William Fraser.

The earls of Cromartie; their kindred, country, and correspondence (Volume 2) online

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I do assure you, my dearest earl, that nothing of that kind under the sun
can give me greater pleasure than to know that your lordship, and the worthy
Countess of Cromerty, and your most lovely family are in perfect health, and
in a flourishing condition ; and that your lordship and I, and our sons after
us, shoud live in great and strict friendship together. I am sure it shall be
the earnest wish and desire of my life, and no power or any consideration
will ever alter me from that resolution. I humbly begg leave to assure your
lordship and the worthy Countess, and all your charming family, of my most
affectionate humble duty, sincerest respects and good wishes.

Whenever I am able to travel so far, I will certainly have the honour to



304 THE GROMARTIE COPdlESPONDENCE.



pay my most humble duty to your lordship whither you are at your seat of
Tarbothouse, or Castle Leod ; and while there is breath in me, I shall remain,
with the highest esteem, most uncommon and faithfuU attachment, and with
the outmost zeal and respect, my dearest Earl,

Your Lordship's most obedient, most obliged and most faithfull humble
servant and most affectionate cousin,

LOVAT.

514.

Beaufort, 9th January 1745.

My dearest Earl, — I cannot realy express how much I have been morti-
fied and concerned these severall months past, for being deprived of the honor
and vast pleasure of paying my most sincere humble duty to your lordship,
and to my good freind the worthy Countess of Cromarty, and to my dear Lord
MacLeod, and to my dear Lady Bell, and all the rest of the charming family
at Castle Leod. But the speat has been so continuall in the river of Beaulie
since harvest last, and swell'd so high, that if it was to save my life I could
not pass the river with my chariot, and I have not been able to ride so far
these two or three years past : so I hope, my dear earl, you will forgive my
not waiting of you long before now, for I had nothing more at heart, if I had
been able to perform the journey.

Allow me now, my dearest earl, in the begining of this new year, to asure
your lordship and the worthy Countess of Cromarty, and all your most lovely
family, of my most humble, most affectionate, and everlasting respects. May
God preserve your person, and the worthy Countess of Cromarty, in perfect
health, and with all manner of prosperity, untill at least you see your great
grandchilderen, which you may doe, without being so old as your great grand-
father, who retained his vast judgement and reason to his dying hour.



SIMON LORD LOVAT, 1745. 305



As I sincerely have a greater esteem aud attachment for your lordship
then I have for any other peer in Scotland, you may freely beleive that my
best wishes to your person and family will only end with my last breath : and
I pray God from my heart and soul, that the Lord M'^Leod and my eldest son
may live in the same affectionate freindship that your lordship and I does, as
long as they have blood in them.

I beleive your lordship will be as much surprized as I am at the great
changes above. I wrote to my cusine M'^Leod of them, and I will presume to
repeat the words that I wrote him here — [" As to the changes, my dear cusine,
you that are in the secret, as the Lyon writes to me, may understand them ;
but they are as incomprehensible to me as the greatest misstries of nature and
religion. However, as to myself, if the world should go upside down, and that
most of those that were honest men last year should turn knaves this year, I
am resolved, by God's assistance, to mantain and preserve my integrity, and
that nothing will shake or disturb my principals till the conflagration."]

I have private letters that tell me that several persons think that tliere is
some thing under these changes that tend to produce greater changes : how-
ever, a little time will clear up that affair. God Almighty preserve our
country, and restore it to its antient libertys and riches.

As soon as ever I can pass this river, and the river of Conin, I shall cer-
tainly do my self the honour to pay my most humble duty to your lordship,
and to the good Countess and all your charming family at Castle Leod. As
that is the visit in the world that I have most at heart, it shall be the first, God
willing, that I shall pay : and your lordship shall find me in all situations of
life, with a very uncommon esteem, attachment, and respect, my dearest Earl,
Your lordship's most obedient, most oblidged, most faithfiill humble servant,
and most affectionate cusine,

LOVAT.
VOL. II. 2 Q



306 THE C ROM ARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.



P.S. — My daughter and Doctor Fraser of Achnagairn, who is with me
here, desire me to offer the complements of the season to your lordship and to
the good Countess, and all your lovely family at Castle Leod.



515.

Beaufort, 4th February 1745.

My DEA.R Earl, — I do not beleive that, since the deluge, there was such
a storm of snow upon the stratli of the Aird. It was seldom or ever seen
that there was above a foot deep of snow upon the plain strath ; but now it
is two, three, and four foot deep, and in some places six, seven, and eight foot
deep. In short, it is imposible for me to describe to your lordship how deep
this storm is in many places in this country, and what bad effects it has
already had, and what dismall effects most people beleive it will have over
all the Highlands of Scotland.

The cattle in this country has suffered a great deal already, and are like
to perish ; for they have not gone out of their stalls these twelve days past,
as much as to water, nether horse, cow, sheep, or goat; but the people are
forced to carry the water to them. In short, the situation of this country is
so dismall that it cannot be expressed. I hope God in his mercy will put ane
end to this unheard of storm, which is so severe, crewell and intense, that if
it continues any time, it must destroy man and beast ; and a great many of
the people are sick with it already.

This makes me mighty anxious to know how your lordship and my
worthy freind the good Countess of Cromarty are, and my dear Lord M'Leod
and Lady Bell, and all the rest of your lordship's charming family ; and my
uneasieness about your healths oblidges me to send this express, to know
how your lordship and the worthy Countess, and all your lovely childeren



SIMOX LORD LOVAT, 1745. 307



does ; aud I wish, from my heart aud soul, I may get good accounts of you,
for I wish your healths as sincerely well as I do my own, and the prosperity
of your family, as I do that of the family of Lovat. And I hope in God
that your lordship's offspring and mine shall live together in the same
affectionate freindship that your lordship and I doe.

I bless God I have keept my health better this winter and harvest, notwith-
standing of the excessive bad weather, than I have done these thirty years
past ; and I have the use of my limbs better then I have had these three
years past.

I attribute, under divine providence, this good state of health that I am
in to my takeing the cold bath every day, which I have constantly done,
notwithstanding of the great storm and the intense frost.

I beg leave to asure your lordship and the worthy Countess of Cromarty,
and my dear Lord M'Leod and Lady Bell, and all your lovely childeren, of
my most affectionate humble duty, sincere respects, and good wishes.

Your friend Doctor Fraser and my cusine Gortuleg, who are here, beg
leave to offer your lordship their most humble complements. We have the
honour to drink every day your lordship's health and the worthy Countess of
Cromarty, and all the rest of your charming family at Castle Leod ; and I
am, while there is life in me, with unalterable zeal, esteem and attachment,
my very dear Earl,

Your lordship's most obedient, most oblidged faithfull, humble servant
and most affectionate cusine,

Lovat.

P.S. — My cusine M'^Leod writes to me that tho he is upon the spot at
London, he knows nothing of the politicks. But I find by his letter and the
Lyon's that the court is in great confusion ; and I hope that out of that con-



308 THE C ROM ARTIE CORRESPONDENCE.

fusion there will come a comfortable good order, wliicli I wish ardently for
the good of my poor country that is like to perish.

I had a roe sent me this morning, which was the only venison I receiv'd
since the new year. I presume to send it to my worthy freind the Countess
of Cromarty, and I wish she may find it good venison ; and I beg her Lady-
ship's pardon for the liberty I take in sending it.

516.

Beaufort, 25th Aprile 1745.

My very dear Earl,— It was only yesterday that I got the certain
accounts from my cousin. Captain Mackenzie, Aplecross' brother, that the
worthy Countess of Cromerty was safely brought to bed of a daughter.

I have sent a young gentleman that stays with me, Fraser of Bouchrabin,
to make my most humble compliments of congratulation to your lordship on
the safe and happy delivery of the worthy Countess of Cromerty, whom I
honor and respect beyond all the counteses in Scotland ; and I wish your
lordship joy, with all my heart, of this new infanta, as ane additionall beauty
to your lordship's lovely family. It is certain that your lordship's family is
already the most beautifull in the King's dominions : I pray God preserve
them for your lordship's comfort and satisfaction, and for that of the good
Countess.

As soon as ever I can cross the river with my chariot, I shall have tlie
honor to pay iiiy duty to your lordship and to the worthy Countess, when I
hear she is recovered ; for I can freely asure your lordship there is not a man
in Scotland that loves your lordship's person and lovely family more sincerely
then I do, and that my attachment to you will be always unalterable.

I am informed that my Lord Streichen and my Lord Drumore will be in
this little house Twesday next, which will oblidge me to wait upon them at



SIMOX LORD LOVAT, 17 -to. -309



Inverness, if they stay two or three clays there. I hear from j\I°Leod every
week. He writes me that they are all in a terrible jumble at Court, and in
the administration, and that our affairs abroad have a bad aspect. Notwith-
standing of that, I hope to bring your lordship good news when I have the
honor to pay my respects to you.

I have the honor to drink your Jprdship's health and the worthy Countess,
and all the lovely family, every day I rise. My daughter Sibie is gone to
Cluny to attend her sister, who is very near her time. I did design to bring
her to pay her respects to the worthy Countess, which, God willing, she will
have the honor to doe when she comes back from BadenocL I truely am,
infinitely more then I can express, with a very uncommon esteem and respect,
and with ane unalterable attachment, my very dear Earl,

Your lordship's most obedient, most oblidged, and most faithfull humble
servant, and most affectionate cousin,

LovAT.

517.

Beaufort, 30 Aprile 1745.

My deak Eael, — The occasion of my giveing your lordship this trouble
is to sollicite you in favours of Eedcastle, in an affair that I am perswaded
your lordship will reckon a piece of common equity and justice, as well as
I do.

I am told there is a year and a half's vacant stipends due by the heretors
of KiUiernan in your lordship's gift. Now, the favour I take the liberty to
ask of your lordship is, that you would please grant Eedcastle a gift of his
own proportion of these vacant stipends, to assist him in building his pro-
portion of the kirk, and to repair two publick bridges in that parish that
are ruinous.



310 THE C ROM ART IE CORRESPONDENCE.

Your lordship knows the situation of Ins family. He is by his reall
rent and valuation little more than the half of the parish, but he pays thrice
more of the stipend than the other two gentlemen : and, considering there is
such an unequall division of the stipend, I am perswaded your lordship will
think it most equitable that Kedcastle, who is very much burden'd yearly in
the teind, should not be burden'd in liuilding the kirk for them, but that
each shou'd rather get a gift of his own stipend seperately.

My Lord President, my Lord Drummore and his son, my Lord Eeay's son,
Sir Arthur Forbes, with several other gentlemen, did me the honour to come
and dine here yesterday. I gave them as good a dinner as this country can
afford, and I had very good wine. They were all very hearty and merry, and
stayed till it was pretty late. I had the honour to drink your lordship's
health, and the worthy Countess's, but no word of your neighbour to his
advantage. They all seem'd to have a great regard for your lordship.

I intend to go to Inverness to-morrow and pay my respects to them ;
and I do expect that, after their business is over, my cousin, my Lord Stri-
chen, will come and stay a night here with me ; and wdien they are away, I
am fully determined, if the river be passable, to go and pay my most humble
duty to your lordship and to the good countess, if I hear that her ladyship
is sitting u[).

I begg leave to make my most dutifuU compliments to your lordship,
to the worthy countess, and to my dear Lord jVFLeod and my dear Lady
Bell, and to the rest of the most lovely family : and I am, with an uncommon
esteem and unalterable respect, much more than I can express, my very dear
earl,

Your lordship's most obedient, most obliged, and most faithfull, humble
servant and most affectionate cousin,

LOVAT.



SIMON LORD LO VAT, 114.0. 311



518.

Beaufort, June 22d, 17-15.

My deaeest Eael, — I presume to send this express to know how your
lordship does, and the worthy Countess of Cromerty, and all the charming
delightfull family. I pray God I may have good accounts of your lordship's
health ; for I am truely affraid that your sitting up the night I was at Castle
Leod has hurt it, and I will not be easie till I know that your lordship is
perfectly well : and it is with my heart and soul that I beg leave to asure your
lordship, the worthy Countess of Cromerty, and my dear Lord MacLeod, and
my dear Lady Bell and Lady Mary, and all the rest of the charming lovely
family, of my most affectionate humble duty, best respects and good wishes.
And I can freely say that your lordship's family is the earl's or lord's family
in Brittain that I respect and love most ; and my sincere and affectionate
attachment for your lordship and your family cannot end but with my life.
And after I am gone, I shall leave it, as a strong article of my last will and
instructions to my son, to live in a most strict and affectionate freindship with
your lordship and your son and family : and I am fully perswaded he will
obey my commands, and live in the same affectionate and freindly manner
with your lordship, with your son and family, that I do : and if he does not,
I wish he may not have a faithfuU freind on earth, and that is a strong curse.

When ever he and his brother come from St. Andrews, which will be about
the begining of next month, after they are a few days here, I shall send them
to pay their duty to your lordship and to the worthy Countess of Cromerty,
and to all the most lovely family at Tarbat-house.

I will live in hopes to see your lordship in this little house before I go
south, which wou'd be very comfortable to me ; and I can freely say that your
lordship will be as wellcome here as in any house in Brittain, except your



312



THE C ROM ART IE CORRESPONDENCE.



lordship's own houses. And I am sure that I will never see a man, of what-
ever quality, that I love and honor more then my dear Earl of Cromerty;
for I truely am, infinitely more then I can express, with unalterable esteem,
sincere attachment and respect, my dearest Earl,

Your lordship's most obedient, most oblidged, and most faithfull humble
servant and most affectionate cousin,

LOVAT.

P.S. — As I am a bottle of wdne of the Cape of Good Hope in the worthy
Countess debt, I presume to send two bottles by the bearer of the same wine
to pay that debt. The only favour I ask, is, that my dear little angell and
freind George may have a glass of it when it's a drinking. I have presumed
to write a letter to him by the bearer, that requires no answer.



519.

October 17th, 1745.

IMy dearest Eakl, — I received this moment, with inexpressable pleasure,
the honor of your lordship's letter by the bearer ; and it gives me the greatest
joy to know that your lordship and my good freind, the worthy Countess of
Cromerty, and my dear Lord M'^Leod and my dear Lady Bell, and all the rest
of the lovely family, are in perfect good health.

I wish from my heart and soul you may all long continue so ; and I beg
leave, in the sincerest manner, to asure your lordship, the worthy Countess of
Cromerty, and my dear Lord M^Leod, and my dear Lady Bell, and all the rest
of the charming family, of my most constant and humble duty, sincerest
respects and best wishes, in which my son and Gortuleg joins me.

I do sincerly asure your lordship that nothing hindred me but my heavey
indisposition and tormenting pains, from being at Tarbathouse to have the



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SIMON LORD LO VAT, 174:5. 313

honor and comfort to pay my humble duty to your lordship, the worthy
Countyss of Cromerty, my dear Lord M^'Leod and Lady Bell, and to the rest
of the charming family. I was so very bad that I thought I wou'd never
recover ; but I thank God I am now in very good health of body, but I have
intyrely lost the use of my limbs, for I can neither walk nor mount a horse
back, which is a very melancholy situation, considering the confusion the
country is in, and when any man in health of body and limbs might have
occasion to serve his king and his country.

I am exceeding glad to know that your lordship is pleased with my son.
He has a vast respect for your lordship, and for all the family of Cromerty.
He loves dear Lord INI^Leod as he loves himself, and was much vexed that he
did not see him ; but I hope they will soon see one another.

My son has taken a military freak : he is going, whether 1 will or not,
with all the name of Fraser that are fitt for it, to join the adventureing Prince.
You may be sure, my dearest earl, this must affect me, because my son is the
hope of my family, and the dareling of my soul. I pray God Almighty send
him safe back, and that neither he nor any that goes with him may do any-
thing that may be dishonorable to themselves or to their family.

I conclude this letter, my dearest earl, with solemnly protesting to you,
upon honor and conscience, that I don't beleive that there is a man upon
earth that has a more ajffectionate attachment and respect for your lordship's
person and family then I have ; and, while there is life in me, I shall be
always ready to serve your lordship and my dear Lord M'^Leod in any shape
I am capable off. And I can asure you that my son is fully as fond of your
lordship and of my dear Lord M°Leod as I am ; and I hope we shall never
differ in politicks, which now divids the world, for I am very sure we both
love our king and country, and I hope we shall see things go on as we wou'd
wish. There is nothing I long more for then a conversation with your lord-

VOL. II. 2 E



314 THE C ROM ART IE CORRESPONDENCE.

ship ; and I beg you wou'd honor my little hutt with your presence and com-
pany, if it was but for one night : for I am as much as any man alive, with
unalterable zeal, esteem, and respect, my dearest Earl,

Your lordship's most obedient, most oblidged and most affectionate, faithfull,
humble servant and most affectionate cousin,

LOVAT.

520.

Beaufort, 26 October 1745.
My dearest Earl, — I hope this will find your lordship and my dear
Lord MacLeod in perfect health, after your last night's merriment at Brahan.
And I beg leave to assure your lordship and my dear Lord MacLeod, and
honest Glastullich, if he is with you, of my most humble and affectionate
respects and best wishes.

There is a gentleman of consequence here just come from the south : he
has a desire to pay his respects to your lordship, but does not well know
where to find your lordship. This obliges me to trouble you with this line,
to beg your lordship to let me know where you will be to morrow, or to
morrow's night, that this gentleman may have an opportunity of waiting of
you. I am perswaded that your lordship will be well pleas'd to see him, and
to hear the accountts he has of your friends.

I ever am, with unalterable zeal attachment and respect, my dearest Earl,
Your most obedient and most obliged, faithful, humble servant and
most affectionate cousin,

Lovat.



315



THE CROMARTIE CHARTERS,

FEOM A.D. 1257.



521. Confirmation by Pope Alexander the Fourth, of certain Ecclesiastical
Statutes regulating the Constitution and Endowments of the Cathedral
Church of Eoss, 11th June 1257.

Alexander episcopus, seruus scruorum Dei, venerabili fratri episcopo et dilectis nostris
filiis decano et capitulo Rossensibus salutera et apostolicam benedictionem. Cum a nobis
petitur quod iustum est et honestum, tara uigor equitatis quam ordo exigit rationis ut
id per sollicitudinem officii nostri ad debitum perducatur eflfectum. Sane vniuersitatis
uestre petitio nobis exhibita continebat quod felicis recordacionis Gregorius papa pre-
decessor noster augmentandi in ecclesia uestra prebendas tenues, et de nouo ibidem, prout
expedire uideret, prebendas alias ordinandi, aliqua ordinatione contraria non obstante,
bone memorie Eoberto episcopo Rossensi predecessor! tuo, frater episcope, concessit per
litteras apostolicas facultatem : Verum licet idem episcopus in augmentatione anti-
quarum et creatione sen ordinatione aliarum prebendarum auctoritate litterarum huius-
modi processisset, quia tamen in ordinatione sua de decanatu, precentoria, cancellaria,
thesauraria, archidiaconatu, et aliis prebendis eidem ecclesie simplicibus in generali
faciens mencionem, non expressit quid cui prebend e assignatum fuerit, uel debuerit per-
tinere, tu ordinationem ipsius episcopi, tam ipsarum litterarum auctoritate, sicut poteras,
quam propria in aliquibus supplens, et in aliquibus corrigens et augmentans, deliberatione
prehabita, proinde ordinando decanatui, cantorie, cancellarie, ac thesaurarie communiter
omnes decimas garbarum de Rosmarakyn et de Crumbathyn, pro equis portionibus inter
ipsos diuidendas diuisim : uero decanatui omnes decimas garbarum de Arderosseir et alter-
agium, saluis episcopalibus, et omnes decimas garbarum de Kelmurch Australi exceptis
garbis dimidie dauach de Aleyn : et cantorie omnes decimas garbarum de Kelmurch et



de Tharueclale : cancellarie autem omnes decimas garbarum de Suthy et de Keimeythes :
thesaurarie quoque omnes decimas garbarum de Vrcharde et de Logibride : archidia-
conatui insuper omnes decimas garbarmn de Fortherdy et de Edirdore, exceptis garbis
unius dauach de Aleyn : ac subdecanatui omnes decimas garbarum de Thayn et de
Edirthayn : succentorie uero ecclesiam de Bron et omnes decimas garbarum Inueraferan :
Prebende autem episcopi omnes decimas garbarum ecclesiarum de Nig et de Tharberth :
et omnes decimas garbarum de Clone et de Lempnelar uni prebende: insuper omnes
decimas garbarum de Koskwin et de Newich similiter alii prebende ; ac omnes decimas
garbarum de Awach prebende Abbatis de Kinlos Cisterciencis ordinis qui pro tempore
fuerit, cum in eadem ecclesia unam prebend am obtineat, assignasti : quatuor vicariis
personarum alteragia de Rosmarkyn et de Crumbathyn sine omni ouere episcopal!.
Ita tamen quod utrique ecclesie honeste deseruiatur perpetuo : ecclesias uero omnes de
Ergayethl, cum uacauerint, communi canonicorum perpetuo deputando. Preterea statu-
isti quod maior decanus, sicuti in Saluberiensi ecclesia, eligatur et inducatur ad aliquam
quatuor dignitatum, sed nee ad subdecanatum, nee ad succentoriam admittatur, nisi
sacerdos existat : archidiaconus uero sic diaconus nee ad aliquam prebendam simplicem
priusquam recipiatur, nisi fuerit in sacris ordinibus constitutus. Adiecisti etiam statute
huiusmodi quod nullus installetur in choro sepefate ecclesie priusquam iuramentum pre-
stiterit de residentia continua facienda ibidem, nisi peregre proficiscatur, uel in scolis steterit,
aut alia honesta causa de licencia episcopi ad certum tempus eius absenciam excusabit.
Et quod subdecanus vicarium diaconum, et succentor vicarium subdiaconum, episcopus uero
nomine prebende sue perpetuum vicarium sacerdotem, cuius stipendiis sex marcas ster-
lingorum percipiendas in alteragio de Ford . . . annis singulis deputasti, et archidiaconus