buxhall,
by conveyance dated Nov. 17, 1870, and the same is now vested by conveyance
dated Dec. 17, 1897, in the writer.



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The three other Manors in Buxhall i8i

It is curious that the last portion retained by a member of the family of the
estates in the county of Suffolk, at one time owned by the Copingers, should, after
the lapse of a century and a half, be the first portion to return to another branch
of the same family.

An interesting point in regard to this Manor was put before one of the most
eminent conveyancing counsel of his day — the late Thomas Coventry — in 1827.
The question was raised as to the right to hold courts. The Court Rolls had styled
the courts which had been regularly held " Courts Baron," and there seemed to be
no free suitors as homagers of the court, but only copyhold tenants. The case was
put on behalf of Mr. Webster, the then lord, and particulars were furnished of courts
held in 1803, three courts in 18 13, 1825, and 1826. The Rev. Henry Hill, one
of the tenants of the manor, having died, his son and customary heir declined to be
admitted, being so advised by his attorney on the ground that the Manor was lost
and that his lands had become freehold. The learned counsel, who was quite a
specialist on copyhold tenure, advised that it was clear the Manor was in existence,
and that Mr. Webster was fully entitled to hold a customary Court of the Manor,
and this, notwithstanding that the former courts had not been so styled on the Rolls,
but had been stated to be Courts Baron. In his opinion fealty was due from all
the freeholders of the Manor which fealty not being within the statute of limitations,
he considered the lord might claim at any time. But he added that, unless some
badge of tenure be reserved as a quit rent, heriot, relief or the like payable by the
freehold tenant, he thought the lord would encounter considerable difficulty in
attempting to revive the Court Baron.

{b) The Manor of Leffey or Liffey Hall.

This Manor was anciently known as LefFye or Lefflye Hall, and in the time of
the Domesday Survey was in the possession of William de Warren, a follower of
the Conqueror. He was probably the son of Ralph de Warren, a benefactor to the
Abbey of La Trinite du Mont about the middle of the eleventh century. The
Duke of Normandy gave him the Castle of Mortemer, and he could not have been
other than a young man at the time of the Norman invasion. His name appears
amongst those who attended the Council at Lillebonne, and he is counted in the
category of those present at the battle of Hastings, for his services in which he received
three hundred manors, nearly half being in Norfolk. In 1067, on the King's departure
for Normandy, he was joined with others in the government of England under Odo



i82 History of the Parish of Buxhall

and William Fitz Osbern. In 1074 he became a chief justiciary, and with Robert,
son of WilHam Malet, routed Earl Ralph and his followers at Fagadune, pursuing
them to Norwich, where the prisoners taken were mutilated by the chopping off the
right foot, "an unmistakable proof," as a facetious writer of the last century observes,
" that the sufferers had taken a step in the wrong direction." He married Gundred
a Gundrada, of whom so much has been written respecting her relationship to William
the Conqueror. They were evidently united before 1078, as in that year they founded
the Priory of Lewis in Sussex. She died in 1085. In the rebellion headed by Odo,
Bishop of Bayeux, in the reign of William Rufus, William de Warren stood by the
King, and for his constancy — a rare virtue in those days — was rewarded with the
Earldom of Surrey. He died in 1089.

In the time of Edward I. the Manor was the inheritance of Sir Thomas
Weyland, Knight. The Weylands are assigned by Davy as lords, but he has a note
to the effect that it is doubtful whether they should be assigned to this Manor or
to that of Fenn Hall. No doubt Davy's difficulty arose by finding that Fenn Hall
Manor is included in the Inquisition post mortem on Sir Thomas Tudenham
5 Edw. IV. and in that on Margaret Bedingfield 15 Edw. IV., they both being in
direct descent from Sir Thomas Weyland through his eldest son. Sir William
Weyland. As a matter of fact, however, there are two Manors bearing the name
Fenn Hall — one in Buxhall and the other in Sutton — and the Weylands strangely
seem to have been connected with and have held both Fenn Hall in Sutton and
LefFey Hall, the lands of which almost adjoin those of Fenn Hall in Buxhall.
The Fenn Hall Manor in the Inquisitions above referred to was no doubt the
Manor in Sutton.

Sir Thomas Weyland, the first lord of whom we have any account, was a
somewhat remarkable character in his day. The eldest son of Sir John Weyland,
Knight, and Mary his wife, and grandson of Sir Nicholas Weyland and Beatrice
his wife, all of whom are buried in the Priory Church of Woodbridge,' he was
bred to the law and rose to be Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. In the
height of his prosperity in 1288 he found himself in the awkward position of
being accused of screening and protecting some of his servants who had committed
a murder. Whereupon he was arrested and delivered into the custody of Sir Robert
Malet, from whom, however, he contrived to escape, and sought sanctuary in the
Church of the Friars Minor at Bury St. Edmunds. Here he was permitted by the
monks to wear their habit and to rest secure — not, however, for long, for the place
' The arms of the family arc, argent, on a cross gules five escallops, or.



The three other Manors in Buxhall 183

of his refuge coming to the knowledge of Edward I. within forty days of his
escape, orders were given by the King that no kind of victuals should be conveyed
into the monastic house in which Sir Thomas had found refuge, and the result
was that all the friars, except three or four, were forced to depart. At length Sir
Thomas himself was constrained to return to a layman's attire, and coming forth
was delivered again to Sir Robert Malet, who brought him to London and shut
him up in the Tower. On being brought before the King's Council he was offered
either a trial by his Peers, to remain in perpetual imprisonment, or to abjure the
realm. He chose the last, and barefooted and bareheaded and with a crucifix in
his hand, was conveyed from the Tower to Dover, and from thence transported
beyond the sea, where he died about 1290. His body was buried in the tomb of
his ancestors in the Priory Church of Woodbridge, but his heart in the Priory
Church of Sudbury. He died seized of Leffey Manor and also of the Manors of
Brandeston, Charsfield, Westerfield, &c., and his widow Margery became Lady of
the Manor of Leffey. He left issue by her three sons — William Weyland, John
Weyland, and Richard Weyland. The last, 9 Edw. II., succeeded his mother, and
Sir Richard Weyland dying 13 Edw. II., leaving an only child Cecily de Weyland,
the Manor passed to her. Cecily married Sir Bartholomew Burghersh, 4th Baron
Burghersh, one of the most eminent warriors of the martial times of Edw. III.,
serving on the staff of the Black Prince in the French wars, and attaining so
much renown as to be deemed worthy of one of the original Garters upon the
institution of that order. He journeyed into the Holy Land, and was sub-
sequently for many years in close attendance upon his royal master, the Black
Prince, during which period he participated in the triumph of Poictiers. He
survived his wife and died on the 4th of April, 1369, in which year his last
will was made in London. By this document he directs that his body be interred
in the chapel of Massingham before the image of the Blessed Virgin ; that a
dirge be there said, and in the morning a mass ; and that a dole should be
daily given to the poor of that place at the discretion of his executors. To Sir
Thomas Pavely (whom, with Lord Badlesmere, he had constituted executors) he
bequeathed a standing cup, gilt, with an L. upon the cover, as also his whole suit
of arms for the jousts, with his coat of mail and sword. He left an only daughter
and eventual heiress Elizabeth, who then became lady of this Manor. She was
married to Sir Edward le Despencer, K.G., a brother-in-arms of her father, having
fought by his side at Poictiers, and for his gallant conduct been summoned to
Parliament as Baron de Spencer from Dec. 15, 1357, to Oct. 6, 1372. He died



184 History of the Parish of Buxhall

in 1375, and Elizabeth Lady Despencer in 1409. Her daughter Anne married Sir
Thomas Morley, fourth Baron Morley, summoned to Parliament July 16, 1381, and
the Manor seems to have then passed into the Morley family. Their son Thomas
married Isabel, daughter of John Lord Molines, and Thomas their son, the fifth
Lord Morley, married Isabel de la Pole, daughter of Michael, Earl of Suffolk, who
died in 1435. Their son Robert Morley, sixth Baron, married Elizabeth, daughter
of William Lord Ros, and their daughter Alianore Morley was married to William
Lovel, second son of William Baron Lovel, and their eldest son Henry Lovel,
Lord Morley having died without issue, Henry Parker, son of their daughter Alice
by Sir William Parker, Knight, standard-bearer to Richard III., became Lord Morley.

The Manor in the time of Edward VI. belonged to Sir John Spring, who is
called Lord of Liffey in the Buxhall Court Rolls of that reign, but in the next
reign it passed to Robert Rychers, who also held free land of the Manor of Buxhall.
He died 1589, leaving his son and heir John Richers, who succeeded to the Manor.
He probably sold to Sir Robert Houghton, for we find him next mentioned as
seised. He was a Serjeant-at-law and one of the King's Justices of the King's
Bench, and died 22 Jac, leaving Francis Houghton, his son and heir, not only to
this Manor, but also to lands in Brettenham and Hitcham. Francis died in 1629,
and was succeeded by Robert Houghton, his son and heir. Robert Houghton, who
lived at Shelton in Norfolk, made his will in 1660, directing his executors Robert
Houghton and John Tuthill, to sell first his Sussex estates and then his Suffolk
estates to pay his debts, which were numerous. He died leaving an infant heir,
Charles Houghton, and his father's creditors obtained a decree in Chancery for sale
of Leffey Manor and the other estates in Suffolk. A Bill was afterwards intro-
duced into Parliament, and against this Sir George Pretyman, Knt., and Elizabeth
his wife, widow of Robert Houghton and mother of the infant heir Charles, pre-
sented two petitions, setting forth that the Bill would deprive Elizabeth of her dower
and ruin her son and heir. On the Bill, 22-23 Car. II., the Committee reported
that the parties should desist from any further prosecution. i

In 1693 Sir Edward Hungerford was Lord of the Manor, and in the early
part of the eighteenth century it passed into the possession of Joshua Grigby, a
lawyer and town clerk of Bury St. Edmunds, who in 1723 married Mary,
daughter of Richard Tulby, Esq., of Brockdish, co. Norfolk, High Sheriff of
that county in 1729, by Frances his wife, niece and co-heiress of Thomas Tenison,

' House of" Lords Journals, xii. 443, 460, 464, 468, 470, 472, 481. Cal. of House of Lords MSS.,
1670-1. House or Commons Journal, ix. 213.



The three other Manors in Buxhall 177

his heirs, which would at least imply a freehold interest, but the absence of any
record of the Manor having been in the Betts family as an estate in fee and the
use of the expression in the will, " be the lease of the Manor," which no doubt is
a clerical error for "be the lessee of the Manor," go to support the view of
William Betts being but the holder of the Manor for a term of years.

Davy says that Sir John Spring, Knt., born at Lavenham, but settled at
Hitcham, who died August 12, 1547, was lord of Cockerells Hall Manor. He
married Dorothy, daughter of Sir William Walgrave, and, dying in 1554, was
succeeded by his son and heir. Sir William Spring, of Pakenham. He married first
Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Kitson, and secondly, Susan, daughter of Sir Anthony
Jermyn, of Rushbrooke. He died in 1599, but seems to have disposed of the
Manor in his lifetime for William Vesey of Hintlesham, son of Robert Vesey, of
Hadleigh, clothier, specifically mentions it in his will of June 3, 1575, proved
Nov. 18, 1577 (Inquis. post mort., 29 EUz.), devising it with Gunnells (now
Hollybush) to his younger son Charles and to the heirs of his body, and in default
of such issue to his (testator's) son WiUiam and to the heirs of his body with divers
remainders over. The two brothers, Charles and William, were the sons of the
testator by his second wife, Joane, daughter of Robert Cutler, of Ipswich, and
widow of John Walton, of Hadleigh, and the marriage settlement is dated Feb. 14,
6 Edw. VI. William Vesey, the father, held his first court Sept. 7, i Eliz., and died
July 4, 1577. Charles died without any issue of his body, and William Vesey, Charles's
brother, came in under the entail, and amongst the Chancery Proceedings is a Bill
of Complaint by William Vesey, filed with the object of perpetuating evidence
and establishing the will of his father. In 1601 William Vesey, Charles's brother,
was lord, and Sept. i, 43 Eliz., held a court, the roll of which is preserved
amongst the MSS. of the British Museum (Add. ch. 26198). This William
Vesey held another court June 28, i Jac, the roll of which is also in the
British Museum (Add. ch. 26200). He married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward
Reynold, of Holton, co. Suffolk (marriage settlement May 16, 18 Eliz.), and died
in 161 6. His will is dated April 10, 16 16, and it was proved at Norwich
July 15, 1616 (Inq., p. m., 14 Jac.) He was succeeded by his eldest son,
Charles Vesey, who held a court Oct. 3, 21 Jac. I. (1623). He married
EHzabeth, daughter of Edmond Doyley of Shottisham, co. Norfolk, by Ann,
daughter of Sir John Goodwin, and his marriage settlement is dated 24 Sept.,
3 Jac. By an indenture dated August 2, i Car. I., this Charles Vesey on the
marriage of his son and heir apparent, Thomas Vesey, with Mary Bull, one of the

24



lyS History of the Parish of Buxhall

daughters of Thomas Bull of Flowton, co. Suffolk, covenanted to suffer a recovery
of the Manor and the tenement Gunnels to provide a jointure for Mary Bull, and
by indenture 20 Jan., 10 Car. I., after reciting that this recovery had not been
suffered and could not be without inconvenience to the estate of Charles Vesey,
certain other property known as Gosling in "Hintlesham was assured to trustees by
way of substitution and in order to secure the jointure. Charles Vesey died in
1657, and was succeeded by his son Thomas, whose will is dated Feb. 20, 1678
(proved Nov. 20, 1679). Thomas Vesey, of Hintlesham, was succeeded at
Cockerells Hall by his son, Charles Vesey. Charles Vesey lived at Hintlesham
and married Frances, daughter of Sir George Wenyeve, of Brettenham Park, and
of Christian, daughter of Sir Dudley (afterwards Lord) North. His will is dated
May 26, 168 1, and was proved July i, 1685. He left an only son, Dudley
Vesey (so called after his great-grandfather. Lord North), who became lord of the
manor on the death of his father, but died an infant about 1700, when the
property passed to his uncle, William Vesey, of Elmsett, who was the last of the
Veseys who could claim the position of lord. In 17 10 he sold the Manor and the
demesne lands and a messuage called Waspes or Gunnells to Gregory Copinger, then
living at Norton in the county of Suffolk. The deed is dated the 20th of April,
1 7 10, and is in the writer's possession. The widow of Charles Vesey, who
evidently was entitled to dower out of the property, and who had married
John Tudman, of Hammerwich, Doctor of Physic, sold all her right in con-
sideration of an annuity, and her interest was vested in Gregory Copinger by a
deed dated March 2, 1709. This John Tudman had been the guardian of the
infant Dudley, but whether before he married Dudley's mother or after does not
appear. The deed of conveyance to Gregory Copinger is sealed with a seal bearing
the leg in armour.

Gregory Copinger resided mostly at Bromehill House, in the county of
Norfolk. In the chancel of the Church of Weting St. Mary in that county,
at the east end on brickwork, is a stone bearing this inscription : —

" Gregory Copinger ot Broomehill House,
who dy'd the 10"' Feb. 1724 aged 65 years,
Elizabeth his wife, bury'd the 19 of July 1702
aged 40 years."

The arms on the tomb are Copinger, Bendy of 6 or. and gu. on a fesse az.,
3 plates in a border arg., impaling Kirkham on a bend three cinquefoils.



The three other Manors in Buxhall 179

By his will dated Oct. 18, 1724, Gregory devised his "manner or lordship of
Cockerells with all the lands tenements and hereditaments and capital messuage
and scite of the said niannor of Cockerells with their and every of their appur-
tenances, and also his messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever
being freehold or charterhold, with their and every of their appurtenances scituate
lying and being in Buxhall in the county of Suffolk " unto his son Gregory for life
with remainder to Gregory, testator's grandson, in tail male, with remainder to his
nephew, Thomas Copinger, in fee.

Gregory Copinger, son of the above Gregory, was High Sheriff for Suffolk in



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