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W.F. Sherfesee.

Annual Report of the Director of Forestry of the Philippine Islands online

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The stand per hectare is 91.01 cubic meters or 22,752.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), yacal,
red lauan, toog, apitong, narra, guijo, pili (pagsahingin and pili),
hialaikmo, palosapis, dungon, amugis, tanguile, tamayuan, and
other miscellaneous species. These estimates apply to 20,000
hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 9.

Mactaon or Malinao Valley and Sulat, — Because of the rugged
condition of this tract, logging is difficult, but owing to the good
stand of timber, not only in quantity but in quality, it is worth
considering. Logs could be hauled either by donkey engines or
by animals to those parts of the streams suitable for rafting.
This tract is recommended for a small concession with a daily
output of about 25 cubic meters.

Sulat Bay and the port of Libas, particularly the latter, offer
good sites for sawmills.

The stand per hectare is 128.59 cubic meters or 32,147.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), tan-
guile, guijo, palomaria, yacal, almaciga, macaasim, dao, tiga, bo-
longeta, malugay, apitong, alupag, balobo, mangasinoro, narra,
and other miscellaneous species. These estimates apply to 18,000
hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 10.

Beginning from the confluence of the Balangao River, the
Borongan River may be used for transportation, but west of this
transportation is impossible, due to stream obstructions. The
rivers south of Borongan present the same difficulties.



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65

The stand of timber is fairly good, but on account of the rug-
gedness of the tract, logging is difficult. This tract should be
developed only under ordinary licenses.

The stand per hectare is 164.23 cubic meters or 41,057.5
board feet, distributed among the following species in the order
of their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), api-
tong, may apis, tanguile, mangasinoro, yacal, guijo, narra, and
other micellaneous species. These estimates apply to 10,000
hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 11.

The Suribao Valley. — In general, the basin of the Suribao
River is recommended for a concession with a daily output of
about 40 cubic meters; although the tract is somewhat rugged,
it has the advantage of being crossed by several tributaries of
the Suribao, most of which are large enough for rafting. An-
other advantage is its suitability for steam logging. A mill site
is available at Suribao, and a small railroad could be built to
transport the lumber to the port of Lalawigan at Borongan.

The stand per hectare is 87.97 cubic meters or 21,992.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance : Mayapis, apitong, yacal, lauan, tanguile, man-
gasinoro, tiga, narra, macaasim, and other miscellaneous spe-
cies. These estimates apply to 25,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 12.

Llorente and Tongkip Valleys. — There is a heavy stand of
commercial timber, but it is inaccessible owing to the rugged-
ness of the tract. The parts which may be reached and for
which the Llorente and Tongkip Rivers can be used for water
transportation would supply a small sawmill and should be de-
veloped under ordinary licenses.

The stand per hectare is 172.80 cubic meters or 43,200
board feet, distributed among the following species in the order
of their abundance : Apitong, narra, mayapis, lauan, guijo, sud-
yang, mangasinoro, yacal, palosapis, tanguile, palomaria, and
other miscellaneous species. These estimates apply to 10,000
hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 13.

Not examined.

The stand per hectare is 159.35 cubic meters or 39,837.5
board feet, distributed among the following species in the order
of their abundance : Sudyang, bansalagin, lauan, yacal, mayapis,
macaasim and other miscellaneous species. These estimates ap-
ply to 8,000 hectares.

148357 5



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66

COMPARTMENT NO. 14.

Balangiga. — This compartment is recommended only for or-
dinary licenses, due to the limited stand of timber and the diffi-
culties of transportation.

The stand per hectare is 78.39 cubic meters or 19,597.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), manga-
sinoro, tiga, yacal, guijo, agoho, sudyang, tanguile, bitanhol,
macaasim, bansalagin, mangachapuy, apitong, and other miscel-
laneous species. These estimates apply to 10,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 15.

The tract of land from Alabat Point to barrio Nouvilas may
be logged to a slight extent, as this tract should be conserved as
a protective forest. The valley of the Sohoton or Basey may be
logged on a larger scale by clear cutting on those areas which
are suitable for agriculture. Logging is rather difficult and the
Sohoton or Basey River can be used for 10 kilometers; the for-
est is dotted with clearings due to caingin making.

The stand per hectare is 84.53 cubic meters of 21,132.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Apitong, lauan, mangasinoro, mayapis, toog,
macaasim, tiga, bitanhol, banuyo, narra, ipil, catmon, and other
miscellaneous species. These estimates apply to 25,000 hec-
tares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 16.

Santa Rita and Villareal. — A few scattered areas supporting
a heavy stand of commercial species occur in this compartment,
but owiiig to the difficulties of logging, this compartment is not
suited for large operations.

The stand per hectare is 253.77 cubic meters or 63,442.5
board feet, distributed among the following species in the order
of their abundance : Lauan, yacal, apitong, mangachapuy, narig,
malanobo, nato, macaasim, amugis, malaikmo, baticulin, mo-
lave, tindalo, and other miscellaneous species. These estimates
apply to 6,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 17.

Daram and Buad Islands. — Buad Island is open in character
and supports extensive cogon areas on lands which are not fit-
ted for agriculture and which should be reforested.

Daram Island supports a few small forest areas with a heavy
stand of trees, but there are also vast cogon areas unfitted for
agricultural purposes, which should be reforested.



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67

Logging in these islands should be restricted to licenses for
local use.

The stand per hectare is 135.09 cubic meters or 33,772.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Yacal, lauan, apitong, balobo, tanguile, guijo,
palomaria, tindalo, molave, ata-ata, narra, balukanad, taluto,
dao, macaasim, and other miscellaneous species. These esti-
mates apply to 2,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 18.

Calbiga-Wright — The forests in this compartment have been
almost destroyed by caingin makers; only small areas with a
fairly good stand of trees occur, but as a whole, owing to dif-
ficulties in transportation, they are inaccessible to modern ex-
ploitation.

The Calbiga River is navigable for a boat of about 5 feet
draft to San Mauricio, but hauling logs to this place is very
difficult and can be done only by carabaos.

The stand per hectare is 170.64 cubic meters or 42,660 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), yacal,
tanguile, molave, apitong, mayapis, gubas, guijo, amugis, ma-
caasim, malaikmo, taluto, banuyo, bitanhol, oak, and other mis-
cellaneous species. These estimates apply to 8,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 19.

Catbalogan-Tarangnan, — This region is largely deforested, con-
taining only scattered stands of timber difficult of access ; most
of the territory is covered with cogon and should be reforested.

Logging should be restricted to supplying local demands.

The stand per hectare is 92.72 cubic meters or 23,180 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), manga-
chapuy, apitong, tanguile, guijo, duguan, alupag, mangasinoro,
dao, amugis, bitanhol, camagon, macaasim, bolongeta, and other
miscellaneous species-. These estimates apply to 5,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 20.

Valley of the Gdndara River and its tributaries. — Being tra-
versed by the Gandara or Matuguinao River, this territory may
be divided into two parts. The eastern part or the basin of the
Blanca River, a tributary of the Gandara, including the Mapa-
pacao, Colongcogon, and Hurao Mountains, is worth studying
for the establishment of a large lumbering enterprise; even



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68

though the tract is somewhat rugged, transportation facilities
may be established without much difficulty by rail or by aerial
cable to the Gandara and Blanca Rivers.

A good sawmill site is at the confluence of the Gandara and
Bulao Rivers. From Gandara, sawn timber may be transported
on large scows to Napalisan Island, at the mouth of the Gandara
River, where a yard could be located. Vessels of more than 15
feet draft can anchor, although exposed to the southwest mon-
soon; such vessels could find shelter in Libucan Island, about 6
kilometers south.

There are small bays along the coast between Catbalogan and
Calbayog, but on account of the water being only 6 to 12 feet
deep, they are of no use.

Logging to the south and west of the Bulao River must be
restricted, as forest preservation is necessary for the protection
of stream flow. Lumbering in the western part of this compart-
ment is recommended under ordinary licenses only.

The stand per hectare is 129.71 cubic meters or 32,427.5 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), tanguile,
mayapis, apitong, macaasim, guijo, yacal, amugis, dao, narra,
bolongeta, and other miscellaneous species. These estimates
apply to 30,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 21.

Calbayog-Oquendo, — ^Logging operations in the eastern part of
the Oquendo Valley and in the jurisdiction of Calbayog must be
rigidly restricted in order to protect the abaca plantations, and
the suitable areas should be planted to this crop.

In the western part of the Oquendo Valley and in the valley
of the Saymonini River to the coast, forest exploitation can only
be carried on under ordinary licenses, because of difficulties in
transportation due to the ruggedness of the tract.

The stand per hectare is 134.66 cubic meters or 33,665 board
feet, distributed among the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan, apitong, mayapis, mangasinoro, toog,
tanguile, malaikmo, amugis, tiga, antipolo, and other miscel-
laneous species. These estimates apply to 15,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 22.

Mauo and Bunglasan Valleys. — ^This region may be operated
under a long term exclusive license for a daily output of about
40 cubic meters.

Although a considerable number of rapids and falls occur



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69

in the Mauo and Bunglasan Rivers, they may be used for tran-
sportation to a distance of several kilometers.

Two places were selected for the mill site, namely, on the
Mauo Gulf or at Barrio Erenas.

The stand per hectare is 136.83 cubic meters or 34,207.5 board
feet, distributed among, the following species in the order of
their abundance: Lauan (bagtican, white lauan, almon), apitong,
tanguile, narra, toog, macaasim, guijo, dalingdingan, pili (pag-
sahingin and pili), and other miscellaneous species. These es-
timates apply to 20,000 hectares.

COMPARTMENT NO. 23.

Capul and Dalupiri Islands. — They are considered of no forest
value. The stand per hectare is 139.49 cubic meters or 34,872.5
board feet, distributed among the following species in the order
of their abundance : Narra, malapaho, apitong, lauan, tamayuan
and other miscellaneous species. These estimates apply to 500
hectares-.

SUMMARY.

The most convenient sites for mills of larger capacity are:
Carangian, Palapag, Gumay, Oras, Sulat, Libas, Suribao, Lo-
quilocon, Gandara, and Mauo.

Beside these, in case of a large lumbering enterprise, a com-
bination of several compartments may be made at Palapag,
Gumay, and Oras, upper valley of the Dolores and Oras, or the
former with the Blanca valley, a tributary of the Gandara River.

In general, the Island of Samar is heavily timbered, but the
country being subject to typhoons, the trees are somewhat
damaged, particularly on the northern and eastern coast, where
the trees are also smaller.

Because of the difficulties in logging due to the mountainous
character of the island, the use of portable sawmills is recom-
mended. In case there is a big demand for timber, the regions
of Suribao and Llorente, Loquilocon, upper Ulot and Concord,
Dolores and Gandara, which contain enough timber to support
a large lumbering operation, should be studied to solve the prob-
lems of logging.

The central part of the island, between Calbiga and Borongan,
as well as the regions which are not readily accessible for timber
exploitation, contain extensive areas of Almaciga trees which,
under the proper methods, may be exploited for resin. This
product, if taken out together with rattan, would bring good
returns.



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70

The valleys of Bobon, Catarman, Bugko, Pambujan, Catubig,
Or as to Hipapad, Dolores to Maslog, Ulot to Tula, Tubig or Mali-
nao to Concord, Basey or Sohoton, Silaga to San Eduardo, Calbiga
to Abaca and Buluan, Oquendo to Tarabucan, and Saymonini to
Dao and Macatingog should be opened up more to agriculture
with no other forest limitations than those necessary for the
protection of streams and the prevention of erosion.

During this reconnaissance an investigation was also made
regarding the general conditions of the mangrove swamp forests ;
the tables and estimates for these have not been finished.

Small reconnaissances have also been made on the Islands of
Polillo and Alabat.



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Appendix B.— STATISTICAL TABLES.

Table No. 1. — Statement of the certifications made to the Bureau of Lands
regarding the agricultural or forest value of public land applied for as
homesteads or for purchase or lease.





Homesteads.


Sale applications.


Fiscal year.


Agri-
culture.


Forest.


Total.


Agri-
culture.


Forest.


Total.


1905 - -


80
318
881
2,456
1.523
1,175
1,528
2,609
2,680
1,653
4,812
5.965
6,015


6

16

19

61

187

385

221

301

269

159

685

688

670


86
334
900
2,507
1,710
1,560
1,749
2,910
2,949
1,812
5,497
6,653
6,685


8

20

23

49

26

34

46

95

104

81

279

317

227




g


1906


1


21


1907


23


1908


1
3
5

1?

30
16
36
52
18


50


1909 —


29


1910 —


39


1911


49


1912 _ -


106


1913


134


1913 (July 1 to Dec. 31) —


97


1914


315


1915 -


369


1916


245






Total


31,695


3,657


35, 352


1,309


176


1,485









Leases.


Grand
total.


Fiscal year.


Agri-
culture.


Forest.


Total.


1905



1

12
26
27
42
30
47
47
41
77
70
55






94


1906




1

12
26
27
44
31
48
48
44
78
71
59


356


1907




935


1908 — - _ -




2,583


1909 .- .




1,766


1910


2
1
1
1
3
1
1
4


1,643


1911


1,829


1912 _


3,064


1913 ..


3,131


1913 (July 1 to Dec. 31) .


1,953


1914


5,890


1915 -


7,093


1916 - -


6,989






Total .- - - — -


475


14


489


37, 326







Note. — Total number of homestead, sale, and lease applications pending inspection Decem-
ber 31, 1914, 2,961 ; December 31, 1915, 2,243 ; December 31, 1916, 3,493.

This increase in pending homesteads is due to the increase in the number of requests
received from the Bureau of Lands.

71



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72



Table No. 2. — Statement shovnng amounts in cubic meters of important
timbers, by species, cut and invoiced in the Philippine Islands during
the fiscal years 1910 to 1916.





Fiscal year —


Species.


1910


1911


1912


1913


July 1 to

Dec. 13,

1913.


Lauan


43,439

20,764
2,106

14, 107
8,225

13,717
8,923
5,744
3,174


46,942

21,096
2.762

14,231
8,150

12,296
7,978
4,996
1,368


57,036

28, 929

3,999

18,579

14,491

17.237

9,091

8,474

938


81,469
32,391
5.249
17.279
21, 770
15.791
9.363
8.877
3.320


20, 249


A.pitonsf -


12,905


Tang:uile


3.390


Guijo -


7.841


Yacal


5,593


Ipil


7,535


Molave , - -


4,783


Narra


3.941


Calantas


886


Palosapis -




Man^achapuy












Macaasim - i.


705

2,453

954

809

1,039

1.062


1,094

1,693

1,018

867

735

944


1,239
1,218

794
1,295
1,108

542


699
931
932
1.690
645
297


267


Dungron -


601


Tindalo . -


484


Acle — —


729


Amugris -


252


Supa


141


Betis




Malug^ay












Other species:

First group


574

4,900

7,277

36,786


322

4,606
10, 192
41,655


707
6,207
10,688
42, 981


1.000

7.547

8.066

59.855


687


Second group


2,858


Third group


2,747


Fourth group


25,613






Total


176.758


182, 945


224, 948


277, 171


101, 503











Fiscal


year —




Species.


1914


1915


1916


Total
1910 to
1916.


Lauan


74,453

32,328

14,682

19. 701

15, 115

17,602

9,753

8,467

2.423

2,222

1,469

1,293

2,199

914

1,287

770

596


73,277

38,849

15,460

15.650

14, 714

12, 089

10,546

9,868

1,999

1,631

1,859

806

1,467

1,181

1,498

612

383


107, 634

52, 529

28, 961

16, 685

16,471

14, 147

10, 788

7,970

4,574

2,723

2,666

1,322

1,127

1,115

1,088

520

162

158

44

2.916
6,454
4,694
56,694


504, 499


Apitong -


249, 326


Tanguile


76, 609


Guijo _ _


124, 073


Yacal _ .


104, 529


Ipil __ _


110, 414


Molave


71, 225


Narra


58, 337


Calantas -_ * _ _


18,682


Palosapis


6,576


Mangachapuy _ _


5,994


Macaasim :


7,425


Dungon __ _ * _ __


11, 684


Tindalo


7,892


Acle _- -


9,263


Amugis .


5,681


Supa __


4,127


Betis _ _


158


Malugay _


'^




44


Other species:

First group


2,196

7,484

6,787

73,017


2,190

5,751

6,308

60, 130


10, 522


Second group .


45, 807


Third group


56, 749


Fourth group__


396, 731






Total


294,688


276.268


341.442


1, 935, 847







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73

Table No. 3, — Revenue derived from the sale of forest products, and ex-
penditures of the Bureau of Forestry since its organization, April
U, 1900.



Fiscal year—


Revenue.


Expenses.


Surplus.


Expenses.


1901 to 1906


P2, 268, 591
191, 080
211,571
251,380
271, 582
884,763
854,685
890, 664
160, 913
442,661
425, 817
494,447


PI, 118. 887
105,050
107.242
115,049
152, 161
160. 476
200, 840
227, 048
141, 131
256,990
274, 176
285,708


PI, 149, 704
86. 030
104, 329
136,331
119, 421
174,287
153, 845
163,616
19, 782
185,671
151, 641
208,739


Per cent.
49


1907__.


55


1908 —


51


1909


45


1910


56


1911 -


48


1912 —


57


1913


59


1913 (July 1 to Dec. 31)


88


1914 -


58


1915


64


1916 -


58






Total


5,798,154


3,144.758


2.653,396


a 57. 38







* Average.

Table No. 4. — Revenue from sale of forest products, January 1 to December

31, 1916,



Provinces.



Affusan

Albay

Ambos Camarines _

Antique

Bataan ___

Batangas

Bohol

Bulacan

Cagayan

Capiz

Cavite -

Cebu -

Cotabato

Davao

Ilocos Norte

Ilocos Sur

Iloilo

Isabela

Laguna

La Union

Lanao

Leyte

Manila-

Mindoro



Amount.



731. 10
582.01
807.46
409.20
327. 58
058. 74

137. 91
833. 33
713. 53
622. 30
328. 70
609. 97

133. 92
073. 55
191.03
385. 01
038.48
397. 94
306. 77
290. 69
588. 58
457.90

,603.63
,853.48



Provinces.



Misamis

Mountain

Negros Occidental

N egros Oriental

Nueva Ecija

Nueva Vizcaya

Palawan

Pampanga. -

Pangasinan

Rizal -_ - ___

Samar

Sorsogon -._ _._

Sulu.-_. - -„

Surigao—

Tarlac

Tayabas

Zambales

Zamboanga

Total charges

Total fines and penalties

Grand total.-



Amount.



P6,
5,

18,
2,
4,



049.80
005.56
955.07
897.34
523. 18
128. 65
503.38
693. 80
047.36
792. 89
676. 33
438. 51
164.42
333. 65
078. 58
787. 65
668.79
219. 93



451,602.33
42,845.32



The above list shows the places where the forest charges were collected and not always
where the products were gathered. This accounts for the large receipts shown by the principal
market centers.



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74

Table No. 5. — Timber licenses in force during the fiscal year 1916
(January 1 to December SI ^ 1916).





Commercial licenses.


Gratuitous licenses.




'J

1


£8

Sis


To

!|


m

1

V


1


For personal
use.


n

Hi






Provinces.


13

k

is


o

3 S ti

o


1


Albay


3

30

7

6

7

8

1

15

43

16

48

47

22

8

25

3

45

5

14

70

68

20

5

26

8

8

3

41
11
60
3
21
7

19
18


22
57

1
22

3

3

8

71
11

9
12
29
11
46
23

4
52
49

6
30

7
23


6

7


-


31
95

8

43
11
11

9
89
55
25
60
76
33
54
50

7
100
59
23
124
81
43

5
72
21
43

7
82
19
86

6

26

10

109

28


12
13


7
10






19


Ambos Camarines


2


20


45


AntlQue




Bataan


14
1


1


1

""is"

""""58"
14
21
26
19

1
49

-

8
__„ - _

24
2

24
1
5
2








1


Batangas


2

60
4
97
22
29

"""26"






2


Bohol _ . .


7
2
5
11

2


8~


82


Bulacan _.






14


Cacrayan _


3
1




160


Capiz


47


Cebu


51


Ilocos Norte






27


liocos Sur ^






67


Iloilo






2


Isabela






51




2




26


La Union






9


Leyte _ _ .


3

5

2

22

4


i"

2
2


3i9
35
74

199
14
33
12
22
26
47


8
4
1

11
5


4-


335


Mindoro _


39


Mieamis


100


Mindanao and Sulu


234


Mountain Province


25


Nueva Eicija


57


Nueva Vizcava






i

1
1

4





14


Negros Occidental


43
13
12
4
41
8
24
3
8
3

81
7


1


2


28


Negros Oriental


29


Palawan


23




51






Panorasinan






47
1
71
15
28

25


33
2
32
61
85
65
9


8




90


Rizal






3


Samar


2








103


SorsofiTon -


6
3
2
2
2
1


4
2

-


86


Surigrao __


2

8"

3





118


Tarlac


67


Tayabaa


28


Zambales


34




1




















Total . -


741


741


109


10


1,601


538


1.371


96


45


2,045







Note. — There was no license issued in the provinces of Batanes and Cavite.

In Cagayan and Isabela 2,123 licenses were issued for building tobacco curing houses. The
timber authorized to be cut under these licenses amounts to 15,600 cubic meters of first and
34,500 cubic meters of lower group timber.



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