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iel



5
3m
54
51
36



1796
1756
1798



1805
1798



Smith, George

Smith, Ann, wife of George

Smith, Martha

Smith, James

Smith, John

Svveetland, Sarah, wife of Benja

man
Sweetland, Eleazur
Sweetland, Polly, wife of Eleazur 179.
Sweetland, Effingham
Sargeant, John, son of Jacob 1802
Steel, Elizabeth, wife of George 1800
Steel, Ashbel 1790

Steel, Nabby, dau. of Ashbel 1772
Steel, Jonathan 1753

Steel, Dorothy, wife of Jonathan 1775
Sloan, Samuel
Starr, Harriett
Stone, Samuel (Rev.), pastor



1775
1801



First Church
Sheldon, Joseph



1663
1794



Sheldon, George, son of Joseph 1764
Sheldon, Deacon Isaac 1749

Sheldon, Elizabeth, wife of Isaac 1745
Sheldon, Anna, wife of Isaac 1802
Sheldon, Daniel 1772

Sheldon. Lucretia, wife of Daniel 1772
Sheldon. William, son of Daniel 1758
Sheldon. Isaac, son of Isaac 1754

Sheldon. Sarah, wife of Joseph 1785
Sheldon, Isaac 1786

Seymour. Israel 1784

Seymour, Jonathan 1776

Seymour, Thomas 1740

Seymour, Thomas 1767

Seymour, John 1748

Seymour, Mary Ann, wife of

Thomas Y. 1782

Seymour, Mary, wife of Nathan-
iel 1758
Seymour, Zebulon 1765
Seymour, Mary, wife of Thomas 1746
Seymour, Jerusha 1753
Seymour, Mary Ann 1766
Seymour, Elizabeth, wife of Rich-
ard 1759
Seymour, Prudence, wife of Fred-
erick 1799
Seymour, Deliverance, wife of

Jared 1799

Seymour, Lovisa, wife of Josenh

W. 1798

Spencer, Obadiah 1741

Spencer, Abigail, wife of Disbrow 1725
Sariford.Hulldah.wife of Robert 1759
Sanford. Robert 1728

Sanford. Zachariah. son of

Zachariah 1683

Skinner. Stephen 1758

Skinner, Joseph 1748

Skinner, John 1773

Skinner, Mary, wife of John 1771

Skinner, Mary, wife of John, Jr., 1772
Skinner. Rebecca, wife of Na-
thaniel 1780
Skinner, Leonard 1746
Skinner, Rachael, wife of John 1748
Skinner, John 1743
Skinner, Sarah 1750
Skinner, Abagail 1750



Age.

82

70

5

I

9m

ii

32



29
59
14
60
82
4
iim

61
65
2
63
53
72
46
47
5
2
50
63
49
73
71
62



54
6S
69
29
6

44
30
66

.^9

75
46
28
72



43
79
76
67
42

31

4
77
71



THE ANCIENT BURYING GROUND OF HARTFORD.



85



Died. Age
Skinner, Abagail, wife of Elisha 1777 -19
Skinner, Hepzebah, wife of John 1791 54
Stanley, Bennet, alias Wolltertqn 1664
Stanley, Hannah ( Children i68i 7

Stanley, Susannah ■ Nathaniel 1683 2

Stanley, Sarah ( Stanley. 1680 20
Stdnley, Sarah, wife of Nathaniel 1716 76
Stanley (one of his Majesty's as-
sistants), Nathaniel 1712 74
Stanley, Joseph 1675 4
Stanley, Anna, wife of Col. Na-
thaniel 1752
Stanley, Natluniel (Hon.), treas-
urer of Connecticut 1755
Stanley, Sarah 1698
Stanley, Hannah (wives of Ca-
leb) 1689
Stanley, Caleb 1718
Stanley, Caleb, son of Caleb 1712
Stanley, Mary 1698
Stanley, William, gave his prop-
erty to Second Church 1786
Thomas, Rachel 1760
Thomas, Lydia, of Marlborough 1758
Thomas, Mary 1764
Tiley, Walter 1791
Tiley, Susanna, wife of John 1724
Thompson, Gideon 1759
Tisdale, Emily 1802
Talcott, Joseph (Hon.) Governor

of Connecticut 1725-1741 1741

Talcott, John, son of the Gov-
ernor 1771 73
Talcott, Abigail, wife of John 1784 80
Talcott, Mabel, wife of Samuel 1775 62
Talcott, Joseph, son of the Gov. 1799 62
Todcker. Michael 1801 18
Taylor, James 1772
Van Norden, Anna, wife of John 1799 40
Wciolterton, Gregory 1674 81
Wqoltferton, Susanna, wife of

Gregory
Wqolferton. Sarnuel
Wilson,. Phineas
Wi(sori, Mary, \vife of Phineas
Waters, Bevil
Wattles, Jonathan S
Wattles, Delight S
Web^Stef, Sarah, wife of Robert
Walker, Marion, wife of John
Watson, Ebenezer
Watson, Elizabeth, wife of Ebe

nezer 1770

Whitrhan. Elnathan (Rev.), pas-
tor of Second Church 1777
Wilson, Elizabeth, wife of Phin-
eas 1727
Welles, Hannah 1683
Welles, Blackleach 1788



Died.

1795
1799
1793
1711
1796
1795



66

73
44

45

75

?,7

6

63
2

30
34
qm
43
56
7



1662
1668
1692
1688


75
7m
64
29


1729


97


1779
1780


I
9


1725

1762


53

25


1777


33



69



Welles, Mary
Welles, Julia

Welles, Britty, wife of Ashbel
Wentworth, Samuel
W'atson, Sally, wife of John
Watson, John ..^^

Watson. Hannah, wife of John 1799
Woodward, John 1793

Walkc, Marian, wife of John 179S
White, Elizabeth, wife of John J. 1804
White, Susan S. 1804

Williamson, Caleb 1738

Williamson, Mary, wife of Caleb 1737
Williamson, Anna, wife of Ebene-
zer 1750
\\'adsworth, Joanna, wife of Jo-
seph , 1762
Wadsworth, Daniel 1762
Wadsworth, William . 1771
Wadsworth, Thomas 1716
Wadsworth, Daniel (Rev.), pas-
tor First Church 1747
Wadsworth, Abigail, wife of Rev.

Daniel 1773

Wadsworth, Daniel 175°

Wadsworth, Ruth 175°

Wadsworth, Jeremiah (Col.) 1804
Wadsworth, Mehitabel, wife of

Col. Jeremiah 1817

Wadsworth, Elizabeth 1810

Wadsworth, Eunice, daughters of

Rev. Daniel 1825

Wadsworth, Millicent, wife of

Capt. Samuel 1790

Willet, Nathaniel 1698

Winchester, Elhanan (Rev.) 1797
Whiting, Joseph 171S

Whiting, Anna, wife of Joseph 1735
Whiting, Mary I7i4

Whiting. Abigail 1722

Whiting, Calvin (Rev.) 1795

Weare. Catv I79i

Weare, William T. 1807

Weare. Martha, wife of William 1795
Watson. Joseph 1803

Watson. Joseph 1806

Weeden. Marv, wife of Henry 1803
Wood. Lucv 1802

Wood. Wilfiam 1795

Wood, Benjamin S. 1793

Warner, Azubah, wife of Eh 1774
Wav. Marv I70i

Wo'odbridge, Timothy (Rev.),

pastor First Church 1732

Woodbridge. Abigail, wife of Rev.
Timothy and formerly of Rich-
ard Lord 1754
Westcoate. Samuel i775



Age

6
15
31
20
38
66
72

4
42
29

7
87
77



67



67
80
46

82
26

4
24

I

lom

38

29

3
19
37

4

I
43
70






AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



BY EDGAR DEANE.



At the advice of his physician, who charged only two dollars for telling
him, Uncle William was induced to take a short rest from his arduous duties.
His consultation with Cousin Jim resulted in their deciding to take a driving
trip down the *Housatonic Valley from Canaan. They were to drive as they
pleased, with no particular point for destination, and get back when they
chose.

Arriving in Canaan rather too late in the afternoon to start the same day
down the valley, Uncle William, who had brought his camera, started out to
cultivate his artistic eye. His operations were not complete, of course, with-
out " Let's see the picture, mister," from the omnipresent small boy, whom a



* As to the meaning of Housatonic, in his book, "Indian Names in Connecticut," Dr.
Trumbull says, " Eunice Mahwee (or Mauwehu), the last full-blooded survivor of the Scati
cook band, in 1859, pronounced the name ' Hous'ate7iuc,' and interpreted it 'over the moun
tain.' The tradition received by the Scaticook Indians of the discover^- of the river and
valley by those who came over the mountain from the west, establishes this interpretation
beyond a doubt." It is also interpreted " River of the Mountains."



88 AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.

companion soon accosted with, " Say, Sammy, yer mother wants yer ; you'll
ketch it when you git home." This cheerful announcement abated Sammy's
ardor in the investigating- line, and he hurriedly departed for that place unlike
any other. The explanations which would have been necessary to enlarge
Sammy's knowledge of photography reminded them of the experience of a
dealer in photographic supplies. A purchaser complained of the plates he
bought. " Did you follow directions ? " asked the dealer. " Oh, yes, very care-
fully. I loaded the holders, exposed the plates, took them in the dark room




and loaked at them, but not a trace of a picture could I find." " Did you de-
velop them?" "Develop! what's that ?" asked he, in utter amazement. This
customer must have been related to the young man who bought a printing
frame at a store and took it back two days later, mad as the proverbial " wet
hen." He gave them to understand that he had bought and paid for a good
printing frame and they couldn't push off any second-hand goods on him. They
said they were very sorry, they supposed the frame was all right and would do
anything they could to rectify a mistake. " Well," said he, pointing to the dial
on the back of the frame, used for registering the number of prints, " I had a
print in that frame all day yesterday, and that pointer never stirred."

As Sammy could not see the picture, neither could Uncle William, and this
was the beginning of a series he was taking on faith, the results to be found



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



89



after his return home, where in the seclusion of his private apartments, "he'd
do the rest."

Early the next morning the journey was begun, they starting for Falls
Village by the way of Twin Lakes, and from thence to Lime Rock and Sharon,
where they stopped for the night.

It has been said that one takes away from a place only what he brings to
it. In a certain sense this may be true. One has to have the ability to appre-
ciate what he sees, in order to absorb it. Aside from that he may learn many





TWIN I,.1KE5.



things and gain much knowledge and pleasure from traversing a country new
to him, although he will realize what he misses, because it is new to him. The
wealth of reminiscence which an inhabitant of the region can impart, the his-
torical detail familiar to the student of that section, the abodes or sometime
homes, of well-known people, — all these the traveler likes to know about and
feels his loss if the knowledge is lacking. The exception to this is when he goes
to a cemetery and finds out what a number of saintly people formerly lived in
that region. Let the tombstones tell their own story, and have no wily native



90



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



appear to disillusion the stranger by hinting that so-and-so's epitaph and truth.
are total strangers.

In few sections of the country of equal area could one find more to interest
him when thoroughly familiar with the history of the inhabitants than in Litch-
field County. In an address delivered before the Litchfield County Historical
and Antiquarian Society, April 9th, 1856, Mr. G. H. Hollister said : -'Many of
you are doubtless aware that Litchfield County has from the first been distin-
guished for its intelligence and enterprise, and that its little county townships




CA.NAAN FALLS.



have contributed more to the forum, the pulpit, the bench, the academic hall,
and the professor's chair, not only within our own limits, but in the several
states of the union, than in any other portion of the continent occupied by
an equal number of inhabitants." He then gives a few brief statistics in sup-
port of his statement and goes on to look for the reason, which, after speaking
of dissensions in church government and boundary lines inducing the removal of
some to Litchfield County in the early times, then known as the " Northwestern
Wilderness," he sums up in part as follows : "A variety of other motives led
these adventurous men to subject themselves to the hardships incident to a
warfare with the rugged obstacles of natiire. A desire like that of Rasselas, to
see what lay beyond ; a love of possessing land, for which the Saxon blood has
been famous from the earliest times — that restlessness which belongs to an un-
settled state of society ; a fearless courage stimulating the emigrant on from
difficulty to difficulty, with an appetite which grew by what it fed on ; a fervent




92 AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.

imagination which always accompanies religious zeal, and lights up whatever
is distant with rays of hope and promises of future glory ; a sublime trust in
God, who made the winds that howled and the snows that drifted over the win-
try waste, to be ministers of His wrath and the servants of His will ; these are
some of the motives which led to the settlements of the forbidding hill-tops
where the oak battled with the elements, and of the more inviting interval

where the pine and hemlock sighed amid
the tall grass of the hunting-ground. The
elasticity of a ball is to be estimated by
the length and number of its rebounds.
This is true of emigration. The toughness
of fiber, the wiry strength of the adven-
turer's nerves, is best known by the num-
ber of removes that he made, and their
distance from the secure abodes of his
fellow men. Hence you will find that the
settlers of Litchfield were from the first
picked men. The love of luxury and ease
was almost unknown to them. They built

CHURCH PORTICO, I-IMF. ROCK. , . , .,,.,, r /-. 1 T -x i

their houses on the hills of Goshen, Litch-
field, Winchester, Torrington, Watertown and Bethlehem, and made their
roads to them from the valleys with a defiance of comfort and civil engineer-
ing shocking to the nerves of their descendants."

The last statement, anyone who has driven in that region can readily ap-
preciate, for it seems as though the roads were built over the steepest hills that
could be found. As another writer, in commenting on the same subject, has
said : " Roads were laid out of a liberal width, usually six rods, but in other re-
spects the layout fails to command our respect. To get to the top of the high-
est hill by the shortest route, and thence to the top of the next, seems to have
been the chief object in view, and though many of these old roads have been
discarded, yet the traveler, if he has an}' taste for engineering, still has the op-
portunity to exercise his properisity."

The pleasant summer morning in a region abounding with enchanting
views was thoroughly enjoyed by Uncle William and Cousin Jim, as they jour-
neyed by the Twin Lakes, Washinee and Washining, and thence to that grand-
est natural phenomenon in the valley, Canaan Falls.

In the afternoon a pleasant time was had at the Barnum, Richardson Go's
works at Lime Rock, where the superintendent entertained them b)' showing
them about the shops. A new tire-setting machine interested Uncle William
by its wonderful efficiency. To anyone in need of such a machine he would
unhesitatingly say, " Look into the merits of this one."

As the stranger drives through the beautiful streets of Sharon, his mind
most naturally turns to the biblical phrase, "The rose of Sharon and the lily of
the valley," and he thinks that surely those who christened the place must
have had that saying in mind. It certainly is one of the most attractive towns
in all New England. The extra broad, well-shaded street, or double street, for
it is a regular boulevard, with nicely-kept lawns on both sides, extending
through the center of the town, and the charming residences, are revelations
to the traveler who comes upon it for the first time, having known nothing



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



95



about it and expecting to find in this far corner of the state, remote from rail-
roads, a primitive country village. It has an air of originality about it, too,
that gives it a character all its own. This is evidenced more especially by its
soldiers' monument, a huge stone cannon, with the inscriptions on its pedestal,
so different from the conventional type of soldiers' memorials elsewhere seen,
and by the stone clock-tower in the center of the town, which musically chimes
the hours.

From Sharon over the mountain to West Cornwall and on to Kent was but
a day's journey, allowing Uncle William ample time to photograph what took
his fancy.

The township of Cornwall, though composed of much good farming land,
and especially land adapted to the turning out of dairy products, is quite hilly
and mountainous.

The Hon. T. S. Gold, in his " History of Cornwall," says : "The rocky sur-
face of Cornwall gave large indications to the early settlers of mineral wealth,
and the township was named after the rich mining region in the old country."
Furthermore, the same author remarks : " When the question of a county seat
was early agitated, and Cornwall put in her claim for the honor, 'Yes,' it was
said, 'go to Cornwall and you will have no need of a jail, for whoever gets in
can never get out again.'




K TOWER, SHARON'.



"The old divine who, passing through Cornwall, delivered himself of the
following couplet, gave more truth with his poetry than is considered essential :



' The Almighty, from His boundless store,
Piled rocks on rocks, and did no more.'



94



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



" Another authority attributes it to Dr. Dwight, president of Yale College, who
came up to look at the college lands, and thus expressed himself :

' The God of Nati:re, from His boundless store,
Threw Cornwall into heaps and did no more.' "

Concerning the names of the several mountains, Mr. Gold gives some in-
teresting information. Besides speaking of a number which were named after
men who lived in their vicinity, such as Hough Mountain, Rugg Hill, Waller
Hill, Bunker Hill, Dudley Town Hill, and Clark Hill, he says : " About half a
mile south from his house (Deacon Waller's, at the foot of Waller Hill), we
find another large hill, properly called Tower Dale. This noble name, thus
written by the early settlers, has degenerated in common speech, into the in-
significant title of Tarrydiddle. Going in the same direction, but a little far-
ther removed from the river, we find Buck Mountain, so called from the great
number of deer that used to be found there. The first hill below West Corn-
wall, and nearer the river, was called Green Mountain before it became de-
nuded of its pines and hemlocks, which in early times covered it densely.
Then next south and easterly lies a long and high hill called Mine Mountain,
from the minerals it was supposed to contain. Cream Hill, lying in the north
middle part of the town, received this appellation from the superiority of its




VIEW IN WEST CORN'WAI.1



soil and the beauty of its scener3^ A pretty lake lies at it.s foot, and in fair
view from its southern aspect, called Cream Hill Lake. A high and steep
mountain range lies at the northwest of Sedgwick Hollow, called Titus Moun-
tain, and was so named from a young man of that name who, with others, was
amusing himself in rolling rocks down the steep side of the mountain, and who
had the misfortune to break his thigh.

" South of Cream Hill rises an isolated hill of no great height, but rough



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



95



and uncomely, to which is given the name of Rattlesnake Hill. I set down
here the tradition of fifty rattlesnakes killed at one time on this hill, lest the
story grow larger and tax our credulity too much as to the origin of the name.
This raid was too much for the snakes, as none have been found there inlthe
period of authentic history.

"Southeasterly from Clark Hill is the most elevated land in the state, lying
mostly in Goshen, from the apex of which is a view of Long Island Sooind.
This is called Mohawk Mountain.




RIVER VIEW AT WEST CORNW.ILL.



" Three hundred acres of land given by the General Assembly to Yale
College, is located in Cornwall, and goes by the name of College Land. Bloody
Mountain, so named from a bloody tragedy not enacted there, lies north of the
old Goshen and Sharon turnpike, northwest from the center of the town.

" From the summits of many of these hills extensive and magnificent
views are presented, extending west of the Hudson River and over a large
share of Berkshire County in Massachusetts. There are many other minor
hills, the beauty and picturesque appearance of which, to be fully appreciated
must be seen."

The keynote is struck in the last sentence. It is vain to attempt to de-
scribe the endless number of mountain and valley views, each with some
special feature of attractiveness, each grand and splendid in itself, that greet
the traveler through this region. To attempt the description is mere idle
repetition of words that fail utterly to adequately express his feelings.




KKNT FALLS.



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



97



Such were the sights that met our travelers' eyes throughout their whole
drive. From Cornwall their line of travel for the next few days was through
Kent, over to Roxbury, and then north through the Shepaug Valley to Wash-
ington and Litchfield, then through Goshen back to their starting point at
Canaan.

And this short trip was but one of many of equal interest that could be
taken in the same region, for the
places necessarily omitted in trav-
ersing the ground but once, were
legion.

The magnificent mountain
scenery was diversified by the nu-
merous beautiful water scenes
constantly met with on the Hous-
atonic, Shepaug and the smaller
streams, with here and there a
pretty lake, besides visits to the
rugged and picturesque ravines at
Kent and Roxbury Falls.

Who of us would not say with
Uncle William, when in such a
spot as either of the latter places,
"Like it ? Why I could stay here
all day."

Cool, restful and delightful in
every way, there the lover of na-
ture is in his element, and few
there be of us who do not retain
an instinctive passion for such

scenes, though it be, perhaps, what remains to us of the most refined of
savage instincts, stifled in vain through a thousand years of civilization.

Perhaps because we associate with the Indian what is most rugged and
wild, the mind naturally goes back to the aboriginal inhabitant when
contemplating this region, despite all the evidences of the two centuries
of the white man's occupancy. And this aside from the Indian names, which
we hope will long remain. Barber, in his "Connecticut Historical Collec-
tions," tells us that, " Gideon Mauwehu, the sachem of the Scaticook tribe, in
one of his hunting excursions came to the summit of the mountain which
rises almost precipitoiisly west of Scatacook (Kent), and beholding the beauti-
ful valley and river below, determined to make it the place of his future resi-
dence. It was indeed a lovely and desirable place ; there were several hundred
acres of excellent land, covered with grass like a prairie, with some few scat-
tering trees interspersed. The river was well supplied with fish, and on the
mountain, on both sides, was found an abundance of deer and other wild game.
At this place Mauwehu collected the Indians and became their sachem."

Well has Mr. Hollister expressed it when he said, in the address previously
alluded to : " All over the country lie scattered these simple mementoes of a
race which held dominion over the soil for unknown ages before the English




MAIDEN S WELL — KENT FALLS.



98 AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.

emigrant ever set foot upon it. His implements of war, sharp as the fabled
dragon's teeth, but not vital like them, still lie buried in the fields over which
he once hunted the wild deer, the bear, the moose and the otter. The plow-
boy whose mind is filled with stories of the Indian wars, continues to turn them
up with the share from year to year, and stops his team with a shuddering chill
to handle the serrated arrow and grooved tomahawk. Their household uten-
sils — the stone mortar and pestle, the pots in which they boiled their venison,
the pans in which they fried their fish, the stone pipe that sent up its grave
offering of peace around the council-fire, their grotesque attempts at sculpture.




lEl.UW NKW MII.IOKD



representing their grim ideal of a god — are still extant in the country, but fast
passing away. Although the war-whoop echoes no longer among the cliffs of
Cornwall and Scaticook ; although the bark palace of the chief of Werauhau-
maug has crumbled by the side of the Great Falls at New Milford, and his peo-
ple no longer frequent the borders of the lake that still bears his name ;
though the tribe of Pomperaug has melted away like the dew, and the mead-
ows of Weatague are swept yearly by the scythe of the Saxon ; yet here and
there in warm sheltered nooks, by river-bank or brook-side, the bones of the
warrior rest in the alluvial mould. Whence came this wild fierce people, wan-
dering without being nomadic, cultivating history without the aid of letters,
generous without knowing how to forgive, scornful of death when called to
look him in the face, yet lurking like the fox to avoid his approach ? Whence
came they ? How long did they remain proprietors of the countrj', and why
did they melt so suddenly away before the rays of civilization ? "



AMONG THE LITCHFIELD HILLS.



99



We wish we could answer. Even Uncle William, who was of a reflective
turn of mind and had given much thought to such problems, vouchsafed no ex-
planation. Besides the scenery and thoughts of the noble red man, there were
many things of more recent historical interest to claim his attention. At Kent
and Roxbury the extensive iron works formerly in operation ; the reminder by



Online LibraryWilliam Columbus FerrilThe Connecticut quarterly (Volume 2) → online text (page 9 of 46)