Washington and Lee University.

Calyx (Volume 1912) online

. (page 1 of 17)
Online LibraryWashington and Lee UniversityCalyx (Volume 1912) → online text (page 1 of 17)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


jiff, no







! ':•"',','




II. M






THECALY








■4/**atm.frti&.



fr ' ^IV!^'^::?.;:': - ^^"^ 1 ;:':' ; ,,;.;




LEE VMBVEraiY




Co

3ln*am prnn Staples, 2L2.. B.

a Virginia gentleman of rnr old school, considerate in rbmi acr

a self Sacrificing teacher of rhr lain, magnanimous

anD sympathetic in all Dealings inirli his

fcllotu man, this bolumc of tlic

Caln.v is bcoicatco



AUG 2 1998



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation



http://www.archive.org/details/calyxu1912wash



3fcram JJcnn ^tapirs




OME years ago the late President Harper of the University of Chicago was
delivering an address of congratulation on the occasion of the inauguration
of a college president. He startled many of his hearers when he suddenly
turned to the new president (who had just been called from a professor's
chair) and told him that in at least one particular he was making a tremen-
dous sacrifice; that, as a professor, he had enjoyed the privilege of intimate
friendship, of unreserved companionship, and of sympathetic understanding
with his associates; that, as a college president, he would be certain to find
a changed situation; that, by degrees, he would drift into a life of social reserve and
loneliness, and, at times, of social isolation and exile; that the old intimacies would soon
disappear, and the old companionships gradually lose their vital power.

This is, happily, not the experience of all college presidents. I doubt whether it is
the experience of the average college president whose happy fortune it is to serve in a
homogeneous institution of high traditions. Certainly, it has not been my own experience.
I have no sweeter memory of the life in Lexington than the memory of the intimate com-
panionships of that life. I value nothing more highly than these friendships. They have
meant everything to me. Of these friendships not one was tested more frequently, or in
a larger number of ways, than the friendship of Abram Penn Staples, with whom I was
as intimately associated as with anyone outside of my own family circle, and to whom I
am as deeply attached as to any living man.

If I were asked to name the most striking characteristic of "Judge" Staples (that
is the affectionate title given him by universal consent), I should without hesitation say
that it is his wonderful capacity for friendship, his unswerving loyalty to his friends, and
his willingness to make sacrifices, if need be, to serve his friends. I have never known a
student who entertained any doubt concerning the friendship of Professor Staples, \oung
men know that he is kindly and sympathetic in an unfailing way. He knows them per-
sonally. He understands them and loves them. He recognizes the sacredness of human
individuality. He recognizes the right of each human soul to work out its own destiny,
and he is the last man to lay upon it the hand of unnecessary or of unkind criticism. It
can not be a matter of surprise that young men are quick to recognize the fact that in him
they have a friend as well as an instructor and a guide.

Professor Staples is a man of distinct and pervasive personality. He is an impressive
figure. That is a great asset to any college. "Have a University in shanties, nay in tents,
but have great personalities in it," was the wise admonition of one of the world's great
teachers. I have known few men of finer or more distinctive personal qualities than are
possessed by Professor Staples. I would trust him anywhere and all the time. ^ ou
always know where to find him. He is the soul of honor. He is the embodiment of



courtesy. I Ic has the finest courage. I [e is steadfast in his convictions. 1 le is generous
to a fault. I believe th.il he would give away Ins lasl dollar to help a friend in need. He
is one ol the few men I have known who has seemed to me to fully understand the real
meaning ol the word sympathy.

Professor Staples is a self-made man. I hat fact should be a stimulus to the young
man who is lighting along hard lines. He has known what it is to struggle against
adversity. Born and bred ol the best of a gracious and unique civilization, his young
manhood was spent in the grinding days of reconstruction. Like many another youth in
those stinting times, he faced a situation that demanded courage and energy and patience
and purpose and steadfastness. His metal stood the test. He was never physically robust.
His spirit had to battle with the infirmity ol the flesh. Yet, in the face of all odds,
neglecting no duty to family or Iriends. he struggled through his college course with high
credit and began his fine career of service at the bar.

1 hose who have come into intimate touch with Professor Staples will be quick to
discover his interest in public affairs. He has been a life-long student of social, economic
and political problems. Early in his career he was sent to the Virginia State Senate when'
he served with conspicuous ability. He has since that time been in intimate touch with
many oi the men who have fashioned the recent history of the commonwealth. 1 lis
advice has been widely sought and greatly valued by them.

As a student ol the law, as an advocate at the bar, and as a teacher ol the law.
Professor Staples is doubtless best known to the general public. For many years he has
been regarded as one of the most learned and able lawyers of Virginia. He has been,
from the beginning, an untiring student ol the law. He has the legal mind and the legal
temperament. As an advocate at the bar, he was reckoned as a master of the Socratic
art. I have frequently heard that he had few equals in examining witnesses. As a
teacher of the law, he is painstaking, exact, conscientious and thorough. I he students
rally about him. I hey are with him in the class-room, on the campus, and in his home.
They love him. I hey trust him. 1 hey seek his advice on any and on every conceivable
subject, all the way from the complex problem of matrimony to the simple matter of
suggesting the most available remedy lor a bad cold. I know of no man who com-
bines in a finer way the charm and grace of the old lime and the freedom and direct-
ness of the new. This combination of qualities in a teacher means, of course, that he is
gifted with the genius ol getting close to young men. It is a fact that service to young
men is, with Professor Staples, an instinct, a passion, ,t i reed.

Such, under the limitations prescribed by the editor, is my simple tribute to a line man
whom I would, in a single word, characterize as a brave soldier in the army ol the
common good. Here is a man who, in the clear view of his fellow-men, is daily illustrat-
ing the dignity and the majesty ol the hie ol the Virginia gentleman. Ol such Mull
is woven the true glory of institutions of learning.

Gl.OKU. H. Dl.NNV.




C OA/TEN"T 6



r u,i

Dedication 2

Abram Penn Staples 3, 4

Foreword 7

The Trustees 8

Administrative Officers 9

The Faculty 10-14

Library Staff 15

The Washington and Lee Law School 17-23

Senior Law —

Class Officers 26

Statistics 27-47

Junior Law —

History 48

Class Roll 49, 50

Senior Academic —

Class Officers 52

Statistics 53-68

Junior Academic —

Class History 69

Class Roll 70

Sophomore Class —

History 71

Roll 72. 73



Freshman Class —

History 74, 7 5

Roll 76. 77

Backward, Turn Backward — Poem. . . 78

Senior Engineering —

Class Officers 80

Statistics 81-86

Post-Graduates —

Class Officeis 83

Statistics 89-91

Acrostic 92

Student Organizations —

Student Body Organization 94

Graham-Lee Literary Sociely 96, 97

Washington Lilerary Sociely 98,99

Intercolleg.ale Debates 100

Burks Law Debating Sociely 101

Young Men's Christian Association 102

Cust.s Lee Engineering Society... . 104

Chemical Sociely 105

Senate 106



CONTENTS Continued



Musk ai Organizations —

Mandolin Club 108

Glee Club 110

Orchestra 112

The Band 114

Poem IK,

Fraternities —

Phi Kappa Psi 118

Kappa Alpha 120

Alpha Tau Omega 122

Sigma Ch, 124

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 126

Ph, Gamma Delia 128

Kappa Sigma I 50

Sigma Nu 132

Ph. Delia Thela 134

P. Kappa Alpha 136

Phi Kappa Sigma 138

Delia Tau Delta 140

Sigma Ph. Eps.lon 142

Alpha Chi Rho 144

Ph, Delia Phi 146

Thela Lambda Ph, 148

Ph, Alpha Delia 150

Phi Beta Kappa 152. 153

Secret Societies —

Mason.c Club 154

P. A. M. O. L. A. R. Y. E 155

White Friars 156

II A x 157

••13- Club 159

Koheleth's Warntnc— Poem 160

Cotillion Club 162

Sophomore Cotillion 1 64

Fancy Dress Ball 1 66

Junior Prom 168

Inter-Fraternity Dance 170

Senior Ball 172

Final Ball 174

Artists 1 76

\i III i in s

Who's Who in Athletics 178

Monogram Wearers I 80

Football —

Team and Record. 1911 182

Resume Football Season. 1911... . 184.185

Statistics of Team 186-190

Senior Football Team 191

Junior Football Team 192

Sophomore Football Team 19 i

Freshman Football Team 194



Baseball —

Team and Record. 1911 196

Resume Baseball Season. 1911 . 198

Schedule. 1912 199

Basket-Ball —

Team and Record. 1912 202

Resume Basket-Ball Season, 1912 . 2U4

Track —

Team and Record. 1911 206

Resume T.ack Season. 1911 208

Gymnasium —

Medal Winners and Record 210

Resume Gymnasium Work. 1912. . 212

Rowing —

Harry Lee Boat Club 214

Albert Sidney Boat Club 215

Row.ng. 1911 216

State Clubs, Etc. —

Alabama 220

Arkansas 221

The Congressionals 222

Florida 223

Georgia 224

Randolph. Macon Academy 225

Kentucky 226

Lynchburg 227

M,ss,ss,ppi 228

North Carolina 229

Southwest Virginia 230

Stonewall 231

Tennessee 232

Texas 233

West Virginia 234

Publications —

The Southern Collegian 236

The Calyx 237

Ring-Turn Ph, 238

George Mutcheson Denny 243-245

The Campbell Brothers 246-249

President-Elect Henry Louis Smith.

Ph. D 250-252

Testimonials 253

In Memoriam 254

"Ye Stude" 256-259

My Little Cigarette — Poem 259

Dum Vivimus. Vivamus — Poem 260

Revised by Authority 261,262

At ma Mater 263. 264

An Appreciation 265

The Installation ok the Phi Alpha

Delta Fraternity 266

College Life

The Rank-Bum Fie




OREWORD



This is the CALYX
of 1912. The edi-
tors bespeak your in-
dulgence of its short-
comings and faults
(editors always do that) ; fur-
ther, we would offer these few
words of explanation. The
Calyx is a combination annual
record and memory book. In it,
by custom, are incorporated records of
the student-body and its activities from
year to year. And by the same custom
the book is illustrated. We have not
departed from such justly honored
precedents. Some things that we have
done, however, we should like to ex-
plain. We have introduced much
more of reading matter than the books
of other years have contained. This
change we believe justified by the mat-
ter. It is all of more or less intimate
application to our Alma Mater. Some
of it is humorous, and all of it is in
good spirit. We hope that it will be
so received. We are frank to admit
that we have spared none, and may perhaps have committed
Use majeste. The only apology for such an act is that it is
all for fun. The pictures of the book are of and by our
friends and the places we love, the only exceptions of note
being the series of the society department. Our hesitancy to
attempt to depict the charms of those events led us to commit
that task to the artists of the E. A. Wright Company. They
are hand-colored for the sake of naturalness.

Aside from our effort to provide some pleasure and a rec-
ord of the current year of our university life, we ask no credit
for our book. And we beg our friends to keep in mind these
purposes to which we have limited ourselves. We hope that
others may get as much pleasure from the book as we have
taken in its preparation.




Arranged in the order of official seniority.



WILLIAM ALF.XANDF.R ANDERSON. 1885

RICHMOND, VIRC1NIA

ALEXANDER TEDFORD BARCLAY, 1885

LEXINGTON, VIRCINIA

REV. EDWARD CLIFFORD GORDON. D. D.. I88H

LEXINGTON. MISSOURI

REV. GIVENS BROWN STRICKLER. D. D„ LL. D. 1894

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

REV. ROBERT HANSON FLEMING. B. A.. D. D . 1898

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND

WILLIAM PAXTON HOUSTON. LL. B.. 1898

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA

JOHN ALFRED PRESTON. 1898

LEW1SBURG, WEST VIRGINIA

LUCIAN HOWARD COCKE. LL. B.. 1898

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA

WILLIAM INGLES. C. F... 1899

RADFORD, VIRGINIA

REV. AUGUSTUS HOUSTON HAMILTON. B. A., 1899
Steele's tavern. Virginia

ALBERT WINSTON GAINES. LL. B. 1901

CHATTANOOGA. TENNESSE]

GEORGE WALKER ST. CLAIR. LL. B.. 1901

TAZEWELL. VIRGINIA

JOHN SINCLAIR MUNCE, 1901

Kit IIMOND. VIRGINIA

FRANK THOMAS GLASGOW. LL. B„ 1907

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA

WILLIAM DICKINSON LEWIS. 1907

CHARLESTON. WEST VIRGINIA

PAUL M. PENH K, 1910

LEXINCTON, VIRGINIA

JOHN LYLE CAMPBELL. LL. B„ 1877

Mi HI I \R1 AND TREASURER, LEXINCTON, VIRGINIA



Stmuntetrattbc
©fftccrs




GEORGE HUTCHESON DENNY, M. A., Ph. D., LL. D.. 1901.

EX-PRESIDENT

HENRY DONALD CAMPBELL. B. A., M. A.. Ph. D., SC. D.. 1912.

ACTING PRESIDENT

HENRY LOUIS SMITH, B. A.. Ph. D., LL. D„ 1912.

PRESIDENT-ELECT

LIVINGSTON WADDELL SMITH, B. A., M. A.. Ph. D.. 1908.

DEAN OF THE ACADEMIC COLLEGE

DAVID CARLISLE HUMPHREYS, C. E., 1903.

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

MARTIN PARKS BURKS. B. A., LL. B., LL. D., 1903.

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW

JOHN LYLE CAMPBELL, LL. B.. 1877.

SECRETARY AND TREASURER

THOMAS JAMES FARRAR, B. A.. M. A.. Ph. D.. 1910.

REGISTRAR

NOBLE DOAK SMITHSON, B. A., LL. B., 1912.

ASSISTANT TO THE DEAN AND TREASURER




HENRY DONALD CAMPBELL. B. A., M. A., Ph. D., \ T '.;, * »

PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY AND BIOLOGY

Studied at Washington and Lee University and Universities of Berlin and I leu
DAVID CARLISLE HUMPHREYS. C. F... * I' A

PROFESSOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

Studied at Washington and Lee University
ADDISON HOGUE. B. A.. M. A.. * K *

PROFESSOR OF CREEK
Studied at I lampden-Sidney College and University of Virginia

JAMES LEWIS HOWE. B. A.. M. A., Ph. D.. M. D. (HON.). A K E, -1

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY
Studied at Amherst College and Universities of Cottmgen and Berlin

WILLIAM SPENSER CURRLLL. B. A., M. A.. Ph. IX. * I' A

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH

Studied at Washington and Lee Univeisilv
WALTER LeCONTE STEVENS, B. A.. Ph. I)

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS

Studied al Universities of South Carolina. Georgia. Virginia, Strasburg, Berlin, an,

10



GEORGE HUTCHESON DENNY, M. A.. Ph. D.. LL. D.. 2 X. * B K

PROFESSOR OF LATIN
Studied al Hampden-S.dney College and University of Virginia

MARTIN PARKS BURKS, B. A., LL. B., LL. D., * A *, * B K

PROFESSOR OF COMMON AND STATUTE LAW
Studied at Washinglon College and University of Virginia

JOSEPH RAGLAND LONG. B. A., B. S., LL. B.. K A, $ A *

PROFESSOR OF CIVIL LAW AND EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE
Studied at Richmond College and the Universities of Pennsylvania and Virginia

JOHN HOLLADAY LATANE. B. A.. Ph. D.. K A, * B K. * A <l>

PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL LAW

Studied at Johns Hopkins University
JAMES WILLIAM KERN. Ph. D„ B G II, * B K

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF LATIN

Studied at Johns Hopkins University
ABRAM PENN STAPLES, LL. B„ $ A •!■

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY
Studied at Richmond College and Virginia Polytechnic Institute

THOMAS JAMES FARRAR, B. A., M. A.. Ph. D.. A T A

PROFESSOR OF GERMANIC LANGUACES
Studied at Washington and Lee University and the Universities of Gottingen and Paris

LIVINGSTON WADDELL SMITH, B. A., M. A.. Ph. D.. * K *

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS

Studied at Washington and Lee University and Johns Hopkins University
JAMES ROBERT HOWERTON, M. A.. D. D.. LL. D.. D K A

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND BIBLE STUDY
Studied al Southwestern Presbyterian University

ROBERT GRANVILLE CAMPBELL, B. A.. M. A.. Ph. D., *48,e \ E, <I> B K

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND COMMERCE

Studied at Washinglon and Lee Universily and Johns Hopkins University

11



DE LA WARR Bl NJAMIN EAST] R, A M. Ph. I).. K 1. i r, * i: K

PROI ESSOR 01 ROMANCE LANGL'ACES

Studied al Randolph-Macon College. Universities of Pans and Grenoble and Johns Hopkins University

JOHN WILLIAM IIOBBS POLLARD. B. A.. B. L.. M. D.. B A X

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION \Mi \H|r\i I PROFESSOR Ol BIOLOCY
Studied at Dartmouth College. Harvard University and the University of Vermont

GLOVER DUNN HANCOCK., B. A. Ph. D., 1 X

PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Studied at William Jewell College and University of Wisconsin

HUGH AUGUSTUS WHITE, A. B..

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF COMMERCIAL LAW
Studied at Washington and Lee University



Knsmictors

ROBERT WILLIAM DICKEY, B. S.. B. A.. ■!■ K *, ■!• I: K

PHYSICS AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

STEPHEN BLAND DOLLY. B. A.. * A A. K 2

FRENCH

BENJAMIN HARRISON FARQUI IAR, B. A.

MATHEMATICS

THOMAS WALTER FRED, B. A.. * A <>. * R K, * A *

HISTORY

HERBERT EVERETT IIANNIS. B. A.. A T A, * a •!•

MATHEMATICS

JOHN GOODWIN HERNDON. Jr., B. A.. •!• ^ K

ECONOMICS, COMMERCE AND POLITICS

AMOS LEE HEROLD. B. A.. A X P

ENGLISH

12



CHARLES NOURSE HOBSON. B. A.

ENGLISH

JOHN PEYTON HOBSON. B. A.

MATHEMATICS

PHILIP WILHELM MURRAY. B. A.. A X I'. •!■ B K. * \ A

HISTORY

WILLIAM TRENT NEEL, B. S.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

WILLIAM WARREN NEWSUM, B. A.

GERMAN

WILLIAM THURMOND RIVIERE, B. A.. * B K

B10L0CV

CHARLES WATK1NS. B. A.. M. S., B 6 I)

CHEMISTRY



Assistants

LLOYD RUTHERFORD CRAIGH1LL. K \

ENGLISH

BENJAMIN HARRISON FARQUHAR. B. A.

PHYSICS

JAMES ALEXANDER HANNA. B. S.

CHEMISTRY

STEVENS PALMER HARMAN. A X P

FRENCH

SAMUEL ALLEN HONAKER. * K *

PHYSICS

l:;



WALTER LEE HOOD

C HEMISTRl

GEORGE WESTLAKI. HOPPER. Jr. !• K 1

CI MN AMI M

J. FRANK KEY

ENGINEERING

JONAH LUPTON LARR1CK, i: X

GYMNASIUM

GEORGE HOLLADAY McK.EE

BIOLOGV

MARK ROBERT MILES. 1 \ I-:

(.1 MN VII M

WILLIAM McELWEE MILLER. * I" A

ENGLISH

HENRY MONCURE, B. S., * K *

CHEMISTRY

C "HAR1.ES LEI ORDEMAN. n X

ENGINEERING

WARREN ASHLEY RAINE

CHEMISTRY

JOHN PURVER RICHARDSON. Jr., 1 X

BIOLOGY

WILLIAM IHURMOND RIVIERE, B. A., * B K

GEOLOGY



Library ^taff

ANNE ROBERTSON WHITE

LIBRARIAN

ROBERT RUSSELL BLAKE

ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN

SHLEEMAN MALEK. YONAN

ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN

SAMUEL HARRY LEWIS

CUSTODIAN OF THE READING ROOM

FRANK. EDMONDSON FAULKNER
JACOB CHARLES MORRISON

CUSTODIANS OF THE ECONOMICS LIBRARY

WILLIAM WHITE ACKERLY

SUMMER LIBRARIAN




U. S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE LAMAR



-







C1)t lElasijtngton ant) Her iLa\u »c1)00l

An Enumeration of a Few of Its Distinguished Alumni.

T IS given to few men to perform as great and as lasting labor for their fellow-
men as did Judge John W. Brockenbrough; for to him is due, in the last
analysis, and without detracting in any measure from the other great and
good men who have served it, the unbroken success of so many years which
has been the lot of the Washington and Lee Law School.

The year 1849 marked the loundation by Judge Brockenbrough of
the Lexington Law School. To it he devoted the best and most arduous
labors of his life, and on its rolls are found the names of many who became
distinguished in the history of Virginia and of other states. After it became, in I 866,
"The School of Law and Equity of Washington College," Judge Brockenbrough
lemained at its head, and was, until Hon. John Randolph Tucker was (in 1870) elected
associate professor, its sole teacher. In 1873 his connection with the school was severed by
his resignation.

Judge Brockenbrough was preeminently qualified to teach the law, and the success
which attended his efforts was well deserved. He had published in 1837 two volumes of
reports containing C hief Justice John Marshall's decisions in the Circuit Court of the
United States for Virginia and North Carolina, which "attest the capacity, industry, and
professional skill of the reporter." At the bar his work had been of the highest rank.
Fifteen years' service on the bench as judge of the United States Court for the Western
District of Virginia had witnessed not a single decision of his reversed by the Supreme
Court.

Since he brought to his work in the law school a mind eminently judicial, and a
desire, to use his own words, "to generate in the mind of the student a taste for the
study of law as an enlarged and rational system of jurisprudence, and to imbue him with
the philosophical spirit which pervades it throughout all its extensive ramifications; to
teach him to regard it as a noble and refined science, and not merely as a crude collection
of arbitrary precedents," the high rank in the profession taken by so many of Judge
Biockenbrough's graduates is but natural.

It is hard to conceive of the labors of one man producing such far-reaching results,
but among the graduates of the Lexington Law School during its sixteen years' existence,
for four of which the war necessitated suspension, were John Goode, member of the
Virginia Legislature, of the Virginia Convention of 1861, and of the Confederate
Congress, C ongressman from Virginia, president of the Virginia Constitutional Conven-
tion of 1901-02, and Solicitor-General of the United States; Robert E. Cowan, another



Virginia legislator and member ol the
Virginia Convention of 1861, later a
judge in Missouri; William A. Seay,
Law professor in Louisiana State Uni-
versity. Judge of the United Stales Dis-
trict Court, and Minister to Bolivia;
Robert White, Attorney-General of West
Virginia; John J. Daws, member of the
Virginia and West Virginia legislatures,
and Congressman from West Virginia;
Henry M. Matthews, Attorney-General
and Governor of West Virginia; Robert
M. Mayo, Congressman Irom Virginia;
James B. Sever, Member of Congress
from Virginia and later Judge of the
United States Court in the Territory of
Wyoming; Alphonso C. Avery, Judge
of the Superior Court of North Carolina;
Adam C. Snyder, Judge of the Court of
Appeals of West Virginia; General Scott
Ship, lor many years Superintendent of
the Virginia Military Institute, and many
other great and distinguished men.
The good work ol the Law School in training young men was continued with
unabated vigor after its union, in 1866, with Washington College. It has always been
guided by the ablest teachers, and a list of its professors would in itself be a roll of
great men.

Upon Judge Brockenbrough's resignation in 1873 Judge Tucker became Dean
of the school, remaining at its head until his death in 1897. Abler pens than mine
have paid tribute to Judge Tucker, and it is unnecessary that I should say more of him
than to quote the words of one whose fortune it was to study law under him:

"When in 1872-3 I was one of his law students, he was incomparably the most
perfect instructor, in all respects, that I, either as a boy or man, have ever known. He
was clear, concise, and entertaining as a lecturer, and yet as lull and complete as it was
practicable to be with students; his methods ol instruction obtained the best results from
the clever as well as Irom the dull student.

In later years Charles A. Graves. William McLaughin, Judges Bolivar Christian.
Hugh W. Sheffey, and Waller R. Staples, of the Virginia Court of Appeals, Harry St.
Geoige Tmkei, John W. Da\ is and William R. Vance, themselves alumni of the




jF.NATOR OWEN




SENATOR CHAMBERLAIN

that position at the Kentucky State Uni-
versity. William R. Vance, '95, whose
career as instructor here and for one year
Acting Dean, Dean of the Law School of
George Washington University, and pro-
fessor in the Yale Law School, has been
so brilliant, will in September become
Dean at the University of Minnesota. A.
H. Throckmorton, 1900, of the law fac-
ulty of Indiana University, was for many
years Dean at Center College, Kentucky.
Judge R. M. Venable, of the class of
1868, is a member of the Law faculty of
the University of Maryland, and W.
Goodwin Williams, '94, has recently be-
come professor of Common Law at
Louisiana State University. Harry St.
George Tucker, B. L., '76, followed in
the footsteps of his father as professor at
Washington and Lee, 1897-99, and
Dean, 1899-1902. But greatest of them
all, perhaps, is Charles A. Graves, '73,



Law School, and our own Martin Parks
Burks, have proved themselves no less
able teachers than their predecessors.

It is but natural that a school having
teachers of such caliber as were these men
should have produced great teachers, and
that has been the case. Not only have the
alumni of the Washington and Lee Law


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Online LibraryWashington and Lee UniversityCalyx (Volume 1912) → online text (page 1 of 17)