William Henry Egle.

History of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical online

. (page 1 of 232)
Online LibraryWilliam Henry EgleHistory of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical → online text (page 1 of 232)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH




-Darlington ^Memorial .Library



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

University of Pittsburgh Library System



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofcountieOOegle



HISTORY



COUNTIES OF



DAUPHIN AND LEBANON



COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL.



BY

WILLIAM HENRY EGLE, M.D., M.A.,

AUTHOR OF " HISTORV OF PENNSYLVANIA."



PHILADELPHIA:
EVERTS & PECK.

188 3.



w



^



[Copyright, 1883, Wm. H. Egle.]



[The foregoing copyright includes not only the General and Local Histories,
but the Family Genealogies and Biographical Sketches; special protection
being desired therein.]



press OF

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.,

PHILADELPHIA.






X



PREFATORY.



It is becoming and proper that the author should make a few statements prefatory to the
following History of the Counties of Dauphin and Lebanon. It is no easy task to prepare
history of any locality, and our labor in the preparation of this volume has not been a light one.
We have endeavored to preserve as full a record of the history and biography of the counties of
Dauphin and Lebanon as the limits of a volume will allow. Much has been omitted because
more important facts have been recorded. A large mass of material has come to our hands, and
the difficulty has been what to preserve in these pages, and what to lay aside for future reference.
Owing to the voluminous details of the war for the Union, which has increased the size of the
volume from eight hundred pages, as promised by the publishers, to over nine hundred pages,
we are reluctantly compelled to omit the record of Dauphin County families.

As to the biographical department, it will be found pretty full and complete. For whatever
errors of omission or commission there may be in this direction, or in any of the local details, the
author does not hold himself responsible — those who could have furnished the information are.
Many communications or personal applications remain unanswered to this day.

We have endeavored to be correct in detail as to names and dates in local matters, and vet
we fear that through the fault of those whose duty it was to furnish such data there may be
errors, and we therefore throw the responsibility where it belongs.

The names of early warrantees of land and all assessment-lists we have printed as in the
original, and also the early township officers. The orthography is varied, it is true, but we did
not feel authorized to correct any, since even to-day members of the same family write their
names differently.

In the records of the war for the Union we have faithfully endeavored to preserve all comino;
within our province, and hence have received the aid of a number of soldiers of that war. There
were instances where companies or parts of comjjanies were raised or drafted within the counties,
but officered by meu from other localities; we have failed to distinguish them. While many of
the survivors are yet living, it would be well if the different posts of the Grand Army of the
Republic would take immediate steps to preserve in permanent form records of all commands or
portions of commands or individuals from the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon. They cannot
better keep green the memory of their departed and valiant comrades.

As previously stated, we have endeavored to prove faithful to the trust reposed in us. If
others can be more so, they have the opportunity. We have been candid in our opinions, in our
views of men and measures, and what we have said, have abundant authority therefor. Xot
desiring to appear in the role of an historical iconoclast, we have been compelled to give facts



PREFATORY.



even though they may have toppled over tradition and current history. We have not forced
any opinion of our own without good and conclusive evidence.

Had it not been for the great energy of the publishers of this volume, it is doubtful if so
comprehensive a work would ever have seen the light of day. They have fulfilled their part of
the agreement made with the public, and we regret that their encouragement and success was not
commensurate with that spirit of enterprise they have exhibited throughout the undertaking.

Our thanks are due to many kind and appreciative friends who gave us every assistance in
their power. To one especially must we make due acknowledgments — our friend and co- laborer
A. Boyd Hamilton, — frequently making use of his information as if it was our own.

WILLIAM H. EGLE.

Harrisburg, Julv 24, 1883.



HISTORY



COUNTY OF DAUPHIN



COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA:



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL.



BY

WILLIAM IIENKY EGLE, M.D., M.A..

AUTHOR OF " HISTORY OF PENNSYLVANIA."



Cfjf iHrmorg

OF

IBE^TEIE^L^" WAUG-H EGLE,

THIS RECORD OP THE

HOME OF HIS ANCESTORS

IS

AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED.



CONTENTS OF HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.



CHAPTER I.

PAGE

The Aborigines — Susquehannas — Shawanese — Customs and Char-
acter — Stone Implements — William Penn'a Account of the In-
dians—Geographical NameB 3

CHAPTER II.
The Proprietary's Concessions — Who were the Scotch-Irish ? — Their
Letter to Governor Shute, of Massachusetts — Penn'a Proposed
Settlement on the Susquehanna 13

CHAPTER III.

John Harris, the First White Settler— The Assessment-List of 171S
— Prices of Land, and Early Warrantees for Paxtang, Derry,
Hanover, Londonderry, and Upper Paxtang Townships 19

CHAPTER IV.
The French and Indian War— Petition of the Inhabitants for Pro-
tection — Braddock's Expedition — The Atrocities of the Savages
— Correspondence of John Harris and others relating to the
Frontiers 39

CHAPTER V.

The French and Indian War (continued)— Treaty at Harris' Ferry
—Fort Halifax— Fort McKee— Fort Manady— Fort at Harris'
Ferry— Fort Hunter 45

CHAPTER VI.
The French and Indian War (continued)— Second Treaty at Har-
ris' Ferry— The Indian Barbarities— Letters from Adam Reed-
Journal of Rev. Charles Beatty in 1756— Officers and Men from
Dauphin in the Provincial Service 51

CHAPTER VII.
The French and Indian War (continued) — Gen. Forbes' Victory —
Conspiracy of Pontiac 57

CHAPTER VIII.
The French and Indian War (continued) — The so-called " Paxtang
Boys' Insurrection"— The Manor of Conestoga— The Conduct of
the Provincial Assembly— The Perfidy of the Friendly Indians —
Insecurity of the Frontiers from their Maraudings — Destruction
of the Indians at Conestoga and Lancaster 59

CHAPTER IX.
The " Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued) — Excitement in
the Province — Chantcteristic Letter of Parson Elder — The
Declaration of the Frontier Inhabitants 63

CHAPTER X.
The " Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued) — The Approach of
the Delegates to Philadelphia— The Fears of the Quaker Me-
tropolis—The Conduct of the Quakers and Dr. Franklin— The
Pamphleteers 66

CHAPTER XI.
The " Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued) — Reward for Capt.
Lazarus Stewart — His Eloquent Declaration — A Summary of the
Affair 69

CHAPTER XII.
The* 1 Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued) — Appendix — Names
of Indians Killed— Bad Character of the Indians— The Paxtang
Boys — " The Apology of the Paxtang Volunteers" — Affidavits of
the Pioneers— Pamphlets Printed 72



CHAPTER XIII.

PAGE

The War for Independence — Resolves of Hanover— Resolves of
Middletown — The Liberty Association of Londonderry — The
Pennsylvania Articles of Association — Capt. Matthew Smith's
Company of Paxtang 78

CHAPTER XIV.
The War for Independence (continued)— Capt. John Brisban's
Company— Capt. John Murray's Company— Capt. John Mar-
shall's Company— Col. James Burd's Battalion, with Bolls of
Capts. Cowden'B, Sherer's, Murray's, Bell's, Manning's, Fridley's,
Reed's, aud Deibler's Companies 84

CHAPTER XV.

Tho War for Independence (continued)— Col. Timothy Green's
Battalion— Rolls of Capts. Koppenheffer's, McQllown's, Brown's,
Rogers', McCallen's, and Rutherford's Companies 91

CHAPTER XVI.

The War for Independence (continued)— Names of Persons who
took the Oath of Allegiance in Paxtang, Londonderry, and Han-
over Townships— Assessments of Non-Associators, 1777 95

CHAPTER XVII.
The War for Independence (continued)— Roll of Capt. John Mar-
shall's Company — Indian Incursions — Abolition of Slavery —
Register of Slaves— Rolls of Capts. McAllister's, Walker's, and
Weaver's Companies— The Close of the War— Continental 102

CHAPTER XVIII.

The Formation of the County of Dauphin — Remonstrances Against
— Act for Erection of— The County in 1789— Opposition to the
Federal Constitution 109

CHAPTER XIX.
Military Organization in 1786-1790— Union Canal— The Whiskey
Insurrection ; DeWees' Journal of— Scott's Description of Dau-
phin County in 1805 114



CHAPTER XX.
The War of 1812— General Officers— Rolls of the Companies of Cap-
tains Carothers, Crain, Dietrick, Elder, Fetterhoff, Graham,
Henry, Knight, McElhenny, Moorhead, Smith, Todd— Peace-
Association of the Soldiers of the War of 1812 119

CHAPTER XXI.
The Buckshot War— The Causes which Led to It— The Proclama-
tion of the Governor— The Call to Arms— Proceedings in the
Legislature 130

CHAPTER XXII.
The War with Mexico— Organization of the Cameron Guards—
Their Services in Mexico— Who raised the first American Flag
in the Citadel of the City of Mexico— Roll of the Cameron
Guards 134

CHAPTER XXIII.

The War for the Union— War Meeting at Harrisburg— Arbitrary
Arrests— First Korthern Invasion by the Army of Lee— The Get-
tysburg Campaign— The Close of the Rebellion— The Assassina-
tion of President Lincoln * 13

vii



CONTENTS OF HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.



154



CHAPTER XXIV.

i

The War for the Union (continued)— Officers from Dauphin County

in other Pennsylvania Regiments— Dauphin County in the Three

Months' Service— The First, Second, Tenth, Fifteenth, and

Twenty-fifth Regiments

CHAPTER XXV.
The War for the Union (continued)— The Reserves and other
Three-Year Organizations: The Thirty-fifth, Forty-first, Forty-
fourth, Forty-sixth, Fifty-fourth, and Fifty-fifth Regiments

CHAPTER XXVI.
The War for the Union (continued)— One Year's Service: Sev-
enty-seventh, Eighty-third, and One Hundred and First Regi-
ment—Three Years' Service: Eightieth, Eighty-fourth, Eighty-
seventh, Ninety-second, and Ninety-sixth Regiments 1V2

CHAPTER XXVII.
The War for the Union (continued)-One Hundred and First Regi-
ment-Nine Months' Service: History of the One Hundred and
Twenty-seventh, or Dauphin County Regiment 201

CHAPTER XXVIII.
The War for the Union (continued)— Oue Hundred and Sixty-third,
Oue Hundred and Seventy-seventh, One Hundred and Seventh,
One Hundred and Thirteenth, One Hundred and Thirtieth, and
One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiments 213

CHAPTER XXIX.
The War for the Union (continued)— Two Hundredth, Two Hun-
dred and First, Two Hundred and Fifth, Two Hundred and
Eighth, and One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Regiments 227

CHAPTER XXX.
The War for the Union (continued)— The Militia of 1862— First
Regiment— Sixth Regiment— Independent Companies— Twenty-
Sixth, Thirty-sixth, and Thirty-seventh Regiments 245

CHAPTER XXXI.

The Early Courts— Where First Held— The Bar in 1789— The
Court-IIouseB— The President Judges of the County— Reminis-
cences of the Bar, and Roll of Members 259

Paxtang Township 286

CITY OF HARRISBURG.

CHAPTER I.
The Proprietary Grants— Manor of Paxtang— The Ferry Grant—
The Harris Mansion— Proposals to lay out a Town— Conveyances
to the Public by John Harris— Early Reminiscences of the Town
— Louisburgh— " Pumpkin Flood"— Taxables for 1787 291

CHAPTER II.

Harrisburg in 1787— In 1788— The Federal Seat of Government—
Harrisburg erected into a Borough — First Assessment of the
Borough— Whiskey Insurrection— Address of the Burgesses to
President Washington, and his Reply 298

CHAPTER III.
Sickness at Harrisburg— Laudis' Mill-Dam the Source of Trouble
—Meeting of the Citizens— F.fforts to Purchase— Removal of Ihe

-Mill-Dam Taxes 305



CHAPTER IV.
The Duke de Rochefoucauld at Harrisburg— Aggressions of the
French Directory— Address of the Citizens of Harrisburg to
President Adams, and his Reply— Cuming's Account of Harris-
burg in 1807— Erection of the Harrisburg Bridge

CHAPTER V.
Removal of the Seat of Government to Harrisburg— Act estab-
lishing the same — Laying of the Comer-stone of the Capitol —
Occupation of the Capitol— Cost of Construction

CHAPTER VI.
Harrisburg in 1818— Visit of Gen. Lafayette— Reception at the
Capitol— Extension of Borough Limits in 1838— The Ha
Nominating Convi



'American Notes" 316 I



PAGE

CHAPTER VII.

Improving the Navigation of the Susquehanna— Steamboats there-
on—Internal Improvement— Pack-horse Teams and Conestoga

Wagons The Pennsylvania Canal— Harrisburg and Lancaster

Railroad— The Cumberland Valley— The Pennsylvania Railroad 319

CHAPTER VIII.
Prosperity of Harrisburg — Additions— Incorporated as a City —
Visit of the Prince of Wales— The War for the Union— The Rail-
road Riots of 1877 322

CHAPTER IX.
Water Supply : Early Efforts to Supply the Town with Water— The
Water- Works of 1840— Shinplasters— The New Water- Works 326

CHAPTER X.

Churches— Reformed— Lutheran— Presbyterian— Methodist Epis-
copal — Protestant Episcopal — Roman Catholic — Baptist — Evan-
gelical—Church of God— Wesley Union 329

CHAPTER XI.
The Newspaper Press of Harrisburg, and of the County 349

CHAPTER XII.
The Industries of Harrisburg— The Location of the City and its
Great Natural and Acquired Advantages 355

CHAPTER XIII.
The Fire Department— How they formerly extinguished Fires in
Harri6burg— The First Fire Company— Friendship— Hope— Cit-
izen —Washington — Mount Vernon — Paxton — Good Will —
Mount Pleasant 359

CHAPTER XIV.
Early Educational Efforts— The Harrisburg Academy— The Lan-
casterian System— The Public Schools 365

CHAPTER XV.
Banks and Banking Institutions— Public Buildings of the State-
Charitable Institutions — Post-Oflfices and Postmasters— Census
Returns, etc 368

MlDDLETOWN BOROUGH 374

Lowr.n Swataua Township 391

Swatara Township 393

Stf.elton Borough 400

Lower Paxtano Township 406

Susquehanna " 408

Derry " 409

Hummelstown Borough 416

Londonderry Township 419

Conewago " 421

Hanover " 422

South Hanover " 428

West " " 429

East " " 429

Halifax " 432

" Borough 433

Rush Township 435

Jackson " 436

Jefferson " 436

Reed " • 437

Wayne " 440

Upper Paxtang Township 441

mlllersburg borough 445

Middle Paxtang Township 446

Lykens Valley 448

Lykens Township 452

Mifflin " 453

Wiconisco " 455

Washington" 458

Williams " 460

Biographical History, I 461



ILLUSTRATIONS TO HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.



PAGE

Alricks, Hamilton 559

American Tube and Iron Company between 388, 389

Ayres, William 463

Bailey, Charles L facing 560

Bethel Church, First 348

Bent, L. S facing 561

Brubaker, George M 562

Bucher, John C facing 470

Bnrd, Col. James, Residence of, 1764 393

Burke, Michael facing 472

Calder, James " 566

Calder, William " 473

Calder, William, Residence of the late " 320



Can



, Sin



564



Camp Cnrtin Hospital 325

Carl, J. R 566

Chesapeake Kail-Works au.l Central Iron-Works between 358, 359

Dauphin and Lebanon Counties, Outline Map of. 1

Deny Church, Old 413

Deny Church, Interior View 414

DeWitt. William R 479

Dock, George facing 480

Dougherty, Philip " 4SI

Du^A. J., Residence of " 312

Dunkel.J. A 569

Durbin. Joseph W 568

Elder, James faciug 556

Etter, B. F 571

Fager, J. H 487

Findlay, William 4S9

Fleming, D facing 574

Fleming, James 491

Forster, John 492

Fortenbaugh, Abraham 57:i

Geary, John W 494

Haldeman, J. M facing 498

Hamiltou, Hugh 500

Hanover Church 430

Harris Mansion, 1850 294

Harris' Log House, 1720 293

Harrisburg Car Manufacturing Company facing 356

Harrisburg,Original Plat " 296

Harris, Robert 502

Hensel, J. M 576

Hildrup, William T facing 679

Hildrup, W. T., Residence of " 408

HofTman, William 578

Hursh, George R 579

Indian Relics facing 6

Indian Purchases, Map of. " 12

Jordan, Francis " 580

Kelker, Frederick 511

Kelker, R. F 582

Kepner, William H 513

Keystone Farm facing 609

■ancaster County, 1730, Map of " 32



PAGE

Locust Grove Farm lacing 007

Lutheran Church, First 333

Lutheran Church, Second 334

Lutheran Church, Third 335

Maclay, William, Residence of, 1701 366

Matheson, George faciug 586

Matter, G.F 587

Methodist Episcopal Church, Grace 342

Miller, J. F 588

Miller, William H facing 521

Myers, H. K 589

Neagley, John 590

Oak Lane Farm between 608, 609

Old Coilrt-House 261

Old Paxtang Church 394

Olth, E. L 524

Pearson, John J 591

Pennsylvania Steel-Works, Geueral View facing 400

Bessemer Mill and Open Hearth Furnace " 403

Frog Department and Rail-Mill " 402

Interior Bessemer Mill " . 401

Superintendent's Residence between 404, 405

Pino Street Presbyterian Church 339

Pine Street Church (Presbyterian) 340

Porter, D. R 527

Presbyterian Church, Market Square 338

Public School, Steelton .«. 404

Rutherford, Abner 696

Rutherford, J. B 596

St. Patrick's Church 345

Schofield.E. Lane 598

Shinplasters, 1S3S facing 328

Shiuplaster Harrisburg Bank 368

Shinplaster Middletown Bank 387

Shoch, Samuel facing 597

Shunk, F. R 537

Simonton, A. G facing 538

Simonton, J. W " 599

Snod^rass, James 542

Snyder, J. D 600

Stato Capitol, the Frontispiece.

Susquehanna Indians 4

Susquehanna Iron-Works facing 390

Susquehanna River in 1701 IS

Thome, C. V 601

Thompson, A. F 602

Weir, James W facing 546

Wenrich, Francis 603

Wiestling, J. M facing 549

Wilhelm, Artemas, Residence of. between 398, 399

Winebrenner, John facing 551

Wolf, George 552

Wyeth, Francis facing 605'

Wyeth, John " 554

Young, James " 606

ix




w y A



GENERAL HISTORY.



CHAPTER I.

The Aborigines— Susquehannas — Sbawanese — Customs and Character —
Stone Implements — William Penn's Account of the Indians— Geo-
graphical Names.

We wish it was possible to give an accurate and
lucid account of the first inhabitants of this locality.
Unfortunately much — very much — of the history of
the aborigines is made up from the details of unre-
liable parties, and yet among the meagre data thus
given, some few facts are gleaned which leave us not
wholly in the dark. Tradition is the main source of
supply, and we all know how little of that can be de-
pended upon for verity. Fortunately the members
of the Society of Jesus, the banner of the cross in
their hands, during the seventeenth century, pre-
served not only a record of their own labors in the
cause of their divine Master, but somewhat concern-
ing the history of a race for whose spiritual salvation
they braved death itself. From their Relations we
glean a few facts important to us as to the earliest of
the aborigines who lorded it over this section we
now claim as our domain.

Prior to 1600, but how long before is not known,
the Susquehannas were seated upon the river of that
name. By the Relations we find that they had pre-
viously come into collision with the Mohawks, then
the most eastern of the Iroquois, by which in a war
that lasted for ten years the former nearly exter-
minated their enemy. According to Capt. John
Smith, who explored the Chesapeake and its tribu-
taries, the Susquehannas were then, in 1608, still at
war with the tribe referred to. In 1633 they were at
war with the Algonquin tribes on the Delaware,
maintaining their supremacy by butchery. They
were friendly to the Dutch, and when the Swedes
arrived on the Delaware, in 1638, they renewed the
friendly intercourse begun by the former. According
to Hazard, they purchased lands of the ruling tribe,
and thus secured their friendship. Southward, also,
they carried the terror of their arms, and from 1634
to 1644 they waged war on the Yaomacoes, the Pis-
cataways, and Patuxents, and were so troublesome
that in 1642 Governor Calvert, by proclamation, de-
clared them public enemies.

When the Hurons, in Upper Canada, in 1647, be-
gan to sink under the fearful blows dealt by the Five
Nations, the Susquehannas sent an embassy to offer



them aid against the common enemy. Nor was the
offer one of little value, for the Susquehannas could
put into the field one thousand three hundred war-
riors, trained to the use of fire-arms and European
modes of war by three Swedish soldiers, whom they
had obtained to instruct them. Before interposing,
however, they began a negotiation, and sent an em-
bassy to Onondaga to urge the cantons to peace. The
Iroquois refused, and the Hurons, sunk in apathy,
took no active steps to secure the aid of the friendly
Susquehannas. That tribe, however, maintained its
friendly intercourse with its European neighbors, and
in 1652, Sawahegeh, and other sachems, in presence
of a Swedish deputy, ceded to Maryland all the terri-
tory from the Patuxent River to Palmer's Island, and
from the Choptauk to the northeast branch north of
Elk River.

Four years later, the Iroquois, grown insolent by
their success in almost annihilating their kindred
tribes north and south of Lake Erie, provoked a war
with the Susquehannas, plundering their hunters on
Lake Ontario. During that year the smallpox, that
terrible scourge of the aborigines, broke out in their
town, sweeping off many, and seriously enfeebling the
nation. War had now begun in earnest with the Five
Nations, and though the Susquehannas had some of
their people killed near their town, they in turn pressed
the Cayugas so hard that some of them retreated across
Lake Ontario to Canada. They also kept the Senecas
in such alarm that they no longer ventured to carry
their peltries to New York, except in caravans escorted
by six hundred men, who even took a most circuitous
route. A law of Maryland, passed May 1, 1661, au-
thorized the Governor of that province to aid the
Susquehannas. — Egle's History of Pennsylvania.

Smarting under constant defeat, the Five Nations
solicited French aid, but in April, 1663, the Western
cantons raised an army of eight hundred men to in-
vest and storm the fort of the Susquehannas. This
fort was located about fifty miles from the mouth of
the river. The enemy embarked on Lake Ontario,
according to the French account, and then went over-
land to the Susquehanna. On reaching the fort,
however, they found it well defended on the river
side, and on the land side with two bastions in Euro-
pean style, with cannon mounted and connected by a
double curtain of large trees. After some trifling
skirmishes the Iroquois had recourse to stratagem.

3



HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY.



They sent in a party of twenty-five men to treat of
peace, and ask provisions to enable them to return.
The Susquehannas admitted them, but immediately
burned them all alive before the eyes of their coun-
trymen. The force of the Iroquois consisted of one
thousand six hundred warriors, while that of the
Susquehannas only one hundred. On the retreat of
the Iroquois, the Susquehannas pursued them with
considerable slaughter.

After this the war was carried on in small parties,
and Susquehanna prisoners were from time to time




STJSQTJ EHANNA INDIAN.

burned at Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, and Cayuga.
In the fall of 1669, the Susquehannas, after defeating
the Cayugas, offered peace, but the Cayugas put their
ambassador and his nephew to death, after retaining
him five or six months, — the Oneidas having taken
nine Susquehannas, and sent some to Cayuga, with
forty wampum belts to maintain the war.

At this time the great war chief of the Susquehan-
nas was one styled Hochitagete, or Barefoot, and
raving women and crafty medicine men deluded the
Iroquois with promises of his capture and execution



at the stake, and a famous medicine man of Oneida
appeared after death to order his body to be taken up
and interred on the trail leading to the Susquehan-
nas, as the only means of saving that canton from
ruin. Towards the summer of 1672 a body of forty
Cayugas descended the Susquehanna in canoes, and
twenty Senecas went by land to attack the enemy in
their fields ; but a band of sixty Andaste, or Susque-
hanna boys, the oldest not over sixteen, attacked the



Online LibraryWilliam Henry EgleHistory of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical → online text (page 1 of 232)