William Day.

Reminiscences of the turf, with anecdotes and recollections of its principal celebrities online

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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA



PRESENTED BY

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND
MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID



REMINISCENCES OF THE TURF



BY



WILLIAM DAY



WITH

ANECDOTES AND RECOLLECTIONS

OF ITS

principal Celebrities




A NEW AND CHEAPER EDITION
BEING THE THIRD



LONDON
RICHARD BENT LEY AND SON

Publishers in rtinarg to ^)cc ^tajestj) the (Queen

1891
[All rights reserved]



PREFACE.



THE favourable reception accorded to ' The Racehorse in
Training ' induces me to appear again before the public,
as the writer of Reminiscences. They aim to deal in a
plain fashion with matters of importance to all who have
an interest in the turf, and rely for success on their
truthful simplicity and impartial mode of dealing with
the diverse subjects which come under consideration.
The work is partly biographical, partly anecdotal, and in
the portions which treat of trials and the stable has its
technical or professional side.

The biographical sketches have, I hope, in most cases
the charm of novelty to recommend them, either in the
subject itself or in their treatment. We must remember,
in forming a judgment of individual character, that the
men whose careers I venture to outline existed in an age
of sensuality and of riotous mirth, and that most of



iv PREFACE.

them lived uncontaminated by the pernicious examples
around them. The anecdotes, when they are not on the
face of them fabulous, are true, or approximately true.
Some of them, indeed, may not be new, but in these
cases their applicability to the subject under discussion
will, I believe, readily excuse their introduction. The
matters of technical detail occasionally dealt with have,
I trust, the claim on the reader's attention that is due to
examples which in similar cases may be safely followed.
The method employed is that which, in the author's
opinion, is best calculated to relieve the work from the
weariness following monotony; whilst if its general
merits should only prove adequate to the truth it con-
tains, he can have little doubt of its being received with
wide approbation.

W. D.
February, 1886.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

MR. HENRY PAD WICK.

PACK

Wide interest in prominent figures on the turf Erroneous concep-
tions of Mr. Padwick His origin Business as a money-
lender His home and friends Introduction to racing
Trains at Findon with my father Purchase of Virago, and
her successes Disappointed with Yellow Jack and St. Hubert
A successful salesman Three horses for 22,000 No judge
of racing Instances Mistake in parting with Joe Miller
Purchases Alvediston from me ; thought ' too good ' A story
to the point My purchase of Blue Pock Flying Duchess
Mr. Greville repudiates a purchase A gentleman's word,
and a lesson learned Mr. Padwick as a borrower Sharp
practice, and what it might have cost me The business of
money-lending Mr. Padwick's clients His share in the
affair of The Earl and Lady Elizabeth; Admiral Rous's
interference Conduct towards Mr. Whieldon ; repaid in his
own coin Entrapped by a fair borrower The Duchess of

N ; a loan on brickbats Equal to the emergency A

frail client His character ; method of dealing all on one
side How ancestral estates are lost Attempt to sell a Derby
favourite on Sunday ; disastrous result ; the favourite missing
Connection with Gully and Hill Insatiable for wealth
His end - 1-27

CHAPTER II.

JOHN BAYNTON STARKEY, ESQ.

The turf injured by foolish supporters Unaccountable disap-
pearance of Mr. Starkey's fortune Purchase of Viridis
Disastrous defeat ; ' save us from our friends ' Ownership of
Fisherman and Leamington Aggregate winnings No large



vi CONTENTS

PACK

loser by racing or betting Curious settlement of trainers'
accounts Propensity to bet First transaction with Mr.
Padwick How a debt of 22,000 was created Another
deal and its result Mr. Padwick as owner of Spye Park
Bound to ruin himself Other examples and their lesson
Idiosyncrasies; curious 'get-up'; mode of travelling; delight
in 'attending a toilet' Personal experience of giving my
name ; a * tidy ' practitioner His end, and sale of Spye
Park - - 27-40

CHAPTER III.

MR. JOHN GULLY.

Connection with * The Danebury Confederacy ' Origin Thrashes
a bully Introduction to the Ring Fights Pierce and Gregson
Owen Swift's trial Personal appearance Joint ownership
of Andover, Mendicant, and Pyrrhus the First ' Old John
Day's bitter pill ' The true story ; my father's real interest
in these Mr. R. Tattersall and the purchase of Fortress for
Lord Caledon The model auctioneer Gully's assault on
Mr. Ridsdale A ' view-holloa ' by the Bar Duel with ' The
Squire ' Interference between my father and brother ; dis-
ruption of the Danebury stud Harry Hill turned out of
Whitewall Danebury to-day Gully and Hill's connection
in racing Silent wisdom The bull and the red-coat
Policemen treated as nine-pins His end - 40-51

CHAPTER IV.

'THE DANEBURY CONFEDERACY.'

Commissioners and their instructors How Gully and Hill made
fortunes Laying against ' dead uns ' Gulling the public
Universal temptation A view of turf parasites in 1832 ;
Richardson, Bland, and others.

Harry Hill ; origin ' A thimble and a pea ' Lord George's
contempt Exposed by Mr. Ray ner Disadvantages of lying
Hill's dress and diversions; loses 20,000 Frank Butler
'carpeted' Caught on the Stock Exchange ' An economic
principle ' Intestacy and disappearance of his money.

Mr. Pedley as a bookmaker and songster Wins the Derby
with Cossack Subsequent poverty An incident at Chester
races Joshua Arnold Saucebox sold below his value Mr.
Turner, another of the clique The moral, and a plea for
it- - .... f,i.61



CONTENTS vii

CHAPTER V.

LORD GEORGE BENTINCK.

PAGE

My knowledge of his lordship Purchase of Bay Middleton
Lameness cured by my brother Failure at the stud A
Yorkshire view of him His produce Lease of Venison, and
attempt to get him back Not a lucky breeder Early races
and successes Performances of Crucifix Change of luck on
leaving Danebury Amount of his winnings Race between
Grey Momus and Bamboo The running confirmed Lord
Suffield's disappointment A rival jockey bids me win Bay
Middleton's Derby Lavish entry of yearlings Crucifix's trial
Her breakdown The secret kept Tripoli in the Feather
Plate ; action of the Jockey Club -Horses run unprepared,
proved by in-and-out running Gaper and Miss Elis Castra-
tion of Naworth A comparison The Derby of 1839
Objection to Mr. Ridsdale's Bloomsbury Lord George's
defiance of the Jockey Club ; brought into court ; result
Lord George's motive (?) Exposure of the Sunning Rein
swindle ; his interest therein Scourges minor faults of the
turf Levanters Conduct towards Glen the baker His
wagering on Bay Middleton for the Derby and on Elis for
the St. Leger contrasted False trial of Cherokee Behaviour
to Mr. Wreford Difference with Mr. Greville How Pre-
serve simulated influenza A coughing-bridle Wins 2,000
from Wm. Scott on Red Deer Solicitude for morality of
trainers not always carried out A race in a fog, and curious
decision Am asked to swear to what I do not know
Accuses ' The Squire ' of swindling Episode of the duel ;
reflections thereon Reputed munificence, but faint proofs
thereof Takes back a gift Personal appearance Bold riding
to hounds Curious choice of associates Care for his pad-
docks Raises Goodwood to a first-class meeting Mode of
travelling Visits to Danebury Performances in the saddle,
and as a starter Attitude to his parents Army career His
superior officer cashiered General disapproval of his conduct
Attacks Sir R. Peel Mr. Disraeli and ' the stable mind '
Hasty sale of his stud Its real value, extent, and nomen-
clature Mistaken judgment of Gaper and Cotherstone
Separation from Danebury Erroneous reports of the real
cause Ill-feeling to my brother Crucifix and her clothing
Delay in settling his accounts Triumphs of the old stable,



viii CONTENTS

PAGE

and effect upon him of continued disappointment Result
of Mathematician's defeat of Crozier ; backs the wrong horse
Melancholy end - 61-99

CHAPTER VI.

MEN OF PAST DAYS.

The Bentinck family The old Duke Proud but liked Races
with Mr. Greville Tiresias's Derby The Duke offended
Incident at Newmarket A needful correction Newmarket
then and now Lord Henry as a sportsman An adventure
on the moors The late Duke as Lord Titchfield Curious
dress in summer Monastic seclusion of Welbeck Lord
George and the fair sex.

Mr. Fulwar Craven ; oddity in dress Deception ; in the
Oaks and Derby The jockey interviewed ; a neat rejoinder
Addicted to low company Mr. Ramsay Curious stories
told of the two Anecdote of his trainer, Mr. Dilly : ' the
dead alive ' Sagacious dogs ; a terror to tramps ; a home-
comer; the signal-dog at Porchester Station Drawing a bear.

Lord Glasgow's oddities General Peel before the Two
Thousand His indifferent stud Delight in reckless matches
Handicaps himself Offers 90,000 against Gaper Temper
and ill-health Bequeaths his stud.

Lord Exeter's personal peculiarities His racing Insist-
ence on trying and running his horses Blue Rock proves not
unbroken Sale of his Newmarket property Sir Gilbert
Heathcote ; Amatols Derby; a racehorse as 'a heriot ' Baron
J. de Tessier Lord Jersey's successes His view of breed-
ing - 99-120

CHAPTER VII.

MR. PARKER.

Varied experiences Commences racing Purchase of One Act
Her trial and our expectations How defeated Forestalled
and struck out Running at Chester ; remarkable dream
Joe Miller in the Metropolitan Winnings on the Chester
Cup Mistake as to his condition Brigantine another
example A perilous journey How Joe Miller was ruined
Noisy, ill-luck in the Chester Cup Cedric Sutherland's
luck and subsequent failure Tame Deer in the Northamp-
ton Cup Confidence of his new owner, but well beaten



CONTENTS ix

PAGE

Bird on the Wing Her chance in the Oaks Sam Rogers and
Frank Butler A revelation in fashionable jockeys Joins hi
uncle in London ' The pace that kills ' Evenings at Owen
Swift's Buying a watch Skill with the gloves London
' life ' as it was A good stock Excellent judgment of racing
An objection sustained Jockeys and amateurs Nearly
' done ' by a welsher An instance of enforced restitution
His belief in condition Analogy from dog-training Fights
between ' Pincher ' and ' Bullet ' Admiral Rous on Cedric's
condition Mr. Parker's belief in Farce, and our parting
His life in retirement - - 120-147

CHAPTER VIII.

MR. FABBANCE.

Origin and marriage Farrance's Hotel Patronage of Sir Robert
Peel Custom of an afternoon Attention to personal appear-
ance His early racing ; my own start Horses well sold
Maley at Shrewsbury Steeplechase ; speed and heavy ground
Partnership with Mr. Parker ; successes not his own
Suspicious conduct and separation Mysterious loss of for-
tune A wretched end Anecdotes ' The Tally-Ho ' without
a coachman How a feather-bed may be lost Mr. Wagstaff 's
clock Parting with a suit of clothes Alderman Cubitt's
watch - - - 147-156

CHAPTER IX.

MEN OF MY TIME, OB DANEBURY PATBICIAN8.

Example needed on the turf Danebury patricians Mr. Harry
Biggs ; love of sport His horses Little, Red Rover A bit
of advice Esteem for his trainer A night in a chalk-pit.

Lord Palmerston ; his horses Iliona's name ; she wins the
Cesarewitch A welcome cheque Buckthorn's performances;
doubtful riding in the Ascot Stakes Purchase of lliona
His lordship's habits Gallops to Danebury Story of my
father's visit to the House of Commons The butcher and his
bill Other peculiarities.

Sir Lewin Glyn Gross libel on him and my father Mr.
Farquharson His original views of racing As a sheep-
breeder ; adventure at a fair.

Mr. Trelawney Coldrenick favourite for the Derby



x CONTENTS

PAGE

Officious friends ' John Davis looked up ' The money
hedged.

Mr. Wreford Success as a breeder ; system pursued ; excel-
lence of yearlings ; Wapiti His horses ; mode of engagement ;
races won ; family disappointments 'A dinner for three ; dis-
appearance of the goose ' A hot breakfast and a hot pudding
Shooting in Devonshire and Wiltshire compared The sheep
and the Downs A sad old age.

Sir E. B. Baker ; complacence when beaten ; removal to
Woodyates.

Sir J. B. Mills ; easily satisfied ; story of another philosopher
and a lazy trainer Gout v. fishing Visits to Danebury
Love of cocking - .... 157-179

CHAPTER X.

MEN OP MY TIME, OR DANEBUBY PATRICIANS (continued).

Lord Howth Acuteness in racing His help in purchase of
Sultan A thorough sportsman Hawking Shooting atBove-
ridge A novel ' get-up ' A spoiled servant Lord Sligo ;
Lord Glenlyon ; Mr. Pryse-Pryse.

Mr. Ralph Etwall Appearance Does much on limited
means His stud and winnings Success in coursing
Remarkable purchase of greyhounds My first red coat
Objection to vails to servants Management of Wild Dayrell
Confidence of the stable Expatriation A visit to
Cholderton.

Lord Dorchester Produce of Little Red Hover mare
Buccaneer Cruiser A body of wise men My father at
Danebury Love of his profession A brief spin with the
hounds - . 179.190

CHAPTER XI.

MR. SWINDELL.

Origin Takes to the turf ; shrewdness and reticence His first
' coup' with Mr. Merry's Chanticleer Horses Weatherbound
in the Cambridgeshire ; extraordinary trial ; his confidence
and the Admiral's disbelief Sir Joseph Hawley's opinion of
Beacon ; beat by JSm's The match with the baronet ; the
latter pays forfeit : diamond cut diamond Brocket run for



CONTENTS xi

PAGE

Ruby ; how Ruby was kept Derby favourite Exposure of a
dishonest trainer.

Character Employment of touts ; generosity ; business
capacity The Burton Brewery How we parted Attitude
to his trainer Rectitude Non-interference Instances of
coolness Love of a good story Examples Adaptability
Prudence Last days 190-212



CHAPTER XII.

TRAINERS WITHOUT TRAINING.

Training at haphazard The brothers Stebbing Own Flatcatcher
and other good horses Accidental success and ultimate
failure Barber and Saxon First association Horses owned
conjointly and separately, and their doings Mistakes in
selling Oaks victory and subsequent decline Saxon and
the thief.

Mr. Thomas Parr First start His patrons A large
stable and few runners Love of plating A mystery ; how
was it done ? Training from a hayloft Sale of Fernldll and
Isoline Embarrassments A lucky release Bovine appear-
ance of Rataplan Disappointment in the St. Leger Misuse
of good horses ; Saucebox, Fiaherman, and others Mortimer's
defeat at Chester Curious excuse How he got Weather-
gage ; unexpected performance and curious treatment Errors
in training A word for George Hall - - 213-230

CHAPTER XIII.

' LORD OF THE ISLES.'

Doncaster Town Moor A search for a yearling Lord of the
Isles bought for Mr. Merry Trial Wins Lavant Stakes at
Goodwood ; Paradigm a good second The ' owner's friend '
Comments on my riding My brother put up for the second
race An invisible difference Mr. Merry at Woodyates
Remarkable scene Detailed trail for the Two Thousand
The race Rival owners and trainers ; heavy wagering In
the saddling-ring Mine wins The owner after the race
The Derby Kingstown mysteriously backed Why did Lord
of the Isles lose ? A jockey's opinion The real facts - 230-239



xii CONTENTS

CHAPTER XIV.

A TRIAL FOB MR. MERRY.

PAOE

I try Hobble Noble for the Cambridgeshire Difference of opinion
as to weights Results Why he beat Joe Miller Treatment
before the race How it was lost Another trial ; Weather-
gage for the Cesarewitch A difference of opinion as to
distance Something about Mr. Merry and his satellites
His success at cocking An old cockpit Regret on his
leaving the turf Buchanan and ' Tass ' Parker Character-
istics and associations Buchanan's beating Loses himself
in a lawsuit against hia employer Different ending of the
two men A doubtful gift ' Betting on a certainty ;' but
the biter bit - 240-250

CHAPTER XV.

THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

Eccentricity of manner Chorister's St. Leger ; a reminiscence of
* the old Duke ' The late Duke Better known as Lord
William Powlett Shrewdness in a bargain Bad luck in
racing Some of my ' deals ' with him I sell him Cedric
A long bargain, but a huge relief Points lef b open, and their
settlement Sale to him of Promised Land, and purchase of
Dulcibella An intricate negotiation ; satisfactorily brought
off Insurance money Sam Rogers on the transaction
Absurd charge of collusion How Sam made a mistr.ke I
claim and keep Romulus His chances spoiled A young
man's gratitude - - 250-263

CHAPTER XVI.

TRAINEES AND JOCKEYS A COMPARISON OF THE OLD AND THE NEW.

Rapid advancement from stable-boy to trainer ' Success is genius '
Changed habits Greater care of health Relaxations
Absurdity of early rising Advantage of the jockey's control
of horses Legitimate gains from stable secrets Trainers
properly set right in trials Marvellous horsemanship Carp-
ing owners Improved habits The whole secret of training
revealed by a light-weight jockey.

The modern stable Added cares of the trainer His needed



CONTENTS xiir

PAGE

absence safe-guarded The vet. and the head-lad in sickness
Condition balls and others Flowers supersede the dung-pit
Improvement in food and drink Suggested additions
Clemency of jockeys towards owners Apology for treating
the subject - 263-282

CHAPTER XVII.

ZACHARIAH SIMPSON, ESQ.

Excellent position as a banker Perverse use of it An example
at Newmarket Turf career Our joint ownership of horses.

Traducer in the Two Thousand The Gillie's dead-heat
with Brick The trial and the race Manrico Getting a
horse out of a well A bet luckily recovered Partial stud
successes How a breeding establishment may be ruined
Curious disposal of yearlings Other costly occupations, and
result A fortune saved on a pound a week The teeth-test
with chickens and horses How Delilah lost and won her
pedigree Social attributes - 282-297

CHAPTER XVIII.

CAMBRIDGESHIRE TRIALS.

Trials at Woodyates and Shipton, and performances in the race of
the following : Allbrook, Hobble Noble, Weatherbound, Catch
'em Alive, Sultan, and Foxhall Foxhall's wonderful victory
Compared with Tristan and Iroquois Need of a ' stayer '
in the Cambridgeshire Value of trials Story of the fraud
as to weight in Catch 'em Alive' s year Jockeys in trials
Jockeys and 'stable-boys' in the saddle contrasted In-
stances and their teaching - 297-311

CHAPTER XIX.

' PROMISED LAND ' AND * DULCIBELLA.'

Happy Land Purchase of Promised Land and joint ownership
with Mr. Robinson How entered Initial disappointment
Improvement Backed for the Derby Beats and is beat by
North Lincoln Two Thousand trial and race receives for-
feit from Musjid How I lost the Derby The candid friend
again My ' emaciated ' condition Home Tooke and ' Old



xiv CONTENTS

PAGE

Smith's bullocks ' Incidents in the Derby My confidence
unabated A stereotyped answer Wins the Goodwood Cup
Beat in the St. Leger.

Despised Dulcibella Trial of Killiqrew Helping a friend
DulcibdlcCs trials Mr. Copperthwaite's belief in Bevis
Public view of Sutherland's chance The Cesarewitch My
dun pony second Killigrew's running A grateful jockey
Dukibella's subsequent doings - - 311-334

CHAPTER XX.

MR. THOMAS ROBINSON.

Olee, by Touchstone Young Trumpeter and horses jointly owned
Sale of Conductor Characteristics A luncheon at High
Wycombe As a story-teller Examples : ' The farmer and
his wife'; 'British brandy' A levee at Newmarket; Mr.
Robinson in the chair' The changeable foxhound puppy '
An octogenarian breaking a colt A tremendous jump
Perilous coachmanship Energy in old age 'A bright
beacon for imitation ' ... 334.345



WILLIAM DAY'S REMINISCENCES



CHAPTER I.

MB. HENRY PADWICK.

Wide interest in prominent figures on the turf Erroneous conceptions
of Mr. Padwick His origin Business as a money-lender His
home and friends Introduction to racing Trains at Findon with
my father Purchase of Virago, and her successes Disappointed
with Yellow Jack and St. Hubert A successful salesman Three
horses for 22,000 No judge of racing Instances Mistake in
parting with Joe Miller Purchases Alvedixton from me ; thought
' too good ' A story to the point My purchase of Blue Bock
Flying Duchess Mr. Greville repudiates a purchase A gentleman's
word, and a lesson learned Mr. Padwick as a borrower Sharp
practice, and what it might have cost me The business of money-
lending Mr. Padwick's clients His share in the affair of The Earl
and Lady Elizabeth ; Admiral Rous's interference Conduct towards
Mr. Whieldon ; repaid in his own coin Entrapped by a fair borrower
The Duchess of N - ; a loan on brickbats Equal to the emer-
gency A frail client His character ; method of dealing all on one
side How ancestral estates are lost Attempt to sell a Derby
favourite on Sunday ; disastrous result ; the favourite missing
Connection with Gully and Hill Insatiable for wealth His end.

THE world is ever curious to learn all that can be learned
of the characteristics of those who have cut a figure in
it. In no section of society does this eager thirst for
information exist to a greater extent than in that which

1



2 MR. HENRY PA I) WICK

comprehends the sporting, and especially the racing,
element. The sayings and doings of the leading turfites
are carefully recorded, to be reproduced at all appropriate
seasons ; and often, it is to be feared, without that exact-
ness which adds real value to the records themselves. In
adding my quota to the mass of information thus obtained,
I feel, therefore, that I shall be addressing a sympathetic
audience ; the more so because I can relate incidents of
which I have personal knowledge, without having resort
to fable, and freed from the risk of inaccuracy. With
most of the characters that I shall venture to introduce
I have been on friendly, if not intimate, terms ; whilst
my facts, when not within my own knowledge, have all
been gathered at first-hand.



Amongst the notable characters connected with the
racing world within the last three decades, none stood
forth more conspicuously than did Mr. Henry Pad wick.
I may say I knew him well. The success of his string
of horses trained at Findon by my father, Mr. John
Barham Day, was remarkable. Besides, I had many
personal dealings with him ; whilst to me he would
unbosom himself on occasion as though to his closest
friend. Of no man in a similar position have more
erroneous notions been held. He has been represented
as a modern Shy lock, a nineteenth-century Machiavelli ;
and his character and habits surrounded with an im-
penetrable veil of mystery. Yet he was, like most of
us, but a human being, with some of the failings and
some of the virtues of humanity. He, at all events,
achieved a notoriety which will render all that may be
set forth concerning his idiosyncrasies and his actions
of a double value ; and so justify the prominence I give



ORIGIN AND EDUCATION 3

to one who made and left his mark upon the time in
which he lived.

Mr. Padwick may be said to have shared with the
late Mr. Frederick Swindell, of Brighton, the reputation
of being the most successful man on the turf in his day.
He was born in Horsham, Sussex, at which place his
father was a butcher. He was not, as we know, the
first example of an exalted rise from such an origin.
His birth, if homely, proved no drawback to his getting
on in life. He had the advantage of being well educated,
the result being shown in the acquirement of the manners
and tastes of a gentleman. He was brought up to the
profession of the law, and in due time became a magis-
trate and deputy-lieutenant of his county. Indeed, I
may say, he never looked better than when he appeared
in uniform with cocked-hat and feathers at the opening
of the Great Exhibition of 1851, at which, in his official
position, he was in attendance on Prince Albert. Though
short in stature, he was of handsome and pleasing appear-
ance, and was quite a finished gentleman in suavity of
manner, and with the power, when he liked, to make
himself the best company in the world.

Henry Padwick gave to the study of the law, I sus-
pect, only that attention which it suited him to give for
the practical aims of his life. He certainly never followed
it as a profession. The business he devoted himself to
was money-lending, which he carried on in a much larger
way than any man of his day. He had his own method
of transacting business, and would take for securities
things that the staid banker would reject as too risky.
And he was justified in the result, for he amassed a very
large fortune. He commenced business in Davis Street,
Berkeley Square ; there, at all events, I first became



Online LibraryWilliam DayReminiscences of the turf, with anecdotes and recollections of its principal celebrities → online text (page 1 of 27)