William Henry Rolph.

The Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes, Volume 21 online

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being utilised. In a majority of cases the decrease in the number
of ducks visiting localities has rendered the working of decoys no
longer profitable, and it may be that in a few years decoys will have
chiefly an antiquarian interest.

Coming to geese, the author notes that eleven different kinds
have been killed in our islands. Five have occurred so seldom that
he has left them out of consideration, devoting his chapters to the
other half-dozen — the bean goose, the pink-footed, the greylagi
the white-fronted, the bernacle, and the brent. The larger fowls
are treated as inexhaustibly as the duck ; Mr. Pope, a practised and
practical sportsman, devoting himself to "The Shooting of the Goose
on Shore by Day '' and ** Afloat by Night," and taking the reader
for an interesting excursion to continental waters. Mr. A. I.Shand,
who has written about the cookery in seven of the previous volumes
of the series, has long been recognised as a most unimpeachable
authority, and there is a literary flavour about his work which is as
agreeable as the flavours he advocates in preparing wildfowl for the
table. Mr. Thorburn admirably maintains his high level of art in
the illustrations ; nothing could be better than his picture of " Duck
Coming in from the Sea," **Teal Dropping into Cover," and brent
geese ** Under the Brightening Dawn."

Another volume of the series, "The Fox," is in preparation.
Cookery will not form part of this book !

Flood, Fell, and Forest. By Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart. In Two
Volumes. Illustrated. London : Edward Arnold. 1905.
Sir Henry Pottinger was one of the pioneers amongst English*
men who have found in Norway a fascinating field of sport, and to



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BOOKS ON SPORT 575

these in particular his volumes will appeal, for the reason that
conditions have altered in many respects during the last half
century ; it is nearly fifty years since Sir Henry was one of two
young men who first went shooting and fishing, and latter-day
sportsmen will be interested to make comparisons. Sir Henry is
rather perplexing in one respect. He says that he writes " as a mere
sportsman," and goes on to confess that ** sportsmen " and '* sport "
are words which he dislikes, and regards as more or less blots on
the English language. If he suggested equivalents, we might pos-
sibly be able to agree with him, but in the absence of such instruc-
tion the situation remains complicated. Avoiding blots, we can
only say that as an apprentice to elk-hunting, as a master of his art
as a fisherman, and generally as a good man with the implements
of the chase — we are endeavouring to gratify him by the evasion of
terms he dislikes — he strikes us as in every respect one of the most
desirable companions that could be found. Readers of this maga-
zine will, we are sure, agree with us, for they are aware that Sir
Henry writes admirably on subjects with which he is thoroughly
acquainted ; two of his chapters, " The Rifle in Norway " and
'*The Shot-gun in Norway,*' being to a great extent made up
of articles originally published in these pages. He is at once
picturesque and graphic, and to the sportsman (with apologies for
the word) in general, and to the frequenter of Scandinavian
homes of sport in particular, we heartily commend the book. The
illustrations are of varying merit ; that all of them are the work of a
cultivated artist cannot be said, but those which fall short convey
the faithful impressions of an observer.

Big Game Shooting. Edited by Horace G. Hutchinson.
London : George Newnes, Ltd. 1905.

The two volumes which make up this contribution to the
Country Life Library of Sport seem to us to possess this weak point
— that they go over ground which is something more than well
trodden, and repeat things which have been said again and again.
The contributors are all good men ; but they have not waited until
the publication of this book to demonstrate the fact. Mr. Clive
Phillipps-Wolley was largely responsible for the Badminton Library
** Big Game Shooting,** Mr. Abel Chapman contributed to this, and
so did Mr. Warburton Pike. Sir Henry Seton-Karr has written, in
this magazine and in many other serials, about subjects which he
treats again in this work; and Mr. H. A. Bryden, who fills more
than half the second volume, has been for years past one of the
most prolific writers for the periodical press on African big game in
all its branches. If the Badminton Library volumes and some



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576 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

scores of other books on big game had not been issued, this bulky
addition to the Country Life Library of Sport would have been
more welcome than it is likely to prove. It is all excellent in its
way — that we cordially admit ; but the complete absence of freshness
cannot possibly be disguised.

The Winning Rules : or, Roulette Practically Coixsidered.
By Sperienza. London : Harrison & Sons. 1905.

To many people, even we suspect to not a few who never play,
the game of Roulette is a fascinating subject. It has been studied
by many keen and critical intellects with a care and attention
which might possibly have been better devoted to other things;
but with practically no exception they are all agreed on one point:
that the bank must win in the long run, for the very simple reason
that there is always a steady and undeviating percentage in its
favour. This is the case when a man makes one stake on each
turn of the wheel ; it increases in progressive ratio as he makes
more than one stake, such as most systems require him to do; and
so, though luck may serve him for a time, it is to luck that he owes
his success and not in the very least to calculation. " Sperienza
is one of the small minority who, so far as he has got, believes that
there are systems that will infallibly beat the bank, and he essays
the hopeless task of putting them down on paper. His work is
only likely to convince the more thoughtless and ignorant of his
readers who start with a complete lack of knowledge of the subject.
Anything can be proved by figures ingeniously manipulated for the
purpose. When, for instance, " Sperienza " wishes to show the
value of intermittences, he goes to the table and assumes that
Rouge and Noir come up alternately with regular swing. I"
another place intermittences would be fatal ; and here the player
is supposed to go to the board and strike a sequence of no fewer
than eight blacks! "If you are lucky enough to hit a series of
eight on black, you win, with only five francs, 635 francs in about
ten minutes ; if you win for three more spins, so much the better
for you ; if you elect to go the whole hog or none for three more
spins, you would win close on ten thousand francs.'* If any reader
has patience to follow out arguments of this description, he maybe
advised to purchase ** Sperienza's " book ; but if he knows anything
of Monte Carlo, and understands that runs of thirteen on red or on
black do not come up just when they are wanted, we are afraid that
he will not derive much practical advantage from a study of
** Sperienza's " pages.

The author devotes much space to criticisms of two books,
'* Monte Carlo Anecdotes and Systems of Play,'' by "V.B.,"and



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BOOKS ON SPORT 577

J

** Monte Carlo Facts and Fallacies," by Sir Hiram Maxim. The j

former (published by Mr. Heinemann) we have always considered \

one of the best and most sensible books ever composed on the \

subject. '* V. B.'' has a head for figures and he has watched the play. 4

Sir Hiram's book we have not read, but he sums up the truth when ^

he states that the player *' always stands slightly less than an even

chance of winning, and the bank always stands slightly more than ;

an even chance of capturing the player's stake." '* Sperienza,"

being under the impression that thirty-five and one make thirty- \

seven, differs entirely from Sir Hiram. The simple fact, though l

** Sperienza" appears to deny it, is that, whereas there are thirty- I

seven numbers on the board including zero, and the mathematical

odds are therefore thirty-six to one, the bank only pays thirty-five

to one, and on various other chances in proportion. If this

were not a fact we might be prepared to accept ** Sperienza's "

deductions.

Useful Hints and Tips for Automobilists. From the Autocar.
London : Iliffe & Sons. 1905.

Books on motors and motoring pour incessantly from the
press ; the consequence being that whenever a new one appears
the critic is induced to ask whether there was really any necessity
for it ? With regard to these *' Useful Hints and Tips," however, we
must say that they are welcome. They have formed a regular weekly
feature of the /I w/ocar for the last two or three years. Apparently
some motorists have written for information, others have been struck
by a little incident which has occurred to them and have forthwith
sent off a comment about it, and the various paragraphs and pages
have been carefully collected and indexed. The consequence is
that if the motorist seeks instruction on almost any point, he has
only to turn to the index, and the chances are that he will receive
enlightenment.

The Illustrated Game Register. London : Alston Rivers. 1905.
This is a new game book intended for the record of the
season's sport. Each page is headed with sketches of partridge,
pheasant, hare, rabbit, woodcock, and duck, and in squares ruled
below, spaces are afforded for giving the number of each variety
killed, together with the date, name of the beat and of the guests,
and total. The work is not apparently intended for the moors, at
least there is no column for grouse, and snipe would have to be
lumped in with woodcock ; but these are details. It is a convenient
book for the purpose.

NO. cxxiv. VOL. XXI,— November 1905 R R



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BADMINTON NOTA BENE

It has been said that there is only one safe and certain cure for sea-
sickness, and that is to stay on shore. Apparently, however,
** Yanatas " (3, Arundel Street, Strand) is another. One is slow to
believe in the possibility of governing all the complex contribu-
tories to this distressing malady by merely taking a preparation, but
there is strikingly convincing evidence that *' Yanatas *' is effectual.
Miss Ellaline Terriss lately went with her Catch of the Season company
to the Isle of Man. There were eighty-seven people voyagers, and
all were extremely ill except Miss KUaline Terriss, her husband
Mr. Seymour Hicks, and eight ladies who took ** Yanatas.'' So the
charming actress writes ; and as testimony had already been borne by
the Tzarinaof Russia, H.I.M. the Grand Duchess Serge, the Duchess

of Beaufort, and others, incredulity must disappear.

* * * *

The question one naturally asks in connection with any
medicine for which successful results are claimed is, Who says so?
It is declared that Rogers' ** Certicure" (128, Fort Road, Bermondsey)
is an unsurpassable remedy for wounds, sprains, greasy heels, and
other ailments in horses, cattle, dogs, etc., and in reply to the above
question the answer is Messrs. Pickford, Messrs. Spiers and Pond,
Messrs. H. D. Rawlings, and other well-known firms, who it may
safely be concluded have made careful search and selected what was

best.

* * * *

With regard to '* Crystalate " billiard balls, which have pre-
viously been commended in these pages, it is to be specially noted
that in the late championship match between W. H. Stevenson and
the Scotch champion, T. Aiken, these balls were used, and that the
big breaks and the number of breaks of over 100 were exceptio^^''
This is the sort of fact which speaks eloquently for itself; and the
** Crystalate " balls have this claim to consideration, that they ^""^

of English manufacture.

* * * *

The excellence of the rifles made by Mr. G. E. Lewis, ^^^
well-known Birmingham gunmaker, was lately demonstrated >" ^
remarkable way, for his son, Mr. E. C. Lewis, has been victorious
for the second year in the keenly-contested championship of ^"^
Birmingham Rifle Club, with the wonderful score of 104 out 01 ^
possible 105.



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the November competition will be announced in
the January issue.

THE SEPTEMBER COMPETITION
The Prize in the September competition has been divided among
the following competitors: — Mr. John C. Smith, Lincoln; Mr. R.
F. Smith, Montreal ; Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels ; Mr. A. Abrahams,
Emmanuel College, Cambridge; Mr. Thomas E. Grant, Leyton-
stone; Mr. P. T. Oyler, Highlands, Swanley, Kent; Mr. W. J.
Abrey, Tonbridge ; Colonel C. N. Simpson, R.F.A., Army and
Navy Club, Pall Mall, S.W. ; Miss Mary Best, Abbott's' Ann,
Andover; and Mr. R. W. Cole, Bexhill-on-Sea.

K R 2



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58o THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



HEAVY-WEIGHT RACE — BAST ANTRIM POINT-TO-POINT

Photograph by Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad, County Down



KLANKNEY PUPPY SHOW — THE FOUR WINNING DOG HOUNDS I 1ST, VAGABOND I
2ND, rambler; 3RD, RALLYWOOD ; 4TH, RATAPLAN

Photograph by Mr. John C. Smith, Lincoln



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PRIZE COMPETITION 581



J. W. MORTON WINNING THB lOO YARDS IN THE CANADIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS

Photooraph by Mr. R. F. Smith, Montreal



GROUSE-SHOOTING GROUP ON A WELSH MOOR, MERIONETHSHIRE, NORTH WALES

Photograf'h by Lord Charles Conyngham, Coedmor, Dolgclley, North Wales



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NOTTINGHAMSHIRE AUTOMOBILE CLUB RACE MEETING AT SKEGNESS

Tlie car w hicli stuck in the sand. Inime.liaiely after it was «ot out this car won its heat and also tlu nc^

in which it was entered

Photograph by Mr. F. H. Flittton, Lincoln



"schooling" IN BRUSSELS

Photograph by Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels



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A HUGE WHALE CAUGHT OFF MUIZENBERC, BEACH IN THE CAl'E PENINSULA

Cutting the flesh at hl^h tide

Photograph by Mr. Arnold Keyzcr, Ca/c Town



BACKWARDS SOMERSAULT DIVE IN THE RIVER CAM, CAMBRIDGE

Photograph by Mr. Thomas E. Grant, Leytonstone

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584 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



GREYHOUND JUMPING

Photograph by Mr. P. T. Oyler, Highlands, Swanky, Kmt



A SHARK, II FT. 9 IN. LONC, CAUGHT IN SINGAPORE ROADS FRO>*
H.M.S. " .SIRIUS "

Photograph by Staff-Surgeon H. II. Gill, R.N., f/.W.S. "Sirius"

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PRIZE COMPETITION 585



WAITING FOR THE HOMEWARD TRAIN — "TIRED OUT*'

Photograph by Mr. IV. J. Airey, Tonbridge



AT THE YEARLING SALES, DONCASTER

Photograph by Mr. Robert Whitbrcad, Wellington Barracks, S. W .



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586 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



OTTER CUBS FOUND WHILST OUT WITH THE CROWHURST OTTER HOUNDS

They were brouj^hi up with a bottle until they could feed on frogs and rabbits

P/iofo^raph by Mr. \V. J. Ahrey, Tonbridge



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L



1/



PRIZE COMPETITION 587



DIVING AT DIEPPE

Photograph by Colontl C. N. Simpson, H.F.A., Army and Savy Chih, Pall Mall, SAW



SISTERS -SEELYHAM TERRIERS

Photograph by Miss Mary Best, Abbott's Ann, Andovcr



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588 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



OTTER-HUNTING ON THB USK, MONMOUTHSHIRE

Photograph by Miss Clara Martin, Abergavenny



DEVOTEES OF TOBACCO

Photograph by Mr. R. W. Cole, Bcxhill-onSea



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PRIZE COMPETITION 589



*ODT YOU go!" — GAZELLE BROUGHT UP IN THE CIVIL JAIL ENCLOSURE, ADEN

Photograph by Major H. S. Hazelgrove, 102nd Grenadiers, Aden, South Arabia



LOOKING AT THE ENTRY AT THE ATHERSTON KENNELS

Photograph by Mrs. G. W. Fitzwilliam, Milton, Peterborough



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590 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A FORWARD RUSH

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



PYTHON SHOT WHILE DEVOURING A BROOD OF YOUNG PARTRIDGES NEAR
KOMATI RIVER, SWAZILAND

Photograph by Mr. Eric S. Girdwood, Lieutenant 2nd Scottish Rifles,
Maryhill Barracks, Glasgow



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JOHN O GAUNT WITH ^MR. GBORGB THURSBY UP
(Photogiaph by W. A. Rouch)



The Badminton Magazine

SPORTSMEN OF MARK
II.— MR. GEORGE THURSBY

BY ALFRED E. T. WATSON

"To ride on even terms with jockeys*' implies a degree of proficiency
seldom approached by any amateur, if the phrase be accepted in its
literal meaning ; and when a gentleman holding this permission from
the Stewards of the Jockey Club shows how fully justified he was in
seeking it by making the best winning average of the year, he
assuredly must be regarded as holding a notable position among
Sportsmen of Mark. The distinction of riding on even terms is a
rare one, only four gentlemen having enjoyed it this year, the others
besides Mr. Thursby being Messrs. G. W. Lushington, V. Maske, and
P. P. Peebles ; for leave is not freely granted. Considerations of

NO. cxxv. VOL. xxi.—Decembtr 1905. S S



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592 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

weight, indeed, keep some enthusiastic horsemen from the saddle in
flat races ; but there is, of course, a serious danger if an unskilful
rider gets muddled up round a turn in a field of horses, or has not
the skill to keep his mount straight when finishing, so that the
Stewards of the Jockey Club have to weigh the credentials of appli-
cants with the greatest care. When we see how often even the best
professional jockeys make mistakes, it is a remarkable thing to
find a gentleman with such an average of success as that which
Mr. George Thursby has obtained this year, especially having regard
to the fact that he does not pick his mounts, but rides for his own
stable whenever it is possible for him to " do " the weight.

The term "gentleman rider" has often an equivocal signifi-



ORMKROD HALL, BURNLBY. THB RSSIDSNCB OF SIR JOHN THURSBY, BART.

cance. *'The only difference between jockey and gentleman that I
know," a close adherent of the sport once observed, " is that
the jockeys take it this way " — holding his hand out straight-
forwardly — *'and the gentlemen take it that,'' curling his fingers
cunningly into the small of his back ; but Mr. George Thursby, it
need hardly be said, is not a rider of this description. Born in
1869, he is the second son of the late Sir John Thursby, who was
one of the best of all-round sportsmen. Sir John was a Master of
Hounds, an active member of the Four-in-hand and Coaching
Clubs, and a shooting man as well as a hunting man, who suc-
ceeded in demonstrating that there was nothing antagonistic in the
preservation of foxes and pheasants. That the son of such a
personage should have early taken to sport was almost a matter of



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MR. GEORGE THURSBY



S S 2



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594 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

course, and like the subject of the previous memoir in these pages,
Mr. George Lambton, the youthful George Thursby was put on a
pony a very few years after he had learned to walk.

He hunted assiduously, and soon after emerging from his teens
began irresistibly to feel an attraction for sport between the flags.
His earliest essay on a racecourse was made at the first meeting
ever held at Hurst Park. The now popular gathering was in-
augurated in 1891 by the National Hunt, the Steeplechase that year,
it may incidentally be remarked, being won by Mr. Eustace Crawley
on the late Mr. Willie Low's Impeyan, trained by Mr. Arthur Yates,



NEW FOREST HOCNDS



who had two fancied animals in the race, and gave Mr. Crawley the
mount on the hopeless outsider, merely because he was, as usual,
eager for a ride on anything. Mr. George Thursby came out in a
Maiden Hunters' Hurdle Race, on a mare of his father's called
Sylph, and starting at 50 to i in a field of five showed that the
odds had been very properly appraised. A few weeks afterwards,
at the Eridge Hunt, he did much better, finishing second to a good
steeplechase horse. The Saint, with seven opponents behind him,
but in this year he never quite succeeded in getting home. At the
Bibury Meeting next season, however, he rode his father's Fog Horn
in the Bibury Stakes. There were eleven starters, and several race-



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MR. GEORGE THURSBY

horses amongst them, including Shortbread, a son of the Goodwood
Stewards' Cup winner Sweetbread, who seemed well to deserve his
favouritism, for he had readily won the two previous races in
which he had taken part, ridden by "Mr. Yorke.*' Five to four
was freely taken about poor Reggie Ward's horse, but after a well-
fought-out finish George Thursby got home by a short head ; and
this was, of course, a feather in his cap, for '* Mr. Yorke," a
nom de course which veiled the identity of the late Lord Hardwicke,
then Lord Royston, was no mean antagonist. The name of
*' Yorke," it may be observed in passing, was taken by the popular



BOVERIDGE PARK



** Tommy Dodd," as he was called by his friends, merely because
two timid old ladies of his family were in mortal terror lest he should
be killed, and anxiously searched the sporting intelligence to see
whether he had survived whatever race-meeting had taken place
on the previous day. Everyone interested in the Turf knew quite
well who " Mr. Yorke " was, and amusement rather than contempt
and disgust was generally felt when a weekly paper came out with
what the editor obviously regarded as the revelation of a dim dark
secret : that ** Mr. Yorke " was heir to an earldom, and, of course,
it was implied, only disguised the fact for the perpetration of
nefarious ends.



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596 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

At this time George Thursby was riding chiefly in steeple-
chases and hurdle races, and on another four-year-old of his
father's, Mike by name, he distinguished himself at Winchester by
winning a head from the odds-on favourite Brackley, ridden by no
less an artist in the saddle than the late William Sensier, one of the
best of steeplechase jockeys, whose lamentable death in a wretched
little hurdle race at Plumpton will still be fresh in the memory of
many readers; so that the fears of Mr. Yorke's aunts were not,
it will be seen, wholly unfounded. Another short-head victory
gained from George Barrett soon followed; and as Sir John was
not quite comfortable about his son's keen participation in cross-
country sport, he gradually abandoned racing under National Hunt
Rules and devoted himself to the flat, except for an occasional Point-
to- Point. About this time Sir John took over the Western portion
of the New Forest, and for seven years George hunted the hounds
with most satisfactory results to followers of the pack. Subse-
quently he became Master of the Ledbury, four days a week, and did
a desperate lot of hard work; for he rode races continually, which of
course meant any amount of travelling backwards and forwards, it
often being necessary to start off to a race-meeting as soon as he got
home from hunting, and to return just in time to take up his duties
in the field. Fog Horn and Capsicum, on whom he won races, were
trained by Mr. Higgens at Alresford ; but when Sir John increased
his stable the horses went to Humphreys at Lambourn, where



Online LibraryWilliam Henry RolphThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes, Volume 21 → online text (page 46 of 55)