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EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
EDITED BY ERNEST RHYS



REFERENCE



ATLAS OF ANCIENT AND
CLASSICAL GEOGRAPHY



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ATLAS OF >S
ANCIENT *^^
& CLASSICAL
GEOGRAPHY




; LONDON:PUBUSHED
lb/JMDENTSSONS&

^jJAND IN NEW YORK
BYEPDUTTONSCO




First Issue of this Edition . May 1907

Reprinted January 1908; July 1909;

December 191 o; May 1912



^// rights reserved



INTRODUCTION



The accompanying Atlas has been included in this series
for the greater convenience of the reader of " Grote's Greece "
and other works that ask a continual reference to maps of
ancient and classical geography. The disadvantage of having
to turn perpetually from the text of a volume to a map at
its end, or a few pages away, is often enough to prevent the
effective use of the one in elucidating the other. Despite
some slight variations of spelling in the classical place-names
used by different authors, there need be no difficulty in adapt-
ing the same Atlas to various works, whether they are English
versions of historians like Herodotus or Livy, or English
histories of the ancient world, such as Grote's and Gibbon's.
Taking the case of Grote, he preferred, as we know, the use
of the " K " in Greek names to the usual equivalent " C," and
he retained other special forms of certain words. A compara-
tive list of a few typical names which appear both in the index
to his " History of Greece " in this series, and in the index
to the present Atlas, will show that the variation between the
two is regular and fairly uniform and easy to remember :



grote's spelling


CLASSICAL ATLAS


grote's SPELLING


CLASSICAL ATLAS


Adrumetum


Hadrumetum


Hydra


Hydrea


.^gean


^gsean


lasus


lassus


Akanthus


Acanthus


Kabala


Cabalia


Akarnania


Acarnania


Nile


NiUis _


AkesJnes


Acesines


Olympieion


Olympieum


Akte


Acte


Oneium


CEneum


Chseroneia


Chzeronea


Palike


Palica


Dekeleia


Decelea


Pattala


Patala


Dyrrachium


Dyrrhachium


Peiraeum


Pirseum


Eetioneia


Eetionea


Phylc


Phylae


Egypt


iEgyptus


Pisa


Pisse


Eresus


Eressus


Pylus


Pylos


Erytheia


Erythia


Thessaly


Thessalia


Helus


Helos


Thrace


Thracia



vu



viii Introduction

By comparing in the same way the place-names in Gibbon's
and other histories, the reader will need no glossarist in using
the Atlas to lighten their geographical allusions. It is not
only when he comes to actual wars, campaigns and sieges that
he will find a working chart of advantage. When he reads in
Grote of the Ionic colonization of Asia Minor, and wishes to
relate the later view of its complex process to the much
simpler account given by Herodotus, he gains equally by
having a map of the region before him.

We realize how Grote himself worked over his topographical
notes, eking out his own observations with map, scale and
compass, when we read his preliminary survey of Greece, in
the second volume of his history. " Greece proper lies between
the 36th and 40th parallels of north latitude and between the
2 1 stand 26th degrees of east longitude. Its greatest length,
from Mount Olympus to Cape Tsenarus, may be stated at 250
English miles ; its greatest breadth, from the western coast of
Akarnania to Marathon in Attica, at 180 miles; and the
distance eastward from Ambrakia across Pindus to the Magne-
sian mountain Homole and the mouth of the Peneius is about
120 miles. Altogether its area is somewhat less than that of
Portugal." But as to the exact limits of Greece proper, he
points out that these limits seem not to have been very precisely
defined even among the Greeks themselves.

The chain called Olympus and the Cambunian mountains,
ranging east and west and commencing with the ^gean Sea or
the Gulf of Therma near the fortieth degree of north latitude,
Grote continues, " is prolonged under the name of Mount Lingon
until it touches the Adriatic at the Akrokeraunian promontory.
The country south of this chain comprehended all that in
ancient times was regarded as Greece or Hellas proper, but it
also comprehended something more. Hellas proper (or
continuous Hellas, to use the language of Skylax and
Dikaearchus) was understood to begin with the town and Gulf
of Ambrakia : from thence northward to the Akrokeraunian
promontory lay the land called by the Greeks Epirus — occupied
by the Chaonians, Molossians, and Thesprotians, who were
termed Epirots and were not esteemed to belong to the
Hellenic aggregate."

Beside this survey of Hellas proper or continuous Hellas, as
Grote presented it, we set the word- map of Italy that Gibbon
draws — Italy changing its face under the Roman civilization :

" Before the Roman conquest, the country which is now



Introduction



IX



called Lombardy was not considered as a part of Italy. It had
been occupied by a powerful colony of Gauls, who, settling
themselves along the banks of the Po, from Piedmont to
Romagna, carried their arms and diffused their name from
the Alps to the Apennine. The Ligurians dwelt on the
rocky coast, which now forms the republic of Genoa. Venice
was yet unborn ; but the territories of that state, which lie to
the east of the Adige, were inhabited by the Venetians. The
middle part of the peninsula, that now composes the duchy
of Tuscany and the ecclesiastical state, was the ancient seat of
the Etruscans and Umbrians ; to the former of whom Italy
was indebted for the first rudiments of a civilized life. The
Tiber rolled at the foot of the seven hills of Rome, and the
country of the Sabines, the Latins, and the Volsci, from that
river to the frontiers of Naples, was the theatre of her infant
victories. On that celebrated ground the first consuls deserved
triumphs, their successors adorned villas, and their posterity
have erected convents. Capua and Campania possessed the
immediate territory of Naples ; the rest of the kingdom was
inhabited by many warlike nations, the Marsi, the Samnites,
the Apulians, and the Lucanians; and the sea-coasts had been
covered by the flourishing colonies of the Greeks. We may
remark, that when Augustus divided Italy into eleven regions,
the little province of Istria was annexed to that seat of Roman
sovereignty."

As we see by this topical extract, Gibbon's practice in the
use of Latin place-names is very much freer than Grote's in
the use of the Greek. A few comparative instances from
the Atlas will suffice :



bbon's spelling


CLASSICAL ATLAS


GIBBON S SPELLING


CLASSICAL ATLAS


Antioch

Apennines

Dardenelles


Antiochia

Apenninus

Hellespontus


Naples
Osrhoene


Neapolis prius
Parlhenope
Osroene


Ctesiphon

Egypt

Gaul


Ctesipon
y^gyptus
Gaula


Thrace

Ostia

Cordova


Thracia

Ostia

Corduba


Genoa


Genua







Among other works which the present Atlas will help to
illustrate, editions of Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the
Roman Empire," and of Merivale's Roman History which
leads up to it, are already in preparation; it is hoped to
publish in the series also an edition of Herodotus, the father
of the recorders of history and geography, who realized almost



X Introduction

as well as did Freeman the application of the two records, one
to another. The good service of the Classical Atlas, however,
is not defined by any possible extension of Everyman's
Library. The maps of Palestine in the time of our Lord,
and under the older Jewish dispensation, of Africa and of
Egypt, and that, now newly added, of the Migrations of the
Barbarians, and the full index, give it the value of a gazetteer
in brief of the ancient world, well adapted to come into the
general use of schools where an inexpensive work of the kind
in compact form has long been needed.

The present Atlas has the advantage of being the result
of the successive labour of many hands. Its original author
was Dr. Samuel Butler, sometime head-master of Shrewsbury
school and afterwards Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. He
edited Aeschylus, and was in his way a famous geographer.
The work was at a later date twice revised, and its maps were
re-drawn, under the editorship of his son. It has now been
again revised and enlarged to suit the special needs of this
series.



LIST OF MAPS

1. Orbis Veteribus Notus

2. Britannia

3. HiSPANIA

4 Gallia

5 Germania

6. ViNDELiciA, Rh^etia, Noricum, Pannonia, et

Illyricum

7. iTALIiE PARS SePTENTRIONALIS

8. IxALiiE PARS Media

9. Italic pars Meridionalis

10. Macedonia, Mcesia, Thracia et Dacia

11. GRiECIA EXTRA PeLOPONNESUM

12. Peloponnesus et Gr^ecia Meridionalis

13. iNSULiE Maris JEgmi

14. Asia Minor

15. Oriens

16. Syria, Mesopotamia, Assyria, etc.

17. PaljESTina, Temporibus Judicum et Regum

1 8. Pal^stina, Christi et Apostolorum ejus Temporibus
19 Armenia, Colchis, Iberia, Albania, etc.

20. Africa Antiqua

21. Africa Septentrionalis

22. yfilGYPTUS

23d!. Roma

23Z'. Vicinia Romana

24a. ATHENiE

24^ SYRACUSiE

25. Orbis Herodoti

26. Orbis Ptolem^ei

27. Migrations of the Barbarians



THE ATLAS

OF

ANCIENT AND CLASSICAL
GEOGRAPHY



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©aiBis iaiEiRO!nio''i3




INDEX

TO THE

CLASSICAL ATLAS



INDEX

TO THE

CLASSICAL ATLAS











No.










No.


Name.


Lat.


Long. of


Name.


Lat.


Long. 1 of










Map.










Map.


Abacanum


38


2n


15


IPe 9


Acalandrus, Fl.,












Abae


38


33n


22


67e U


^ Salandrella


40


15n


16


35e


9


Abalites .


11


On


43


Oe 1


Acamas, Pr., C.












Abalites Sinus


12


On


45


Ok 1


„ Arnaut


35


9n : 32


ISk


14


Aballo, AvaZlon .


47


3lN


3


5SE 4


Acauipsis, Fl.,




1






Abana, R.


3:-i


40n


36


lOE 17


Jorak, or Acam-




1






Abarhina, Abinard .


37


,',0n


59


30e 15


„ pus, R,


41


39n I 41


39e


14


Abarim, MU. of .


31


35N


35


43e 17


Acampsia, Fl.


41


35n 41


45e


10


Abarue .


38


4n


39


3-2E


19


Acanthonltia .


26


12n I 60


Oe


15


Abassus .


39


llN


31


12e


14


Acanthus


40


23n 23


52e


10


Abbaitis


39


18>!


29


Oe 14


Acanthus, J>eshoar


29


42n 1 31


17e


22


Abdera, Adra


36


40n


3


2w 3


Acanthus


,86


46n i 27


50e


13


Abdera .


40


53n


24


4Se 13


Acaruania, Carnia .


38


50n


21


12e


11


Abel-bSth, Maa-












Accad .


33


24n


44


9e


16


chah, Abil .


33


18n


85


3lE


17


Accho, Acre .


32


56n


35


5e


17


Abel Mgh51ah


32


23n


5J


35e


17


Accl, Ouadix .


37


23n


3


21w


3


Abel Misraim, Beth












Accipitrum, I., St.












Hogla .


31


47n


35


34E


17


Pietro, I. .


39


9n


8


20e


8


Ahel Shittim .


31


53n


35


33k


17


Acfilum, Asolo


45


49n


11


56e


7


Abflla .


40


57n


14


34e


8


Acerrse, Oeia .


45


IOn


9


47e


7


AbeUm\im,Avelliiio


40


55n


14


4Se


8


Acerrse, Acerra


40


57n


14


23e


8


Abelterium .


39


8n


7


15w


3


Acesines, FL,












AbiaB, P. Mandinia


3(i


54N


22


IOe


12


^ Alcantara, R.


37


50n


15


5e


9


Abila .


32


44N


35


54e


18


Ai gslnes, vel Acis,












Abil;i (of Lysanias),












F\., Chinah, R. .


31


40n


73


Oe


15


vr. Archlatay


33


40n


36


7e


18


Achala .


38


8n


22


Oe


12


Abilene .


33


35n


S6


5e


18


Acharnee


38


2n


23


42e


12


Abilunum


48


35N


15


25e


5


Acharnicse, P.


A






24


Abiioba, 'ms., Black












Acharnica, Via


A






24


Mtn. .


48


ION


8


15e


5


Achatara


14


son


105


Ok


1


Abona, FL .


51


23n


2


lOw


2


Achates, Fl.,












Abone .


51


27n


2


31w


2


^ Drillo, R. .


37


On


14


22b


9


Abonitichos, po.












Achelous, Fl.,












loriopolis, IneboH


41


56n 33


50e


14


Aspro Potamo


39


25n


21


20e


11


Abragana


3l5


3n 101


Oe


1


Acligron, Fl. .


37


31n


21


40e


12


AbravannuB .


54


45n


4


45 w


2


Acheron, Fl., Souk,












Abrettene


39


27n


28


Oe


14


. -R.


39


18n


20


38e


11


Abrinoatiii


48


50n


1


Ow


4


AoliSrontia, Ace-












Abrost61a


39


In


31


50e


14


renza .


40


49n


15


58b


8


Abula


40


43n


4


49w


3


AchSrusia, L.


40


5lN


4


2e


8


Abus vel Ararat,












Achgrusia, Pal us .


S9


14n


20


34e


11


M., m. Ararat .


39


4lN


44


30b


19


Achfirusia, Pr.


41


18n


31


25k


14


Abus, Fl.


53


40n








2


Achilleus, P., Pt.












Abus, Mons .


39


26n


41


Ok


19


Vathiy


36


24n


22


2Se


12


Abusina, Abensberg


48


5lN


11


47e


6


AchoUa, Malta


35


ISN


11


5k


21


Abydos, Nagara .


40


9n 26


25e


13


Achshaph


33


7n


35


13e


17


Abyilus, El Kirbah


26


15n


32


5e


22


Achzib, £z Zib


33


3n


35


tiE


17


AbJ^la, Cmta .


35


42n


5


20w


21


Acidava .


44


44N


24


18e


10


Acabe, M.


25


30n


34


20e


22


Aeilisane


39


5n


39


30e


19


Acabene .


36


ION


42


40e


16


Aciniincum, Pder-












Acidemia


A






24


wardein


45


12n


19


52b


«



Index



Acinasis, Fl. .
Acincum Contra,

Pesth .
Acinipo, Ronda, la

Vega .
Aciris, Fl., Agri
_R.

Acis, Fl., Paci, R.
Acithis, FL, Corbo,

R. .
Acitoduiium .
AcmSiiia
iLcontisma
Acoris, Metagara .
Aci-a

Acra, Pr., C. Kosta
Acra, I. .
Acrabatene .
Acrabbim
Acratliiia
Acrse, Palazzolo
Acrse
Acraephia
Acrseum Lepas
Acragas, Fl., Ger-
^ genti, R.
Acrife, nr. Kokinia
Acritas, Pr. , C.

Gallo .
Acr6e6raiinia, Pr.,

C. Linguetta
Acr6c6riiuiiia, Pr .,

C. Linguetta
Acr0p61i8
Acroria .
Acr6th6on, S.

Laura .
Actania, I., Ter

Schelling, I.
Acte

Actium, Azio.
Acunmn.
Ad VII .
Ad Abum
Ad Adriini, Fl.
Ad Albillos, Tejra .
Ad Alpes Peninas
Ad Ammoneiii,

Kadula NuJ'tiz .
Ad Aiisam
Ad Aquas
Ad Aqr.as, Acqua,

Sa. . . .
Ad Aquas, Berza

Pidanka
Ad Aras .
Ad VII Aras .
Ad Amiim, Lastra .
Ad Aurfios, Monte-
hello .
Ad Bacchanas
Ad Cinales
Ad Canales .
Ad Carejas .



47 29n



40 13k
37 35n

37 BIN

46 5n

38 38n
40 65n
27 59n

37 16n

35 18n
32 llN
32 ION

B

37 5n

38 35n
38 27n

B

37 15n

36 44n



40 25n

40 25n
A

37 55n

40 llN

53 25n

40 15n

38 56n
44 36n

43 58n
53 42n

38 55n
34 52n
53 68n

32 50n
51 57n
51 14n

42 49n

44 25n
37 3SN

39 2n

43 44n

45 29n
B

40 35n

41 35n
B



16 30e
15 15e

13 Oe

21 2e
30 lE
24 3lE
30 59b

23 12e

1 32w

35 24e

35 20e

14 54e
21 23b
23 13e



13 38E
22 49e

21 56e

19 18e

19 ISe

41 42e

24 23E

5 20e
24 12e

20 47e
4 42e

21 14E

35w

6 52w

1 17w

2 lOw

12 IOe
59b
2 37w

13 28b

22 29k
4 59w

7 30w
11 5k

11 24K

16 50k

14 38e



No.

of

Map.



Name.



Ad CastSris .

Ad Castra

Ad Centesimum,
Quinto Decimo .

Ad Cepasias, Spres-
siano .

Ad CephSlum

Ad Dan urn

Ad Deciiuum.

Ad Dgciniuui .

Ad DSciiiuim .

Ad Dgclnium, Bi-
nasco .

Ad Diilnam .

Ad Dricoues .

Ad Drinum .

Ad DnniLm,Zvornik

Ad Duodficimuni .

Ad Fmem,Arlesega

Ad Fines

Ad Fines

Ad Fines

Ad Fines

Ad Fines, Avigliana

Ad Fines

Ad Fines Maximse,

at Flaviae .
Ad Fines, vel C3.sas
Csesarianas, S.
Giovanni
Ad Flexuin .
Ad Fornillos, Dorn-

berg
Ad Fratres
Ad Grsecos, Fojano
Ad HerctUem .
Ad isideui
Ad Joglandem, Civi-

tella
Ad LS.bores .
Ad Laniinas .
Ad Laniinas .
Ad Lapidem .
Ad Libras, Lobi-ech
Ad Lippos
Ad Lunain
Ad Malum, /aft^aniz
Ad Martem, Peschia
Ad Martis
Ad Martis, Massa .
Ad Martis, Houlx .
Ad Matrices, Mos-

tar
Ad MSdias .
Ad Mensulas, Mon-

talcino
Ad Mercurlos
Ad Mercilrios, Al

Mansoriah .
Ad Morum
Ad Navalia, Lahnn
Ad Nonuiii
Ad Novas
Ad N6vas



Lat.



45 6n
45 5lN

42 48n

45 45n

41 2lN
53 33N

B
50 48n
40 50n

45 19n

39 42n

40 IOn

44 15n
a 55n
48 56n

45 28n

44 59n

45 29n

42 56N
53 29n
45 5n
55 22n



Long.



10 15e
13 55b



12 18e

21 54e

1 6w

35w

17 30k

9 9e

20 5k
39 20b
19 18k
19 22e

6 30e
11 45b
16 59e
15 55e

21 22e

1 19 w

7 20e

2 21w



53


29n


2 15w


43


32n


11 29b


47


55n


17 5e


45


54N


13 43e


35


2n


2 lOw


43


20n


11 47e


43


6n


21 57k


41


55n


41 50k


43


25n


11 44e


45


39n


18 5lK


42


4n
B


12 55E


50


57n


1 24w


43


40n


17 12E


40


3(iN


5 53w


48


52n


9 40e


45


27n


14 IOe


42


50n


10 43b


42


49n


13 2lK


42


47n


12 30b


45


In


6 50E


43


20n


17 58E


44


59n


22 22b


43


6n


11 29e


35


30n


6 Ow


<53


45n


7 15w


37


36n


2 18w


44


23n


8 3Sb


43


3()N


1 30e


40


52n


19 36e


41


30n


O 50e



Index



Name.



Ad Novas, Muhact

Ad N6vas (PitzUng)

Ad Novas, S.
Albino

Ad Niivas, Sistova .

Ad N6vas, Slivno .

Ad Octavum, Rivoli

Ad Octavum, Col-
cinello .

Ad Pnlatium, Pa-
lazzo .

Ad Piriun

Ad Pisi'inam .

Ad Pontem .

Ad Portuin, Enipoli

Ad Piaetorluin

Ad Publlcanos

Ad Publk'anos

Ad Pfit6a

Ad Pat«a

Ad Quintanas

Ad Radices .

Ad Rhenum {Rhei-
neck) .

Ad Riibras

Ad Sabrinam .

Ad Salioes

Ad Sava .

Ad Scroffilas .

Ad Septimum D6ci-
mum .

Ad Sextum, Se-
galajoe .

Ad Silanum .

Ad S6iores

Ad Speluncas

Ad Statttas .

Ad Statflas .

Ad St5raa

Ad Taum

Ad Tivonnm .

Ad Tricesimum,

Tricesmo
Ad Tuirem, nr.

Brignole
Ad Turres, Imolitza
Ad Tiures, Maida .
Ad Turres, T. Flavia
Ad Turres
Ad Turres
Ad Turres
Ad Turres
Ad Vallum
Ad VicSsImum,

Roaeto .
Ad Vigeslmum
Adana, Adanah
Addfla, FL, Adda,
R. . . .
Addila, Fl., Adda,
R. . . .
Adeba, Amposta
Adrlluin, Elda
Adiiibene



Lat.


46


2n


48


3n


43


12n


43


4lN


43


23n


45


5n


43


46n


45


50n


41


4lN


34


55n


53


2n


43


4lN


3S


47n


45


40n


46


8n


40


In


43


42n



B

42 52n

47 26n

37 42n

51 30n
44 27n
36 18n
44 32n

41 12n

43 17n

44 30n

39 14N

40 45n

38 54n
46 4lN

44 53n

52 32n
52 48N

46 8n

43 28n

42 55n
38 54n

41 56k
38 52n

45 13n



1 38


50jf




B


56


In


39


59n


51


53n


36


57n


45


35n


46


14n


40


44n


38


3tiN


36


On



Long.



18 40k

10 54e

11 48e
25 20e
17 17e

7 30e

12 45e

II Oe
14 44e

5 55e

53w
10 55e
38 5e

6 29e
14 50e

1 38w
23 66e

25 He

9 35e

6 5:.w

2 3Sw

28 32e
4 30e

22 Oe

1 20e

11 llE

3 5k
6 ^yr

17 45e

29w

18 50e

29 BOe

1 12e
1 38w

18 U

6 Oe
17 40b
16 23e
12 4b

3 55w
14 4SK

35w

8 45w

16 85k

4 54w
35 18e

9 34k
10 Ok

4lK

51 w
44 Ob



N(i.

of

Map,



Name.



As-



Co-



st.



AdTenus, Fl

Jeros, R.
A'lmedSra
Adouis, FL .
Adora
Adoraiml.
AdorSus, Ms., Emir

Darjh .
Adraa, Adra .
Adrabae Campi
Adraraitse
AdramyttSnus Si-
nus, Adramyti,
Gulf of
Adraiiiyttium, Ad-
ramyti
Adraua, Fl. .
Adraiis .

Adranum, Ademo .
Adrastea
Adriani Villa .
Adrlus, Ms. .
AdrobiPum,

runna .
Adrumetum,

Hadrumetum
Adula, M., Mt.

Gothard . ,
Adulis, Arkiko
Adullam
Adjrmachldse
Ma vel .^apeiis .
J'^antiura
Mas, M. .

Mas vel Aous, Fl.,
Poro, or Vojuzza,
R. . . .
^bura .
Jilbutiana
Mcai, Troja .
jEciilanuni
iEdepsus, Dipto .
Mdea Bellonae
Mdcs Diiinae .
jEdes S6ra]udis
Miles TriptcMgmi .
Mdea Vulcani
iEdui, in Auiun,

Chalons, Jsc.
iEgabrum
^gse
MgsA
M\;2i, Ayat .

iEgfe vel Bdessa,

Vodina
^gseum Mare
iEgalgus, M. .
^gaiSus, M. .
^SgilSus, t/l.jAghia,

M. . . .
MgU\ei,\.,Stoura,I.
Mj'^aUiS, Ins. .
JDgiile . . .



Lat.



41 ON

35 45N
33 52n

31 3lN
81 8lN

38 40n

32 59n
48 8Sn
16 On



39 25n

89 84n
51 5n
46 l-'N
87 86n

40 20n
B

43 55N

48 23n



46 30n
15 30n
81 3Sn
81 On
42 ION
89 6n
25 44N



40 SON
39 40n

41 25n
41 19n
41 6n
38 50n



Long.


40


4^B


8


12k


35


40e


35


4e


35


4B


32


Oe


36


20b


H


60e


50


Oe



1


A




A




A




A




A


46


40n


87


S2n


88


46n


88


8n


i 36


48n


88


45n


41


In


89


On


88


6n




B


37


6n


38


llN


37


55n


86


54n



26 80b

26 58e
8 40b

14 59k
14 50b

27 13k

17 30e
8 19w



8 40e
39 30k
35 lE
26 Oe
41 40e
23 5e
34 20e



19 41b
4 14w

14 IOe

15 14k
15 Oe
23 4e



4 IDE

4 28w

26 59b

22 19b
35 52b

23 21k

22 2SK
25 20k
28 45b



21 42e

24 10k
12 20k

25 58k



No.

of

Map.



Index











No.








No.


Name.


Lat.


Long.


of


Name.


Lat.


Long.


of










Map.








Map


^giaius .


41


52n


33 IE


14


jEsej us, PI. .


40 On


27 26E


13


Jigitla, Capo d'htria


45


3lN


13 43e


7


Jisernia, Isernia .


41 34n


14 12e


8


^yila, ScutaH


36


38N


2-2 30e


12


.SIsice


55 On


2 21W


2


Jigilia, I., Cerigotto


35


52n 23 20k


13


.-Esis, Fl., Eiino, R.


43 39n


13 22e


7


^,'Uon, I., Capraja,










Mstidd .


57 On


23 Ok


1


I. . . .


43


Sn


9 52e


8


Matria, I., Lagosta


42 44n


16 54e


6


^gilon vel Capra-










MsHln .


A




23


ria, I. , Capraja, I.


43


2li


9 50b


7


.^thlces .


39 50N


21 28e


11


JilEjImunis, I., Zem-










.aithi6j)ps (3dran-








bra, I.


37


ION 10 50e


21


gltSB .


9 On


12 Ow


20


Mim& .


37


44N


23 2Ge


12


^thI6pia


21 On


32 Oe


1


jEgina, I., Egina .


37


44N


23 30e


13


jEthlOjia Interior .


8 30n


7 Oe


20


^ginetes


41


56n


34 8e


14


iEthOpia .


39 28N


21 26e


11


^ginium


39


4lN


21 38e


11


Mtna,


37 35N


14 56e


9


^Eglra .


38


7n


22 23b


12


j:tna, M., M. Etna


37 40n


15 Oe


9


iEgirus .


39


16N


26 22e


13


.SEWlIa, Hakia


38 40n


21 50e


11


^githalhis, P.,










jEtSUa Epictetus .


38 50n


21 .OOe


11


Theodoro, Pt. .


37


55N


12 28e


9


^tSlIci, Mts. .


38 45n


21 40e


11


.Slgitium


38


28n


21 59b


11


Africa, Tunis .


35 On


9 Oe


20


^gium, Vostitm .


38


14n


22 5e


12


AMoa, Tripoli


30 40n


14 Oe


21


^gos POtamos,










AWca Graecis,








^gospotami


40


19n


26 32e


13


Libya ,


20 On


12 Oe


1


^gostligna, Port










Africones


10 30n


5 Ow


20


Germano


38


8n


28 14e


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18