Walter G. (Walter Gilman) Berg.

Buildings and structures of American railroads. A reference book for railroad managers, superintendents, master mechanics, engineers, architects, and students online

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UNIVERSITY OF

ILLINOIS LIBRARY

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

BOOKSTACKS



I



The person charging this material is re-
sponsible for its return to the library from
which it was withdrawn on or before the
Latest Date stamped below.

Theff, molilafion, and underlining of books ore reasons
for disciplinary action and moy result in dismissal from
the University.
To renew coll Telephone Center, 333-8400

UNIVERSITY OF IlllNOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN



APR 1 6 1884

SEP 2C USA

'■'■■■-'dim

JUL 05 19! il



f^€e 1 1999



yuN 1 1



1999



L161— O-1096



BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES



OF



AMERICAN RAILROADS.



A REFERENCE BOOK



FOR



Railroad Managers, Superintendents, Master Mechanics,
Engineers, Architects, and Students.



BY

WALTER G. BERG, C.E.,

PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT ENGINEER.LEHIG11 VALLEY RAILROAD.



LIBRARY



NEW YORK:

JOHN WILEY ;& SONS,

5H East Tenth Street.



^



(K C.



Copyright, 1892,

BY

WALTER G. BERG.



Ferbis BBoa.,

S26 Pearl Stieet,
Kew York.



Robert Drummond,

Elect rot y per f

ill Jt 446 Pearl Street,

New York.






■Jj^ ois.



PREFACE.



This work is intended to serve as a reference book for Railroad Managers, Superintend-
ents, Master Mechanics, Engineers, Architects, Students, and others connected with the
various departments of railroading or kindred interests, who are desirous of obtaining data as
to the existing practice on American railroads relating to any of the subjects discussed in the
book. Extracts from the first sixteen chapters were previously published in serial form in
the Railroad Gazette, and met with favorable and encouraging comments.

It is hardly necessary to call attention to the scarcity of American literature on build-
ings and similar structures connected with the station service, maintenance of way and
operating departments of railroads. With the exception of isolated articles to be found in
technical periodicals or in the publications of professional societies, accurate and exhaustive
data relating to existing railroad structures can only be obtained by personal inspection or by
addressing the proper department official in charge of the work in question. The purpose of
this book is to obviate to a large extent the necessity of railroad men and others in search of
such information having to resort to tedious investigations and personal inquiries. Attention
is also called to the fact that most of the subjects embraced in this book have never before
been discussed in print in a systematic and thorough manner.

The aim of the author has been to present a collection embodying the best practice for
each particular class of structure, whether cheap or expensive, and showing ihe sundry varia-
tions caused by individual views or local conditions in different sections of the country.
Particular attention has been paid to the smaller buildings connected with the roadway and
operating departments. The cheap and simple structures in use in the thinly settled sections
of the country have been considered of as much importance as those of the most elaborate
and artistic design.

Each subject is discussed in a general manner at the beginning of the corresponding
chapter, so that inexperienced persons can gain information on the salient points and con-
trolling features for each class of structures, while others more conversant with the subject
will find these general discussions convenient for reference. The second part of each chapter
is devoted to detail descriptions and illustrations of structures in use on American railroads.

The extensive territory covered is shown by the fact that over five hundred different
buildings and structures are described, illustrated, or referred to, while there are nearly seven
hundred illustrations accompanying the te.xt, of which over six hundred have been specially
prepared for this work. The illustrations, which range from the simple details, general plans.



iv PREFACE.

sections, and elevations of structures, to elaborate and artistic half-tone cuts of exteriors and
interiors, are inserted throughout the book in their proper places opposite the text.

The collection and selection of the necessary data and the preparation for publication of
such a large number of illustrations have been accomplished only by great assiduity and con-
siderable expense. The intrinsic merit of the book is enhanced by the fact that Engineers,
Architects, and Railroad Men from all parts of the country have placed valuable plans and
important information at the disposal of the author which otherwise would be very difficult
to obtain.

The author desires to express his thanks to all who have so generously and kindly
assisted him in the preparation of this book. It has been his aim to give credit throughout
the book to the originators or contributors of designs or data. Where the designers or per-
sons in charge of work are not mentioned, it is because they were unknown to the author, and
not through any desire to suppress their names.

While it is obviously difficult to mention all persons who have personally, directly or
indirectly, furnished data or information utilized in the preparation and compilation of this
book, the author feels bound to place on record the valuable assistance furnished by the fol-
lowing railroad men, engineers, and architects:

L. M. Allen, General Passenger Agent, New York & Northern Railway.

M. J. Becker, Chief Engineer, Pennsylvania Lines West of Pittsburg.

V. G. Bogue, Chief Engineer, Union Pacific liailway.

Geo. W. Boyd, Assistant General Passenger Agent, Pennsylvania Railroad.

W. W. Boyington, Architect, Chicago, 111.

E. F. Brooks, Engineer Maintenance of Way, New York Division, Pennsylvania Railroad.

E. D. B. Brown, Architect and Civil Engineer, New York, N. Y.
Wm. H. Brown, Chief Engineer, Pennsylvania Railroad.

C. W. Bvichholz, Chief Engineer, New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad.

R. Caffrey, Supervisor, Eastern Division, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad (formerly General Road-
master, Lehigh Valley Railroad).

H. E. Chaniberlin, Superintendent, Concord Railroad.

F. A. Chase, Master Mechanic, Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluilfs Railroad.
S. F"rench Collins, Car Department, Lehigh Valley Railroad.

P. H. Conradson, formerly Chemist, New York & New England Railroad.
F. S. Curtis, Chief Engineer, New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad.
Philip H. Dewitt, Assistant Engineer, Lehigh Valley Railroad.
Charles B. Dudley, Chemist, Pennsylvania Railroad.
H. T. Douglass, Chief Engineer, Baltimore & Ohio Railway.
Cyrus L, W. Eidlitz, Architect, New York, N. Y.

H. Ferastrom, Chief Engineer, Minnesota & Northwestern Railroad and Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas
City Railroad.

L. Focht, Assistant Engineer, Lehigh Valley Railroad.

William Forsyth, Mechanical Engineer, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad.

Wolcott C. Foster, Civil Engineer, New York, N. Y.

J. D. Fouquet, Assistant Chief Engineer, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad.

F. W. Fratt, Chief Engineer, Wisconsin Central Railway.

Geo. H. Frost, Managing Editor, Engineering Ncios, New York, N. Y.

C. C. Genung, Chief Engineer, Ohio Valley Railway.

George Gibbs, Mechanical Engineer, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway.

T. H. Grant. .Assistant Engineer, Central Railroad of New Jersey.

Bradford L. Gilbert, Architect, New York, N. Y.

Walter D. Gregory, formerly Chemist, New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad.

A. Griggs, Superintendent of Motive Power, New York & New England Railroad.



PREFACE. V

Charles Hansel, formerly Resident Engineer, Wabasji, St. Louis & Pacific Railway.

S. B. Haupt. Superintendent Motive Power, Norfolk & Western Railroad.

Edwin A. Hill, Chief Engineer, Indianapolis, Decatur & Springfield Railway.

Hawthorne Hill, Managing Editor, The Engineering lilngasine. New York, N. Y.

Julius G. Hocke, Assistant Engineer, Lehigh Valley Railro.ul.

W. B. W. Howe, Jr., Chief Engineer, S.ivannah, Florida & Western Railroad.

F. W. Johnstone. Superintendent, Mexican Central Railroad.

J. M. Jones, Station Master, Concord Railroad, Concord N. H.

W. S. Jones. Chief Engineer, Chicago & Northern Paciiic Railroad.

Walter Katte. Chief Engineer, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad.

J. W. Kendrick, Chief Engineer, Nortliern Pacific Railroad.

John S. Lentz, Superintendent Car Department, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, formerly Super-
intendent Car Department, Lehigh Valley Railroad.

Chas. F. Loweth, Civil Engineer, St. Paul, Minn.

S. D. Mason, Principal Assistant Engineer, Northern Pacific Railroad.

Wm. Mcllvaine, Civil Engineer, Philadelphia, Pa.

J. M. Meade, Resident Engineer, Atchinson, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad.

Alex. Mitchel, Superintendent of Motive Power, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, formerly Super-
intendent, Lehigh Valley Railroad.

R. Montford, Chief Engineer. Louisville & Nash-'illc Railroad.

H. K. Nichol, Chief Engineer, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad.

C. B. Nicholson, Chief Engineer, Cincinnati, New Orleans & Te.xas Pacific Railroad and Alabama Great
Southern Railroad.

W. Barclay Parsons, Jr., Civil Engineer, author of "Track," New York, N. Y.

W. F. Pascoe, Superintendent Bridges and Buildings, Lehigh Valley Railroad.

Wm. H. Peddle, Division Superintendent and Engineer, Central Railroad of New Jersey.

H. G. Prout, Editor, Railroad Gazette, New York, N. Y.

L. S. Randolph, Engineer of Tests. Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.

A. L. Reed, Chief Engineer, Port Huron & Northwestern Railway.

C. A. Reed, Supervising Architect, Minnesota & Northwestern Railroad and Chicago, St. Paul &
Kansas City Railroad, St. Paul, Minn.

C. Rosenberg, General Foreman, Lehigh Valley Creosoting Works (formerly Master Carpenter, New
Jersey Division, Lehigh Valley Railroad).

F. E. Schall, Assistant Engineer. Lehigh Valley Railroad.

F. M. Slater, Chief Engineer, National Docks Railway.

E. F. Smith, Engineer in Charge, Philadelphia & Reading Terminal, Philadelphia, Pa.

A. W. Stedman, Chief Engineer, Lehigh Valley Railroad.

C. B. Talbot, Civil Engineer, Northern Pacific Railroad, Tacoma, Wash.

J. F. Wallace, Chief Engineer, Illinois Central Railroad.

H. F. While, Chief Engineer, Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railroad.

Wilson Brothers & Co., Civil Engineers and Architects, Philadelphia, Pa.

H. Wolters, Architect, Louisville, Ky.

The technical journals am! publications have been carefufl)' examined in order to furnish
desirable references to matter previously published. The author takes pleasure in acknowl-
edging the uniform courtesy extended to him by the editors of the technical press and the
liberal spirit manifested in according permis.sion to quote from their files. The publications
thus utilized arc as follows: American Architect and Building Nezvs ; Engineering Ncius and
American Raihvay Journal ; Railroad Gazette ; Railroad Topics; The Engineering Magazine ;
The Engineering Record {Building Record and The Sanitary Engineer) ; Tlie Inland Architect

and Nezvs Record ; The Railroad and Engineering Journal ; The Railway Neivs ; The Railway
Revieiv ; and others.

The preparation of this work has extended over several years, not through any lack of

enthusiasm on the part of the author, but owing to the fact that the book liad to be written



vi PREFACE.

in such hours that could be spared from the exacting demands of an extensive professional
practice. The author trusts, therefore, tliat any omissions or deficiencies found in the book
will not be too severely criticised, and that " Buildings and Structures of American Railroads"
will be accepted as a valuable contribution to the technical literature of the day and take its
place among standard reference books in the libraries of Railroad Men, Engineers, Architects
Students, and others interested in the subject.

New York., N. Y., December, ist, 1892.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



PAGB

Preface iii

Table of Contents vii

List of Illustrations

CHAPTER I. WATCHMAN'S SHANTIES.

General Remarks I

*Square Watchman's Shanty, Richmond & Alleghany Railroad 2

*Octagonal Watchman's Shanty, Richmond & Alleghany Railroad 2

Watchman's Shanty, Alleghany Valley Railroad 3

*Watchman's Shanty, Philadelphia c& Reading Railroad 3

*Watchman's Shanty, Lehigh Valley Railroad. ^

*Watchman's Shanty of Limited Width, Ne%v York Division, Pennsylvania Railroad 4

Standard Watchman's Shanty, Pennsylvania Railroad 5

*Watchman's Shanty, Norfolk & Western Railroad 5

Design for a Watchman's Shanty, by W. B. Parsons, Jr 5

CHAPTER II. SECTION TOOL-HOUSES.

General Remarks 6

*Standard Section Tool -house, Pennsylvania Railroad 7

*Standard Section Tool-house, Union Pacific Railway g

*Standard Hand-car and Tool-house, Cincinnati Southern Railway g

Standard Tool-house, Atchison , Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 10

*Standard Tool-house, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 10

*Section Tool-house, Northern Pacific Railroad II

*Single Hand-car House, Northern Pacific Railroad 12

Double Hand-car House, Northern Pacific Railroad 12

*Section Tool-house, Lehigh Valley Railroad 12

Tool-house Design by W. B. Parsons, Jr 13

Section Tool-house, Macon & Birmingham Railroad 13

CHAPTER III. SECTION HOUSES.

General Remarks 14

*Two-room Section House, East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad 15

Two-room Section House, Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific Railroad 15

*Three-room Section House, East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad 16

*Three-room Section House, Chesapeake & Ohio Railway 16

*Three-room Section House, New Orleans & North Eastern Railroad 17

*Section House, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 18

* White Men's Section House, Northern Pacific Railroad 18

*Two-story Section House, Northern Pacific Railroad ig

*Section House, Savannah, Florida & Western Railroad 20

* Illustrated.



viii TABLE OF CONTENTS. j(

PAGE

*Tivo-story Section House, Louisville & Nashville Railroad 21

*Desigii for a Section House by W. B. Parsons, Jr 21

*Standard Section House, Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railroad . • 2i

Standard Section Houses, Macon & Birminghain Railroad 22

CHAPTER IV. DWELLING-HOUSES FOR EMPLOYES.

General Remarks 23

*Agent's Dwelling, Northern Pacific Railroad System 23

*Five-room Cottage " K," Chesapeake & Ohio Railway 24

*Five-room Cottage " L, " Chesapeake & Ohio Railway 25

*Seven-room Cottage, Chesapeake & Ohio Railway , 25

*Dvvelling-house, Union Pacific Railway 26

*Dwelling-house, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 27

Employes' Homes of Weslinghouse Air-brake Co., Wilmerding, Pa 27

CHAPTER V. SLEEPING QUARTERS, READING-ROOMS, AND CLUB-HOUSES FOR EMPLOYES

General Remarks 28

*Bunk-house at Jersey City, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad '. . . . 29

*Bunk-house at Perth Amboy, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 29

*Reading-room, Union Pacific Railway 30

^Railroad Branch Building, Young Men's Christian Association, at East Buffalo, N. Y 31

Employes' Club-house, Chicago, Burlington & Northern Railroad 32

Railroad Branch Building, Young Men's Christian Association, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad,

New York, N. Y 32

Railroad Men's Club-house, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, New York, N. Y 32

CHAPTER VI. SNOW-SHEDS AND PROTECTION-SHEDS FOR MOUNTAIN-SLIDES.

General Remarks 33

*Snow-shed on Level Ground, Central Pacific Railroad 34

*Snow-shed on Level Ground, Northern Pacific Railroad , 35

*Snow-shed over Cuts or on Side Hills, Northern Pacific Railroad 36

*Snow-sheds, Canadian Pacific Railway 3^

*Snow-shed over Cuts or on Side H ills. Central Pacific Railroad 37

*Protection-shed for Mountain-slides, Oregon & California Railroad 38

CHAPTER VII. SIGNAL-TOWERS.

General Remarks 39

*Octagonal Signal-tower, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad . 40

Square Signal- tower, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 4°

Signal Station, Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad 40

*Elevated Gate-house at Whitehaven, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 41

*Standard Signal-tower, Pennsylvania Railroad 42

*Signal-tower on Depot Building, Richmond & Alleghany Railroad 42

*Signal-tower at Jutland, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 42

*Signal- tower at Hillsboro, N. j., Lehigh Valley Railroad 42

*Signal-tower at Jersey City, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 43

*Two-legged Signal tower at Newark, N. J., Pennsylvania Railroad, 44

*One-legged Signal- tower at Chicago, 111., Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 44

*Signal- tower at Jersey City, N. J., Central Railroad of New Jersey 45

Signal-tower and Bridge, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 45

CHAPTER VIII. CAR-SHEDS AND CAR-CLEANING YARDS.

General Remarks .., 46

*Brick Car-shed at Mauch Chunk, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 47

*Temporary Car-sheds, Richmond & Alleghany Railroad 48

*Frame Car-shed at Wallula, Wash., Northern Pacific Railroad 48



TABLE OF CONTENTS. ix

PAGE

*Car-cleaniiig Platform at Jersey City, N. J., Central Railroad of New Jersey 49

*Carcleaning Platform Shed at Jersey City, N. J , Pennsylvania Railroad 49

Passenger-car Yard at Chicago, 111., Pennsylvania Railroad 5°

CHAPTER IX. .ASHPITS.

*General Remarks 5^

^Standard Ashpit, Atchison, T opeka & Santa Fe Railroad 56

*Ashpit at Heron, Mont., Northern Pacific Railroad 56

*Ashpit at Packerton, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 57

*Ashpit at Aurora, 111., Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 57

Ashpit, Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Biul'fs Railroad 58

*Rail-chair, Savannah, Florida & Western Railroad 5S

*.Ashpit, Lehigh & Susquehanna Railroad 59

Ashpit Cinder-loading Plant, Cincinnati, Washington & Baltimore Railroad 59

Ash-conveyor at Port Richmond, Philadelphia, Pa., Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 59

CHAPTER X. ICE-HOUSES.

General Remarks ^o

*Design for a Fifty-ton Ice-house ^4

Fifty-ton Ice-house, Jersey City Termin.d, Leliiglt Valley Railroad 64

One-hundred-and-fifty-ton Ice-house at South Bethlehem, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad O5

*Standard Five-hundred-ton Ice-house, Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City Railroad 65

*Fifteen-hundred-ton Ice-house at Sayre, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 66

*Two-thousand-ton Ice-house at Jersey City, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 67

*Fifteen-hundred-ton Ice-house at Nickerson, Kan., Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 68

*Fifteen-hundred-ton Brick Ice-house at Mauch Chunk, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 69

Sixteen-hundred-ton Ice-house, PhiUipsburg, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 7°

CHAPTER XI. SAND HOUSES.

General Remarks. .'. 7i

*Sand-house at Richmond, Va., Richmond & Alleghany Railroad 74

*Sand-house, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 75

*Sand-house at Perth Amboy, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 76

*Sand-house Design, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 76

Sand house at Burlington, 111., Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 76

Sand-house at Columbus, O., Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railway 77

*Sand-house Design for Lehigh Valley Railroad 77

*Sand-house at Cressona, Pa., Philadelphia ^S: Reading Railroad 78

Sand-drier at Connemaugh, Pa., Pennsylvania Railroad : 78

Sand-house at Weatherly, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 79

Design for Sand-house, Lehigh Valley Railroad 79

*Sand-house at Washington, D. C, Pennsylvania Railroad 79

CHAPTER XII. OIL-STORAGE HOUSES.

General Remarks °'

*Frame Oil and Waste Storage Shed at Penh .^.mboy, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 83

*Brick Oil-house at Perth Amboy, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 83

*Stone Oil and Waste House at Lehighton, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 85

Brick Oil-house at West Philadelphia, Pa., Pennsylvania Railroad 85

*Brick Oil and Waste House, Mexican Central Railroad 86



Oil house at Denver, Col., Union Pacific Railway.



86



*Frame Oil-storage and Car-inspector's House at Penh Amboy, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 87

*Frame Oil-storage and Car-inspector's House at Packerton, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 87

*Brick Oil-house at Washington, D. C, Pennsylvania Railroad 8S

*Brick Oil-house at Jersey City, N. J., Pennsylvania Railroad 89

*Brick Oil-storage House at Western Avenue, Chicago, 111., Chicago, Burlington & puincy Railroad , 90



X TABLE OF CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XIII. OIL-MIXING HOUSES.

PAGE

General Remarks 93

*Oil mixins; House at Aurora, III., Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 95

*Oil-mi.xing House at Meadow Shops, Newark, N. J., Pennsylvania Railroad 96

Oil-Mi.\ing House at Mt. Clare Shops, Baltimore, Md., Baltimore & Ohio Railroad ' gS

*Oil-Mi.xing House at Altoona, Pa., Pennsylvania Railroad 99

*Oil-Mi-xing House at Susquehanna, Pa., New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad 100

Oil-mi.xing House at Milwaukee, Wis., Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway lOi

Oil-mi.xing Houses of the New York & New England Railroad loi

*Oil-mixing House Design, Packerton, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 103

*Oil-mixi[ig House at Perth Amboy, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 104

*Chemical Laboratory at South Bethlehem, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 110

CHAPTER XIV. WATER STATIONS.

General Remarks 113

*General Design of a Circular Water-tank ■. iiS

■"Square Water-tank, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 119

Standard 16 ft. X 24 ft.. Circular Water-tank, Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railway . 119

Standard, 16 ft. X 24 ft.. Circular Water-tank, Cincinnati Southern Railway 120

*Standard, 14 ft. X 22 ft., Circular Water-tank, Pennsylvania Railroad 120

Standard, 14 ft. X iS ft.. Circular Water-tank, Pennsylvania Railroad 122

*Slandard, 15 ft. X 16 ft., Circular Water-tank, Savannah, Florida & Western Railway 122

*Slandard, 16 ft. X 24 ft.. Circular Water-tank, Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City Railway 123

Standard, 16 ft, X 24 ft., Circular Water-tank, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 124

Standard, 16 ft. X 16 ft.. Circular Water-lank, Northern Pacific Railroad 124

Standard, 16 ft. X 24 ft.. Circular Water-tank, Northern Pacific Railroad 124

* High Water-tank, Northern Pacific Railroad 123

^Standard, 16 ft. X 20 ft.. Circular Water-tank, Lehigh Valley Railroad .... 126

*Standard, 16 ft. X 30 ft., Circular Water-tank, Lehigh Valley Railroad 127

Standard, 16 ft. X 24 ft.. Circular Water-tank, Union Pacific Railway 129

Feed Water-trough, Pennsylvania Railroad 129

CHAPTER XV. COALING STATIONS FOR LOCOMOTIVES.

General Remarks 130

*Derrick Coal-shed, Wisconsin Central Railroad 141

*Derrick Coal-house, Northern Pacific Railroad 142

Stationary Crane-and- Bucket System, Des Moines & Fort Dodge Railway 143

Stationary Crane-and- Bucket System, New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railway 143

Travelling Crane for Coaling Engines at Columbus, O., Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railway 143

*Coaling Platform at Jersey City, N. J., Lehigh Valley Railroad 145

*Cualing Platform at Lehighton, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 145

Coaling Platform at South Easton, Pa., Lehigh Valley Railroad 146

Coaling Platform, Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway 146

-Coaling Platform, St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway 147

Coaling Platform with Tipping Trolley Dump-car, Connecticut River Railroad 147

Coaling Platform with Tipping Trolley Dump-car, New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad 147

Coaling Platform with Tipping Trolley Dump-cars, Northern Central Railroad 147

Coaling Platform at Altoona, Pa., Pennsylvania Railroad. . . 148

Coaling Platform at West Philadelphia, Pa., Pennsylvania Railroad 148

Coaling Platform at East Tyrone, Pa., Pennsylvania Railroad 148

*Elevated Coal-shed, Northern Pacific Railroad 148

Coal-chutes, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 148

Coal-chutes at Southport, N. Y., New York, Lake Erie i: Western Railroad 149

*Coal-chutes, New Orleans & Northeastern Railroad 149

*Coal-chutes at Scottsville, Va., Richmond & Alleghany Railroad 150

New Coal-chutes at Waverly, N. Y., New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad 150

Coal-chntes at Hornellsville, N. Y., New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad .... 151

Old Coal -chutes at Waverly, N. Y., New York, Lake Erie iS: Western Railroad 151

'Coal-chutes at Susquehanna, Pa., New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad 151



TABLE OF CONTENTS. xi



PAGE



Coal-chutes at Buffalo. N. Y., and at Connellsville, Pa 151

*Coal-buiikers, Northern Pacific Railroad 151

•Standard Coal-chutes, Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railway 152

*Coalchutes at Black Diamond Mine, Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railway 153



Online LibraryWalter G. (Walter Gilman) BergBuildings and structures of American railroads. A reference book for railroad managers, superintendents, master mechanics, engineers, architects, and students → online text (page 1 of 67)