William Cothren.

History of ancient Woodbury, Connecticut : from the first Indian dead in 1659.. (Volume 3) online

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HISTORY ^



Ancient Woodbury,



f^ \



FROM THE



>5' > ^



FIRST INDIAN DEED IN 1659 TO 1819,



INCLUDING THE

PRESENT TOWNS OF WASHINGTON, SOUTIIBUUY, BETHLEHEM,
ROXBURY, AND A PART OF OXFORD AND MIDDLEBURY,

CONTAINING THE

GENEALOGICAL STATISTICS OF THE SAME,
AND OF ANCIENT STRATFORD, FROM 1639 TO 1728.



BY WILLIAM COTHREN,



VOLUME III.



WOODBURY, CONN.:

PUBLISHED BY WILLIAM COTHREN

1879.



ri



r



/ d^



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1879,

By WILLIAM COTHREN,

In the OfBce of the Librarian of Congress.

as wBiXisteir
r^U^ 8 1915



Press op The Case, Lock-wood & Bkainaiid CosrPANT, Hartford, Conn.



INTRODUCTION.



Genealogical inquiries have become far more frequent than they
were fifty years ago. Since the publication of the first volume of
the History of Ancient Woodbury in 1854, by the compiler of
this, he has been overwhelmed by a multitude of letters, increasing
in number with the passing years, making inquiries after genea-
logical information not contamed in that book. The design of
the genealogical part of that work was the introduction of the
genealogies of such families, bearing the early names in the
ancient territory, as the living members of which would interest
themselves in furnishing him, from family Bibles and other
authentic sources, the later branches, so as to make a complete
family history. This was needful, because, from the breaking out
of the War of the Revolution, the public records were scantily
and imperfectly kept for more than fifty years. At the time of
the publication of that work, great inattention and ignorance
existed in relation to genealogical information. The writer was
often amused, in the course of his inquiries, when he found intelli-
gent and otherwise well-informed persons unable to tell the names
of their grandfathers. Perhaps the publication of the History of
Ancient Woodbury, with others of a similar nature of other locali-
ties, has had much influence in arousing and fostering an interest
in genealogical inquiries. At any rate, the pressure of these inqui-
ries upon the compiler has become so great, that he is in some
sense compelled to publish this work as a personal relief from the
labor of continual searches of the records to answer the questions
of correspondents. After this work shall have been published,
the writer can answer each inquirer by a printed circular, saying :
" Behold ! I have written it all in aybook; purchase, and search for
yourselves." '■ '-'— -r'.v ^ ia

This spirit of research, — this inquiry after the history of one's
ancestors, near or remote, is commendable. The sons of New
England have an ancestry of which they may well be proud. We



4 HISTORY OF ANCIENT WO'' -: '

are far from saying that pride of birth, or arrogance of position
are to be coramepded and cultivated, or that they are to be compared
to an upright life and virtuous character. In this regard, we join
with Frederick of Prussia in the exclamation : "I love the lineage
of heroes ; but 1 love merit more. Patents of nobility are but
phantoms ; true worth is within. Kings are nothing but men, a,nd
all men are equal." While, therefore, we repudiate the idea that
there is any honor in searching for an illustrious ancestry as a
means to elevate the ignoble in the estimation of the world, and
in relying on such ancestry as a shield to cover, not only a multi-
tude of transgressions, but also great mental imbecility and mean-
ness; yet it is nevertheless true that the upright son of genius,
who can point to a long and virtuous line of ancestors, whose
fair fame has been by himself untarnished, has that whereof he
may well be proud. Not that mushroom, aristocratic pride, so
often witnessed in those whose fathers were from the lowest grade
in life, which leads its possessor to daintily spurn the air breathed
by those whom he terms the "common herd"; but that manly
pride experienced by those who are actuated by pure aspirations
and high resolves for the good of mankind ; for the advancement of
the best interests of the race. Su!'h men have a right to search
the dim and dusky records of the past, and having found an hon-
ored and virtuous line of progenitors, have a right to be recorded
as the legitimate and true descendants of an illustrious race. In
this view, the inquiries concerning this subject, made during the
last few years with so good success, are eminently pi'aiseworthy.
All such investigations should tend to rebuke false pride, and to
encourage unobtrusive merit. There is no more contemptible
spectacle in social life than the foolish and absurd airs put on by
miserable pretenders to standing and refinement, so often seen by
sensible observers. If such coxcombs and butterflies could know
and appreciate the supreme contempt bestowed upon their preten-
sions by all people of common sense, it is believed that some, even
of their number, brazen-faced and hardened as they have become,
would be shamed into propriety. Such behavior is to the last
degree vulgar and disgusting. There is no gentihty in it.

No inquiries can be more interesting to the intelligent student
of human nature, than those that relate to the generations of men.
The feelings that prompt them are just and natural. They give
birth to some of the dearest charities of life, and fortify some of
the sternest virtues. The principle that prompts them lies deep



^JB




I N T K O D I' C T I O N . O

within our n:tture. In the eloquent words of Kdward Everett,
uttered duriiis; the last years of his life, — Tie sacred tie of
family, which, reaching backward and forward. ) nd> the genera-
tions of men together, and draws out the plaintive music of our
being from the s*>lcmti alternations of cradle and grave — the black
and white keys of life'.* harjvwer of lan-
guage, which puts spirit in communion with .spirit in distant
perio Is and climes ; the syrii{u»thies of country, which \k\u] the
Greek of the prestMit day to talk of the victories < > gaine»l over
the barl>arians at Marathon; the mystic tissue of race. wove!i far
back in the dark chambers of the |^ast. and which, after the vicis-
situdes and mignitions of centuries, wraps up great nations in its
broad mantle: tht.>se signiticant expressions which carry v.'lunie.-
of meaning in a won! — Fort^father. Parent, Child. l'o. . Itin>ti/iil: ni . n\:»rriotl; d , dit ' " " ' ' ' '

chiKlrm; ss., sou- wi»l., widow.



I



Ruth. onas Roots.
Sarah, dau. (,'f Benjanuu and llanner Heicock.



June ;>0. 1'".: '

Kv •_'('.. ir.s5

March •_'•.'. IGnT

Jan. l.">. l«l>'.t

April .vO. lO'.U

Au^ ."0. 1 «■>««,■)

April J 7. itiye

Julv js. uv.m;

Feb. J. 161>G



Feb.


11


Jan.


17.


Julv


•J 4


Fel"..


3


Nov.


I'J


Jan.


1-'.


Nov.


IM


Dec.


19



March I

March ;?»•

Marcli JO

Dec J.-.

Sept. •-'."»

Apr:l 11

June ;>

July 13



Vol.. Ill —J



10



H 1 S T O K Y OF A N C I K N T W «> O P B I It V



1691).

Joseph S., s. of William and Abigail Fmlorick. March 1

Joseph, s. of Joseph IJallil.ut, April IJ

Stepheti. s. of Israel, Jr.. and Mary Curtiss.^ April JT
Isaac (aftorwanls LaptisoJ Stophon). s. of rornelius and

Abigail Urunscn. May 12

Rachael. dau. of Benjamin and Rebocca (Jalpin. Aug. ;U

Sarah, dau. of John. Jr.. and Sarah Judson, Sept. 10

Samuel, s. of Jolin Thonia."^, Sept. 10

Mary. dau. of Thoma.«> Drakeley. by lii.- lirst wife. Oct. .">
Elnathan. s. of Kbenozer and Sarah llurd. V night

y" y first snow fell. Hemomber it, Oct. 12

Harriet, dau. of Jolin and Johannah ("urtiss, Nov. 1

Henry, s. of Honry and Hannah Ca.ssell. F'eb. 12

1700.

Ichabod. s. of John and Kli/abeth SluM-inan.
I.siiac. s. of John and Mary Jud^■on,
Kuth. dau. of Joseph and l^ith lieioock.
Haeliel, dau. of Henjaniin and Klizai'eth Hinman.
Joseph, s. of Stephen and ."^arah ('urtiss,
IVter. s. of Thomas ami Hannah Minor.
Adoniram. s. of John and Abigail 'I'readwoU,

lTt>l.

David, s. of Benjamin and Hannah HtMCOck.

Thomas, s. of John Tlioina.s

Joseph, s. of Joseph and Abigail Waller.

Timothy, s. of Cornelius Brunson.

l>avid, s. of Benjamin and ."^arah Hurd,

Rev. Mr. Stoddard, his first born, a son. born and die

the same day,
Rebeekah, dau. of Israel, Jr.. aTid Mary ('urtiss.
Euniee. dau. of Abraham I'ullford.
Daniel, s. of Jolin and Marv Judson.
Rachell. dau. of Jo.inezer and Sarah llurd,
Nathan, s. of John and Johannah ("urtiss. Feb.



April 27
June 3

July :n

Sept. 12
IVt. 20
TVc. 10
Jan. 14



March


4.


March


5.


April


3.


June


14.


July
1


«.


Julv


8.


JulV


•»•>


A ug.


24.


Sept.


♦ >.


Sept.


2,".


N..V.


.'..


2, 1702


-i.



1702.

Zachariah, s. of Mr. Zachariah and Elizabeth Walker.

Hannah, dau. of Henry Cassell.

Mary. dau. of Rev. Anthonv and Prudence Stoddard,

Stephen, s. of Joseph Heicock, by wife Ruth.

Nathan, s. of Jonathan and .l.«'.-kah tJalpin, Ajril •'..

Marv. dau. of .lolin aii.l Mary Ju«1s

RelHi-kah. dau »>f Khene/i-r anen»>zer and Niartlia Warner.
Peter, s. of Thomas and Hannah Minor.
Samuel, s. of William and Martha Treston,



April


•JO


April


30


May


•JO


.lune


:?o


.luiv


•jv


July


•js


A UK


(i


Sept.


4


Sept.


•10
• >


."-^.•pi.
(Vt.


.")


( >ct.


;n


Nov.


l^


IVe.


1.


Feb.


'J . »



1706.

Ksther, dau. of John and Joanna ('urti>s, April ">.

Hannah, liau. of H.-njainin and Hannah Hukok. .lune ..!.

Eunice, dau. of Joseph and liuth Hiekok. .Inly 11.

Benjamin, s. of Thomas and .Sirah Wheeler, .1 :iv "Jl.

Mary, dau. of .losepli and Mary Hurlhut, .^.'pt. I'V

Wait, s. of H»m. an.i Kli/.alM-tii Hintnan, < 'et. 16.

Ann, dau. of Henj. ami Sarah Huid. Oit. JO.

Thankful, ilau. of 15enj. and Hcl>eekah t^alpin. < 'ec. 16.

Caleb, s. of John and Jane Nichols. Dec.

Adino. s. of Adino and Eunice Strong, April 17.



1709.

Timothy, s. of Titus and Mary Hinman. March 4.

Mary. dau. of John and Sarali Baker, Jan.

Jemima, dau. of Henry and Hannah Castle. March 3.

Lois, dau. of Benjamin and Haimah Hickok, March IS.

Abel, f!. of Samuel and Abigail Munn. March 23.

Matthew, s. of Juiuithan and Hannah Mitchel, March 31.

Sarah, dau. of John and Sarah Minor. April 7.

Esther, dau. of Joseph and Jane Hurd. April i».

Margaret, dau. of Robert and Mary Warner. April 22.

Martha, dau. of William and Martha Bn-ston, April 23.

Nathan, s. of William and Joanna Gavlord. May 4.

Benjamin, s. of Kbonczer and Martha Warner, May (k

( tl«diah. s. of John and Ruth Wheeler. May 2S.

Hannah, dau. of Nathaniel and Sarah Hurlbutt, Aug. 2S.

Hannah, dau. of Ebenezer and Sarah Hurd, Oct. 31.

Mercy, dau. of Benjamin and Elisabeth Hinman, Dec. 23.



BIKTIT? IN WOODBtRY 1.1



1710.



Koh.


23


Maroli


•>


Marvh





Man-h


•!••


Man-h


•23


Man-li


■js


M.iv


u>


May


I'.'


May


•Jl


Jniu»


10


July


2:>


Sopr.


«.»


Nin-.


in


IVo.


31



Stephen, s. of Stophen and Sarah Curtu?*.
John. s. of H.*v. Anthony an. I rrilonof St^HlJani.
Thomas, s. of Thomas and Hannah Sjuut,
Clement, s. of Thoma.- and Hannah Minor,
liartlitt. s. of Thomas and KlisaUnh Mal'.ery.
Abigail, dau. of Samuol and Hannah Jenm-r. |
Nathan, s. of Samnel and Hannali Jennor. )
Salmon, s. of John and Mercy Hnrlbutt.
Bathslieba. dau. of Jo.n of liuilford. by wifo

Hannah.
Benjamin, s. of Adino and Kunioe Strong.
Francis, s. i>f Francis and Mary ,"^tilos,
Jonathan, s. of Jonathan and Santh At\vo