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William Richard Cutter.

Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of the state of Massachusetts; (Volume 1) online

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GENEALOGICAL



AND



PERSONAL MEMOIRS



Rl-,I.ATl.\(i TO TllR FA.MII.II'.S Ol'" rill-: STATl-: Ol-' M ASS ACHTSETTS.



i'Kia'Ai<i:i> rNi):;K riii-: kdi idkiai. sipkkv isk.in ui-
WILLIAM RICHARD CUTTER, A. M.

Hislorian of ilie New Kngland Histoiic-Cem-aliisiial Scuiety: Liljiariaii Kineiil us uf Wi>liiiiM I'lililic
Lihi-ary: Aullior of "The Cutter Family." "History of Arliiiglon." "HihlioHrapliy ot Woinirii." .-tir.. etc.

ASSIS'I'KI) l!V

WILLIAM FREDERICK ADAMS,

President of Connecticul Valley Historical Society; l'iil)lisliir of Pynchoii Genealogy. "Picturesque
Hampden." "Picture.«(iue Berkshire," etc.. etc.



VOLUME I.



■'*/^- : : :v:



lUvUS.T.RATEip.



NEW YORK
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY

1 9 1 A. . .



INTRODUCTORY



who gathered about them, and provinjj a puwer tor ideal citizenship and good government.

Uni(|iic in conce|)tion and treatment, this work constitutes one of the most original and
permanently \alual)le contributions ever made to the social history of an American community
In it are arrayed in a lucid and dignified mainiei' all the ini])ijrtant tact^ regarding the ancestry,
personal career and matrimonial alliances of those who. in each succeeding generation, have
been accorded leading ])ositions in the social, professional and business life of the State. Xor
has it been based u])on. neither does it mini>lrr lo. ari - tocralic preiudice - and assum])tions.
On the contrary, its fundamental ideas are thoroughl\ American and democratic. The work
everywhere conveys the lesson that distinction has been "gained only by honorable |)uhlic service.
or by usefulness in pri\ale station, .ind that the development and i)ros])erity of the ."^late of
which it treats has been dependent itpon the character of its citizens, and the stimulus which
they have given to commerce, to industry, to the arts and sciences, to education and religion —
to all that is com|)risc(l in the highest civiliz.ilion oi' the pre^eiU day — through ;i conlimial pro-
gressive develc )])ment .

The inspiration un<lerl\iiig the w (Ilk i^ a ler\eut a]iprecialioii of the truth -n well exprosed
b)- .^ir \\ alter .^cott. that "there is no heroic poem in the wciid. but is at the bottom the lili-
of a man." And with this goes a kitidred truth, that to know a man. and rij,ditly measure his
character, and weigh his achievements, we must know whence he came, from what forbears be
sprang. Truly as heroic poetns have been written in buman lives in the paths of peace as in
the scarred roads of war. Such examples, in whatever line of endeavtir. are of much worth
a.s an incentive to those who come afterward, and such were never so needful to he written oi
as in the jjresent day, when pessimism, forgetful of the s])len(lid lessons of the past, witlibolds
its effort in the present, and views the future only with alarm.

.And. further, the custodian of records concerning the useful men oi preceding generations.
who has aided in placing his knowledge in preservable and accessible form, of the homes and
churches, schools, and otlier institutions, which
they fotmded, and of their descendants who have
lived honorable and useful lives, has |)erformed a
public service in rendering honor to whom honor
is due, and in inculcating the most valuable les-
sons of patriotism and good citizenshi]).

The \'ast intluence e.xerteil b\ the people of
this .State is imtueasurable. The story of the
Plymouth and Massachusetts ilay colonies lies a;
the foun(lalii>n of the best there is in .\mericau
history, and the names of ISrewsler. \\ inslow,
Bradford, .^tandish. .\lden. AX'arren. 1 lowland
I all ot whom c;niie in the ".\lavllow er" and were
prominent in the (lid t'oloiu'.) with bfet'iuati.
< lorbam and I-^ears — all these of I'lymouth : and
Winihrop. Saltoustall. Dudley, Wilson, I'.rad-
street, and others, of the Massachusetts I'.ay Col-
ony, have an undying fame, and these names are
|)rominent to-day in Massachusetts. These early
settlers erected an original form of govertiment,
pledging themselves to maintain atid ])reserve all
their liberties and privileges, and in their vote ,><i.uki>riiiKi- ^r.>lulnu•llt.




IXTRODL l K )KN'




IsaiHll Thomas,

.if "MHSsai'luisetls S|i.v."



ami surt'rage as tlieir oiiisi-iciiic nii,i;lil iluiu iimM'. a^ lo bcsi

conduce and tend to the jnihlic weal of the body, witlunU

respect of persons or tavor of any man. Their heroism was

CNhibited in their confliots with savages. In >tatc-.inan-~lu|)

thev Iniilded better than they knew. Their code of law s know n

as the "I'.ody of Liberties" has l)ecn termed an ahuo>i drclara-

tion of independence, opening with the pninnunci. nuiit thai

neither life, liberty, honor nor estate weru to be in\ aikd unless

under e.vjiress laws enacted b\- the local aiitlmritii.-^. aiul when

this bold declaration led to the ikiiiand nf the l'".ngli>h t^ovuii-

ment that the colonial charter >h(iiild be snrrendereil. the cole

nists resisted to a successful issue. In later ilay^ b'aneuil I lall

became the cradle of .American Libeiix. and from il^ platform

were proclaimed the doctrines which bore frttit in loistance to

the Stamj) .\ct. in the Boston .Massacre, and the engagement.^

of contesting armed forces at Lexington and Concord and ISuiiker I Mil

.\t a later da\ . when came the uiMmentnUN ijuestioii wlu'tber a free and liberal i^iAern-
ment "of the i)eo])lc. by the peoi>le and for the |)eople" was to perish from the earth, the
>ons of their illustrious sires were not found wanting in |)atriotism and devolinii, but lreel\

sacriliced comforts, ])ro|)e!-t\ and life, tur the \inili-
■ . cation I if the pi-inciples inherited from the fathers.

I leie. too. wi're developed in highest degree the
arts of ])eace. Keliginn. ediieatii m, science, inveii
ticiii, labor along all the lines "\ mechanical and
inilusii-ial iirnoress, ]]<.rv made llieir be^innmgs. and
while iheiv ramificatic nis extended tlir. m.^bc mt the
lentjth and breadth <if the land. ih. parnn Imuie ,ind
the parent stuck held llieir pre einiiieiice. as they do
111 the presi'iit day.

The descendants of those early si tilers are
especialh- proud of their ancestry : for. whatever the
])art allotted them. e\eii the nmst trixial service
rendered shmild coiuuiand I'especM and adniiralic m.
and those now residents of .Massachusetts slimilij
esteem it a ]:)recious ])ri\'ilege to have their n.uius
.issdciated witli such an illiistiiDiis i,M-ou]i ol laiiii-
ilies. Such an honorable aiici-stry is a noble heritage,
and the st(ir\- of its achievements is a sacred trust
committed to its descendants, upon whom devolves
the perpetuation of the riconl,

II was the consensus of opinion ol L;eiilleiiK-n
well informed and loval to ihe memories ot tb,- past
;md the- needs of the ])resent and fulure, that the
editorial supervision of William Kichard flitter. ,\,
.M.. ensured the best results attainable in lhe|irepara-

Stanie of fapt. Parker. I.exinKtnn. tioii of material for the proposed work. b'or more





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Old Staiv House. Boston



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INTRODUCTORY.




Governor Levi Lincoln.



than a generation ]jast he has given his leisure to hi.storicaI
and genealogical research and authorship. He was thc
author. with his father, of "History of the Cutter Family of
Xew England.'' 1871-1875: and "History of .\rlington.
-Massachusetts." 1880: and edited Lieutenant Samuel Thomp-
son's "Diary While Serving in the French and Indian War.
1758," 1896. He also prepared a monograph entitled "Jour-
nal of a Forton Prisoner, England." sketches of Arlington
and Woburn. Massachusetts, and many articles on subjects
connected with local historical and genealogical matters, for
jjeriodical literature. He prepared a "Bibliography of
Woburn." which was published, and he has lieen engaged as
editor of various historical works outside of his own city.
His narrative on "Early Families," which introduces Volume
1. of this work, and the leading fifty pages of biography in
V'okmie II.. are of peculiar value.

Others to whom the publishers desire to make grateful
acknowledgment for services rendered in various ways — a^
writers, or in an advisory way. in pointing to channels of valuable information, are: William
l-'rederick Adams, a first authority. ]niblisher of "The Pynchon ( jenealogv." "Picturesque
Hampden," "Picturesque Berkshire," etc.; Edward Henry Clement, for many years editor
of the Boston Transcript; John Howard Brown, editor of Lamb's "Biographical Dictionary
of the United States:"' and Ezra Scolly Stearns, the well-known Xew Hampshire historian
and antiquarian.

This work comprises a carefully prepared genealogical history of several hundred rep-
resentative families of Massachusetts. The editor and publishers desire to state that they
have adopted a different method for collecting and compiling data than has heretofore been
l>ursued in this country. Time and expense w ere not spared in making the publication a
valuable work for reference. The value of family history and genealogy depends upon
accuracy, and the thoroughness of research in [)ublic and private records : also, upon the use
of old and unpublished manuscripts, supplemented by a careful gleaning and compiling of
information to be found in the various
])rinted works in public and private
libraries. It was the aim of editor and
publishers to utilize all such material.
connecting the same with the .-Xmerican
progenitor, where possible, and present
in a narrative form the family line
down to and including the present gen-
eration, weaving in the military and
civic services of the subject treated. In
order to insure greatest possible accu-
racy, all matter for this work was sub-
mitted in typewritten manuscript to per-
sons mo.st interested, for revision and

correction. Bancn.ft House. Worcester.




INTRO! )l('r( )R^'



111 the comparalivcly lew iiistaiico
where a sketch is faulty, the shortcoiiiiiig
is in the main ascrihahle tn the paucity (jf
(hit a (ilitainahle, xnne lamihes heiiif^ wilh-
iiut exact reciifds in their family line; in
nlher cases, rejoresentatives of a given
family are at flisagreenient as to name - .
dates, etc.

It is helieved that the present wnrk.
in spite ui llu- nccasinnal fault which
attaches to such undertakings, will prci\^
a real addition to the mass of annals con-
cerning tile historic families of Massa-
cluisetts, and that, without it. much vahiahle infunnalion would remain inacce
irretrievahh' lost, owing to the passing away of cusiddi.ins df lamily records,
:onse(iiient disappearance of material in their possessiwu.

THE PUBLISl




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ind the

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5



EARLY FAMILIES.



SUFFOLK CDLXTY.

The late William II. \\ hilinure. city regis-
trar of Boston, has treated the history of the
prominent families of I'oston in the seven-
teenth and eighteenth centuries in a cursory
manner in two chapters at the end of the first
and second volumes of Winsor's "^lemorial
History of Boston." There has never been,
according to his statement, any general or
com|)lete attempt to write their genealogy, as
a whole, and probably never will be, owing to
the want of jjroper material, and the magni-
tude of the undertaking. The greater part of
the early settlers came from the middle class
of England. Their ideas of society were the
same as the English, and they were devoid of
the element of the very poor, as well as of the
higher class of the nobility. Until the Revolu-
tion of 1775 they were in effect and in practice
a I'ritish province.

Mr. W'hitriKire gives a list of forty promi-
nent families of the seventeenth century in
which he names the following:



I.


\\ inthrop.


21.


( ierrish.


2.


Bellingham.


22.


f'ayne.


.3-


Endicott.


23-


Middlecott.


4-


Leverett.


24.


I'sher.


5-


Rradstreet.


2^-


Jeft'ries.


6.


Hough.


2(k


Lidgett.


7-


Hibbens.


-27-


Safifin.


8.


Gibbons.


28.


Ruck.


9-


Davie.


2\)-


W hittingliam


10.


Richards.


30-


Shrimpton.


II.


Savage.


31-


Stoddard.


12.


Cooke.


32-


Sergeant.


13-


Hutchinson.


^?^■


.Sheaffe.


14.


Oliver.


34-


Gibbs.


IS-


Hull.


35-


Lynde.


16.


Brattle.


36.


Lvde.


17-


Tyng.


2,7-


Clarke.


18.


.Alford.


.18.


Cotton.


10-


Scarlett.


yh


.Allen.


20.


Joyliffe.


40.


Mather.



Of the above. W'inthrop. Endicott. Leverett,
Rradstreet. Savage. Hutchinson. Oliver, Brat-
tle, Tyng, I'sher. Jeffries. .Shrimpton. Stod-
dard, Lynde, Clarke, Cotton and Mather, are

(i



about all the names that are familiar to the
jiresent generation. Taken up seriatim :

1. The ancestor of the W'inthrop family left
two sons who left male descendants in New
London. Connecticut, and Cambridge, Massa-
chusetts. One son, whose only son died with-
out issue, is represented at present by descend-
ants in the female line in Chelsea and W'in-
throp, Massachusetts.

2. Bellingham: Name extinct in the second
generation.

3. Endicott : Descendants in Esse.x county,
through one son. The other son died without
issue.

4. Leverett : .Vncestor an alderman in Old
Boston before removal here; one son and
several married daughters in the second gener-
ation.

5. Bradstreet : Numerous descendants.

6. Hough : Alderman of Old Boston before
coming here ; one son in the second generation,
one son in the third ; two sons in the fourth
generation died before middle age.

7. Hibbens: No issue after first generation.

8. Gibbons: Extinct soon.

9. Davy: Ancestor was son of a baronet:
one son returned to England and inherited
estate and title of his grandfather; two sons
by a second wife.

10. Richards : No children in one case ;
another Richards had an only son and also
daughters; a third of the name died without
issue.

11. Savage: By two wives, six children and
eleven children. "The family has maintained
its position in Boston till the present genera-
tion."

12. Cooke: One son of the second genera-
tion. This -son had an only daughter whose
descendants of another name still represent
the family in Boston.

13. Hutchinson: The later generation belongs
to the record of the eighteenth century.

74. ()liver: .Appear to have well sustained
their innulxr and influence.

13. Hull: In the second generation, an only
clu'ld. a daughter, whose descendants were
numerous.

ifi. I'.rattlc: Male line extinct in the third
generation.

)



MASSACHUSETTS.



17. Tyng: Male members, descendants of
two brothers, not numerous ; line continued in
female branches.

18. Altord: Does not appear after the third
generation.

19. Scarlett : Xo male descendants.

20. Joylift'e: In the second generation, an
only child, a daughter, died unmarried.

21. Gerrish (later Essex county) ; a grand-
son returned to Boston and left descendants.

22. Payne: One child (a-son). "The family
became extinct here in 1834."

23. Middlecott : Four children, three daugh-
ters and one son ; the son settled in England.

24. Usher: Two sons and two daughters of
the second generation ; one son married and
had no children ; one son married and had one
daughter, and by a second marriage had other
issue "still represented in Rhode Island. "'

25. Jeffries : Two sons of the second gener-
ation. '"The family is still represented in
Boston, being one of the few which have con-
tinued through all the changes of two centu-
ries."

26. I.idgett: Represented by a son of the
second generation, who died at London in
1698.

27. Saffin : No issue of the first generation.

28. Ruck, or Rock: one son of second gen-
eration, beyond whom the line is not traced.

29. Whittingham : Left issue after first gen-
eration here.

30. Shriniptun: Eeft issue of a later distin-
guished generation.

31. Stoddard: "The family still flourishes,
though not in Boston."

32. Sergeant: Onegeneration, without issue.

33. Sheaffe : Two daughters of the second
generation, one of whom married a relative of
the same name. The name appears to have
ended in Hoston in 1724.

34. ( iibbs : "The name continued till recently
in Middlesex county."

35. I^ynde : One son (second generation)
settled in Salem.

36. Lyde : One child, a son, no further men-
tion.

37. Clarke : One son, for one family ; other
families of this name were more numerously
represented.

38. Cotton : Tw-o sons of the second gener-
ation an<l two daughters. "The family, how-
ever, soon passed from Boston."

39. Allen: One son, who was treasurer of
the province.

40. Mather: The members of this family
appear to be numerous, especially in the female



branches. "The name, however, was soon lost
to Boston, though descendants in Connecticut
still bear it."

Mr. W'hitmore, for the eighteenth century,
continues his list of the most prominent fami-
lies of IJoston (or Suffolk county ) until he
has included one hundred numbers for the two
centuries which his list was designed to cover;
more especially for the eighteenth century, the
provincial period from 1692 to 1775. He also
observes that with few exceptions the names
of the colonial (or first period) disappear early
in the eighteenth century. In his list for the
eighteenth century he includes such names as
follows :



41.


Phips.


71-


Tavlor.


42.


Tailer.


72.


Ehot.


4.S-


Dummer.


7?,-


lielchcr.


44-


Shirley.


74-


Williams.


45-


Hutchinson. •


75-


Winslow.


46.


Oliver.


76.


Willard.


47-


Hobby.


77-


Walley.


48.


Temple.


78.


I>allentine.


49-


Nelson.


79-


\'alentine.


50.


Sewall.


80.


Cushing.


5'-


.Addington.


81.


]!owdoin.


5^-


Davenport.


82.


Faneuil.


53-


Savage.


83-


Johonnot.


54-


Phillips.


84.


Olivier.


.S5-


Wendell.


85-


Sigourney.


56.


Lloyd.


86.


Brimmer.


57-


Borland.


87.


Mascarene.


58.


\'assall.


88.


Bethune.


50-


Lindall.


89.


Cunningham


60.


Brinlev.


90.


I'ovlston.


Cm.


Pitts. ■


91.


Trail.


62.


.\pthorp.


92.


Mount fort.


63-


Salisbury.


93-


Greenwood.


Ch.


Marion.


94-


Charnock.


6S.


Bridge.


95-


Martyn.


66.


Ouincv.


96.


Cooper.


67.


Fitch.'


97.


I-ynde.


68.


Clark.


98.


Gardiner.


69.


Bromfield.


99.


.Amorv.


70.


Pavne.


TOO.


Waldo.



The Eighteenth Century, taken up .seriatim :

41. Phips: No children of the first ancestor,
but a wife's nephew became bis heir and
adopted the name : this nephew had an only
surviving son. whose family consisted of three
sons and three daughters.

42. Tailer: The founder married twice; no
issue reported after first generation.

43. Dummer : Three sons of this name, of
which one died unmarried, another married



MASSACHL-SETTS.



111.



left an only daughter, and the third left no
children. "The family has been continued in
Boston, though not in the name."

44. Shirley ( family nf the English Gover-
nor ) : Four .sons ami five daughters. "Only
one son survived him. whose only son died
without issue in 1815."

45. Hutchinson (also of the seventeenth
centur}') : 1-amily consisting of two sons, botli
married, whose descendants were most notable ;
the first had Thomas (the famous lieutenant-
governor of the province) and Foster Hutch-
inson : the second left a son Edward and tv;o
daughters. Foster had a son and daughter,
and Governor Thomas had three children. As
the members became refugees, they are not
found here after the Revolution.

46. Oliver: In the second generation was
one son, whose son was the father of a branch
of the family which remained here. By a
second marriage the first ancestor had a famil}-
of fourteen children. Another branch of the
early Oliver family had two sons who were
married. Another branch of the second gen-
eration was a member who had four sons, the
flescendants of whom have been numerous.
There was still another branch of these Bos-
ton Olivers, one of whose members had two
wives, and by them many children, most of
whom died young. A son of this last group
was a graduate of Harvard College in 1719,
one of whose daughters married Benjamin
I'rescott. and was "the ancestress of famous
men."

47. Hobby: The particular member was
knighted— "one of our few titled natives ;" he
left a widow, but no children.

48. Temi>le: One son of this family had
three dauglitcrs, and sons, whose descendants
are numerous. One of the sons of the emi-
grant inherited the baronetcy belonging to this
family.

49. Xelson : Two sons represented this
family in the second generation; also daugh
tirs.

50. Sewall : One son of the second genera-
tion was married, but "the line soon ceased in
the name ;" one son of the same generation was
married and had a family. "Descendants of
tiie name still reside in Boston and the vicin-
ity."

51. Addington: The family ended in the
second generation with the death of a daughter
who died young.

^2. Davenport : Third generation was repre-
seiitc<l by two sons and two married daughters
in Boston. , I



53. Savage: Thi.s family was numerously
rei)resented in the eightecth centurv in the
male line.

54. I'hillips: Well represented in the male
line in I'.oston to a late generation.

55. \\ endell : Well represented in the male
line.

56. Lloyd : Numerously represented in the
male line to about 1850.



.^z-



Borlanc



An only son of the second



generation here had two sons and a daughter.
Oni' of the two sons had twelve children.

58. \ assail : h^arly rather numerous, and
rue of a later generation had seventeen chil-
dren, and another member of the faniilv had
si.vteen children.

5|^ Lindall; The first generation was repre-
sented by a person who had three wives and
seven children, hut only one daughter lived to
marry.

fio. Brinley: The representative of the first
gentration left a daughter and a son ; the son
had five sons and two daughters. One of these
sons married his cousin and left no children:
another left many descendants, the third mar-
ried his cousin and left one married son.

61. Pitts: Here after 1731. The father
had three sons, the second of whom had five
sons and two daughters. The third left issue.

62. Apthorp : The first representative had
eighteen children, of whom fifteen survived
him. and eleven married. "The name is still
rejjresented among us."

63. Salisbury: The first representative had
ten children, of whom two sons and six daugh-
ters married. "Many descendants of this
worthy couple remain."

64. Marion: In the second generation fixe
sons and three daughters. Later members ot
this family are still numerous in this vicinity.

65. Bridge : Represented by several married
daughters.

66. Ouincy: Long identified with Boston.
The emigrant had an only son, whose progenv
are numerous. One of the male descendants
had nine children from whom are many de-
scendants of the name and of other families.
Another line represented by an only son had
later very eminent representatives.

67. Fitch : In the male line .soon extinct ;
but through a daughter there are descendants.

68. Clark: Two children, two daughters, of
the second generation in one case, one son and
daughters only in the other. In the second
case the only son had two daughters who mar-
ried. A sister of the only son died "a child-
less widow ;" her sister had four children.



AIASSACHUSETTS.



( Jther lines of this family in ISoston have been
distinguished for their number and influence.
(«}. Bromfield : ( )ne daughter and a son of
the second generation ; and several sons and
(laughter of the third have carried the name
and family down to 1849.

70. Payne: An only son, who died in 1735,
left a large family.

71. Taylor: Of two sons of the second gen-
eration, one died unmarrietl ; the other had
only two daughters.

•]2. Eli(jt: The descendants of the first
member are now mostly in Connecticut ; the
second member had only daughters; the thir'l
had the same ; and the fourth had two sons and
several daughters. Of three male members
of a later generation two died without issue.
Another noted family of this name, more proj)-



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