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r I 18







E\/EA/T HORIZON



CALYX 19Bmm



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation



http://www.archive.org/details/calyx1998wash



T H E



CALVK




WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA



VOLUME 101
1997-1998



Opening 1




SEr 0n998



2 Oncnins:



1997-1998 CALYX



LtAble of Contents]



Campus Life

16



Seniors

50



Underclass

116



Facultif

15i



Same mi^ht sai^ cade's from eatieo

And I sujjpose thei^ outfit to knou^

The derit/ation;

But tittle ^ir(s Wear calico,

Don't you supfjose that must be so

In E(/erif Nation}

Now I'l/e a theori^ of mi^ oWn

you miqht not quess, so I'd make it knoWn,

But keep it {(uiet.

CatyK, a cup, must be the source.

Just hear mif Words and i^ou'tt indorse

Mif novel fiat.

Cups are -pla (i)ted and qirls are, too.

And painted qirls are nothing new

In decoration.

Too much cup and too much girl

Both throw our heads into a whirl

and cause gyration.

A cup, you know, goes to the lips.

And sometimes makes frequent trips

In that direction.

A cup has dregs, hoWe(/er sWeet,

And We a calic rarely meet

That's all perfection.

Charles J. Boppel
Calyx Volume One, 1895



k^anizations

174



Greeks

192



Sports

236



[diJertisements

16 A



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14 Opeiiin<;




SAMUEL J. KOZAK
1931-1997

"HE WAS A SPECIAL PERSON WHO HELD ON TO THE

PAST WITHOUT LETTING IT TYRANNIZE THE PRESENT:

A CULTURAL HYBRID. AND EVERYBODY WHO KNEW

HIM REALIZED THAT HIS HEART AND A BIT OF HIS

SOUL REALLY BELONGED TO WASHINGTON AND LEE:

FOR NEARLY FORTY YEARS HE EMBODIED THE

UNIVERSITY'S MISSION; HE WAS ABSOLUTELY

DEVOTED TO HIS STUDENTS."

- Professor of Historic Barry F. Machado



When Professor of Geology Samuel J. Kozak
died suddenly on Wednesday, July 2, 1997,
Washington and Lee lost more than a faculty
member. There will never be a way for the
Washington and Lee community to thank him
enough for his contributions that have enriched
our lives. The following has been compiled from
colleagues of Professor Kozak.

In ways that can never be
measured, Sam's heart and a Httle bit
of his soul really belonged to
Washington and Lee. For nearly forty
years, he embodied the university's
mission.

These four decades were filled with
active service to this community and
the enjoyment of life within it. Sam's
service did not stop at the door of the
classroom or even at the door of his
office.

The extra things Sam did for his
students, for athletics and athletes, for
student life, and to support his
friends and colleagues have been so
outstanding that we did not have to
wait... to hear them celebrated.

Sam loved Washington and Lee and
his students in a way few could ever
understand much less duplicate.

Yet there is nothing which
compares with the passion and love
which he reserved for those closest to
him: Julia, Matt, Jennifer, Kim, Phil,
Annie, Sam, Maggie, and, of course,
the lovable but totally untrainable
Beckley. Sam Kozak will remain with
us in our memories. We hope that we
will always display evidences ol his
positive influences on our lives. Let us
give thanks tor Sam Kozak.

The staff of the 1998 Calyx realizes that

there is no way it can ever repay Professor

Kozak for ivhat he contributed to Washington

and Lee. However, we would like to take this

opportuuit)' to give thanks for Sam Kozak.

And to give thanks to him, for what he was

for our coniuuDiity. ,^ . , -

Upening O



campus life



16



MOVE IN RUSH HOMECOMING PARENTS'WEEK-
END CHRISTMAS WEEKEND LENFEST VACA-
TIONS SPEAKERS FANCY DRESS SPRING TERM
SENIOR PARTY BACCALAUREATE GRADUATION



17



EVERY INCOMINC FRESHMAN BELIEVES

THAT HE/SHE WILL NEED EVERY COMFORT

OF HOME. WITH A FULL VAN AND AN

EXTRA U-HAUL THIS FRESHMAN WILL SOON

REALIZE HIS/HER MISTAKE AFTER SEEING

THE SIZE OF THE ROOM




SETTING UP THIS DAYTAKES MANY HOURS OF WORK. THESE UPPER-
CLASSMAN DO THEIR PARTTO HELP BY SETTING UP ONE OF THE BDG
QUAD TABLES.



18 Campu.s Life




TO ENSURE A SMOOTH MOVE IN DAY UPPERCLASS HELP IS ESSENTIAL. EACH YEAR MANY
UPPERLCASS MAN COME BACK TO SCHOOL EARLY TO HELP THE INCOMING FRESHMAN.







FOR THE FRESHMAN CLASS OF 2001, MOVE IN DAY WAS FILLED WITH
ANTICIPATION, EXCITEMENT, AND JUST A BIT OF ANXIETY. NEVERTHE-
LESS, THE WASHINGTON AND LEE COMMUNITY WELCOMED ITS NEW
CLASS WITH WARMTH AND OPEN ARMS, ASSISTING THEM IN EVERY
POSSIBLE WAY, FROM GIVING DIRECTIONS TO LUGGING SUITCASES.
THROUGHOUTTHE DAY, VEHICLES LINED UP IN FRONT OF THE BDG
QUAD AS PARENTS UNLOADED BOX AFTER BOX WHILE STUDENTS WERE
EAGER TO CATCH A FIRST GLIMPSE OF WHAT WOULD BECOME THEIR
LIVING SPACE FOR THE UPCOMING YEAR.

RUMOR HAS IT AT WASHINGTON AND LEE THAT IF IT RAINS ON
FRESHMAN MOVE IN DAY, THEN COMMENCEMENT DAY WILL BE SUNNY.
THIS YEAR, WHILE THE SKIES WERE OVERCAST AND APPEARED THREATEN-
ING, THE DAY PASSED WITH ONLY A SLIGHT DRIZZLE, MAKING LIFE A BIT
EASIER FOR FRESHMEN AND THEIR PARENTS. THE BUSY SCHEDULE AR-
RANGED FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS ALIKE INCLUDED NUMEROUS
ORIENTATIONS, MEETINGS, AND RECEPTIONS THROUGHOUTTHE DAY.
THE CLASS OF 2001 MANAGED TO QUICKLY ADJUSTTO THE TIMELESS
TRADITIONS AT WASHINGTON AND LEE, ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT
BEING THE SPEAKING TRADITION.

AS THE DAY WINDED DOWN, PARENTS WERE HUDDLED WITH STU-
DENTS IN THE LAST FEW MOMENTS BEFORE PARTING. MANY PARENTS
IMPARTED WORDS OF WISDOM AS HUGS AND TEARS PUNCTUATED THE
LINGERING FAREWELLS. THE NEW CLASS, WHILE SAD TO SEE THEIR FAMI-
LIES DRIVE AWAY, WAS COMFORTED IN KNOWING THAT THIS WAS ONLY
THE BEGINNING OF THE MOST EXCITING TIME IN THEIR LIVES, A TIME
FOR NEW BEGINNINGS AND LASTING MEMORIES.



Campus Life 19



(RIGHT) TAIL6ATING AT THE RUINS

(BELOW) BRUCE HORNSBY KICKING OFFTHE WEEKEND
WITH A THURSDAY NIGHT CONCERT




NEWLY CROWNED HOMECOMING QUEEN MARY NEW WITH ESCORT T.J. GRIFFIN C97:,



20 Campus Life



MOMINEES FOR HOMECOMING QUEEN AND THEIR ESCORTS WAIT AS THE
lUDGES' DECISION IS DELIVERED




Homecoming



HOMECOMING KICKED OFF ONE OF THE THE BIGGEST PARTY

WEEKENDS OF THE NEW ACADEMIC YEAR. ON A GORGEOUS OCTOBER

SATURDAY, STUDENTS GATHERED AT THE RUINS FOR THE

TRADITIONAL TAILGATING PARTY FOLLOWED BY AN EXCITING AND

HARD-FOUGHT VICTORY OVER DAVIDSON.

ASIDE FROM THE USUAL FRATERNITY BAND PARTIES AND EVENTS,

FRIDAY NIGHT OFFERED A SPECTACULAR CONCERT FEATURING BRUCE

HORNSBY ANDTHE AGENTS OF GOOD ROOTS. HOMECOMING

WEEKEND 1997 SAW CLASS REUNIONS AND GATHERINGS AS WELL AS

THE ANNUAL CROWNING OF HOMECOMING QUEEN.

CONGRATULATIONS TO MARY NEW, WHO WON THE HONOR OF BEING

CROWNED BY THE TRADITIONAL PARACHUTING SKYDIVER.



Campus Life 21



THIS YEAR'S PARENTS' WEEKEND WAS OCTOBER 31-

NOVEMBER 2. MANY STUDENTS ENJOYED THE CHANCE TO

VISIT WITH THEIR FAMILIES AND SHOW THEM A LITTLE

SLICE OF LIFE AT WASHINGTON AND LEE. FOR SOME, THIS

MEANTATOUROFTHE CAMPUS AND THE TOWN OF

LEXINGTON AND MEETINGS WITH PROFESSORS. FOR SOME

OF THE BOLDER STUDENTS, PARENTS' WEEKEND OFFERED

THE OPPORTUNITYTO LET MOM AND DAD INSIDE THE

MYSTERIOUS WORLD OF TAILGATING AND FRATERNITY

PARTIES.

Parents' Weekend




THE TRADITIONAL TAILGATE UP AT THE RUINS



22 Campus Life



SPENDING SOME QUALITY TIME TOGETHER AT LIBERTY HALL









SOPHOMORE BRITTANY AH LSTROM ENJOYS LUNGH WITH HER FAMILY



Campus Life 15



tmas Weekend




24 Campus Life




ONE WEEKEND IN DECEMBER STUDENTS GETAWAY FROM THE NORMAL DRUD6ERYOF CAROLING
AND GOOD DEEDS FOR A FRAT PARTY. POISED AT THE LAST WEEKEND BEFORE EXAMS IT GIVES
STUDENTS THE CHANCETO RELAX BEFORETHE MASS HYSTERIAOF CRAMMING. AS THE LAST PARTY
OF FALL TERM THE FRATERNITIES DEFINITELY SAVE THEIR BEST FOR LAST WITH COCKTAIL PARTIES
GALORE. IT ALSO PROVIDES A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR LASTMINUTE RUSHING BY FRATERNITIES
BEFORE FORMAL RUSH STARTS. CHRISTMAS WEEKEND IS A GREAT WAY FOR STUDENTS TO ENDTHE
FIRSTTERM AND TO GET ALL THEIR PARTING OUT OF BEFORE EXAMS HIT.




Campus Lite 25



Men^s
Rush

THIS YEAR WAS THE SECOND TIME FOR
MALES TO HAVE WINTER RUSH, AND IT WAS
AGAIN A SUCCESS. KAPPA SIGMA LED TH E
PACK BY GETTING 25 PLEDGES, BUT THE
OTHER FRATERNITIES WERE EQUALLY
PLEASED WITH THE GREAT PLEDGE CLASSES
THEYTOOKON. LAMBDA CHI ALPHA SUR-
PRISED MANY BY MAKING THE DECISION TO
DEFER RUSH. TO ACCOMPANY THIS, ACCU-
SATIONS MADE BY THE IFC ABOUT SERVING
ALCOHOL ON THE FINAL NIGHT OF RUSH-
WHICH IS PROHIBITED-KEPTTHIS YEAR'S
MEN'S RUSH QUITE INTERESTING. BUT IN
THE END, ALL 15 FRATERNITIES AND ALL THE
MEN INVOLVED SEEMED SATISFIED WITH
THE GROUP OF MEN THEY ARE PROUD TO
CALL THEIR BROTHERS.



BASEMENT RUSH PARTIES ALLOW
AN OPPORTUNITY FOR BROTH-
ERS TO MEET RUSHEES.





26 Campus Life



|!ID NIGHT 15 THE FIRST NIGHT FOR PLEDGES TO GET TO KNOW THEIR PLEDGE SISTERS.




VOMENS RUSH ISA GREAT WAY TO MAKE N EW FRI EN DS AND MEET
JPPERCLASS GIRLS, FRESHMAN JOGELYN BOWMAN POSES WITH SOPHO-
\AORES KELLY SEWELL AND EMILY SGHULZ



WOMEN'S RUSH THIS YEAR MARKED THE
FIRST RUSH OPPORTUNITY FOR W6k LS NEW-
EST SORORITY, KAPPA DELTA. WHEREAS
LAST YEAR THEIR COLONIZATION KEPT THE
PLEDGE CLASSES OF THE OTHER FOUR SO-
RORITIES SMALLER, THIS YEAR THE NUM-
BERS WERE BACK UP AGAIN, WITH A QUOTA
OF 33 PLEDGES FOR EACH SORORITY. KAPPA
KAPPA GAMMA AND CHI OMEGA BOTH MET
QUOTA AND PI BETA PHI WAS CLOSE BE-
HIND WITH 32 PLEDGES. KAPPA ALPHA
THETA AND KAPPA DELTA EACH PLEDGED 28
GIRLS. WHILE THE MALES MAKE FUN OF THE
CLAPPING AND SINGING THAT IS A TRADE-
MARK OF WOMEN'S RUSH, BOTH ACTIVES
AND RUSHEES ENJOY THIS TRADITION.



Campus Life 2 /



"THE PARTIES WERE BI06ER,

THE PACE WAS FASTER,

THE SHOWS WERE BROADER,

THE BUILDINGS WERE HIGHER,

THE MORALS WERE LOOSER..."

-F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

famu Oress




28 Campus Life




Campus Life 29




SOME POST-BALL DANCING AT CHI PSIS LAWN PARTY WITH BAABA
SETH



30 Campus Life



JUNIOR LEONARD RORRER POSES WITH SOPHOMORES CHRISTINE WONG, CHRIS NIELSEN
S. MICHELE CONNORS




ON MARCH 6, 1998, THE FD STEERING
COMMITTEE ROLLED OUT THE RED CARPET AS
STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND ALUMNI ENTERED
A SCENE RIGHT OUT OF THE ROARING TWEN-
TIES. THE MUSIC OF BO THORPE ORCHESTRA
AND LIQUID PLEASURE LEFT MANY DANCERS
ATTEMPTING TO SWING AND CH A CH A. FOR
THOSE NOT GIFTED WITH DANCING ABILITY,
THE TRADITIONAL FRATERNITY AND SOROR-
ITY DINNERS AND THE VIOLENT FEMMES

CONCERT AT THE PAVILION OFFERED
EQUALLY ENTERTAINING OPPORTUNITIES.



Campus Life 3 1



Lenfest Productions



COLIN TATE AS SEBASTIAN AND MICHAEL

LEASER AS ANDREW ACUECHEEK IN

"TWELFTH NIGHT."




JOSH CARPENTER AND

FRANCIS MCWILLIAMS ACT IN

THE PHILADELPHIA," PART OF

THE FESTIVAL OF ONE ACTS



32 Campus Lite



MEGAN JOHNSON TRIES TO PREVENT A CONFRONTA-
TION BETWEEN ZACH HANKS AND GEORGE RAY IN
"UNCLE VANYA."




CASSIE RITTER, HOLLY ESTES
AND MEGAN JOHNSON IN
"CRIMES OF THE HEART."



RYAN TRUAX
AND COLIN
TATE IN
"HOTLINE,"
DIRECTED BY
ZACH HANKS.



Campus Life 33



Vacations





34 Campus Life




WASHINGTON &< LEE'S UNOFFICIAL MOTTO,
"WORK HARD, PLAY HARD," HAS BECOME A
WAY OF LIFE FOR MANY STUDENTS WHO
MANAGED TO TEAR AWAY FROM THEIR
STUDIES DURING THE YEAR TO HAVE A GOOD
TIME. FOR SOME IT WAS THE UNIVERSITY
WIND ENSEMBLE SPENT SPRING BREAK IN
GREECE OR FRATERNITY AND SORORITY
SPONSORED GETAWAYS WHILE MANY OTHER
STUDENTS STUCK TO THE TIME HONORED
TRADITION OF RANDOM ROAD TRIPS.



Campus Lite 3")



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36 Campus Life








1



JAMES MACKENZIE WAS THE
WOODROW WILSON FELLOWSHIP
SPEAKER IN MARCH.

PRESIDENT ELROD STANDS WITH DR.
STEPHEN COULD OF HARVARD WHO
SHARED HIS THEORIES ON
EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOCY.




Campus Life 37



Spring Term

FILLED WITH ACTIVITIES SUCH AS BUFFALO CREEK, COSHEN,

LAYING OUT, FRISBY ON THE COLONNADE MANY STUDENTS

FORGET THATTHIS IS REALLY AN ACADEMIC TERM. EXCEPTOF

COURSE THOSE FRESHMEN THAT HAVENT FIGURED OUT HOW

TO SIGN UP FOR AN EASYCLASS. PLEDGESHIP IS DONE ANDTHE

WEATHER HAS TAKEN A TURN FOR THE BEST SO NO ONE HAS

AN EXCUSE TO BE IN A BAD MOOD. OF COURSE NO ONE CAN

FORGETSEEING HOW OUR SCHOOL USEDTO BE WHEN ALLTHE

ALUMNI COME ROLLING BACK IN TOWN FOR THEIR WEEKEND. WITH THE HELP FROM A FEV\

DRINKS STUDENTS EVENTUALLY GET USED TO THEM CONTINUALLY TALKING ABOUT HOV^

BETTER IT ALL USEDTO BE AND ACTUALLY HAVE A FUN WEEKEND. WITH ALLTHE EXCITEMEN1

SPRING TERM OFFERS MANY STUDENTS PREFER JUST A LAZY DAY IN THE RIVER.





.^ .V §m ■ '*



38 Campus Life










Campus Lire 39




40 Campus Life




Campus Life 41




Parties

WHETHER IT WAS A GIANT
BASH OR A QUIET GET TO-
GETHER PARTIES WERE ESSEN-
TIAL TO KEEPING STUDENTS
SANE AND AWAY FROM WORK.
WHILE GREEKS DOMINATED
THE SOCIAL SCENES MANY STU-
DENTS FOUND ESCAPE
THROUGH GOING TO THE
PALMS OR STAIRCASE AND
SPENDING TIME IN A MORE
INTIMATE SETTING. NO MAT-
TER WHAT SETTING GOOD
TIMES WERE ALWAYS TO BE
HAD.




42 Campus Life




SAH




Campus Life 43



THE GRADUATES PROCESS ACROSS THE FRONT LAWN.




44 Campus Life



JUSTIN RIEDELL IS CONGRATULATED DURING THE PROCESSION.




Graduation 1998

PHOTOS BYW. PATRICK HINELY

ON JUNE 4, THE CLASS OF 1998 TOOK ITS LAST STROLL ALONG THE COLONNADE AS STU-
DENTS. THEIR LAST DAYS IN LEXINGTON WERE FULL OF PACKING, SAYING GOODBYE TO
FACULTY AND FRIENDS AND CONTEMPLATING THE FUTURES. SOME WERE HEADED TO
LAW OR MEDICAL SCHOOL. OTHERS WERE OFF TO TRAVEL. AND FOR A BRAVE FEW,
POST GRADUATION PLANS INVOLVED WEDDING BELLS. ALTHOUGH EACH STUDENTS
FUTURE IS DIFFERENT, THE CLASS OF 1998 SHARES, WITHOUT A DOUBT, MANY FOND
MEMORIES OF WASHINGTON S^ LEE. AS THEY RETURN OVER THE NEXT FEW YEARS AS
ALUMNI FOR REUNIONS, HOMECOMING OR JUST WHILE PASSING THROUGH, THE
MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1998 WILL BE REMINDED OF ALL THE TIMES THEY LAUGHED,

CRIED, AND ENJOYED AT W^L.



Campus Life 4^




CHRIS BALDWIN ADDRESS

HIS CLASSMATES DURING

THE CEREMONY.

FAMILIES AND FRIENDS

GATHER BY THE LAWN

NEAR LEE HOUSE TO

WATCH THE GRADUATION.



Campus Life




STUDENTS LISTEN PATIENTLY BEFORE RECEIVING THEI R DIPLOMAS.



Campus Life 47



A GRADUATE WAITS IN THE

SUN FOR HIS NAME TO BE

CALLED.

BS.C SETS UP FOR THE

LUNCHEON FOLLOWING THE

GRADUATION CEREMONY.




48 Campus Life





THE CLASS OF '98 WAITS TO BE
SEATED.

MANY OF THE GRADUATES
SOUGHT OUT FRIENDS AND
FAMILY MEMBERS THROUGH-
OUT THE CEREMONY.



Campus Life 49



semars



50



C LAS $ O F 1998



51



DAVE 6ALBRAITH, BEN YEMINI 6< BRAD SIMPSOr




(ABOVE) MEGAN BARBER (OLE MISS '98)

^ MEGAN JOHNSON

(RIGHT)

CECILY REYNOLDS ('97)

6. MILLER WILD

52 Seniors



(LEFT) JASON ZACHER &. FRANCES
GROBERG COD

(BELOW) CHARLIE MASON, KRIS O'NEAL,
STUART CHIKAMI, JUSTIN RIEDELL 6<
CHRIS FORREST




rLER RATCLIFFE, MILLER WILD, KERYN PAIER, BILLY POYNTER 6< JASON CALLEN



Seniors 53



(RIGHT) DEMIAN MCGARRY 6< ERIC REUTHER
(BELOW) SENIOR GIRLS, BAHAMAS 1998




lAE SENIORS



54 Senior



(LEFT) HOLLY LAYMAN C97) 6. JEN MCKENRICK
(BELOW) BRIAN HIGGINS ^ DOUG PANZER




(ABOVE) BRENT HILPERT^.

CATHERINE PRICE C99)

(LEFT) JEN BRADY 6. BILL DONNELY



Seniors 55



(RIGHT) 6LENN MILLER S.
NATALIA 6ARCIA

(BELOW) CAROLINE AMPORT S<
DAVID WILKINS




JEN BRADY, STEPHANIE ROSKOM, LIZZIE PERKINS C99), BRIDGET QUEALY ^ SUZANNE

SCOTT C99)



56 Seniors



AARY JO MAHONEY, EMILY GIPSON, WHITNEY PARKER,

AELISSA FOOTE, LORRAINE TAURASSI, SUSIE CREAMER S. BETSY HOWE




(LEFT) ALISON ROHAS, ALI l<APPEL6<
ALLISON FREY



Seniors 5'



(RIGHT) MILLER WILD &< JASON
CALLEN




58 Seniors




sic; ep seniors

ICHRIS CAN DON, MATT O'BRIEN, Z. TAYLOR SCHULTZ, TODD ELLINGSON, MATT SEWELL, MATT
GRAVES, JSAON LARSON, ERIC CINNIS, RICK ELY, GLENN MILLER, JON DZIOK 6< JED HAZLETT

Seniors 59



(RIGHT) JAG6ER HARVEY &< MELISSA GIBSON C97)

(BELOW) HEATHER COOK, ALLISON PREY ^ BLIGH

WOLLNER




PHI PS! SENIORS

FORREST NORVELL,

CHRIS BALDWIN,

SCOTT DYNAN,

ANDREW

VARDAMAN,

AL WEST,

J.B. KILEY,

SETH MCKINLEY,

JACOB GARRETT &

JOHN THRALL




60 St



(LEFT) LAURA SEAMAN S. HELEN KIM

(BELOW) LAURA-ASHLEY ALLEN, ROBIN BOYCE,
KATHERINE STEUART, LEIGHTON KIRBY, HANNAH
GOULDSTONE S. ERIN MULLANEY




Seniors 61



KATIE MOORE



TAYLOR, RAMEY HARRIS, NICK TATAR C96) 6< MAX




JEN BUCKEY, "CROSBY," MARY PRESSLEY , JENNA WORLEY ^ JEN OWEN



62 Seniors




r"^V-



KATHARINE MCFALL
6< JILL DALOVISIO




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AMY 6REELEY, JILL DALOVISIO ^ WHITNEY PARKER



AVID COON £< JENNIFER JUSTEMA



Seniors G5



(RIGHT) CLAIRE PARSONS, KRISTEN
SMITH 6< ANSLEYTHARPE




RICHARD COBBS C97), BLAKE LOVELACE S. SHAN MULLIN 09"



64 Seniors



JNDA WELLS, NATALIA GARCIA, CATHY HADDOCK S. STEPHANIE BREWER




MY KIROUAC £< ALISON ROHAS



Seniors 6"



FIJI SENIORS

ERIC ZAVOLINSKY, LEE HUNT, DAVID FOSTER &< ROBERT HUGHES



66 S




(ABOVE) MARGARET RICH, NORA ZWEHL-

BURKE, CHRISTIANA CALLAHAN,

KELLY TOTTEN & RHETT DACG

(RIGHT) LAURA SEAMAN 6<JEN MCKENRICK



(LEFT) BARRETT BLASCHKE S. MELIA CHILDRESS
(SWEET BRIAR '98)




JAWS
'DEACON," WILL HENDRICKSON, TOFER HARRISON S. DAVID COON



Seniors 67



(RIGHT) RICH ELY 6< CHRISTIANA
CALLAHAN

(BELOW) EMILY FRAMPTON S< ERICA

PELLETIER




68 Seniors



KRIS ONEAL, CHRIS FORREST ^ CHARLIE MASOf



(LEFT) LAURA
SEAMAN,
MICHELLE
DALL VECHIA
C99), ASHLEY
EIGHER C99),
RACHEL
NITSCHE C99),
MECAN
CARLETON
C99), KATY
GIBBS, JEN
MCKENRICK,
LEYLA

CUSTER C99),
DANIELLE
SIMON ETTA,
HELEN KIM 6.
RACHEL
ALLEN




KAREN WATTS, MILLIE HEATWOLE &<
TARYN KIEKOW



:endall cruickshanks s. amy KIROUAC



Seniors 69



BEDROCK

JOHN THRALL, CHRIS BALDWIN, FORREST NORVELL, AL WEST,
ANDREW VARDAMAN S. OMAR MONEIM




(RICHT)

RUSS WOODY &.

LEIGH MILDREN

WAKE FOREST '98)



70 Seniors




(LEFT, FRONT TO BACK)
MOGANA RICHARDS,
NATASHA EDELEN S.
SHERI HAMILTON



Seniors 71



rRArx ROW) KATHERINE MCALPINE, AMY KIROUAC, EMILY CARTWRIGHT, JENN JUSTEMA,,
STE^himE BRE\^^^^^ CALLAHAN, JEN MCKENRICK (FRONT ROW) TARYnI

STEPHANIE bKtWtK, cmk KIEKOW, CAROLINE YATES S. RACHEL ALLEN




(ABOVE) STEPHANIE ROSKOM S<

DOUG PANZER

(RIGHT) STACY PATTON £< LEIGH

LUNDSTROM



72 Seniors



(LEFT) CHRIS BALDWIN AND KATIE
BALDWIN COD

(BELOW) ERIC ZAVOLINSKY, DAVID FOS-
TER i< JAKE BLUMENTHAL




ACOB GARRETT, J.B. KILEYS<TIM CLEARY



Seniors



(RIGHT) MARISA FROST, ADAM
AVITABLE S. ZACH HANKS




CLAUDIA ARCURI, LINDSAY WOOD, ANNIE LONG &< JEN BUGKEY



74 Seniors



^THERINE MCALPINE, MILLER WILD, CHRISTY STEVENS S. LAUREN WILLSON




^

^i
>



(ABOVE) ANDREW HERON
(LEFT) JAMIE KALISTA C99), DIANA
VAAMONDE 6< DIANA'S COD
DAUCHTER, MACARENA (20??)



Seniors 75



(RIGHT) DAN STACKHOUSE S.
CHARITY FORSTMANN




76 Seniors




^ HILLARY MCMILLIAN &<
KELLEY CHAPOTON



AAGGIE WOOLDRIDGE &< CHRISTI WOOLDRIDGE 097)



Seniors /7



(RIGHT) STEVE OSBORN, JASON ZACHER S. MATT

CRAIG

(BELOW) KENDALL CRUICKSHANKS S. JAMES

BROWNE COO)




78 Seniors



(LEFT) EMILY 6IPSON, BETSY HOWE, MOLLY NORTON
S. SUSIE CREAMER



CROSS COUNTRY SENIORS

(BELOW) GREG RUTHIG, WILL OLSON, JASON CALLEN,

TAYLOR SHULTZ 6< DAVID LAWRENCE




Seniors /9



(RIGHT) CAROLINE AMPORT i.
LAURENCE PHILLIPS

(BELOW) JUSTIN RIEDELL S.
STUART CHI KAMI




I I



JEFF KILLION, ALAN WILLIS, BEN LACY S< ALAN CUTHBERTSOr



80 Seniors



THENA MAHONEY (OO) S. MARY JO MAHONEY




(ABOVE) SUNDA WELLS S. SHELL!
HENDERSON

(LEFT) HILLARY MARTIN 6< AMANDA
ROBSON

Seniors 81



UNDERGRAD RUGBY MINKS




(RIGHT) ALLISON FREY, LAURA
COHEN 6< DANA HOOD



82 Seniors



(LEFT) BRIAN HOOPER S. MARGARET
LYONS (HOLLINS COLLEGE '98)

(BELOW) "CROSBY," JENN BUCKEY &<
LINDSAY WOOD




\ARCARET HEINER, LINDSAY THURMAN, MOLLY CIESELMAN, JULIANA
PMUNDS 6< ASHLEY PETERSON



Seniors 83




(ABOVE) CARSON FLOWERS, STACY PATTON, LEICH
LUNDSTROM 6< LAURENCE PHILLIPS

(RIGHT) ALISON ROHAS, MARY KATHRYN WILLIAMS

6< ASHLEY SHREVES COO)



84 Seniors




(ABOVE) CARSON FLOWERS, LAURENCE PHILLIPS 6<
ROBIN BOYCE

(LEFT) TODD DENBO C97) 6< LEIGH LUNDSTROM



Seniors 83



(RIGHT) DEMIAN MC6ARRY S< DAN HILLEY
(BELOW)BRIAN CULVER 6< LIZA JAMISON C99)



MOLLIE

HARMON C99), PAUL

SAUPE C99), DIANA

VAAMON DE-MARTIN

6. JAMIE KALISTAC99)




86 Seniors



I (LEFT) MARGARET HOEHL ('99), BLIGH WOLLNER S.
MAGGIE GEORGE ('97)




(BAGK ROW)
PAUL SABOE ('97),
SCOTT

BOOKWALTER,
DEMIAN MCGARRY,
ERIC REUTHER
(FRONT ROW)
DAN STACKHOUSE &<
JEREMY ADAMS



Seniors 8"



(RIGHT) LORRAINE TAURASSI,

CLAIRE BOWERS, CHRISTY

MEADE S. ERICA REINEKE




Seniors




JENNY GRANT, CAROLINE
AMPORT, MOLLY NORTON,
MILLER WILD, KERYN PAIER,
CHRISTY STEVENS S. LAUREN
WILLSON




LODELL

DAN THOMPSON, JUSTIN LABORDE, BRIAN CULVER, JONATHAN CORAB, REED DEUPREE S.

FORREST STEWART



89



DOUG PANZER 6. NATE TAYLOR




(RIGHT) DAVID BUTLER 6. DAVID
SUGERMAN C99)



90 Seniors



EFT) VALERIE HARRIS, EMI LY CARTWRIGHT Sc
JATALIA GARCIA



DAVE FOSTER S< LEE HUNT (AT JUMP
MOUNTAIN)




MARK DICRISTINA, ANDREW KINTZ, MAGGIE WOOLDRIDGE S. CHRIS
EDWARDS C99)



Seniors 91



KATHRYN MAYURNIK S. LIZ DETTER



THE MILL

SETH CORNEAL, TIM CLEARY, GORDON

MEEKER, BYRON BURNS, MIKE VASALLO,

JOHN REID ^MATT LAU




VICTORIA PAVLOVA S. MACIEJ GOLUBIEWSKY C99



92 Seniors



\AGGIE WOOLDRIGE, RACHEL ALLEN
AMY KIROAUC




TOP: WHITNEY PARKER, LORRAINE TAURASSI,
MELISSA FOOTE, SUSIE CREAMER
BOTTOM: EMILY CIPSON, BETSY HOWE, ANNE-
LAMAR BROWN &< MARY JO MAHONEY



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(LEFT) NICOLE RICHARD 6< REBECCA
BACDONAS



Seniors 9;



;RIAN HIGGINS, LEIGH SMITH COO) ^ DOUG
PANZER



BJORNEN DU PONT, ANDERW RUPPAR 6<
JENNY WILLIAMS




94 Seniors



AMITYVILLE

SARA MC6EORGE, MELISSA FOOTE, SAM
HORSTMAN ('99), MARY JO MAHONEY S.
ANNE-LAMAR BROWN



E$ MAISTER C96)i<TARYN KIEKOW



AN WISE S< BRENDAN BREENCOMBES C99)





Kl4 ^^ '^^^^^^^^^^m '^^1













LAKE LOVELACE, JESSE MCCUIRE &< PATRICK O'CONNELL



1). KRITSER&.CEORCE KING



Seniors 9~



RACHEL ALLEN, TARYN KIEKOW
S. CAROLINE YATES

MEGAN WEIDEMAER 6<TADZIA
CRANDPRE




FRONT: M1LA6ROS DALY, BILL OVERBAU6

DAWN HEWITT. BACK: DIANA VAAMONC

MARTIN, KEITH HABER 6< KATHLEEN DU5



96 Seniors



BEANS AND DBMS

DAVID DEMARTINO, CHRIS BEACH, MATT E.
HOLBROOK, MALCOLM MILNE 6< NOAH EGORIN




(ABOVE) MARY NEW, CHRISTI WOOLDRIDGE C97),
MAGGIE WOOLDRIDGE, CARSON FLOWERS S. MARY
MICHAEL PETTYJOHN

(LEFT) LAURA COHEN S. ALISON ROHAS



Seniors 9"



(RIGHT) JOHNNY OILMAN C99) 6< LORRAINE

TAURASS!

(BELOW)JED HAZLETT, GREG CHOW, AARON
BROTHERTON 6< DAN RUSHING




SUSIE CREAMER, MOLLY NORTON, BETSY HOWE,


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