Walter H Wills.

The Anglo-African who's who and biographical sketch-book online

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Captains

Capt. R. L. Carnegy, Ind. Army.
Capt. W. H. Nicolson, Ind. Army, Adjt.

6th (SOMALILAND) BATTALION.

Commandant.
Capt. (loca Maj.) A. G. G. Sharp, Leins. R.

Company Commanders.
Lt. (locaJ Capt.) A. C. H. Dixon, W.I.R.
Capt. H. du B. O'Neill, Bedf. R.
Capt. T. N. S. M. Howard, W. York R., Adjt.
Lt. (local Capt.) L. C. Morley, Hamps. R.



Lieutenant.
Lt. N. Macleod, Ind. Army.

Adjutant and Quarter-Master.
Capt. W. H. Nicolson.

Medical Officer.
Capt. H. Price, M.B., Ind. Med. Serv.



Subalterns.

Capt. T. G. Salmon, 3 Bn. W. York P
Capt. L. W. D. Everett, Welsh R.
Lt. J. W. C. Kirk, D. of Corn. L.I.
Lt. R. A. McClymont, R. Art.

Adjutant and Quarter-Master.
T. N. S. M. Howard, Co. Comdr.



BRITISH CENTRAL AFRICA PROTECTORATE)

COMMISSIONER COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AND Sir Alfred Sharpe, K.C.M.G., C.B.
CONSUL-GENERAL

EAST AFRICA PROTECTORATE.

COMMISSIONER, COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AND Sir Donald William Stewart, K.C.M.G.
CONSUL GENERAL



252



ANGLO-AFRICAN WHO'S WHO



UGANDA PROTECTORATE.

COMMISSIONER, COMMANDER-INCHIEF AND Lt.-Col. James Hayes Sadler, C.B.
CONSUL-GENERAL

SOMALI COAST PROTECTORATE.

COMMISSIONER, COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AND Brev. Lt.-Col. Eric John Eagles Swayne, I. Army
CONSUL-GENERAL

SOMALILAND FIELD FORCE.

COMMANDING THE FORCE Maj.-Gen. Sir C. C. Egerton, K.C.B., D.S.O., In. A.

AIDES-DE-CAMP Capt. R. G. Munn, Ind. Army.

Lt. J. B. Egerton, Ind. Army.

Maj. H. E. Stanton, D.S.O., R. Art.

Maj. C. L. R. Petrie, D.S.O., Manch. R. (Co.

Comdr. 4 Bn. King's Afr. Rif.).
ASSISTANT QUARTER-MASTER-GENERAL (FOR Lt.-Col. G. T. Forestier Walker, R. Art., p.s.c.

INTELL. )

DEPUTY- ASSISTANT QUARTER-MASTER-GENERAL Maj. E. M. Woodward, Leic. R., p.s.c.
(FOR INTELL.)

STAFF CAPTAIN (FOR INTELL.) Capt. R. W. C. Blair, Ind. Army.

DEPUTY-ASSISTANT QUARTER-MASTER-GENERAL Maj. C. O. Swanston, D.S.O., Ind. Army.

ADJUTANT - GENERALS Lt.-Col. R. G. Brooke, D.S.O., 7 Hrs., p.s.c.

Capt. J. H. W. Pollard, R. Sc. Fus., p.s.c.



CHIEF STAFF OFFICER

DEPUTY-ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL



DEPUTY - ASSISTANT

(LINES OF COMMUNICATION)

BASE COMMANDANTS Lt.*-Col. J. C. Swann, C.B., Ind. Army.

Maj. M. L. Hornby, D.S.O., Ind. Army (Comdt

5 Bn. King's Afr. Rif.).

Col. W. R. Yeilding, C.I.E., D.S.O., Ind. Army.
Major H. de B. Codrington, Ind. Army.
Brev. Maj. C. R. Ballard, Norf. R., p.s.c.
Capt. E. B. Macnaghten, R. Art.
Maj. R. F. Allen, R. Eng.
Lt.-Col. J. F. Williamson, M.B., C.B., C.M.G.,

R.A. Med. Corps.
Maj. P. A. Bainbridge, R. Art., p.a.c., Berbers.

IST BRIGADE.

COMMANDING Brev. Lt.-Col. (local Brig. -Gen.) Sir W. H. Manning,

K.C.M.G., C.B., Ind. Army, Insp.-Gen. King's
Afr. Rif.

AIDE-DE-CAMP Lt. H. W. Peebles, Res. of Off.

DEPUTY- ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL . . Capt. J. H. Lloyd, Ind. Army.

2ND BRIGADE.

COMMANDING

DEPUTY- ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL . . Capt. P. C. Eliott-Lockhart, D.S.O., Ind. Army.

SPECIAL SERVICE OFFICERS.
Brev. Col. A. N. Rochfort, C.B., C.M.G. Capt. W. F. B. R. Dugmore, D.S.O., N. Staff. R.



DIRECTOR OF SUPPLIES AND TRANSPORT
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SUPPLIES .
TRANSPORT OFFICERS ....

COMMANDING ROYAL ENGINEER
PRINCIPAL MEDICAL OFFICER

CHIEF ORDNANCE OFFICER



Lt.-Col. P. A. Kenna, V.C., D.S.O., 21 Lrs.

Brev. Maj. J. E. Gough, Rif. Brig.

Brev. Maj. G. T. M. Bridges, R. Art.

Brev. Maj. A. W. S. Ewing, N. Staff. R.

Capt. (local Maj.) R. P. Cobbold, Res. of Off.

Maj. Hon. J. G. H. H. Beresford, 7 Hrs.

Capt. W. H. Armstrong, E. York R.

Capt. H. P. Lane, Ind. Army.

Capt. C. H. M. Doughty, R. W. Fus.

Capt. C. V. N. Lyne, Ind. Army.

Capt. A. E. Barnard, Ind. Army.

Capt. D. J. Glasfurd, Arg. and Suth'd Highrs.

Capt. C. B. L. Clery, Ind. Army.

Capt. H. Maclear, E. Lan. R.



Capt. S. R. Davidson, Ind. Army.
Capt. F. D. Farquhar, D.S.O., C. Gds.
Capt. D. G. Bryce, Ind. Army.
Capt. G. W. G. Lindesay, Ind. Army.
Capt. H. W. B. Thorp, York. L.I.
Capt. G. Knowles, D.S.O., Ind. Army.
Capt. Hon. T. Lister, D.S.O., 10 Hrs.
Lt. J. A. Longridge, Ind. Army.
Lt. R. W. M. Stevens, R. Ir. Rif.
Lt. H. H. Syer, Ind. Army.
Lt. G. H. Walford, Suff. R.
Lt. J. A. Ballard. R. Art.
Lt. C. L. Smith, D. of Corn. L.I.
Lt. A. E. H. Breslin, 4 Hrs.



EGYPTIAN ARMY 253



EGYPTIAN ARMY.

HE AD QUARTERS STAITT.

SIBDAR . . . .. . Maj.-Gen. Sir F. B. V/ingate, K.C.B., K.C.M.G.

D.S.O., R. Art.

AIDE-L-E-CAMP Capt. E. J. F. Vaughan, Manchester R.

PRIVATE SECRETARY Maj. P. R. Phipps, Dorset R., p.s.c.

ASSISTANT PRIVATE SECRETARY Capt. C E. C. G. Charlton, Royal Art.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL Brev. Col. St. G. C. Henry, C.B.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERALS .... Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) J. K. Watson, C.M.G., D.S.O.,

K. R. Rif. C.

Maj. H. D. Palmer, R.M.
Capt. E. S. Herbert, R. Highrs.

DEMITS- ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERALS . . Capt. A. R. Lempriere, Lancashire Fua.

Capt. G. F. Clayton, R.A.

DIRECTOR OF SUPPLIES Maj. (local Lt. Col.) C. E. G. Blunt.

DIRECTOR OF WORKS Capt. M. R. Kennedy, D.S.O., R.E.

DIRECTOR OF STORES . Qr. -Mr. (hon. Capt.) G.W. Anderson, Sea. Highlrs.

FINANCIAL SECRETARY Brev. Maj. (local Lieut.-Col.) J. J. Asser.

PRINCIPAL MEDICAL OFFICER Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) R. H. Penton, D.S.O., R. A.

Med. Corps.

PRINCIPAL VETERINARY SURGEON .... Vety. Maj. (local Vety. Lt.-Col.) G. R. Griffith,

D.S.O.

EGYPTIAN FORCES.

MAJOR-GENERAL Maj. -Gen. J. R. Slr.de, C.B., R. Art.

AIDE-DE-CAMP Lt. R. B. Brassey, 17 Lrs. vprov.).

CHIEF STAFF OFFICER (GRADED AS ASSISTANT Col. G. M. Bullock, C.B., p.s.c.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL ).

DEPUTY-ASSISTANT QUARTER-MASTER-GENERAL Maj. A. H. C. Kenney-Herbert, North'n. F.

STAFF CAPTAIN Capt. T. E. Bayley, 20 Hussars.

OFFICER COMMANDING ROYAL ARTILLERY . Brev. Lt.-Col. G. F. W. St. John, R. Garr. Art.

COMMANDING ROYAL ENGINEER .... Brev. Col. L. B. Friend, R.E.

OFFICER COMMANDING ARMY SERVICE CORPS. Lt.-Col. C. Rawnsley, D.S.O. , A.S. Corps.

PRINCIPAL MEDICAL OFFICER ..... Col. W. A. May, C.B., R. A. Med. Corps.

CHIEF ORDNANCE OFFICER .Lt. Col. G. R. Atkinson, A. Ord. Dept.

DISTRICT PAYMASTER Col. T. S. Coppinger, A. P. Dept.

SENIOR VETERINARY SURGEON Vety. Maj. E. J. Lawson.

GARRISON OF ALEXANDRIA.

COLONEL ON THE STAFF Col. (local Brig. Gen.) R. H. Murray, 0-B., CM. G.

DEPUTY- ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL . . Maj. E. R. O. Ludlow, A.S.C., p.s.c.

CHIEF ORDNANCE OFFICER Maj. A. Mackenzie Pendrill, N. Stafi. R,

IST CLASS MILITARY DISTRICTS.

BERBER Brev. Maj. Sir H. B. Hill, Bart. R. Irish Fus.

CAIRO Brev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) H. G. K. Matchett,

Conn. Rang.

DONGOLA Brev. Col. H. W. Jackson, C.B.

KASSALA Brev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col. ) E. B.Wilkinson, Lin. R.

SENNAR Brev. Lt.-C^l. G. F. Gorringe, C.M.G., D.S.O.

KHARTOUM Brev. Col. St. G. C. Henry, C.B.

BAHR-EL-GHAZAL Maj. W. A. Boulnois, R.A.

KORDOFAN Capt. (local Maj.) J. R. O'Connell, Shrops. L.I,

2ND CLASS MILITARY DISTRICTS.

SUAKIN Brev. Maj. F. J. L. Howard, A.S.C,

HALFA Brev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) G. B. Macauley, R.Eng



254



ANGLO-AFRICAN WHO'S WHO



OFFICER COMMANDING CAVALRY
OFFICER COMMANDING ARTILLERY .
OFFICER COMMANDING CAMEL CORPS
COMMANDANT MILITARY SCHOOL



Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) W. H. Persse 2 D.G.
Mai. (local Lt.-Col.) M. Peake, C.M.G., R. Art.
Capt. C. J. Hawker, Cold. Gds.
Brev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) H. G. X. Matchett,
Conn. Bang.



SUDAN ADMINISTRATION.

Mai -Gen Sir F R. Wingate, K.C.B., K.C.M.G.
GOVERNOR-GENERAL D S.O , R. Art.

PRIVATE SECRETARY ^ P P ^ ^^rSn B R A ^

ASSISTANT PRIVATE SECRETARY Cap t-C.E. C. GO nan* on, -i-

ASSISTANT SECRETARY M aj D.K. E- HaU A. S Corp *.

DEPUTY- ASSISTANT SECRETARIES .... Capt. K. o. K. u\ .n, ^

IP "Ob A. \J JT ctrivCr. Xv. O UOOC-N- J.V.

DIRECTOR OF INTELLIGENCE AND AGENT- Brev. Lt.-Col. Lord E.H. Cecil, D.S.O., G

ij. (local Lt.-Col.) E. E. Bernard, A. S. Corps.

ev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col
,pt. J. S. Liddell, R.

INSPECTOR OF PRISONS Capt. N. T. Borton, R. War. R.

GOVERNORS OF PROVINCES (!ST CLASS).

Brev. Maj. Sir H. B. Hill, Bart.
Brev. Col. H. W. Jackson, C.B.

T . At Brev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) E. B. Wilkinson.

KASSALA Brev. Maj. (local Lt.-Col.) E. A. Stanton, Oxf .L.I.

. Brev. Lt.-Col. G. F. Gorringe, C.M.G., D.S.O.

GEzmirKHARTOUM (Vacant.)

BAHR-EL-GHAZAL Maj. W A Bou Inois, R.A.

UPPER NILE Maj. G. E Matthews, R.M-

GOVERNORS OF PROVINCES (2ND CLASS).

O TT Brevt. Maj. F. J. L. Howard, A.S.G

HALFA . ' ' ' '.'.'.'..- Capt. W. Hayes-Sadler, R- Sc. Fus.

MILITARY RANKS.

SIRDAR Commander-in-Chief.

EL-LEW A' (carrying title of "Pasha"). . . Major-General.

EL MIRALAI, carrying title of "Bey"). . . Colonel.

EL KAIMAKAN Lieutenant-Colonel.

EL BIMBASHI Major.

EL YUSBASHI Captain.

EL MULAZIM Lieutenant.

EL MULAZIM JANI 2nd Lieutenant.



SPECIAL ARTICLES



SOME PROMINENT ANGLO-AFRICANS
AND THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS.



IN the biographical section of this book we have referred, in some cases at considerable
length, to undertakings with which the subjects of our sketches have been identified.
But a difficulty has constantly confronted us, inasmuch as in a large majority of cases
it would be exceedingly invidious to ascribe the success (or failure) of a particular
enterprise to any one individual, and, in the lines devoted to his career, to credit him
with achievements in which he has been equally aided by other members of his own,
or temporarily allied, groups. In South Africa especially there are few cases where
one strong man stands out pre-eminently above his confreres, and who might with
justice say " Alone I did it." Mr. J. B. Robinson in the Transvaal, Mr. Robert
Williams in Northern Zambesia, and Sir Alfred Jones in West Africa, are instances
of the latter which immediately occur to one. But in the vast majority of cases it is
more suitable to deal with South African enterprises as the joint achievements of
numerous workers, combining their forces for a common end, be that end the develop-
ment of industries or the expansion of an Empire.

THE BRITISH SOUTH AFRICA COMPANY.

The sub-Continent is particularly indebted to joint-stock enterprise. Even
Rhodesia, a country larger in area than France, Germany, Austria and Italy com-
bined, is administered under what is for all intents and purposes the Joint Stock Com-
panies Acts. At a time when more than one European Power was anxious to establish
itself in Africa, the British Imperial Parliament could not undertake the vast responsi-
bilities involved in the acquisition of such an extensive territory as that which has
for years borne the name of Rhodesia ; and had it not been for the foresight and
patriotic enterprise of Mr. Cecil Rhodes and his associates in the formation of the
Chartered Company, Matabeleland and Mashonaland would probably have fallen
to either one of these Powers, or would have become part of the South African
Republic. Early in 1888 Lobengula entered into a Treaty with Great Britain ; and
Messrs. C. D. Rudd, Rochfort Maguire and F. R. Thompson went to Matabeleland
to obtain concessions, with a view to the formation of the Chartered Company. The
Rudd Concession was obtained from Lobengula in October, 1888, and the Royal
Charter was granted just a year later.

The Company having decided, on the advice of Lobengula, to open up Mashona-

257 S



258 ANGLO-AFRICAN WHO'S WHO

land first, organized a pioneer expedition under Major Frank Johnson (June, 1890),
consisting of about 200 Europeans and 150 native labourers. The aim of the expe-
dition was to cut a road 400 miles long from Macloutsie, passing through the south
of Matabeleland and terminating at Mount Hampden, in Mashonaland. This was
duly accomplished, and having founded Fort Salisbury at a spot twelve miles south-
east of Mount Hampden (September 12, 1890), the column was disbanded, and
immediately set to work prospecting and occupying the country.

Much was done by the Company in the next four years to develop the country.
Mr. A. Colquhoun assumed the administration of Mashonaland in October, 1890,
there being then about 1,000 white men in the country. Mining Commissioners were
appointed, townships laid out, roads constructed to different parts, a postal system
inaugurated and measures taken generally for the settlement of the country. Mr.
Colquhoun was succeeded by Dr. L. S. Jameson, who was appointed Chief Magistrate
in September, 1891. For the protection of the community forts were built at Tuli,
Victoria, Charter and Salisbury, and a military police force was enrolled. The
strength of the force in 1891 reached 650, but was reduced as soon as possible to 140
whites and 15 native police, and a volunteer force (" Mashonaland Horse ") 500 strong,
raised locally by Major Forbes, took its place ; the remainder of the settlers forming
a burgher force in case of need. The Chartered Company arranged for the extension
northwards of the Cape telegraph and railway from Mafeking, and the surveys for the
Beira Railway, connecting Mashonaland with the East Coast, were begun in 1891.
A commission of prominent South African farmers came up in 1891 to look into the
agricultural prospects of the country, and gave a most satisfactory report, resulting
in the organization of the " Moodie trek " of farmers with their families, which left
the Orange Free State in May, 1892, and founded the settlement of Melsetter, in Gaza-
land, early in 1893.

In 1890 and 1891 a number of Boers from the Transvaal attempted to enter the
south-east portion of Matabeleland and occupy it by force. This invasion was averted
by the firm attitude of the Company (see Pres. Kruger, p. 97). Boer farmers were,
however, invited to come in and settle peacefully in the country ; they now form the
majority in the districts of Charter and Melsetter, and assisted the Company loyally
during the native troubles.

The same year the Company found themselves somewhat embarrassed by the
action of Mr. Edward Lippert, a Transvaal financier and banker, who obtained from
Lobengula a concession to grant titles to land in the Company's field of operations. As
the Rudd Concession did not formally provide for more than mining rights, it was
decided to come to terms with Mr. Lippert and to take over his concession. This
was accordingly arranged, and the matter received the consent of Her late Majesty's
Secretary of State, in March, 1892. Other concessions from numerous chiefs were
secured soon after the entrance of the pioneers to the country, the most important
being those from Umtassa (Manicaland), Lewanika (Barotseland), and Gungunhana
(Gazaland). In connexion with certain of these concessions some friction arose with
the Portuguese, resulting in the temporary occupation of Massikessi by the Rhode-
sians. A modus vivendi was, however, arrived at, and the most cordial relations have
since prevailed.



SOUTHERN RHODESIA 259



THE FIRST MATABELE WAR.

The year 1893 was a most eventful one for the pioneer community. The Bechu-
analand Railway Company had been formed and work started on the Vryburg-Bula-
wayo extension ; the first section of the Beira Railway had been opened, a good road
made from Salisbury to the railhead, and a telegraph line constructed from Mafeking
to Salisbury. A period of steady progress was anticipated. Unfortunately, war
with the Matabele was forced on the Company by the action of Lobengula. The
duties of maintaining peace and order imposed on them by the Charter were made
most difficult by the existence of the Matabele military system, under which the
Mashonas were periodically raided, their cattle looted, and men, women and children
carried into slavery, thus reducing the Mashona tribes to an abject and impoverished
condition.

The Company prepared for war, informing the High Commissioner that they
did not wish to ask the assistance of Her Majesty's Government in dealing with the
trouble which had arisen. Repeated attempts at negotiation with Lobengula proved
fruitless, and the Company's police having been fired upon near Victoria, Dr. Jameson
was authorized by the High Commissioner to proceed as he thought best. On October 5
the Matabele fired on a party of Bechuanaland Border Police, an Imperial force patrol-
ling British territory. The High Commissioner immediately ordered Col. Goold-
Adams to occupy Tati with a force of Bechuanaland Border Police and to affect a
junction with the Company's column at Tuli, which was about to proceed northwards.
The main body of the Company's forces, consisting of police, settlers and native allies,
under the command of Maj. P. W. Forbes, accompanied by Dr. Jameson, entered
Matabeleland early in October, 1893, being joined there by Mr. Rhodes, who had
hurried up from the South. Decisive engagements occurred at the Shangani River
(October 24) and the Bembesi River (November 1), in which Lobengula's best regi-
ments were thoroughly beaten. Bulawayo was burnt by Lobengula's orders and left
in our hands (November 4), while the king himself took to flight towards the Zambesi.
Letters were sent after him asking him to come back, and guaranteeing his safety ;
but no answer having been received before the two days of grace had expired, Major
Forbes was instructed to pursue him. On December 3, at a point on the Shangani
River, eighty-four miles N.N.W. of Shiloh, the pursuers came close on Lobengula's
track, and a small reconnoitring party under Maj. Alan Wilson crossed the river,
which unfortunately came down in flood and cut them off from their companions.
After making a most gallant stand they were overwhelmed by the king's body guard,
who did not leave one alive. A monument has been erected to their memory close to
the tomb of Mr. Rhodes in the Matoppo Hills. Owing to the difficulty of moving
troops in the rainy season, Major Forbes returned to Bulawayo, while Lobengula and
the remnants of his band retired towards the Zambesi, where Lobengula died.

Under the altered circumstances of the country it became necessary to discuss
its future Administration with Her Majesty's government, and a new Constitution
was agreed upon (July 18, 1894), the government of the country being carried on by
an Administrator (Dr. L. S. Jameson) and a Council of four, consisting of Mr. Justice



260 ANGLO- AFRICAN WHO'S WHO

Vintcent ; Col. F. W. Rhodes, D.S.O., Military Member of Council ; A. H. F. Dun-
can, Surveyor-General ; and George Pauling, Commissioner of Public Works.

The years 1894 and 1895 were marked by prosperity and peace. The mining
and farming industries were pushed on and the railways and telegraphs extended.
The volunteer force was reorganized, and a native police force consisting entirely of
Matabele was established.

The political disturbances, which had long been threatening in the Transvaal,
culminated in December, 1895, when Dr. Jameson, with a force largely composed.
of the Company's police, made an unauthorized incursion into the South African Re-
public, with a view to assisting the Uitlander population (see Dr. L. S. Jameson's life).
Dr. Jameson's resignation from the position of Administrator was accepted early in
1896, and the Right Hon. the Earl Grey succeeded him in April of that year.



THE SECOND MATABELE WAR.

Then followed a series of misfortunes which might have combined to wreck a
greater country than Rhodesia. A drought of abnormal length and severity had
prevailed ; locusts devastated the country ; and rinderpest, hitherto quite unknown
in South Africa, came down from the north, destroying whole herds of native cattle.
The M'Limo (the Makalaka deity) persuaded the Matabele that this combination of
plagues was the direct result of the malign influence of the white men ; and Matabe-
leland was once more plunged in war, the natives beginning hostilities with a pre-
arranged series of savage murders of white men, women and children, in March, 1896.

The Company's territory, deprived for the time of its police protection owing
to the Jameson Raid, was at a disadvantage when this second Matabele War broke
out ; but the danger to the whole population was successfully averted by the courageous
and self-reliant action of the settlers.

Measures for protecting the community were at once taken. Laagers were formed
at Bulawayo and Gwelo, and Maj. Laing with his small party also went into laager
at Belingwe. The existing Volunteer Force was expanded into the Bulawayo Field
Force, and under the leadership of Cols. W. Napier, J. Spreckley and Hon. Maurice
Gifford, Capts. Macfarlane, George Grey and F. C. Selous, numerous patrols were
sent out in various directions, and they were successful in bringing in small parties of
refugees. The great danger to the Bulawayo laager was that the Matoppo and
Umgusa rebels might combine and rush the town, but on April 25, Capt. Macfarlane
engaged the enemy at the Umgusa, and defeated them so heavily as to remove all
cause for anxiety. It was necessary to follow up with vigour Capt. Macfarlane's
victory ; the settlers, however, were not strong enough to accomplish this, and the
Imperial Government issued instructions for the inhabitants to wait for reinforce-
ments. Col. Plumer, with a force of Volunteers, left Mafeking on April 12, and
reached Bulawayo at the end of May, after a brilliant engagement at the Khami.
Simultaneously, a column raised in Salisbury under Col. Beal, and accompanied
by Mr. Rhodes, left for the relief of Bulawayo. Col. Napier went out to meet them,
defeating the rebels at Thabas Induna ; and Col. Beal, after a successful action at



THE MATABELE REBELLION 261

Mavene, joined Napier's force, and proceeded to Buiawayo, bringing in quantities of
captured stock.

Sir Richard Martin arrived in Buiawayo on May 21, and took over command
of military operations until the arrival of Gen. Sir F. Carrington on June 3. Two
columns under Plurner and Macfarlane were sent out north and south, and a third
was on the point of starting when an impi appeared at the Umgusa, six miles out of
Buiawayo. Cols. Spreckley and Beal immediately moved against them, and
inflicted heavy loss on the enemy. Spreckley's column then set out as originally
intended, and the three columns swept the country of rebels. Col. Plumer stormed
and carried the stronghold of Thabas Imamba, where he made important captures
of prisoners, grain and cattle, and recovered a quantity of loot taken from murdered
settlers.

The country was now practically free from rebels, except the Matoppo Hills,
where they occupied positions which were almost impregnable. Operations were
successfully initiated, but the white losses were heavy owing to the nature of the
country. Mr. Rhodes, therefore, determined to open negotiations, going five miles
into the hills accompanied by three unarmed men, and holding an indaba with the
rebel chiefs. To further allay the suspicions of the natives he moved his camp, which
was quite unprotected by any military force, to a spot close to the rebel stronghold,
where he remained for two months, reassuring and conferring with the natives. On
October 13 the Administrator had an official indaba with the Matabele chiefs, and
received their formal promises of submission. Col. Plumer 's column was disbanded
on the 22nd of the same month, many of its members remaining in the country as
settlers.

Long before the restoration of peace to Matabeleland, trouble had appeared in
Mashonaland. In June, 1896, a series of murders similar to those in Matabeleland
occurred.

Mr. Justice Vintcent was at the head of affairs in Salisbury, and immediately
organized a defence committee, and called in all the population to laager.

One of the first events which followed was the stirring episode of the rescue of a
party of twelve, including three women, who gathered at the Alice Mine, in the Mazoe
district, twenty-seven miles from Salisbury. In order to telegraph for assistance,
two of their number heroically volunteered to go to the telegraph office. They were
successful in sending their message, but were killed in trying to regain the laager. On
receiving the telegram, Inspector Judson left Salisbury with five men, but found the
situation at the laager so desperate that he sent a message to Salisbury to say that it
would require forty men and a Maxim to effect a rescue, as the whole Mazoe valley
was lined with natives some 1,000 strong. Capt. Nesbitt, who had gone out with
twelve men to reinforce Inspector Judson's patrol, received the message, and deter-
mined, notwithstanding the smallness of his force, to push on. He succeeded in
bringing out the party, and for this deed was rewarded with the Victoria Cross. The
return journey was accomplished under heavy fire, all concerned displaying much
courage.

A small body of Volunteers from Natal, under Capt. Taylor, who were at Charter,
on their way to Matabeleland, returned to Salisbury on the outbreak of hostilities,



Online LibraryWalter H WillsThe Anglo-African who's who and biographical sketch-book → online text (page 45 of 49)