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WASHINGTON



AND LEE UNIVERSITY



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Published Annually by the Students of WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA



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CONTENTS












• ADMINISTRATION



• CLASSES



• FEATURES



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ORGANIZATIONS



e FRATERNITIES



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• ATHLETICS



FARRIS HOTCHKISS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

BILL ROBERTS
BUSINESS MANAGER





THE NINETEEN FIFTY-EIGHT

CALYX





The Container Corporation of America has, over the past few years,
presented to the American public a series of illustrated quotations en-
tiHed "Great Ideas of Western Man." Each of these have been chosen
because of a particular pertinence to education, government, morals, and
other allied subjects. In addition, the art work has been done by the most
prominent commercial artists. Special permission was granted by the Con-
tainer Corporation for the use of those reproductions appearing in the
1958 CALYX. For this favor we acknowledge our thanks.




purpose



The statement "man as a rational being" has often prefaced sundry remarks and
descriptions of the human race. Logically speaking, this well-worn phrase is very signifi-
cant as it illuminates the salient difference between the "homo sapiens" and all other forms
of animal life.

Moreover, as man is a thinking being, it suggests a very profound and possibly
dangerous adjunct of his existence. That is, he has the power to direct his course as
regards himself and his relations with others. To the extent that these relations are car-
ried forth in a harmonious manner, his power has, and will, reach its highest fruition. But
to the extent that mental energy is spent in solveniy, selfish, and unproductive activit-
ies, the great benefit of the mind is circumvented and its presence is to no good avail.

For better or for worse, then, man has recorded a history of thought. He has built
civilizations and he has destroyed them, hie has made peace and declared war. He has
risen to the heights of moral attainment and has fallen to the depths of decadence.
Whether these actions have been lauded or condemned, they are all products of the
mind.

As is true with all else, some men have been blessed with better or more active mental
powers than others. To these has fallen the heavy responsibility of recording history,
analyzing its results and proposing theories as to its eventual outcome. Others have
theorized on utopias of both political and economic nature. But above the various ap-








Change of Class on the Colonnade.



proaches lies a transcendent purpose, that is, to improve man and the
places in which he lives.

It soon became evident that there must be a systematic method by
which to communicate the knowledge of the past to the present, for
the benefit of the future. This method is education.

Although much of the educative process is creative, there is, never-
theless, a building on the archives of the past. These collected thoughts
of the scholars of antiquity are not limiting in their nature, but rather
serve to direct the thoughts along known channels. Early investigations
of thought provide the foundations on which modern conjecture must
rest.

It is here that the vital role of the University appears. In taking the
great ideas of the past, interpreting them, and building upon them,
the security of the future is, in part, assured. There must, however, be a
highly selective process of deleting that which has little value and utiliz-
ing that which has great value.

Washington and Lee is one of hundreds of institutions striving for



J



the mental maturity needed to judge between the alternatives offered by the past. It is this
role that is so vital to the safety of the American tradition, and without which our security
is in danger.

As we cast off the peripheral, we must direct our thoughts to the esential and central core
of this institution. Although its physical history covers but a few hundred years, that which
we will cherish as part of our heritage covers a far greater span of time; it represents the
recorded history of man, his hopes, fears, joys, loves, or more inclusive, his ideas, the totality
of which represent the unbroken chain of rational human heritage.

In a moment in time we have been capable of bringing both the past and the future into
the immediate present. Thus it seems, as it were, that we stand at a "still point in the turning
world"; we have been introduced to the eternal crossroads of rationale where the sum total
of human learning may pass before our minds.

The illumination of the past is, inversely, the key to the future. Only a thorough knowledge
of the past will give us the right to speculation and experimentation in time to come. We,
through the very nature of this institution, have become the mediators of the past and the
future. It is this responsibility of being the caretakers of the record handed down through
ages past that should be cherished as the essential and significant meaning of our associa-
tion with Washington and Lee.

In truth, the very substance of this University has been bestowed upon us; the instruction
in the history of man; his ideas. From this moment on, each concrete symbol that calls to
memory our residence here must also call into being the gift we have received. We are no
longer the observers of the substance of this University, rather, we are now the transmittors.




The culmination of four years
is made by a leisurely stroll
from Washington Hall to the
lawn of the President's home.




Spring discussion and pol-

ifics af the Omicron Delta

Kappa Circle



Many hours spent in Mc-

Cormiclt Library pass

away.






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Enthusiastic football crowd
packs the stands of Wilson Field



Freshnnen receive Iheir orienta-
tion in the tent ai Freshman
Camp.




The late Marcellus H. Stow, Professor of Geology.




in memoriam



As a scholar, friend, and gentleman Dr.
Marcellus H. Stow will be remembered by
his students and fellow faculty members. It
is with deep appreciation and sorrow that
we mark his untimely passing. The 1958
Calyx humbly dedicates this book to his
memory.



I




GRCAT IDEAS OF WESTEDN MAN



CONTAINER CORPORATION OF AMERICA




Managing Editor

EVAN KEMP

Assistant Editor

DON SIGMUND

Editorial Assistant

IRBY WALTON



^nsm



administration



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the
president





To the Seniors of I 958:

We thank you. We who watch the years
bring us our students and then take them away
— from our campus but not from our hearts —
are grateful that you elected this school as your
Alma Mater.

You go forth into your own world, in many
ways a world uniquely exciting, challenging,
even perilous. We hope we have given some
fitness for the complex opportunity, some cour-
age for the dangerous duty. We hope also that
you, remembering the traditions of your Uni-
versity, are mindful of the changeless in a world
of change.



branch f . Ljcii



the deans




LEON F. SENSABAUGH
Dean of the University



LEWIS W. ADAMS

1 of the Commerce Scho(



FRANK J. GILLIAM
Dean of Men



JAMES D. FARRAR



CLAYTON E. WILLIAMS

Dean of the Law School



EARL S. MATTINSLY

University Treasurer



administration




EDWIN H HOWARD Registra

HENRY E. COLEMAN Librariai

RICHARD L. SELWICK Religious Activities Directo

RUPERT N, LATTURE Freshman Work Directo



HENRY L RAVENHORST Housing Director

ANDREW B, VARNER Assistant Treasurer

FRANK A, PARSONS Publicity Director






^>7s.ys5




LIBRARY OF

WASHINGTON & LEF L'NI\'ERS!TY

LEXINGTON. VA.




ACCOUNTING

JAY D COOK, PhD Associate Professor

THOMAS E. ENNIS, MBA Assistant Professor

AMERICAN STUDIES
MARSHALL W. FISHWICK, Pli.D Professor

BIOLOGY

KENNETH P STEVENS, Ph.D Professor

JAMES H STARLING, Pfi D, Professor

JOSEPH J MURRAY, MA Instructor

CHEMISTRY

LUCIUS J, DESHA, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus

ESMARCH S. GILREATH, PhD Prolessot

JOHN H. WISE, PhD Associate Professor

JAMES K. SHILLINGTON, PhD Assistant Professor

WILLIAM J. WATT, Ph.D Assistant Professor

COMMERCE

LEWIS K. JOHNSON, Ph.D Professor

BRANSTON B. HOLDER. Ph.D Associate Professor

LELAND W. McCLOUD. Ph.D Associate Professor

ECONOMICS

ROBERT H. TUCKER, A.M., LL.D Professor Emeritus

LEWIS W. ADAMS, Ph.D. Professor

EDWIN C. GRIFFITH, Ph.D Professor

•MERTON O. PHILLIPS, Ph.D Professor

EDWARD C. ATWOOD, MA Assistant Professor

JOHN M. GUNN, M.A Assistant Professor

ENGINEERING
HENRY L. RAVENHORST, B S Assistant Professor

ENGLISH

JAMES S. MOFFAH, Ph D Professor Emeritus

MARVIN B. PERRY, Ph.D Professor

FITZGERALD FLOURNOY, Ph,D Professor



GEORGE H. FOSTER. Ph.D Professor

ROWLAND W NELSON, Ph.D Professor

ARTHUR R. BORDEN, PhD. Associate Professor

SIDNEY COULLING. Ph.D Associate Professor

JAMES D FARRAR, B.A Instructor

HERNANDO M. READ, MA Instructor

RANDOLPH M. BULGIN, MA. Instructor

FINE ARTS

MARION M. JUNKIN, A,B.. Arts D Professor

ROBERT STEWART, M.M Assistant Professor

LLOYD LANICH, M,A Assistant Professor

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

ROBERT F, BRADLEY, Ph.D. Professor

WILLIAM W. PUSEY. Ph.D Professor

HENRY V. SHELLEY, Ph.D Professor

LINTON L. BARRETT, Ph,D Professor

BOYD R. EWING. Ph.D Associate Professor

GEORGE F. DRAKE, Ph,D Associate Professor

CARLYLE W. BARRITT, Ph.D Associate Professor

EARL L. CRUM, Ph.D Visiting Professor

ALBERT L. LANCASTER. Ph.D Visiting Professor

GEORGE J. IRWIN, A.B Assistant Professor

EDWARD B. HAMER, PhD Assistant Professor

BUFORD S. STEPHENSON, AM Assistant Professor

GEOLOGY
EDGAR N. SPENCER, Ph.D Assistant Professor

HISTORY

WILLIAM G. BEAN, Ph.D Professor

OLLINGER CRENSHAW, Ph.D Professor

ALLEN W. MOGER, Ph.D Professor

WILLIAM A. JENKS, PhD Professor

CHARLES W. TURNER, Ph.D Associate Professor

THOMAS P. HUGHES. Ph.D Assistant Professor

ARNOLD J. TOYNBEE, Ph.D Visiting Professor



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

EDWIN P. TWOMBLY, B P E Professor

NORMAN F. LORD, MS Associate Professor

LEE McLaughlin, BB Associate Professor

RICHARD MILLER, BS Assistant Professor

LOUIS F. MILLER, BS Assistant Professor

CHARLES HARRINGTON. A. 8 Assistant Professor

EUGENE F. CORRIGAN, A.B Instructor

PSYCHOLOGY

WALTER A. FLICK, Ph D Professor

WILLIAM M HINTON Ph D Professor

RELIGION

DAVID W SPRUNT, Th D Professor

RICHARD L, GELWICK, B D Assistant Professor

SOCIOLOGY

JAMES G. LEYBURN, Ph.D. Professor

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS

CHARLES E. COATES. Lt, Col , B S Professor

JOHN P. BODKIN, Maj., B.S Associate Professor

DAVID R. PEACOCK, Capt., BS Assistant Professor

KARL E. STEIN. Capt., B.A Assistant Professor

JOHN T. JONES, M/Sgt Instructor

RALPH DUFFIE, M/Sgt. Instructor

JAMES W. OLIVER, M/Sqt Instructor

WILLIAM E. CREWS, Sgt Instructor

PHILOSOPHY

WILLIAM W. MORTON. D.D Professor Emeritus

EDWARD D. MYERS. PhD Professor

PAUL C HAYNER. Ph D Associate Professor

PHYSICS

ROBERT W, DICKEY. Ph D Professor

EDWARD F. TURNER. Pti.D Associate Professor

ANDREGUY LACERTE. MS Assistant Professor

DELBERT A. DAVIS Instructor



the faculty



POLITICAL SCIENCE

RUPERT N LATURE. MA Professor

JOHN H WHEELER. Ph D Professor

ALLEN E RAGAN. Ph D Associate Professor

JOURNALISM

OSCAR W RIEGEL. AM Professor

JAMES P DAVIS. A 8 Assistant Professor

CHARLES H LAUCK. A B Instructor

HERBERT PATCHIN Instructor

WILLIAM G LEVERTY. B.A Lecturer

WILLIAM ATKINSON. 8 S Lecturer

ROD G. GELATT. B A Instructor

LEON S DURE. A B Visiting Instructor

SHIELDS JOHNSON. 8. A Visiting Lecturer

LAW

CHARLES P. LIGHT. MA. LL B Professor

CHARLES R McDOWELL. M.A . LL.B Professor

CLAYTON E, WILLIAMS. LL.B Professor

CHARLES V. LAUGHLIN. A.B.. LL.B.. J.SD Professor

THEODORE A, SMEDLEY, A.B,. J.D Professor

JAMES W STEWART. LL.M Associate Professor

WILFRED J RITZ. LL.M Associate Professor

LEWIS S. MINTER. LL.B Assistant Professor

EDWARD S. GRAVES. A M., LL.B Visiting Lecturer

MATHEMATICS

FELIX P. WELCH. PhD Professor

CHARLES W, WILLIAMS. PhD Associate Professor

ROBERT W. ROYSTON. PhD Associate Professor

MERION J. BLANCHARD. BS Instructor




C.rv.a IiU-as (.f Wt-tfii! M;:





Joseph Addison
on Fxlucation

Ivlucatidii is a c(im|)anion which iin iiii>rcriiuiK' can (Icpress, no crimo

can destroy, no enemy can alienate, no despotism can enslave. At home a fi-ieiid,

alii-oad an introduction; in .solitude a solace and in society an ornament.

It chastens vice, it guides virtue, it gives, at once, grace and government to genius.

Without it. what is man? A splendid slave, a reasoning .savage.

CONTAINER CORPORATION OF AMERICA "iT"!^



Editors

JIM BARNES

JACK KOTZ




classes



school of law





DR. CLAYTON E. WILLIAMS

Dean of the Ldw School



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS

CHARLES RODRIGUEZ Executive Committeeman

ED TEETER President

NORM ROETTGER Vice-President

MERRILL TRADER Secretary

LAIRD HARMAN Historian



INTERMEDIATE CLASS OFFICERS

GEORGE WARD E;<ecur,ve Committeeman

JOHN ALFORD President

ROBERT C. MILLER Vice-President

JAKE LEMMON Secretary

JIM JETER Historian




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS

PAUL ROBERTSON Executive Committeeman

DAVE DUNLAP President

IKE SMITH Vice-President

CHARLIE McCORMICK Secretary

JOE LYLE Historian



MOOT COURT TEAM

NORMAN C. ROETTGER PATRICK D. SULLIVAN

CHARLES S. GAY ROBERT G. McCULLOUGH




law school seniors



class of fifty-eight




First Row • ERNEST HOGE CLARKE, Louisville, Kentucl<y; Jl'.V, Vice-President 4; Law Review 5, 6; Phi Alpha Delta, Treas-
urer 6: Troubadours I, 2, President 3. • HAROLD COTESWORTH CRAIG, JR., Washington, D.C. • DONALD JAMES
CURRIE, Shelter Island Heights, New York; Phi Alpha Delta. Vice-President 6; Law Review, « MARK BYRN DAVIS, JR.,
Louisville, Kentucky; //AM, hHousemanager-Treasurer 3; Phi Delta Phi, President 6; Law School Board of Governors 6; Fresh-
man Dormitory Counselor 4, 6; Freshman Camp Counselor 4; White Friars, Secretary 3.

Second Row • CHARLES WESLEY GUNN, JR., Tallahassee, Florida, Phi Delta Phi. • SAMUEL LAIRD HARMAN, Tazewell,
Virginia, IIKA. Secretary 3; White Friars; Cotillion Club; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi. • RICHARD DUVAL HAYNES, Ada,
Oklahoma; Phi Beta Kappa. • RICHARD CANEAR LEWIS, Covington, Virginia; Student Bar Association 4, 5. 6; Phi Alpha
Delta, Treasurer 6.

Third Row • ROBERT GARRETT McCULLOUGH, Murfreesbo.o, Tennessee; Phi Delta Phi, Exchequer 5; Student Bar Associa-
tion President 6; Chairman National Moot Court Team 6; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Editor Wash-
ington and Lee Law Review 6. • J. HARDIN MARION, III, Richmond, Virginia; '/'/' I, Secretary 3, Rush Chairman 4, Pres-
ident 4; Ring-turn Phi I, Sports Editor 2; President's Advisory Council 4, 6, 7; Chairman Independent Party 4; Freshman Dor-
mitory Counselor 5, hHead Counselor 6, 7; Vice-President Freshman Law Class; President Intermediate Law Class; "Who's
Who m American Colleges and Universities"; Phi Delta Phi, Excheguer 6; Law Review 6, Associate Editor 7; Board of Gov-
ernors 6. • ROBERT LEWIS RHEA, Staunton, Virginia; President Intermediate Law Class; Vice-President Student Bar Associa-
tion 2; Board of Governors 2, 3; Phi Alpha Delta, President 3. • CHARLES CONWELL RODRIGUEZ, Magnolia, Delaware;
Phi Alpha Delta; Senior Executive Committee Representative; Law Review; Moot Court Team; Student Bar Association, Sec-
retary 2. • NORMAN CHARLES ROETTGER, Green Camp, Ohio Intermediate Executive Committeeman; Law Review;
Moot Court; Phi Alpha Delta; Board of Governors; President Senior Law Class.

Fourth Row • PATRICK DONNELLY SULLIVAN, Lorton, Virginia; .I'A', President 4; Pi Alpha Nu; 13 Club; Pi Sigma Alpha;
Mock Convention Steering Committee 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; Ring-turn Phi I, 2, 3, 4; Basketball I, 2; Dorm Coun-
selor 6; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4, 5; Phi Delta Phi; Moot Court 5, 6; Law Review 5, 6; President Student Bar Association 6; Board of
Governors 6. • CHARLES EVANS SWOPE, West Chester, Pennsylvania, <I>K'I'\ President Freshman Law Class; Board of Gov-
ernors; Student Bar Association. • EDMUND HERSHEY TEETER, Fayetteville, Pennsylvania. • CHARLES CALDWELL WAT-
SON, Winchester, Virginia; IIKA. President 4; Vice-President 1955 Spring Dances; Cotillion Club; Phi Delta Phi. • THOMAS
DEE WILKERSON, Whitesville, West Virginia; Student Bar Association; Business Manager Law Review 6; Clerk, Phi Alpha
Delta; Chairman Mock Trial Committee 6.




law school




First Row • JOHN RAY ALFORD, Glasgow, Virginia, '/'/'I. • RICHARD GARDINER ANDERSON, Gambrills, Maryland,
nK<l> • JOHN COLIN CAMPBELL, Independence, Virginia, 0A'2\ • PHILIP RALPH CAMPBELL, Tulsa, Oklahoma, -TX.
• CHARLES F. DAVIS, JR., New York, N.Y., <1>K1. • HARRISON STEELE DEY, JR., Staunton, Virginia, 0A'2'.

Second Row • JOHN MICHAEL GARNER, Miami Florida, 2^A'. • LEONARD C. GREENEBAUM, Richmond, Virginia,
ZSr. • FREDERICK ODELL GRIFFITH, Monroeville, Pennsylvania. • RICHARD HENRY HORN, York, Pennsylvania. •
DONALD SWEAT HUFF, Marshall, Missouri. • JAMES CLAY JETER, Charleston, West Virginia, A'2'.



phi delta phi

OFFICERS

CHARLES GUNN, JR Magister

VIC MILLNER Exchequer

BAYLES MACK Clerk

BUDDY DEY Historian




26



intermediates




First Row • ROBERT LESTER KAUFMAN, Fairmont, West Virginia, ZBT. » JOHN EARLY McDONALD, JR., Petersburg,
Virginia, 0/v2'. • BARRON BAYLES MACK, Fort Mill, South Carolina. • HUBERT HUNDLEY MARLOW, JR., Front Royal,
Virginia. UKA. • JOHN DUNCAN MARSH, Purcellville, Virginia, /7A'0. • MARRS ALLEN MAY, Pikevllle, Kentucky.

Second Row • ROBERT CLAY MILLER, Huntington, West Virginia, UKA. • MARTIN G. RAND, Summit, N.J. • SPIROS
BASIL SKENDERIS, Danville, Virginia. • JEROME ALEXANDER SUSSKIND, Jackson, Michigan, J)'. • LARRY McNEIL TOP-
PING, Newport News, Virginia, <1>K1. • GEORGE ELINGER WARD, Rosewell, New Mexico, ATA.




Spring litigafion In process in fronf of the Law School's
Tucker Hall.



law school freshmen




First Row o GEORGE EMANUEL ANTHOU, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. • DAVID L. DUNLAP, Huntington, West Virginia.
• NEAL PATRICK LAVELLE, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. • H. BURNETT, JR., Hickory, North Carolina, hi.

Second Row • PAUL RAY ROBERTSON, Huntington, V^est Virginia. • JORDAN MARSHALL SMITH, Chevy Chase, Mary-
lana, 'I'l' I. • PAUL RICHARD SPECKMAN, JR., Grand Blanc, Michigan, //A'0. • BARRY M. STORICK, BrooUyn, N. Y.,
<I>EII. • HERMAN A. TURNER, Chase City, Virginia.



phi alpha delta

OFFICERS

MORM ROETTGER Justice

JOHN ALFORD Vice-Justice

JAKE LEMMON Clerk

STEVE THOMAS Treasurer

GEORGE WARD Marshal




m..




school of
arts and sciences



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS

MIKE BARRY President

BOB NEUNREITER Arts Vice-President

ROSS PICKUS Commerce Vice-President

ANDY McTHENIA Science Vice-President

GEORGE THOMPSON Historian

TOM KING Secretary

SAGE LYONS Executive Committeeman

PARKHILL MAYS Executive Committeeman




DR. LEON FRANKLIN SENSABAUGH
Dean of the University




MR. FRANK JOHNSON GILLIAM

Dean of Men





arts and sciences seniors



■^^> ////////



class of fifty-eight




First Row • JERRY LEWIS ABRAMSON, Dallas, Texas; Z/>'7'; Seminars in Literature, 2; Washington Literary Society 3, Pres-
ident 4; Cheerleaders, hHead Cheerleader 3; Troubadours 2; Track I; Wrestling I; Cross Country I .• OSBORNE SANDERS
AIKEN, JR., Florence, South Carolina; K—\ Pi Alpha Nu 2, 3, 4; Commerce Fraternity 3, 4; Shenandoah Staff I; Dean's List
I, 2, 3, 4; Infernatlonal Relal-ions Club. • ARThlUR LEWIS ALLEN, Hampton, Virginia, //AM; Social Chairman 4; Political
Representative 2, 3, 4; Chapter Sentinel 3, 4; Pi Alpha Nu 2, President 4. • RLfDOLPH AUKSCHUN, Washington, D.C.



Second Row « R03ERT FREDERICK BANKS, Montclair, New Jersey; //AM , President 4; Commerce Fraternity 2, President 4.
• PETER BAYNE BARKER, Lynchburg, Virginia; 0/v'2'; Pi Alpha Nu. • WILLIAM BION BARNETT, Jacksonville, Florida;
'A IH, Secretary 3; White Friars 2, 3, 4; Cotillion Club; Vice-President Openings 3. • MIChHAEL JOSEPH BARRY, La Grange
Park, lllionis; -J)', Pledgemasfer; President Senior Class; Secretary of Junior Class; Secretary of Commerce Fraternity; Dean's
List; Cross Country I, 2, 3 (All-Conference I); Track, 2, 3.



Third Row • RALPH WILLARD BAUCUM, JR., Shreveport, Louisiana; />H//, Recorder 3, 4; Sazeracs 1,2,3,4; Cotillion Club
3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Glee Club I; Christian Council I, 2; Dormitory Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List; Concert Guild 2,
3, 4. • STEPHEN BERG, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; '/'/;//, President, House Manager; Football I; Baseball 2; Editor-in-Chief,
Friday Edition, Ring-tum-Phi; Christian Association, Publicity Director; President's Advisory Board; Minstrel Show, Publicity;
Mock Convention; Sigma Delta Chi, Vice-President; Cotillion Club. • IRWIN RALPH BERMAN, Baltimore, Maryland; '/AW.
Rush Chairman 3, 4; Psi Chi Secretary 3, President 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta; Southern Collegian I, 2; Cotillian Club; Mongolian
Minks. • ANTHONY BIJOU, Brewster, New York; Jl', House Manager 3.



Fourth Row • JOHN BAYARD BOYLE, Memphis, Tennessee; lAK. • ALFRED FREDERICK BRACHER, III, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania; <1>K1\ White Friars; Intramural Manager. • THOMAS ELRED BRADFORD, JR., Birmingham, Alabama; /\M .
Secretary 3; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Gamma Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma, Vice-President 3, President 4; Commerce Fraternity, Pres-
dent 4. • THOMAS BROUGHTON BRANCH, III, Atlanta, Georgia; 2'X; Varsity Swimming I, 2; Varsity Golf I, 2, 3, 4;
Cotillion Club 2, 3, 4; Scabbard and Blade; Dean's List; Assimilation Committee 3; Sazeracs I, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council;
Graham-Lee Society.





class of fifty-eight



First Row • KAJ MICHAEL BRENT, Montclalr, New Jersey: '/-'/'.I, Secretary, 4; Psi Chi, Treasurer, 4; White Friars, 2, 3, 4;
Christian Council. • RICHARD MERRILL BRICKMAN, Shaker Heights, Ohio; ZBT: White Friars; "13" Club. • HARRY
EDGAR BRUNETT, Baltimore, Maryland; 17' 1, Secretary 2: Dormitory Counselor 3; Dance Board, Business Manager 3, Pres-
ident 4; Co-Director University Religious Conference 3; Christian Council I, 2, 3, 4; Douglas Haynes Award 2; Young Schol-
arship in Philosophy 2. • MANLEY PATTON CALDWELL, Palm Beach, Florida; .1X4, Social Chairman 2, 3, Vice-President
4: Gaines Guard 1,2.



Second Row • JOHN HOWARD CANDLER, JR., Atlanta, Georgia; 0J«. • IRWIN NORMAN CAPLAN, Baltimore, Mary-
land; ZBT; Treasurer 4; House Managers Association 3, 4; Commerce Fraternity; Student Service Society 2, 3, 4; Concert
Guild; Honor Roll; Cold Check Committee. • BARTON F. CARTER, Arlington, Virginia; • DALE L. CARTER, Tulsa, Okla-
home; .1"X, Pledge Trainer 4; Swimming 1,2; Tennis 1,2.



Third Row • MARION MAXWELL CASKIE, 111, Arlington, Virginia; J)'; Phi Eta Sigma; Psi Chi; Washington Literary So-
ciety, I, 2, President 3; College Quiz Bowl, I, 2; Cross Country Manager I, 2, 3; Student Library Committee 2;
Friends of the Library 2, Secretary 3, Chairman 4; Shenandoah 2, Editor 3, 4; Ring-turn Phi 2, 3, 4; CALYX 3; Southern Col-
legian 4; Seminars in Literature Committee 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4. • CHARLES J. CELLA, St. Louis, Missouri; IN; Mon-
golian Minks; White Friars; Intramural Manager. • KENNETH WILLIAM CHANDLER, Memphis, Tennessee; ^AE; Pi Alpha
Nu; Tennis I. • LEIGHTON D. CHAPMAN, Pelham, New York; J)'; Phi Alpha Nu.



Fourth Row • ROGER G. CLARK, Kingston, Pennsylvania; <I>K'¥: Wrestling; White Friars; Intramural Board; House Manager.

• SHELDON CLARK, II, Columbia, South Carolina; 2'.V, Vice-President 4; Track Team I; football 2; Lacrosse 2, 3, 4; Sigma.

• MALCOLM A. CLINGER, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania; 'W.l; R.O.T.C. Band I, 3, 4, Treasurer-Secretary 2; Drum Major and
Student Conductor 3. 4; Student Service Society 2, 3, 4; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Southern Collegian I; Christian Council I;
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Concert Guild I, 4; Southern Collegian Dance Band I, 2; Troubadours I. • HARRY S. COCKY, Balti-


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Online LibraryWashington and Lee UniversityCalyx (Volume 1958) → online text (page 1 of 12)