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Jas. Somervillf. Vaiden
1 1. s. gllleylen aberdeen

B. G. Aldridce Aki ola
Frank B. Hayni

C. A. Coi HOUN

J.J.I Ialblrt
R. M. McGi hi i

I.. C. Thomas



0©embers



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J. Ozro Day
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1 I M. Hayne
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NORTH

CAROLINA

CLUB




Officers

CHARLES ROBERT BAILEY President

JOSEPH MANSON TURBYFILL Vice-President

CYRUS McLAWSON De ARMON Secretary-Treasurer



eaembcrs



E. N. Atkinson
W. J. Brown
J. J. Casey
E. P. Davis

E. A. Enclebert
C. B. Fetner

P. T. Haizlip

N. LeGrand

V. M. Matthews

F. M. Mitchell
E. M. Myatt
CM. Ray

R. E. Steele, Jr.

J. M. TURBYFILL



C. R. Bailey
W. H. R. Campbell
M. De C. Coiner
C. McL. De Armon
E. M. Eutsler
J. B. Glover, Jr.
E. M. Hardin
Ira Lemmon
C. F. McIntyre
G. A. Morrow
S. O. Oliver
W. H. Smathers
J. D. Taylor, Jr.
T. W. Varnon




SOUTH-
WEST VA.



Officers



H. L. CROWGEY, President Wylhevill.

\\ I NEEL. Vice-President Dublii

H. B. APPF.RSON. Sec re tarv-Treasurer Marioi



Annual Banquet



February 15th.

W. M. MlNTER

J W. Baylor
W. G. Wertii
II. A. Kaiser
H. B. Barton
H. M. Collins
W. G Laughon

H. B. Apperson E.

W. R. Pennington W P
T. L. Walker
J. D. Harman
B R. Lemmon
J. J. Kelly. Jr.
T. F. Boch
1 1. L. Crowcey
F. W. McWani
J. D. Davidson



S. R. Gammon. Jr.

S. F. Harm \\
R. G. Craft
W. S. Dunn
O. C. Bell

S. A 1 Ion \ki k

J. M. Quillin

C. DlCKERSON

Groseclose
F. P. Burton
H. V. Carson
C C. Payne
W. T. Neei.
J. F. Bullitt, Jr.
A. S. Johnson, Jr.

(.' C. Croi ki i i
J. P. Richardson. Jr.



H. C. Groseclose




Birthplace of Stonewall Jacksoh Clarksburg. W Va



"jstonrUiaU" Club

of Clarksburg, W. Va.

Colors — Conlederate Gray and Maroon.

Motto — "You can be whatever you resolve to be."

Officers

ARLOS J. HARBERT President

HOWARD L. ROBINSON Vice-President

CLAUD B. BUSH Secretary

ROBERT C. HOOD Treasurer



George W. Blair
Claud B. Bush
Arlos J. Harbert



S©em tiers

Robert C. Hood
Goodloe Jackson
Orville L. McDonald

231



I Ioward L. Robinson
U. W. Showalter
Chas. M. Switzer



TENNESSEE




**S**g~



Officers

WILl 1AM WARREN NEWSUM President

ROBERT KERN WILLIAMS Vice-President

HENRY NEVELS BARKER Sec retard

PAUL DULANEY CONVERSE Treasi ri r



Other COemfjer


8




\l


irk S


tewart


R P. Adams




1. D.


Thornton


J 1 1 vans, Jr.




W.


1 W'UIMIB


G. W. Hopplr




K


i Williams


S. G. Keller, Jr.






II 1! \L MGARDNER


R. N. Lai hki






A. C. Fast


c. r Eat






C. N. Gros\ inch


I I I Mathis






J. I. Rol HRCK K


J. R. M \ « •






R. r. Sams


1 ' Mi Cai i ii






N. L. Thompson


A Pari t 1 1






C. i I. Wn i iams


B. S. Sanford










I I I I I I



TEXAS CLUB

Officers

FRANK M. MOORE President

JOSEPH G. GLASS Vice-President

CLARENCE C. GEISELMAN Treasurer

CECIL C. GRAY Secretary

I IOMER G. PRICE Rinc-tum Phi Reporter

Other neembers



F. J. Breaker
M. M. Crane
E. D. French
O. T. Henry

G. O. McCrohan
C F. McFarland
J. R. Neal

Roy Satteriteld



J. D. Watts

M. A. Wescott, Jr.
W. O. Dorsey
E. C. Jalonick
C. L. Dexter
B. L. Ballard
Walter Steves
J. R. Strong
N. V. Pillot




WEST
VA.



Dfficcrs

JOI IN ALEXAND! R Ma D< »N \l D
Preside n i

DANIEL NATHAN MOHLER

Vice-President

PIERCE BYRON LANTZ
Secretary-Treasurer

CHESTER PAUL HEAVENER

Historian



8©em tiers



P. L. Baird
P. B. Earwood
H. M. Banks
W. G. Wood
C. R. Beai i
W. M. La Fon

F. J. Bl ( KWII II
R. L. Bl I HRINC

G. N. Blair
R. R. Bi \ki

A. T. Bhaconier
C. B. Bush
1 1. W. Campbei i.
I .. W. Lawson
S. II. Lewis



J I I. McGinnis
II. I. Millfr
D. N. Mohler
D. E. Newton. Jr.
J. J. D. Pri STor
J. L. Price
D. L. Snyder

I'. C. I 1IOM \-

J. C. Fishi i!
P. B. Lantz
A. G. Lively

I. G Li v

C. II. Marstili in
I A MacDonai.d

II. 1 .. Robinson



J. B. Watts
C. Ghisi i in. Jr
M R Dodd
J A. Hanna
II. E. Hannis
A J.I Iarbi hi
L. |. I hit i

C. P. I II \\ I Nl H
C. C. I ll NSHAW
II R. 1 lr.m roitn
A I .. I li ROI D
O. D. I llCCINBOl II \M

R. C. I I i

J. G. J M KSON, |n

I '. A. I .Al CHI IN, Jit.



S. O. Laughlin, Jr

H. E. Moran

| C. Pll Kl -
CHAS Ql VRRll I!

U. W. Showalter, Jr.

C. M. S«ITZER

J. C. XX'hetzel
B F. Fiery
O. L. Mi Donai ii
W. L. Newman
J. 1 I. Miller, Jr.
I S. Osburn
\\ \\ Roci rs
J Rui i Nut. Jr.




^je



INWica
-tions




Converse Diehl Ackerly Somerville Keister

Dunn Wilcox Crowcey Lemmon Wilson Preston



Ok »ottt1)rrn Collrgtan

CDitorial ^taff

IRA EEMMON Editor-in-Chief

PAUL DULANF.Y CONVERSE \ssistani Editor-in ( hiei

GEORGE WEST DIEHL Associate Editor

THURSTON LANTZ KEISTER Associati ! d i

GOODRIDGE A. WILSON Associati I ditor

WILLIAM WI HIE ACKER1 .Y Mis< ellani

WILLIAM JENKINS WILCOX Y. M. C. A Editor

JAMES SOMERVILLE, Jr Exchanci Editor

HENRY L. CROWGEY Business M\nacer

JOHN J. D. PRESTON Y-mmam Business Manager

W. SC III RER DUNN Assistant Business Manager




Ramsey Sawkins Shaw Collins Null Kirkpatrick

Sherertz Richardson Goldman Foster Hanna Pyle

Murray Wilcox Owen Burks Lemmon Herndon



Cl)f Calp.t

CHARLES EDWARD BURKS Editor-in-Chief

WILLIAM JENKINS WILCOX Assistant Editor-in-Chief

PHILIP WILHELM MURRAY Historian, Senior Law

IRA LEMMON Historian, Senior Academic

MILLARD FILLMORE NULL. Jr Historian, Senior Encineers

CLIFFORD BURDETTE FOSTER Historian. Junior Law

PHILIP PENDLETON GIBSON Historian, Junior Class

THOMAS SYDNOR KIRKPATRICK Historian, Sophomore Class

GEORGE WESTLAKE HOPPER Historian, Freshman Class

RANDOLPH CODMAN SHAW Athletic Editor

JOSEPH GILPIN PYLE Associate Editor

JOHN GOODWIN HERNDON. Jr Associate Editor

LAWRENCE EUGENE GOLDMAN Associate Editor

JOHN SAMUEL SHERERTZ Associate Editor

JOHN DOUGLAS TAYLOR. Jr Associate Editor

HAROLD MOORMAN COLLINS .' Associate Editor

JOHN HOFFMAN SAWKINS Associate Editor

ROBERT DOUGLAS RAMSEY Associate Editor

DANIEL BAILEY OWEN Business Manacer

JOHN PURVER RICHARDSON, Jr Assistant Business Manacer

LAFAYETTE RANDOLPH HANNA Assistant Business Manager




\\ i bster Burks
Hobson Shaw



Ranson Eager Lemmon Curry Mann

McWane Harman Milling Turbyfill



l\tng;=Cttm J31)t



<230itoruiI ^tnff

STEVENS PALMER HARMAN Editor-in-Chief

WEAR FRANCIS MILLING Assistant Editor-in Chiei



3ssochuc CDitors



William Leonidas Webster
William I Iopces Mann, Jr.
Thomas Davis Ranson, Jr.
Randolph Codman Shaw



Charles Edward Burks
Chari is Nourse Hobson
Walter I In i.m.w I w.i n
Ira I i mmun



8©anatrement

Frederic k William McWane Business Managi

John Leslie Curry ) , „ ■ «,

J '. Assistant Business Manage.

Joseph Manson Turbyi ii i \




ILttrran?




GENERAL ROBERT EDWARD LEE




GENERAL ROBERT EDWARD LEE



I R NEPHE



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(^rorcjc Jbutdbrson Benn?

HEN in the fall of 1901 the Board of Trustees of Washington and Lee
University chose as president a young man barely turned thirty, of limited
experience, and comparatively unknown, many friends of the University had
serious misgivings as to the wisdom of the selection, and no one had the
prophetic gift to foresee that the event marked the beginning of the most
successful decade in the history of the College. This was not the type
of man the public was expecting to see appointed. It was a radical de-
parture from precedent to place in the chair successively occupied by Gen-
eral Robert E. Lee, General G. W. Curtis Lee, and William L. Wilson, a man of
merely academic attainments, of whose existence the general public was hardly aware.
Never did a college board of trustees make a happier choice. This young man was
endowed by nature with a forceful personality, strong will, keen intellect, and unusual
sagacity in dealing with men and aflairs — qualities which would have made him a marked
leader in any field of public activity. He entered on the duties of the office with a
deep sense of humility, but with whole-souled devotion lo the great task before him, and
quickly won the recognition he deserved. When he resigned the office in the fall of
1911 he had become one of the most influential and popular citizens of Virginia, and one
of the most widely known college presidents of the South.

What he did for Washington and Lee during these ten years of service is well
known. He realized that the first thing to be done was to build up the student body.
An institution fostered in its infancy by the generosity of Washington, and consecrated
later by the service of Lee, was not doing its full duty and could not expect public sup-
port if it could not enroll more than two hundred students. A college so rich in traditions
was able to draw from a wide territory provided the territory was properly cultivated.
Dr. Denny applied himself assiduously to this task and developed a system which richly
rewarded his efforts. By reaching out to the more progressive communities of the South,
where good schools were to be lound, he not only ■attracted numbers, but greatly improved
the personnel of the student body, securing young men who were far better perpared for
college than those formerly enrolled.

Another thing which attracted Dr. Denny's attention from the first was the im-
provement of the plant and equipment. He removed from the class rooms the old stoves
which formerly divided the attention of the professor, as we ll as of the students, and
installed a central heating plant; he painted the outside and completely renovated the
inside of the old buildings; he constructed a series of granolithic walks, and added three
fine buildings — the dormitory, Reid Hall, and the library — to the campus. These additions
to the group of buildings provided new and ample accommodations for several of the
departments which had been very much cramped in their old quarters, especially physics,
engineering, chemistry, and economics and political science. These departments were
thus given the opportunity to do far better work than had been possible under former
conditions.

243




DR. G. H. DENNY



In the matter of finance Dr. Denny showed himself a master. When he took charge,
the University was carrying a large floating debt, and every year showed a deficit of
several thousand dollars. He at once put a stop to this state of affairs, and in a few
years paid off the floating debt. He completed the raising of the Wilson fund, and
secured the money for Reid Hall and for the Carnegie Library. Other gifts came in,
some as the result of earlier bequests and others as the result of his own efforts, so that
when he resigned he left nearly double the endowment that he found.

Dr. Denny would be the last man to regard his work here as complete. He fully
realized that there were many things which of necessity had to be left undone, but which
he confidently believed would be done in the next decade. With the growth of the
student body from 200 to over 600 he recognized the need for a larger faculty. This
meant a much larger endowment, for he was not willing to embarrass the finances of the
University by establishing more professorships than the endowment would justify. Conse-
quently he proceeded conservatively. Assistant professorships were, however, established
in the department of economics and political science and in the department of biology,
and a new professorship in modern languages, the old chair being divided into a chair of
[ eutonic and a chair of Romance languages. A lectureship in Commercial Law was also
established and the number of instructors and assistants in all departments greatly increased.

While it is true that most Southern colleges and universities grew and prospered
during this period, it is equally true that none made such rapid strides as Washington and
Lee. Dr. Denny infused new life into every department of the University, kept it prom-
inently before the public, and left it in a more commanding position than it had ever
occupied before.

So far we have discussed what Dr. Denny did for Washington and Lee, but this
sketch would not be complete if it did not state the converse proposition — what Washington
and Lee did for Dr. Denny. Although a graduate, in the ordinary sense, of Hampden-
Sidney and the University of Virginia, he is nevertheless a Washington and Lee product,
for it was here that his greatest mental development took place, and we are proud to claim
him as an alumnus. He entered here without administrative experience and left a full-
fledged college president. With the tinge of grey that came into his hair as the result of
the cares and responsibilites of his office came also experience and wisdom far beyond his
years. In the performance of his high duties he developed many striking traits and charac-
teristics of mind and heart. Students were often amazed at his remarkable facility in
remembering names and faces. He never forgot or failed to recognize anybody, and
little that took place in the life of the college community escaped his keen observation.

His service as president of the State Board of Charities and Corrections, and as a
trustee of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, as well as his
presidential office, brought him into contact with the great world of affairs, and with the
passing of years his mental horizon continually widened. He developed into a public
speaker of rare force, and in private conversation his keen analytical power, his lucid
statement of fact, and his magnetic personality always command attention.

Such is the man whom, in the full tide of his powers, Washington and Lee has
given to Alabama with reluctance, but with a mother's blessing.

John Holladay Latane.



Or Campbell Brothers




AT an interregnum is dangerous may be a general principle, but it is a
principle to which there are sometimes exceptions. When Dr. Denny re-
signed the presidency ol Washington and Lee many an alumnus, possibly
many a student, wondered how the L niversity would pass through the period
which must ensue until a new president assumed office. Half this time is
now by, and as yet there is no evidence that the reins have been dropped or
are being held less firmly, or that the institution is being any less i.uelulK
guided than in the past. She is still "doing business at the old stand," and
doing it just as successfully as ever. To be sure, there are two heads instead of one, but
there is no disadvantage in this if there is always harmony, as in the present i~stance.

Such a state of affairs would hardly have been possible had there not been two men,
brothers, each connected with Washington and Lee by inheritance and by a service well
over a quarter of a century in duration, reared in its atmosphere and imbued with its
traditions, familiar with its every detail of academic and social life, ready and qualified
to carry on the executive duties, with lull appioval and co-operation ol trustees, faculty
and students. I hat their work is being well done the present condition ol the University
bears witness. To them, the Campbell brothers, John Lyle and Harry Donald, we
dedicate this appreciation.

The name of Campbell has long been associated with Washington College and
Washington and Lee University. The father of John Lyle and Harry Donald graduated
here in 1843. He, too, was a John Lyle. and from 1851 till his death in 1886 held
the chair of chemistry and geology in this institution. Three of his brothers were also
graduates, and one of them was for a time instructor in mathematics. Two other sons
of his were graduates here, at least three nephews, one grandson, another grandson is at
present in college, and "still there's more to follow.' 1 he present executive heads of
Washington and Lee were surely "to the manor born." I heir father's duties took him
far beyond the precincts of the L niversity. and he was distinguished both as chemist and
geologist. He also interested himself much in local civic affairs and was for many years
Superintendent of Schools for Rockbridge County. It has been naturally with no little
pride that in this respect, as in others, Harry Donald has lollowed in his lather's footsteps.
In spite of college duties, certainly at times very onerous, he is secretary ol the Lexington
School Board, and was largely instrumental m the erection ol the new building of the
Lexington High School. lo his counsels on the Board ol Health is due much of the
sanitary improvement of the town. Familiar, too. as no one else with the physiography of
the region about Lexington, he was able to point out a source ol pure soft water, and we
doubt not that in the near future the town water supply will be pointed to as his greatest



c i\ u ,cn ii e.



240



How Washington and Lee could have gotten along without John Lyle Campbell in
the past thirty years, one may well ask. Since 1877 he has been treasurer of the institu-
tion, and most of this lime secretary of the faculty and of the Board of Trustees. He
was the first official we met as we performed cur initial act of matriculation. It was he
who helped us find a room and boarding-place; he who was prompt with a notice if we
were not prompt with our academic accounts; he who was lenient with us in our financial
straits, and even whose dun was more pleasant than some other men's thanks. It is he




HARRY DONALD CAMPBELL



who always makes one feel a welcome guest in his office, and who is never too busy to
render any service within his power to a student. His office seems as well to be a general
home for the faculty, and we wonder how it is possible for one so often interrupted to
carry on his work. ^ et that the work is done, and well done, is evidenced by the financial
condition of the University. To be responsible for the productive investment of nearly
a million of dollars and to have the care of buildings and grounds representing half as
much more; to collect and disburse the fees of more than six hundred students; to act
as secretary of faculty and trustees, and incidentally to be a valued counsellor on all



matters pertaining to the welfare of the institution; to do all tins and to do it well would
be .1 greal big task for any man: but to do it all, and still be never too engrossed for a
friendly word, never too occupied to be at the service of his fellow man — this is John Lyle
Campbell. It is no wonder that all the alumni are his friends and that he is ever a welcome
guest at alumni banquets; that to the men who have gone forth Irom these walls he, more
than anyone else, represents the institution.

A translation from Purgatory to Paradise should be a happy lot. For the benefit
ol recent graduates and undergraduates, be it known that the end of the mam building,
Irom which, as in time past so in time present, there emanate fumes which might have come
from the Inferno, was once known as Purgatory. Here our Dean was raised and in his
youthful days held sway, but in due process of time he was graduated to the other end
of the building, then known as Paradise. It is saying a good deal for the teaching knowl-
edge of a man that he can handle not only his specialty of geology and mineralogy, but
also chemistry and biology and physiology and hygiene. But a half-dozen generations of
students can testify that everything that Harry C ampbell taught was well taught. Inci-
dentally may we hope that in the future he may be permitted to concentrate Ins energies
on that which he has sought to make his life work. He has already brought reputation
to Washington and Lee by his geological investigations, and he will bring yet more; the
academic possibilities in the development of this department, so fundamental in the
industrial progress of the South, need no comment. May the opportunity be his!

A man may possess knowledge and be able to impart it, yet fail of success as a
teacher. 1 le must be able to give himself to his students, and he must be himself worth
the giving. A student who has passed through the courses in the geological or biological
departments at Washington and Lee has indeed learned geology or biology, but he has
learned something more: he has become more of a man; he has become better fitted and
more eager to serve his fellow man; he has felt the impress of a true teacher.

To speak of Harry Campbell's services to the University outside of the classroom
would touch upon well-nigh every phase of college activities. We must, however, allude
to his furtherance of every athletic interest, and especially his work in connection with
the development of the Wilson Athletic Field. We can hardly imagine what athletics
would be here had we no Wilson Field, and without detracting in the least from the
earlier services of Professor Humphreys and the recent effective labors of Dr. Pollard, we
may note that from first to last everything has been done with the continued counsel of
our Dean, as a continuous member and for several years chairman ol the Faculty Ath-
letic Committee.

When a few years ago the growth ol the University made it necessary to appoint
some one to lake charge of many matters which in the days of small things were carried
on by president or faculty, it was recognized that the only man lor tin- place was Harry
Campbell. As Dean, more and more duties devolved upon him, not merely in matters
academic, but also frequently during the absence of the president matters disciplinary:



hence he has come ever more in touch with the whole student body, as he had previously
been with those in his own department, and it is needless to add that his extending
influence has been for the great advantage of all who have been brought into contact with
him. It was thus only natural that with the resignation of President Denny his duties
should fall upon the Dean and Treasurer, for this had been the case whenever Dr. Denny
had been obliged to be away from the University. It was merely an almost unnoticed
transition, as the Campbell brothers became, by act of the trustees, Acting co-Presidents
of Washington and Lee. We can assure our alumni that no interests of the University




JOHN LYLE CAMPBELL

have suffered at their hands, and we think the student body would be satisfied to have
the present conditions of authority continue indefinitely. We are glad it lasted long
enough for our Dean to be honored with the well-merited degree of Doctor of Science at
the recent great anniversary celebration at the University of Pittsburg. We only regret
that the Treasurer was not equally honored. We are certain it is seldom that a new
executive comes, as will President Smith, to an institution where he has two such men
to depend upon in "learning the ropes" and getting a grip on things.

Fralres Campbell, nos salutamus!

249



PresitientsClect I)rnn> ilouts ^mttl), pi).D.




HORTL^ alter the resign, ilion o! Dr. Denny, the Board of Trustee- ol
Washington and Lee University, appointed a committee consisting of Dr.
G. B. Strickler, the Rector, and Messrs. Paul IY1. Penick and Lucian 11.
Cocke, Trustees, to consider all the available men for the presidency ol this
noble institution, fully aware ol then responsibility, this committee can-
vassed the field thoroughly, and finally decided to recommend to the Board
President Henry Louis Smith, Ph. D., LL. D.. now at the head ol
Davidson College. North Carolina. January 24. at a special called meet-
ing, the Board emphatically endorsed the recommendation of the Committee by the unani-
mous election of Dr. Smith, who signified his acceptance I- ebruary 26, and will enter
upon the duties ol his office July 1,1912. I he choice is an admirable one. It will meet
with the cordial approval of all Southern educators, and will win the hearts of the alumni
and friends of Washington and Lee University.

Dr. Smith has made a decided success in his present position. In 1901, when he
was elected president ol Davidson College, this institution had 122 students. Now it


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Online LibraryWashington and Lee UniversityCalyx (Volume 1912) → online text (page 10 of 17)