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The earls of Cromartie; their kindred, country, and correspondence (Volume 2) online

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393. Duncan Foebes of Culloden, Lord President of the Court of Session, to
George third earl of Cromartie.-^

Culloden, 23d September 1745.
My Lord, — His Majestic haveing been pleased to entrust me with the
disposall of commissions for some independant companys now to be rais'd,
Sir John Gordon, who was occasionally at this place, undertook to let me
know from your Lordship whether you would permitt my Lord MacLeod to
accept of a captain's commission, and how tlie young man would like it.
Sir John has acquainted me that he saw my Lord MacLeod, but had not
access to see your Lordship, as you was not at home ; that the young man
expressed his willingness, and that he believed your Lordship would fall in
with his inclinations ; tho', as he had not seen you, he could not give your
own answer. What, therefor, brings your Lordship this trouble, is, to have
your consent to your son's accepting this commission, which may be ane intro-
duction to what he promises one day to deserve : because, however willing
he may be to be in the army, and however desireous I may be to gratify him
in what I hope will turn out for his advantage, yet, without your Lordship's
approbation, I would not presume to conclude any thing in a matter wherein
you are so nearly concerned. I am, with great respect, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant, etc.

1 From Culloden Pajjers, p. -41 L



GEORGE THIRD EARL OF C ROM ARTIE, 1745. 187



394. The Same to [The Same].

CuUoden, 25th September 1745.
My Lord, — I have the honour of your Lordship's of yesterday's date.
As neither your Lordship nor my Lord Macleod dislike the commission that
is proposed, I must confess it gives me very great uneasyness to find that
the circumstances your Lordship mentions occasions any deliberation. Your
Lordship will readily agree with me, that in the execution of the trust com-
mitted to me, my chief reguard must be to the service ; and if what that
requires, in circumstantiall matters only, should give your Lordship offence,
or create in you a diffidence of my respect for your Lordship, it would be
to me a very great mortification, I hope your Lordship will not think so
harshly of me ; and that, upon considerations such as 3^ou mention, you
will not suffer an opportunity to slip of introducing the young lord into
a state of life which he seems desirous to pursue — especially at a conjunc-
ture where the nature of the service seems to require that men so well dis-
posed as your Lordship should not stand upon ceremonys. Let me therfor
beg of your Lordship to consider well what is to be done, and to give your
consent to your son's accepting the commission ; and I dare assure you that
you and he will find that I am very sincerely, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant,

Dun. Forbes.

395. George third Earl of Cromartie to Duncan Forbes of Culloden,
Lord President of the Court of Session.^

Tarbat House, 26th September 1745.
My Lord, — I have the honour of your lordship's of the 25th. I cannot

^ From Culloden Papers, p. 415.



188 THE CROMARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.

help thinking that the circumstances in that commission that is proposed for
my son are so singular, that I cannot desire him, nor is it in his own inclina-
tion, to accept of it on these terms, as it disables him from doing the service
as he would wish ; and if he is thought less capable then others who are
offered greater priviledges, it is no less to lay him aside. But he will very
soon have the honour of waiting of your Lordship to returne you his hearty
thanks for your kindeness ; and I am, with great regard, my lord.
Your Lordship's most obedient most humble servant,

Cromertie.



396. William Marquis of Tullibardine, signing "Atholl," to [George
THIRD Earl of Cromartie].

Blair Castle, 28 September 1745.

My Lord,- — Being perswaded of your Lordships inclinations to serve the
King for the delivery of your country from oppression, his Eoyal Highness
having constituted me commander in chief of his Majesty's forces benorth the
river of Forth, I cannot but hereby desire your Lordship may raise all your
men in arms, and with the outmost expedition march them with me to join
his Eoyal Highness.

I hope your Lordship will without delay appoint your men, with such
officers as you think proper, and direct them to set out soon ; and as doubtless
you are inform'd of his Highness's complete victory, your Lordship will also
encourage your neighbours quickly to second his glorious undertaking.

Pray let me have your return as soon as possible, that I may acquaint his
Eoyal Highness of your Lordship's resolution, who expects you are ready to
show your loyalty on so happy an occasion.



GEORGE THIRD EARL OF CROM ARTIE, 1745. 189



I beg your Lordship will excuse the not writing with mine own hand,

having really so much adoe as renders it almost impossible. I am, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant,

Atholl.



397. Geoege third Earl of Cromartie to Duncan Forbes of CuUoden,
Lord President of the Court of Session,^

Tarbat, 19th October 1745.
My Lord, — When I saw your lordship last at Culodden, we then con-
certed that 1 should look out for some men, to have them in raddiness when
there might be occasion for them. In consequence of which, I spoke to
several of my friends to know what I might expect from them ; and to others
at a distance I wrote, and us'd such arguments as I thought might be most
apt to exceet them to come into measures. I am sorry to hear that I am
misrepresented ; and that my endeavours, when I meant them for the best,
are misconstrued by some ; tho' I hope your Lordship, who know my senti-
ments of these matters, will give no credite to any idle story s. On the con-
trary, I w^ould expect you wou'd contradict them, and take my parte against
any that, out of ill will, endeavour to assperce me. But I believe there is
none at this time free of being, in some shape or other, misrepresented : I
must take my share in a generall calamity. When I see your Lordship I will
tell you a great deall more of this then I can trouble you with in a letter.
In the mean time, I beg leave, in this way, to assure you that I am, with
great truth, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant,

Cromertie.

^ From Culloden Papers, p. 232.



190 THE CROM ARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.



398. Duncan Forbes of CuUoden, Lord President of the Court of Session,
to [George third Earl of Cromartie].^

Culloden, October 21, 1745.
My Lord, — The letter which your Lordship did me the honour to write
of the 19th was delivered to me yesterday by Andrew Monro. It came to me
seasonably to relieve me from abundance of uneasiness, occasioned by very
many reports to your lordship's prejudice ; to which nevertheless I could not
give credite, as they were flatly contradictory to the hearty declarations of
your zeal for his Majestie's service which your Lordship made to me when
I last had the honour to see you at this place. But as nothing is more
possible, than that the very steps taken by your Lordship to forward the
intention which you declared to me might, in this age of rumors and suspi-
tions, be construed by those who dislike the government into so many
evidences of your purpose of sideing with them ; and as your lordship has
again assured me that your disposition is and has been the same as you
formerly declared to me, I dismiss all doubts, and leave those idle reports to
be entertainment for those that made them. And I'me very hopefuU that if
any such reports have found their way southward (which I assure your
lordship they liave not from me, or by my means), what I from your Lord-
ship's declarations can say, together with your future conduct dureing these
commotions — which I pray God and hope may be soon over — will be effec-
tuall to dissipate all surmises that have hitherto prevail'd amongst tlie
makers and retailers of news in this country. I am, with great respect,
my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant, etc.

' 1 From Culloden Papers, p. 235.



LORD GEORGE MURRAY, 1746. 191



399. Lord John Drummond, second son of James Lord Drummond, who
was eldest son of James first Duke of Perth, to [George third Earl
OF Cromartie].

Drummond, 31 December [1745].
My Lord, — If your Lordship is not yet corned back to Perth, the prince's
orders ar that you should send imediatly, strait from Fife, the picquet of
30 men of Irish and a Eoyal Scot[c]h that you have under your comand, to
Dumb[l]ain. I think it is very esential, the moment that you have ended your
business in Fife, that your Lordship should comme to Dumb[l]ain, wher my
brother and I will be ; when I will have a good many things to say to you,
wlio am, with great valeu and esteem, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most humble and obedient servant,

J. Drummond.

The Prince intends imediatly to comme to Stirling, and to make the seige
of the castle himself



400. Lord George Murray, fifth son of John first Duke of Atliole, to

The Same.

Aberdeen, February 10th, 1746.
Your Lordship is to march to-morrow morning at the same time with the
rest of the foot ; and at going out of this town you seperate from Lord John
Drummond's battalion and the piquetts of the Irish brigade, taking the road
to Old Meldrum, where you are to quarter all night. Your lordship has with
you, besides those belonging to your own brigade, Glenbucket's battalion.



192 THE C ROM ARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.

and any other Highlanders who have been left behind. Glenbucket's battalion
has the van to-morrow, and your lordship will appoint the different order the
others are to march in. Next day you are to march early in the morning for
Strathbogie, where I shall meet you. I pray your lordship cause all the men
in your division march close together, and not to straggle ; and, if you please,
be in the front yourself, and your son in the rear : but, from time to time, go
from front to rear to see all come up in good order in their march.

George Murray.
To the right honorable the Earl of Cromarty.



401. The Same to The Same.

Dingwall, 25th February 1746.

My Lord, — I was marching with all the expedition in my power, by
his Royal Highness's comands, to have joind your Lordship ; but about one
a' clock I mett your express with the letter to his Highness's secretarry, which
I opend, and found by it that the enemy were retyrd to Sutherland. It was
great pitty I did not know it soonner, for the men that I had with me last
night at this place have had a sevear day's march. Your Lordship knows
his Pioyal Highness did not think it a proper time to follow the enemy to
Sutherland ; and as the flower of tlie armie were in this country it would
have been dangerous to have keept them at so remott a place as Tayine on[e]
night, except the service absolutly requierd it, for they could scarce [have]
been back at Inverness in time had the enemy march'd thro' Atlioll.

As Colonel Carr tells me your Lordship would wish to have some other
people besides your own, in order to inable you to send in meaU and raise con-
tributions, I have left the Steuarts of Appine at Fowlis, and the Macgregors



LOBB GEORGE MURRAY, 1746. 193



are to be at this place to receive your Lordship's orders ; and if his Highness
aproves of it, they may remain till your Lordship think they can return.

I offer my compliments to the countess and familie, and have the honour
to be, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant,

George Murray.
To the right honorable the Earle of Cromarty.



402. The Same to The Same.

Dingwall, 26th February, 1746, 7 in the morning.

My Lord, — I receivd your letter last night, and your Lordship will see,
by what I wrote, that I have left near 300 good men, instead of 200 you
thought sufficient, — and this besides the Mackenzies. I would have some
two or three chalder of meall in the house of Foulis ; and if Lord Loudon,
with his whole forse should repass the water, if your Lordship do not think
yourself strong enough to fight him, you and all the party you have can retyre
to Foulis, till such time as such a detatchment were sent from Inverness as
could cutt him off. Your Lordship should establish good intelegince ; and as
the country people will give frequent alarms, on purpose to get you out of the
country, your Lordship will see and judge how far they will be well founded.

I see'd a boat near Foulis, which your Lordship should secure as the

easyest way to convoy intelegince back and fore to Inverness : but any thing

of great moment your Lordship should send both ways. I am, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant,

George Murray.
To the right honorable the Earle of Cromerty.

VOL. II. 2 B



194 THE C ROM ART IE CORRESPONDEXGE.



403. Colonel John O'Sulivan, Adjutant-General in Scotland to Prince
Charles Edward, to The Same.

Invernesse, 27tli February 1746.
My Lord, — His Eoyal Highness orders me to inform your Lordship that
he has an account that the enemy is in march towards Aberdeen, and that his
intention is, if those news be confirmed, to march towards them with the
whole army. In consequence, he desires you'l keep your brigade in readinesse
to march at an hour's warning, and to give the same notice to the different
regiments that are under your orders, and in your neighbourhood. I have the
honour to be, my Lord, with respect,

Your Lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

J. O'Sulivan.
To the right honourable the Earl of Cromartie, at Dingwall or Foulis.

404. Sir Thomas Sheridan,^ attending Prince Charles Edward, to

The Same.

Inverness, February the 28, 1746.
My Lord, — His Eoyal Highness orders me to acquaint your Lordship
that Posse of Pitcarney has undertaken to raise a good number of his own
men for the King's service ; but for the better effectuating of this he stands
in need of a party from the corps under your Lordship's command to sup-
port him. The Prince therefore desires you wou'd do what you can to assist
him, and let Glanguile have the command of the men you send for that

' Sir Thomas Sheridan was descended from King James the Second. Sir Thomas was

an ancient Irish family, and appears to have api)ointed Governor to Prince Charles Edward,

been the son of the Honourable Thomas He is represented as a man of high literary

Sheridan, Secretary of State in Ireland under culture.



SIB THOMAS SHERIDAN, 1746. 195

purpose. Whither fifty or a hundred be necessary, his Highness leaves it
to you and Glanguile to consider, as well as other circumstances that may
occurr. He only recommends it to you to do all in your power to forward
the undertaking. I have the honour to be, with all respect, my Lord,
Your Lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho. Sheridan.
To the right honorable the Earl of Cromarty.



405. The Same to The Same.

Inverness, March the 1st [1746], nine in the morning.

My Lord, — I have just now received your Lordship's letter to Mr.
Murray, and in his absence opend and communicated it [to] his Royal High-
ness, who orders me to tell you that, in the present circumstances, he thinks
it no ways adviseable to send any more forces in quest of Loudun, who upon
the least intelligence of it woud not fail to repass the water again, and
thereby harass and divide our army. All that his Royal Highness expects of
you is that you shoud. be upon your guard and keep a good look out for
intelligence, and, if you learn any thing material, acquaint his Royal High-
ness immediately with it. If you find it absolutely necessary to retreat, the
Prince leaves it to your own discretion. The Phrasers are near you at Buley
or thereabouts, and you have Glanguile and his people with you.

I have the honour to be, with all possible respect, my lord,

Your Lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho. Sheridan,
To the right honorable the Earl of Cromarty.



196 THE G ROM ARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.



406. The Same to The Same.

Inverness, March the 1st, 1746, five in the evening.
My Lokd, — I had the honour this morning to send your Lordship an
answer to your first letter between nine and ten, which was within an houi'
after I received it. In answer to your second, his Eoyal Highness now
orders me to tell you that he has order'd the reinforcement you desire to
march at break of day to join you ; so that he hopes they will be with you
at Kinkell by the time you desire. I have the honour to be, with all respect,
my Lord,

Your Lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho. Sheridan.

To the rioht honorable the Earl of Cromartie.



407. Colonel John O'Sulivan to The Same.

Invernesse, this 1st March 1746.
My Lord,— His Eoyal Highness lias given his orders to Glengary's,
Clanranold's, Appen's, Barostel's, and Fraisser's regiments to joyn your Lord-
ship at Kenkell ere eight o'clock tomorrow morning ; so that I expect you'l
find yourself in a condition to face the enemy. He has likewise orderd Mr.
Candelan lieutenant-colonel in the Spanish service, Mr. Creagh of the same
service, Mr. Bourk, Mr. Nemaragh and Mr. Swiny, Frinch officers, to joyn
your Lordship. They'l serve you as aide de camps ; and in case of an action,
they can be very usfull, one at the liead of each corp. Captain Burk, who
is the Prince's aide de camp, can bring him an account of what passes when



COLONEL JOHN O'SULIVAN, 1746. 197

your Lordship will have any news to send to his Royal Highness. I have
the honor to be, with respect, my Lord,

Your Lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

J. O'SULIVAK

To the right honorable the Earl of Cromartie, at Kenkell.



408. The Same to The Same.

Invernesse, 2d March 1746.
My Lord, — I wou'd have sent, as your Lordship [desired], the 100 stand
of armes by the troops that parted this morning, but do assure you there are
not two in order or condition to be made use of. We'l get guns smiths to
work tomorrow to get as many as possibly we can in order, and I'l take care
that the quantity you desire shou'd be kept for you. I am

Your Lordship's most humble and obedient servant,

J. O'SULIVA.V.

To the right honorable the Earl of Cromartie, at Kenkell.



409. The Same to The Same.

Livernesse, 2d March 1746.

My Lord, — His Royal Highness, being informed that Lord Louden's troops

are repast the ferry and gone back to the contry of Sutherland, orders me to

let your lordship know that his intentions is, if those news be true, that

Glengary's, Clanranold's, and Appen's regiments shou'd quarter as near as



198 TEE CROMARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.



possibly they can from Kenkell to Ferntosh and there abouts, so that they
may be ready to assemble at the least allarm. Your lordship will be pleas'd
to send them those orders, and to inform his Eoyal Highness of the intelli-
gence you have of the enemy, and the names of the quarters that the
different regiments occupes. I have the honour to be, with respect,

Your lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

J. O'SULIVAN.

To the right honorable the Earl of Cromertie, commanding the troops of his
lioyal Highness, near Kenkell.



410. Sir Thomas Sheridan to The Same.

Inverness, March the 2d, 1746, six in the evening.
My Lord, — Mr. Carr was dispatch'd towards your lordship some hours
ago ; but it having been reported here since, that Loudun was again returned
into Southerland, his Eoyal Highness is impatient to know the truth of it as
soon as possible, and therefore sends you this by a foot messenger, who, it
is thought, may come to reach your lordship sooner than one on horseback.
If your lordship has not yet had the pleasure of hearing it, I shall have the
honour to acquaint you that Fort Augustus surrender'd this morning, — the
garrison being to remain prisoners of war. I have the honour to be, with all
possible respect, my lord,

Your lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho. Sheridan.

To the right honorable the Earl of Cromartie.



SIR THOMAS SHERIDAX, 174G. 199



411. The Same to The Same.

Inverness, March the 3d, 1746.
My Lord, — His Eoyal Highness commands me to let you know that he
woud have you send hither, without loss of time, as much meal as you can
possibly gather in the country where you [are]. This he recommends to you
as a most important thing for his service. I have the honour to be, with all
imaginable respect, my lord,

Your lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho. Sheridan.

To the right honorable the Earl of Cromartie.



412. The Same to The Same.

Inverness, March the 3d, 1746.
My Lord, — I have received the honour of your lordship's [letter], with one
inclosed for his Eoyal Highness, who, in the present situation of affairs, do's
not think it advisable to have such a body of men, as wou'd be necessary at
Tain, remain at so great a distance. He therefore desires you wou'd remain
at Dingwell, and from thence send out partys to raise men and bring in all
the meal that can be got : and your lordship, with the troops, be ready at an
hour's warning to come and join him. If you will send some of your men
hither, of those that want arms, he will deliver arms to them. As to tlie
naming of officers to the men you raise, there can be no difficulty in it. His
Eoyal Highness has always left that power to those who raised any men ; and
your lordship may be sure he never intended to deprive you of it. All that



200 THE CROMARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.



is to be observed is, that each company is to consist of three officers and fifty

men. I have the honour to be, with all respect, my lord,

Your lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho, Sheridan.
To the right honourable the Earl of Cromartie.

413. Colonel John O'Sulivan to The Same.

Inverness, 3d March 1746.
My Lord, — The desir I have to do any thing that may be agreable to you
and for the good of the service, I have ingaged lord Louis Dromond to se[n]de
me a hundred stand of armes, which I'l reserve for your lordship's men.
So when you think it proper to send for them, they'l be ready ; but the
sooner the better,

I gave an account to his Eoyal Highness of the contence of your lettre,
and refer your lordship to Sir Thomas Sheridan's lettre in regard of the
provisions, etc,

I have the honour to be, my lord.

Your lordship's most humble and most obedient sen^ant,

J. O'Sulivan.
To the right honorable the Earl of Cromertie commanding his
Eoyal Highness's forces at Dingwall.

414. Sir Thomas Sheridan, attending Prince Charles Edward, to

The Same.

Inverness, March the 4th, 1746.
My Lord, — His Eoyal Highness, who is just gon towards Elgin, desires
you woud send hither Mr. Burgh, his aid de camp, as soon as you can. We



COLONEL JOHX O'SULIVAN, 1746. 201

have uothing new here, but that a little French ship, which has been for

some time hovering npon the coast, is stranded, by which we have got fifty

soldiers which she had on board, Avith five hundred arms, and the ship's crew,

consisting of one hundred and ten men. These may be useful on different

occasions. I have the honour to be, with all respect, my lord,

Your lordship's most humble and most obedient servant,

Tho. Sheridan.
To the right honorable the Earl of Cromartie.



415. Colonel John O'Sulivan, to [The Same].

Invernesse, 6th March 1746.
My Lord, — His Eoyal Highness has order'd Captain Stack to go and
passe the troops that your Lordship commands in revew, and desires you
may send orders, in consequence, to the different regiments to assemble, after
to-morrow, in the most convenient place of the quarters they are in. If your
lordship thought it proper, I believe it wou'd not be amisse to be present.
The troops are to be payed according to Captain Stack's muster, and is forbid
to passe only the present and effective. Your Lordship's presence will hinder
certain abusses which his Eoyal Highness is informed are only too frequent.
According to your lordship's last lettre, I caused to be delivered to the bearer
of it 108 guns, and as many bayonets. As soon as the others are mended
you shall be informed of it, and [I] will do all that lyes in me to reserve you
the number you desire. In the mean while, I have the honor to be, my
Lord,

Your Lordship's most humble and obedient servant,

J. O'Sulivan.

We expect his Eoyal Highness here to-morrow night.

vol. II. 2 c



202 THE C ROM ART IE CORRESPONDENCE.



416. Sir Thomas Sheridan to The Same.

Inverness, March the 6th, 1746.
My Lord, — I have just now received the honour of your Lordship's, in
answer to my last, which I am glad to find arrived so seasonably, I heartily