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FOREWORD



W'



'ITHIN THE COVERS OF THIS BOOK, THE
1922 VOLUME OF THE CALYX. WE HAVE
ENDEAVORED TO INCLUDE THOSE
I RECORDS OF THE PAST YEAR WHICH WE BE-

i LIEVE, IN THE YEARS TO COME, WILL SERVE

AS PLEASANT MEMORIES FOR THE MEMBERS
OF OUR CLASS, AND WILL CALL FORTH THE
WONDROUS REMINISCENCES OF THEIR UNDER-
GRADUATE DAYS. \ \ \ \ \
THERE IS NO DOUBT THAT WE HAVE FAILED
TO INCLUDE RECORDS OF INCIDENTS, PERSON-
ALITIES, AND PLACES THAT ARE DEAR TO THE
HEARTS OF MANY, FOR THIS, WE ARE INDEED
SORRY, AND IF IT SHOULD HAPPEN THAT IN
SO DOING WE HAVE OFFENDED ANYONE, WE
TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO BEG FORGIVENESS,
THE WEALTH AND QUANTITY OF MATERIAL FOR
A BOOK SUCH AS THIS CANNOT BE MEASURED,
AND IT IS INDEED NO LIGHT TASK TO ELIMI-
NATE FROM ITS PAGES ALL EXTRANEOUS MATTER
WE REALIZE THE POSSIBILITY OF OVER DOING
ANY CERTAIN SUBJECT, AND IN SPITE OF OUR
EFFORTS, PARTS OF THE BOOK MAY PROVE UN-
INTERESTING AND EVEN TIRESOME TO SOME—
THUS DEFEATING OUR PRIMARY AIM TO
COMPILE A CONCISE AND RELEVANT RECORD
IF WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO PLACE BEFORE YOU
THE MATERIAL IN OUR POSSESSION IN A CO-
HERENT AND SATISFACTORY MANNER, WE HAVE
ACCOMPLISHED OUR PURPOSE. AND WE HOPE
THAT EDITORS OF THE CALYX IN FUTURE YEARS
WILL RECEIVE BOTH AID AND INSPIRATION
FROM OUR SUCCESSES AND FAILURES, \ ^



lBir^Vtiti0n




So

iE^iiar iFutbij ^liamtnn. Pli.i-

3h\ rea^rrt at\h aiJmtration for liis arltolarly

attatitmnitii an& tuBptring pprHonaltla

iEljia 1922 ITolumf of tl|p (Ealyx

3a i3pliiratf&



DOCTOR EDGAR FINLEY SHANNON, Professor of English at Washington and Lee. was Ijorn in Bourli.in fountv,
Kentucky. September 19. 1874. the son of James Butler Shannon and Lois Va.shti McCain, his wife.
Passing his early life in the bluegrass section of Kentuck.v, he there developed the strength of will and purpose and
the length of body that are said to be the natural products of that portion of our countr.v.

After the customary secondary school training of the time and place of his boyhood, he entered Centre College, where he
gr,Hclnateci in 18M with the B.A. degree-

liachinK. an,l in 189.i, joined the Faculty of the University of Arkansas as

niL' in mil-'. A^M,,ial,■ ProfesM.r of Kntrlisli and Modern Languages: in IMC,

;. ■.:■ ,.! Arl- :in.l Scl, nils. In ml t, lie la to Washington and Lee as Prii-

I I. ninri ihoii li.' ...iiliinics l>. huM.

11. . I Mm .. .1,1 ii.u.d zeal ufllic student, and Ml, in 190i!, he received the Jlaster's
II 1 111 ■,*, ;,'radiiated with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. During
I Knn.pe.
I I . \ille, .\rk., whose charming personality, joined to that of Doctor



Following this, he took up the |.r..fi
AvM„ial.- I'nifevM.r of Aiuienl Laln'm:,
l'r,,r.'-,i.r ..f Kiiflivli. :.n<i in l!ll:l, il
f, r ..f Knt'lisi, :,n.l Il.a.l of llir I

Bui l,,ln^|)r..f.■~^"^ial,luh,■.,l^ \-

degree from Hav.ir.l. fr 1

thesameperi.i.l.l,,. fonnilM

In l!lllt III- married \\ ■ I .



Sha

Don,, I -;, I. , 1 ,,

Omicrini II : ,, K ,|,:,, , i,i I', i I;,
Sill.. , w . .

studenU .,! ,i I ■ . _:,|, -,,:'■, I ,,

him to ellj..\- a j..k., I'V.,.! if II I,., al

Well V.TM-.I ill 111,- ClasMMs, l),„l
in regard lo llie Clerk ..f Ox,iit,.r.l pi

DccL.r Shannon lia, !«,. p.ls an
aversion, si.. velllv work. F..r, Inni-.lf
tliinkii.g ..r iiiiM,ii,.larlv u..rk 11.- i.
aeliviti,,, ..f .■.,lli-j;e life, li.', .,- l..,|n- !.i
h.il.Mirmlv I., III.- llu'si- I In



I'r.-I.yte



I Church. South.



nber of Delta Kappa Epsilon, Sigma I'psilon,



i,..-. Doctor Shannon has continually grown in the esteem and affection of both his
illv He is sane, sensible, and s,-holarlv. and possessed of a fund of humor that allows
l~ own ex|)i-nse. wliiill same is held l.v liianv I.. I.,- I lie Hllal test of a human being,
r Slialinon is ~,.iiii.llv traim-.l in FiiKliOi, and i, an anlliorilv ,.n Chaucer, whose words
iir.- w.-ll l)..,l..r Slninii..li. for: '(.lailK- w,,le li.- lern,- all.l gladlv teelie."
..11,- |.,-l av,r.i..li; 1 1„- l«„ pel, l.,-iliR Kilgar. junior i.it'ed llireel. ami Cllall,-i-r: his pet
11 a.-.-iir;il.- ..Iiohi r a li.l all a.-.-nral,- tliink,-r. li,-,-ann,.l ami d..,-s n,,t bear willl ilia,-(-lirate

...lit ,il -,. k.r .fl.r Inilli. all.l viliile a ,lallli.li l,eli,-ver in llie various ,-\l ra-.-lirrieula

i-.ll ,1 |.r.„].i. In. -, li,.kir «li,.,earti,-l,-, are pill, li-lie.l «illi pleaMir,- alul rea,l « ill, profit,
.f 1 1..- .-..Il.-K.,- .,r llie iiiiiv. rsilv i, llie pr...lu,-li f tlioiightfiil s,-li,.larsliip joined



to those other qualities of m.uI and spirit llial make the youth that nliieh Doctor



on himself i



-in truth a

-D. B. E.



Snlanft iSuthrrfnr^ fall

fflnorrtirlft. IBtBl Hiryiiiia
irmlmr^. iEciii 29. 1921




l"". M M u/A. N 5 .




^hip me back to old Virginia,

Where the summer s^ies are blue.

Where the gods walk on the hilltops.
In the sunset's rosy hue.

For I've heard their voices calling.

And it's there that I would be.
In the shadow of the mountains.

Back ol Washington and Lee.



By the banks of old North River,
Winding lazy round the hill.

To the dear old College Campus,
My thoughts are turning still.

For the college bells are calling.
And I know they say to me.

Come you back, you old Alumnus.
Back 'o Washington and Lee.







* ' ^^onhood made thee.

Honor stayed thee.
By truth thou shalt prevail,

Bowered in beauty, built on duty,
IVashington and Lee, all hail."




"prom the old South Gate.'




* '(j" *c''c'' among your idle dreams.
Your busy or your vain extremes.
And find a life of equal bliss.

Or own the next begun in this."




*"7*'/ie thought of our past years, in me doth
breed perpetual benediction.




* '^^ere, where the world is quiet;

Here, where all the trouble seems
Dead winds' and spent waves' riot
In doubtful dreams of dreams."




" '^ouards the East at Sunrise.




"J^ashington and Lee, all Hail,
Hail this, our glorious team.
Now altogether we will prevail.
So let the echo ring."




"De il ours to meditate

In these calm shades

"Thy sights shall cheer the weary traveler's toil.
And Joy shall hail me to my native soil.




"J ike as the waves make towards the pebbled shore.
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before.
In sequent toil all forwards do contend."




^''lYhcrc once my careless childhood strayed.
A stranger yet to pain.



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'"^hough friendships fail and friends be few,
We'll love thee still, our Alma Mater,
Our dear old W and L U."




'"^T^hrough ihe Columns.




"r^limbing up to meet the blue,

Stands our tropbied school.
Honor is its heritage.
Chivalry its rule."




' ' ^eat of my youth where every sport could please.




' * fATatural Bridge — not on the
Campus, but near it."



ADNINISTRATION




^mnsniaeoon—uiEU amowRSJjQf



-^cwuay



Trustees



William Alexander Anderson, 1885

LuciAN Howard Cocke, 1898

George Walker St. Clair, 1901

John Sinclair Munce, 1901

Frank Thomas Glasgow, 1907

William Dickinson Lewis, 1907 .

Robert Edward Lee, 1915 .

Rev. William McClanahan White, 1915

Harrington Waddell, 1915

William Alexander McCorkle, 1918 .

Rev. Abel McIver Fraser, 1918

John William Davis, 1921



Lexington, Virginia

Roanoke, Virginia

Tazewell, Virginia

Richmond, Virginia

Lexington, Virginia

Charleston, West Virginia

Burke, Fairfax County, Virginia

Raleigh, North Carolina

Lexington, Virginia

Charleston, West Virginia

Staunton, Virginia

New York, New York



126]



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The Outlook

SINCE the dist)iganization of the war and the doletLiI da\s of the S. A. T. C,
the progress of Washington and Lee has been almost meteoric, especially
when we consider the business depression of the whole South durmg the past
eighteen months.

The popularity of Washington and Lee both with the public and in educational
circles is rapidly increasing. The number of students applying for admission, in
spite of rigid entrance requirements and unusual tuition tees, has far surpassed the
accommodations of the University, with each year breaking all previous records.
The Million-Dollar Campaign is drawing to its close in a blaze of glory with over
^1,300,000 already subscribed. Ihe alumni have employed a permanent secretary,
the athletics of the institution are on a Hrmer footing and under better management
than ever before, the relations between student-body and faculty are most cordial
and harmonious, and the whole institution is permeated with an atmosphere of
enthusiasm and hopefulness.

The editors of the South with singular unanimity and enthusiasm have under-
taken to re-establish and endow Ceneral Lee's original School of Journalism;
The United Daughters of the Confederacy are raising money over the whole United
States to make the Lee Chapel in architectural beauty and stateliness worthy ot
the sacred dust it enshrines; and the whole South is waking anew to a realization
of the fact that Washington and Lee is the one All-Southern historic institution,
independent of Church and State divisions, which is to serve as the fruitful nursery
of Southern and National leadership through coming generations.

H. L. S.



-132.^



[27]



128]



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'^



School of Law

JosKPH Ragland Long, LL.B., LL.D.
Dean of the School of Law

Bradford Professor of La-w

William Haywood Moreland, LL.B.

Bradford Professor of Law

Clayton Epes Williams, LL.B.
Professor of Law

Lewis Tyree, M.A., LL.B.

Professor of Law

Lames Burroughs Noell, M.A., LL.B.
Associate Professor of Law



-/922^



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Academic School



ANCIENT LANGUAGES
James William Kern, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Ancient Languages

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

William Moseley Brown, M.A. .... Professor of Education

Daniel Thomas Ordeman, B.A. . Student Assistant in Education

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH



Edgar Finley Shannon, Ph.D. .
William Edward Farnham, Ph.D.
James Strong Moffat, Ph.D.
John Wilson Bowyer, B.A.
Fitzgerald Flournoy, B.A.
George Edward Harris, Jr.



Professor of English

Associate Professor of English

Assistant Professor of English

Howard Houston Fellotv in English

Instructor in English

Student Assistant m English



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN

Thomas James Farrar, Ph.D. .... Professor of German

Sidney Hal Price ..... Student Assistant in German

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

Franklin Lafayette Riley, Ph.D., LL.D. . Professor of History

D. HuGER Bacot, M.A. .... Assistant Professor of History
William Tipton Caldwell, B.A. . Instructor in History
William Best Hesseltine .... Student Assistant in History

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

Livingston Waddell Smith, Ph.D. . . Professor of Mathematics

Earle Kerr Paxton, M.A. . Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Homer A. Holt, B.A. ..... Instructor in Mathematics

L. P. Haynes ...... Instructor in Mathematics

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY
James Robert Howerton, M.A., D.D., LL.D. Professor of Philosophy

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES

De La Warr Benjamin Easter, Ph.D. Professor of Romance Languages

John Alexander Graham, B.A. . Associate Professor of Romance Languages
Rupert Nelson Latture, M.A. . Assistant Professor of Romance Languages
W. T. Spencer, B.A. ...... Instructor in Spanish

G. J. Irwin, B.A. ...... Instructor in French

DEPARTMENT OF HYGIENE

John William Hobbs Pollard, M.D. Professor of Hygiene and Physical Educatioii'

Forest Fletcher, E.E. . Associate Professor of Physical Education

Earnest E. Brett, B.P.E. . . Instructor in Physical Education

E. P. TwoMBLY, B.P.E. Instructoi in Physical Education
William L. Leap . . . . Student Assistant in Physical Education

130]

^92S.




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School of Applied Science

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

William Dana Ho-iT, Ph.D Projessor oj Biology

Charles O. Handley Student Assistant in Biology

KiLBY A. Page ...... Student Assistant in Biology

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

James Lewis Howe, Ph.D., M.D. Professor of Chemistry

Lucius Junius Desha, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry

Russell W. WiNSLOW, B.S. . . . Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Cicero B. Ogburn, Jr., B.A Instructor in Chemistry

Dewey A. Reynolds ..... Student Assistant in Chemistry

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

William Thomas Lyle, C.E. Professor of Civil Engineering

Hale Houston, C.E. . Associate Professor of Civil Engineering

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

Henry Donald Campbell, Ph.D., Sc.D. Professor of Geology

Robert Murr.ay Bear .... Student Assistant in Geology

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS

Walter Le Conte Stevens, Ph.D. . . Professor of Physics

Robert William Dickey, Ph.D -issociate Professor of Physics

M. I. Dunn ...... Student Assistant in Physics

Richard E. Sherrill Student Assistant in Physics



-/92^



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School of Commerce



Glover Dunn Hancock, Ph.D. WilsonProjessor oj Economics and Commerce.

Dean of the School of Commerce



Robert Gr.\nville Campbell, Ph.D.
Solly Hartzo, B.A.
L. Y. Thompson, B.A.



Professor of Political Science
Instructor in Political Science
Instructor in Political Science



Robert Henry Tucker, M. A. Professor of Economics and Business Administration
William Coan, M.A. . . Associate Professor of Commerce and Accoundng

Garland Alexander ..... Student Assistant in Accounting
Edmund Douglas Campbell, M.A. Assistant Professor of Commerce

Emmett W. Poindexter, B.A. .... Instructor in Economics

R. S. Weaver, B.A., M.A. ..... Instructor in Commerce



m\



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DEAN CAMPBELL

Administration

Henry Louis Smith, Ph.D., LL.D. ...... President

Henry Donald Campbell, Ph.D., Sc.D. ..... Dean

Paul McNeel Penick ........ Treasurer

Earl Stansbury Mattingly ...... Registrar

Miss Anne Robertson White ...... Librarian

Edwin Beswick Shultz, B.A. .... Y . M. C. A. Secretary

Edwin Parks Davis, LL.B. ..... Alumni Secretary

William Caulfield Raftery ..... Athletic Coach

Richard Andrew Smith ..... Graduate Manager Athletics
[361

i92^



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>ua?

The Traditions of Washington and Lee

So much has been said at various times about the traditions of
schools, that we feel we must say a word for Washington and
Lee in this regard. We believe, frankly, that it is the traditions
of the school, living on after their beginnings in associations with such
men as George Washington and General Robert E. Lee, that differen-
tiates Washington and Lee from all other universities.

Traditions must ultimately find their bases in history. Listen
to the history from which our traditions and our ideals are drawn.

Early in the eighteenth century, a stream of Scotch-Irish
immigrants began to spread over the mountainous parts ot Pennsyl-
vania, Maryland, and Virginia. The settlers in Augusta County, Va.,
in 1749, established a school about fifteen miles southwest of what is
now the City of Staunton, and called it the Augusta Academy. In
1776 the name Augusta Academy was changed to Liberty Hall, and
in 1780 the school was moved to the immediate vicinity of Lexington.

Through the influence of Mr. Graham, its principal. Liberty
Hall was incorporated by the Legislature of Virginia in 1782 as
Liberty Hall Academy. It had been for a short time under the care
of the Presbytery of Hanover, but it received now a charter, under
the terms of which the board of trustees became independent and
self-perpetuating. In 1793 a stone building was erected in which Mr.
Graham labored until his resignation in 1796.

The first important gift received by Liberty Hall Academy was
conferred by George Washington. In recognition of his services in
the Revolution, the Legislature of Virginia presented him in 1784
with a number of shares in a canal company. Washington would not
accept these for his own benefit, but turned them over to Liberty
Hall to which his attention had been called. The generous gift was
accepted by the trustees, who acknowledged the gift, following an
act of the legislature in 1798, changing the name of the school to
Washington Academy. The property thus bestowed on Washington
Academy still yields an annual income of three thousand dollars to
Washington and Lee University.



[37]

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-4a£c



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The bequest of Washington served to inspire another gift. The
Cincinnati Society was an organization of surviving officers of the
Revolutionary War, with a branch in each of the several States. In
1802 the Virginia Society decided to disband. Inspired by the example
of Washington, the Society bestowed its funds to the value of about
twenty-five thousand dollars upon the academy.

In December, 1802, the academy building was destroyed by
fire, and in 1803 the work of the school was conducted in rented
buildings within the limits of Lexington. Before the end of 1804 a
building was constructed on the grounds of the present university,
from which the ruins of the old academy are still visible, a half-mile
from Washington College, this being the next title the school was to
assume by act of the legislature.

An important impulse was received through the bequest of over
forty-six thousand dollars by John Robinson, a native of Ireland and
a soldier under Washington.

Soon after the outbreak of the Civil War, the work of the college
was discontinued, most of its students enlisting in the Confederate
Army under the name of the Liberty Hall Volunteers. The buildings
and other property were much injured during the federal occupation
of Lexington in June, 1864. About thirty years later, remuneration
was granted by Congress for the destruction of property.

At the close of the war, the college without income borrowed
money on the private credit of some of the trustees tor the repair of
buildings. Rehabilitation was now begun. On August 4, 1865,
General Robert E. Lee was elected president, and was formally
installed in October. During his administration of five years the
growth of the college in numbers and influence was phenomenal. In
the rear of the chapel which he built, a mausoleum was subsequently
erected in which his remains are interred. Over them is a recumbent
statue of him in marble, by the sculptor, Valentine.

In 1849 a law school was founded in Lexington by Judge John W.
Brockenbrough. Under the influence of General Lee the Lexington
Law School became, in 1866, the "School of Law and Equity of
Washington College", with Judge Brockenbrough as professor in
charge.

138]

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^u^\^



Soon after the death of Cleneral Lee, in 1871, the name of
Washington College was changed to its present corporate title, "The
Washington and Lee University".

From such meagre beginnings have grown the traditions, the
ideals, the characte'r, and the progressiveness of the University.

Considering the wonderful inspirational assets of Washington
and Lee, we need not be surprised at its nationalism. Although
located in the very focus of Southern History and tradition, its
campus has become the meeting-ground for North, South, East, and
West, where a universal friendliness knows no difference between
parties, sections, or religions. Of the 770 students enrolled in 1921-22,
430, or more than two-thirds, are from outside Virginia. Three-
tourths ot the LIniversity's endowment and equipment are National
rather than Southern in origin. The extraordinary inHuence of its
alumni in national affairs, from the time of Meriwether Lewis to
the present, bears witness to the national spirit engendered within its
walls.

Throughout the history of the institution, Washington and Lee
has been a center of ardent patriotism and Evangelical religion.

Its sons exemplified the spirit of their Alma Mater on the fields
ot the Revolution. In 1861 they left the campus in a body as the
Liberty Hall Volunteers, and shed their blood on a score of the battle-
fields during the dark days of the Civil War. Lately, the horrors of
France and Flanders were braved by its thousand representatives in
the military service.

In Independence and Progressiveness Washington and Lee is
unique among Southern institutions. It stands almost alone in its
entire independence of Church and State. Deeply and evangelically
Christian in its founders and presidents, its local environment, its
ideals and traditions, it is governed by a self-perpetuating board and
is under no denominational control. Although located in the heart of
Virginia and itself a shrine of Southern tradition, it is entirely inde-
pendent of Virginia politics or legislative control.

Washington and Lee was the first school in America to recognize
journalism as a profession, and established regular courses in this
department. The first endowed School of Commerce in the South
was founded at Washington and Lee with its own faculty, building,

19^^ ^



-€>a£ua?-



library, and reading-room. It is also one of the very few Southern
institutions which for many years has allowed a student to substitute
modern languages and take an A.B. degree without either Greek or
Latin. In the freedom of its elective system, its universal physical
training, and its fifteen-unit requirement for entrance, it also follows
National rather than Southern customs and standards.

We call Washington and Lee, therefore, A NATIONAL INSTI-
TUTION located in the shrine of Southern tradition, A CENTER OF
PATRIOTISM since Colonial times, yet independent of State or
party politics, A LOYALLY CHRISTIAN INSTITUTION, yet
independent of Church control.



[40]



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C[a55C5.



POST-CRAP




John Wilson Bowyer

Lexington, Virginia

* B K; Z T; Arcades Club; Editor-in-Chiej
Calyx, '21-22, University Editor Calyx, '20-'2i;
"Ring-turn Phi" Staff, 'iQ-'20, Associate Editor
"Ring-turn Phi", '20-' 21; Howard Houston Fellow-
ship, '21; Vincent L. Bradford Scholarship, '20;
Franklin Society Scholarship, 'ig; German Schol-
arship, ' iS; Secretary Graham Washington Liter-
ary Society, '21; Instructor in English, '21-22:
Member Debating Council.

John W. Bowyer was born in Rockbridge
County within the sound of the old college bell,
whose hourly ringing, year in and year out, early
impressed upon his youthful mind the place
where he was destined to seek achievement.
Having accumulated various honors and scholar-
ships at the Lexington High School, "Johnny"
entered Washington and Lee in the Fall of 1917.

He soon distinguished himself as belonging to
that exclusive group known as "sharks", whose
wearisome duty it is to trail around a string of
A's, scholarships, and grade the papers of their
more fortunate fellows. To make a long story
short, he secured his B..A. along with Phi Beta
Kappa in 1921, and now holds the University's
highest scholastic honor — the Howard Houston
Fellowship. John has been a leader in literary
and journalistic work, being for 1922 the Editor
of the Calyx, a position held by but few of the
"home-town boys."




1421



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'^





William Tipton Caldwell
Tiptonville, Tennessee

"I> B K; Instructor in History: Latin Scholarship,
'iS-'iq; History Scholarship, 'iQ-'io; I'arsity
Track Team, '30-'3i; I'arsity Cross Country
Team, ' iQ-'lo; Monogram, '21.

Tip" is one of our shining lights in scholastic
paths, and "many were the hearts" that were
glad to see his return as history instructor.
He did in three years what others take four years
to accomplish, never failing to make the Honor
Roll during that time. History was his special
delight.

Time lor study and time for play is in "1 ip's"
make-up and he created no slight effulgence in
his track work on the Cross Country and Varsity
Track teams, making his monogram on the
latter.

His earnestness ot purpose, strength of char-
acter, and brilliant scholarship, assure him em-
inent success in the law profession which he
intends to follow, after taking his law course at
Harvard.



Fitzgerald Flournoy, B.A.
Bayview, Virginia

* K *; * B K; O A K; i: T; .i :: P; Graham-Lee
Society: Founder and Editor ^Wlink", *2/; State
Oratorical Contest, '20 and '21: Cincinnati Orator's


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