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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES

FROM THE LIBRARY
OF

ELI SOBEL



rr-

r

L-



t



' I .



THE TRAGEDIE OF

MACBETH.



<t//t?j Trtmus. Sctena Trima.



T)>Kuta<ndLt'tiliZ. SU




T time HWctn.
men agline?



iHen (hall we thre
In Thunder.Lighi t

j. WhentheHuiley-burley'sdone,
When the Battaile's loft.and wonne.
I. ThatwiUbeerenhefetoCSonne.
j Wheietheplace?
j. Vpon the Heath.
,. There to meet with MxhA.
I I comc,Gr*,-M~!kj.

Jl />i>4.llsanon:faireisfoule..3ndfouitisfaire,
Houet ihroughthefoggeindfilthieayre. Exmt.



Scena Secunda.



um waha. Enter King iJMilcomi, Vnit-
ttendants, mtttijtg



Ki*. What bloody man is that r he cin rcpott,
Ai feemeth by his plight.of die Rcuoli
The neweft ftatc.

Mtd. ThismheSerieant,
Who likea good and bardie Souldier fougVt
Cainft my Capiiuiiie : Haile braue friend ,
Say^ to the King.thc knowledge of the Bioyio.
Aithoudidfl leaueit.

Op. Doubifull it flood.

And choake their Act : The mciMcKcTO^dairlU

(Worlhie to be a Rebcll, for to that

'The multiplying ViUaniei of Nature

Doe fwaime tpon him) from the Weftcrne Ifles

Of Kernes andGiHovrgroiTci is fopply'd,

ShewM like a Rebelli Whore root all's too weiVe:
For brauc /Mro-ino (well her deferues thit Nime)
DifdayningFortune.nlthhisbnndKhtStcele,
Which fmoak'd with bloody ereninon
(Like Valours Minion; caru'd out his p adage,
Till hec fac'd the Slaue:
Which neu'r fbooke handv.nor bad faroell to him,
Till he vnfeam'd him from the Naue toth 1 Chops,
And fix'd his Head rpon out Battlernenu.



C*f. As whence the Sunne 'gins his teflcftion.
Shipwracking Stonnes,nd direfoll Thunders :

Difcomfort fwells?Marke KingofScotland,iDarkt,
No fooner Mice had.with Valoui arm'd.
Compeird thefc skipping Kernes to null their heelcs.
But theNorweyan Lord.furueying vantage.
Wiih furbnflit Armes,and new fupplyes of men,
Begin afrediaiTault.



Ctf. Yes.asSparrovKi.Eagles;
Or the Hare, tl.el.yon:
111 fay footh, I mutt report they Jf ert
As Cannons ouer-<hirg'd with double Cnc4,
So they doubly redoubled Rroakes rpon the Foe >
Except they meant to bithe in rceLing Wounds,

Icannoi tell : butlamfaint,
MyGatTiescryfoihelpe.

fj. So well thy wordsbecomethee,a5tnyVTOHDd9,
They Iraack of Hoaoi both : Goeget him Surgcoru.

ittfr Rejje Mutt Af?m.
Who comes here ?

Mil. ThewonhyTiaxofRoSc.

LtK. What a haHc lookes through Mi eye?
So fhould he looke.thjt fceuics to fpcale thingt ttnogc

Koff,. God fauc the King.

K,g. Whence cja>'ftthou.worthy7lar >

Ktff. From Fiffe, great Kiog,
Where the Norweyan Barmen flow! the Slie,
And fanne our people colj.

AfnUedbytlmmoftdinoyillTraytor,

The Tint of Cawdor.bcgan a diCmatl Conflift,

Till that Itllnfi Bridegroome.lapl in proofc.

Confronted himwith fclfe-coaipatifoni,

Point againd Point.rebellioul Anne 'gainft Arme,

Curbing his Uuifh {pirn : and toconclude,

TheV,aoriefellonl.

Kmf. Great happinelTe.

Keffi. Thatnow.JwOTii.theNorwiyesKing,
Craues compoBtion :

Nor would we deigne him banal! of his me:i,
Till he disburfed , at Saint ftlma ynch,
Ten thoufand Dollars'.io our generall ife.



FACSIMILE (REDUCED) OF THE FIRST PAGE OF MACBETH,
FIRST FOLIO



THENEWHUDSON
SHAKESPEARE



THETRAGEDYOF
MACBETH



HENRYNORMAN
HUDSON, LI/D-



EDITED AND REVISED BY
EBENE-ZER CHARITON
BLACK LLD- (GLASGOW)

WITH THE COOPERATION OF

ANDREW JACKS OK
GEORGE HTH



GINN AND COMPANY

BOSTON NEWTORK CHICACX) LONDON
ATLANTA. DALLAS COLUMBUS SAN FBANCISCD



ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL



COPYRIGHT, 1908, BY
GINN AND COMPANY



ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

73 '-3



fltbtngum



CINN AND COMPANY PRO-
PRIETORS BOSTON U.S.A.



SRLF

URL



PREFACE

The text of this edition of Macbeth is based upon a
collation of the seventeenth century Folios, the Globe edi-
tion, and that of Delius. As compared with the text of the
earlier editions of the Hudson Shakespeare, it is conservative.
Exclusive of changes in spelling, punctuation, and stage
directions, very few emendations by eighteenth century and
nineteenth century editors have been adopted ; and these,
with every variation from the First Folio, are indicated in the
textual notes. These notes are printed immediately below
the text so that a reader or student may see at a glance the
evidence in the case of a disputed reading and have some
definite understanding of the reasons for those differences in
the text of Shakespeare which frequently surprise and very
often annoy. A consideration of the more poetical, or the
more dramatically effective, of two variant readings will often
lead to rich results in awakening a spirit of discriminating
interpretation and in developing true creative criticism. In
no sense is this a textual variorum edition. The variants
given are only those of importance and high authority.

The spelling and the punctuation of the text are mod-
ern, except in the case of verb terminations in -ed, which,
when the e is silent, are printed with the apostrophe in its
place. This is the general usage in the First Folio. Modern



iv PREFACE

spelling has to a certain extent been followed in the
text variants ; but the original spelling has been retained
wherever its peculiarities have been the basis for impor-
tant textual criticism and emendation.

With the exception of the position of the textual variants,
the plan of this edition is similar to that of the earlier edi-
tions of the Hudson Shakespeare. It is impossible to specify
the various instances of revision and rearrangement in the
matter of the Introduction and the interpretative notes, but
the endeavor has been to retain all that gave the Hudson
Shakespeare its unique place and to add the results of what
seems vital and permanent in later inquiry and research.

While it is important that the principle of siium cuique
be attended to so far as is possible in matters of research
and scholarship, it is becoming more and more difficult to
give every man his own in Shakespearian annotation. The
amount of material accumulated is so great that the identity-
origin of much important comment and suggestion is either
wholly lost or so crushed out of shape as to be beyond
recognition. Instructive significance perhaps attaches to
this in editing the works of one who quietly made so much
of materials gathered by others. But the list of authorities
given on page Ixxi will indicate the chief source of much
that has gone to enrich the value of this edition. Espe-
cial acknowledgment is here made of the obligations to
Dr. William Aldis Wright and Dr. Horace Howard Furness,
whose work in Shakespearian criticism, research, and col-
lating, has made all subsequent editors and investigators
their eternal bondmen.



PREFACE V

With regard to the general plan of this edition, Professor
W. P. Trent, of Columbia University, has offered valuable
suggestions and given important advice ; and to Mr. M.
Grant Daniell's patience, accuracy, and judgment this volume
owes both its freedom from many a blunder and its possession
of a carefully arranged index.



CONTENTS



INTRODUCTION

PAGE

I. SOURCES . ix

THE MAIN STORY ix

THE MACBETH OF HISTORY ix

THE MACBETH OF LEGEND x

JOHN OK FORDUN x

ANDREW OF WYNTOUN xi

BOECE xii

BELLENDEN xii

STEWART xiii

HOLINSHED xiii

BUCHANAN xvii

EARLIER PLAYS xviii

WITCH LORE xx

THE MOVING WOOD xxiii

MACDUFF'S BIRTH xxiv

WAS SHAKESPEARE EVER IN SCOTLAND? . . . xxv

II. DATE OF COMPOSITION xxvi

EXTERNAL EVIDENCE xxvi

INTERNAL EVIDENCE xxviii

III. EARLY EDITIONS xxi*

FOLIOS xxix

THE QUARTOS OF 1673 AND '674 xxx

ROWE'S EDITIONS xxxi

IV. SHAKESPEARE AND MIDDLETON xxxi

V. VERSIFICATION AND DICTION xxxiii

BLANK VERSE xxxiii

RHYME xxxv

PROSE xxxvi

vii



Viii CONTENTS

PAGE

VI. DRAMATIC STRUCTURE xxxviii

ANALYSIS BY ACT AND SCENE xxxix

VII. MANAGEMENT OF TIME AND PLACE xliv

VIII. THE CHARACTERS xlv

THE WEIRD SISTERS xlv

THE WEIRD SISTERS AND MACBETH xlix

MACBETH AND BANQUO Hi

MACBETH liv

LADY MACBETH Ivii

IX. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS , Ixiv

X. STAGE HISTORY Ixvi

THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Ixvi

THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Ixviii

THE NINETEENTH CENTURY Ixix

AUTHORITIES (WITH ABBREVIATIONS) Ixxi

CHRONOLOGICAL CHART Ixxii

DISTRIBUTION OF CHARACTERS Ixxvi

THE TEXT

ACT I 3

ACT II 42

ACT III 67

ACT IV 97

ACT V 128

INDEX

I. WORDS AND PHRASES .... 153

II. QUOTATIONS FROM HOLINSHED 159

ILLUSTRATIONS

FACSIMILE, FIRST PAGE OF MACBETH, FIRST FOLIO . Frontispiece

MACBETH MEETS THE WEIRD SISTERS (FROM HOLINSHED) xiv

MACBETH'S INVESTITURE (FROM HOLINSHED) xiv

TITLE-PAGE, HOLINSHED'S DESCRIPTION OF SCOTLAND . . xvi



INTRODUCTION



NOTE. In citations from Shakespeare's plays and nondramatic
poems the numbering has reference to the Globe edition, except in
the case of this play, where the reference is to this edition.



I. SOURCES

The fatal consequence of the intervention of malignant
supernatural powers in human affairs has fascinated the
deepest minds in all ages and in all lands. It is the theme
of Greek tragedy ; it is the germ idea of the Faust legend ;
it is the essential element in Paradise Lost, The story of
Macbeth, as we have it in Shakespeare, belongs to that great
cycle of temptation themes which, developing naturally from
the story of the fall in the Genesis narrative, became in the
Middle Ages the legend of the man who sells his soul to the
devil in exchange for fortune, power, or universal knowledge.

THE MAIN STORY
THE MACBETH OF HISTORY

Modern research 1 has established that the Macbeth of
history was, for his time, a worthy and beneficent monarch,
thoroughly deserving the title of " the liberal king " given to

1 Cf. Freeman's The History of the Norman Conquest, 1867-1879;
Skene's Celtic Scotland, 1876-1880 ; Professor Hume Brown's The
History of Scotland (Cambridge Historical Series) ; Robertson's Scot-
land under her Early Kings.



x THE NEW HUDSON SHAKESPEARE

him by St. Berchan. He appears first in trustworthy annals *
as the hereditary ' mormaor,' or high steward, of Moray,
accompanying his grandfather, Malcolm II, on a mission of
homage to Cnut, king of England, in 1031. His seventeen
years' reign (1040-1057) was marked by unprecedented
order and prosperity ; and, as Buchanan states in his Rerum
Scoticarum Historia, first printed in 1582, he applied his
mind to make good and useful laws, a thing almost wholly
neglected by former kings. From this eleventh century
king of Scotland the influence of mediaeval story-telling and
the wilful falsification of historical material for political pur-
poses have created the Macbeth of myth and legend. " With
the Scottish historians who followed the War of Independ-
ence it was a prime concern to produce an unbroken line
of Scottish kings stretching to the fathers of the human
race. As an interloper in this series Macbeth was a monster
whose origin and whose actions must alike have been con-
trary to nature." Hume Brown.

THE MACBETH OF LEGEND

i . John ofFordurfs Chronica. The earliest extant version
of the Macbeth legend is in the Chronica Gentis Scotorum
(sometimes called the Scotichronicon? of which it forms the
first part), written in Latin by John of Fordun (often called
John Fordun), a secular priest and canon of the cathedral
church of Aberdeen, who died about the year 1385. This

1 Tn the earliest records the name is spelled ' Mealbeafte,' ' Mac-
beofte,' ' Machetad,' ' Machbet.' In Dalrymple's version, " in Scot-
tish," of Leslie's Historic of Scotland, printed in 1 578, the name is given
as ' Machabie.' In Boece the Latin form of the name is ' Maccabaeus.'

2 Edited (with a translation) by Skene, Edinburgh, 1871-1872.



INTRODUCTION Xl

chantry priest did for Scottish history and story what Geoffrey
of Monmouth more than two hundred years earlier had done
for the mythical history of Britain and the Arthurian story in
his Historia Regutn Britannia. Both gathered the floating
legends and stories, facts and fables, and compacted them
into " something like a chronological system," thus starting
them on their literary career.

2. Andrew of Wyntoun' s Orygynale Cronykil. About the
year 1424 Andrew (Androwe, Andro) of Wyntoun (often
called Andrew Wyntoun), a canon of St. Andrews who be-
came prior of St. Serf's Inch in Lochleven, resolved to draw
up a Cronykil out "off Latine in tyll Ynglys sawe," 1 as he
puts it. He prefixed the adjective ' Orygynale ' because the
Cronykil went back to the beginnings of men and angels.
In the octosyllabic couplets of the Orygynale Cronykil is
the earliest form of the prophecy of the Weird Sisters. This
is the famous passage :

A nycht he thowcht in hys dremying,

That syttand he wes besyd the kyng

At a sete in hwntyng, swa

In till a leysh had grewhundys twa :

He thowcht quhile he wes swa syttand

He sawe thre wemen by gangand ;

And thai wemen than thowcht he

Thre werd Systrys mast lyk to be.

The fyrst he hard say gangand by,

' Lo, yhondyr the Thayne off Crumbawchty I '

The tothir woman sayd agane,

' Of Morave yhondre I se the Thayne ! '

The thryd than sayd, ' I se the Kyng ! '

1 into English speech. Untilwell into the sixteenth century the Low-
land Scots, though they called themselves Scottis ' and their country
'Scotland,' called their language ' Ynglys,' ' Inglisch,' or Inglis.'



xii THE NEW HUDSON SHAKESPEARE

Here, it is to be noted, the temptation of Macbeth by the
Weird Sisters takes place in a dream. This version of the
story is followed by the skeptical and rationalistic Buchanan.

3. Boece's Historic. In 15261527 was printed the Sco-
torum Histories, of Hector Boece (Boetius, Boyis, Boyce).
the first principal of King's College, Aberdeen. This Latin
redaction added new epic and dramatic elements to the
Macbeth legend. The meeting of Macbeth and three women
supposed to be the Weird Sisters is now described as an actual
occurrence on the road to Forres, and the story begins to
take the definite shape familiar to readers of Holinshed and
Shakespeare.

4. Bellenderfs Croniklis. Under the title Croniklis of
Scotland a very free translation of Boece's work into vigor-
ous Scottish prose was made aboi't the year 1533 by John
Bellenden (Ballantyne), archdeacon of Moray and canon of
Ross. In Bellenden's version in the vernacular, first printed
in I536, 1 the description of the temptation scene is pithy
and dramatic :

Nocht lang eftir, hapnit ane uncouth and wounderfull thing, be
quhilk followit sone ane gret alteration in the realme. Be aventura,
Makbeth and Banquho wer passing to Fores, quhair King Duncane
hapnit to be for the time, and met be the gait thre wemen, clothit
in elrage and uncouth weid. They were jugit be the pepill to be
weird sisteris. The first of thaim said to Makbeth: 'Hale, Thane
of Glammis ! ' The secound said : ' Hale, Thane of Cawder ! ' and
the thrid said : ' Hale, King of Scotland ! '

Bellenden rehearses Lady Macbeth's complicity in the plot
to murder Duncan with much greater detail than is found
in either earlier or later versions of the legend.

1 Edited by Maitland, Edinburgh, 1821. Reprin-ted in Collier's
Shakespeare ' s Library.



INTRODUCTION xiii

5. Stewart* s Cronikle. In 1535 appeared a Scottish met-
rical version of Bellenden's Cronik/is, purporting to be by
William Stewart 1 and made at the command of Margaret
Tudor, Queen of Scotland, for her son James V. Though
this Cronikle was not printed till after Shakespeare's day, it is
perfectly possible that he may have had access to it through
the friendly relations between James VI and the " King's
Company " of players, to which Shakespeare belonged. Signi-
ficant verbal resemblances make this not only possible but
not at all improbable.

6. Holinshed's Chronicles. As the numerous extracts in
the notes to the text in this edition of Macbeth will show,
Shakespeare derived the great body of his story material from
the Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland, of Raphael
Holinshed(Holynshed,Hollingshead,Hollinshead), first pub-
lished in two folio volumes in 15 77, and again in 1586-1587,
"newlie augmented and continued." 2 In this second edi-
tion are many significant changes in the text, and it is
interesting to note that on the title-page The description and
historic of Ireland precedes Tlie description and historie of
Scotland. The first edition has a great many quaint wood-
cuts inserted in the text, 8 and two of these are here repro-
duced in facsimile, with some lines of the text. Figure i
represents the meeting of Macbeth and the " .iij women in
straunge & ferly apparell, resembling creatures of an elder

1 Edited by Turnbull (Rolls Series), 3 vols., 1858.

2 In \V. G. Boswell-Stone's Shaksperis Holinshed are given all
the portions of the Chronicles which are of special interest to the
Shakespeare student.

8 These woodcuts were omitted in the second edition, and many
passages of the original text were cancelled by order of the Privy
Council " as disagreeable to Queen Elizabeth."



.j ait trt totbt fapot^ncbt, men to te twra fapoe : an *?apU flpiktatfr^tf feoafM
t gtanmtoffij tit emvt of tbt ffianw, w ;o lljanbeMtigdf&cotlano.




Itai Banqutjo, total niantt of toomrn 50 w tn8 placemen contrarilptljoa in WDt (Hall
(tlil)attpou,tl)atttEnulb Iitlt feuontablt not rtygntat dI,tatofflwftoftffiaBhbMM



FIG. i



2?alcoliiu pjmrt of CnmbnUnoe, as u turn lent, ht ntE^uco tbe tnuetlurt of tlje Kin^Dem
tljctcbp to appoint tjlmljiufiucdlaj in ttielrtng* acwoingtotdeaccuflomtDtnanct.




^bcboDie of SDnneanc toau Mi conntpco tbe fcnnw of King jeuncanr, Ewfrare of tw
-\onlitbtt butlffltn anojptoift, UutsaDljtclJEtDEpmigtjttticIlknrtD^seaaW*

FIG. 2



INTRODUCTION XV

worlde "; Figure 2 represents Macbeth receiving the " inues-
ture of the kingdome according to the accustomed maner."

In the special title prefixed to The Description of Scot-
land v& the edition of 1586-1587, given in facsimile on the
following page (Figure 3), Holinshed's indebtedness to Boece
and to Bellenden is clearly set forth. This is the edition
undoubtedly used by Shakespeare, 1 and it is not improbable
that the mention of these authorities would stimulate him to
read them at first hand.

While the dramatist follows closely Holinshed's account
of the reigns of Duncan and Macbeth, he transfers to the
murder of Duncan such details as the drugging of the grooms,
the portents, the tempest, etc., from the narrative of the
murder of Duffe, Lady Macbeth's great-grandfather. Addi-
tional details taken from other parts of the Chronicles and
woven into the plot of the play are the story of young
Siward's death and the description of the English king's
touching to cure ' the evil.' Furness, too, has pointed out
that the hint for the ' voice ' which cried " Sleep no more ! "
(II, ii, 35) probably came from the voice that Kenneth, who
had poisoned his nephew Malcolm, heard :

And (as the fame goeth) it chanced that a voice was heard as he
was in bed in the night time to take his rest, vttering vnto him these
or the like woords in effect : " Thinke not Kenneth that the wicked
slaughter of Malcolme Duffe by thee contriued, is kept secret from
the knowledge of the eternall God." . . . The king with this voice
being stricken into great dread and terror, passed that night without
anie sleepe comming in his eies.

1 For example, ' ferly,' in the description of the dress of the Weird
Sisters in the first edition, is changed to ' wild ' in the second, as in
Macbeth I, iii, 40. Boswell-Stone gives other proofs of this kind.



DESCRIPTION



OF SCOTLAND,



Written ac die firft b Hc^or Boe-



flated into the Scocifh fpeech by

Inhn Bflleiuun Ar elide tun tf

Murrey , and DOW final.



Wherevpon is inferred the
biftorie of Scotland , contdmng
the beginning, incrcafe.procecding,
continuance ,*8s ,nd gaucrncmcnt of
the Scotifh nation, from the original!
ttiereofvntithcjetrc i sjt,gM
ted and written in Englim by ft-



_ eontt
nucd from I 5 7 i , to
tjSj.byo.
then.




INTRODUCTION xvii

(In this connection see Buchanan's account of the con-
science-stricken king quoted below.)

Notable changes in Shakespeare's use of the material
furnished by Holinshed are the idealization of the character
of Banquo and the simplification and compression of the
action in the interests of dramatic economy. Above all,
and most significant of all, the drama throbs with a passion
and a moral energy of which Holinshed's Chronicles, with
all their infusion of enchantment and the supernatural, have
not the slightest trace.

7. Buchanan's Historia. In 1582 was printed in Edin-
burgh the Rerum Scoticarum Historia of George Buchanan,
the famous tutor of James I and one of Scotland's most illus-
trious scholars. Of this work there was no version in Eng-
lish until after Shakespeare's death, but there was naturally
much discussion of it in London after James ascended the
English throne, and Shakespeare must have been acquainted
with the book to a greater or less extent. At the close of
the Macbeth narrative, Buchanan, whose attitude towards
the supernatural is, as already indicated, uncompromisingly
rationalistic, has this very significant sentence : " Certain of
our writers here relate many things which I omit, as they
seem fitter for stage representations or Milesian stories than
for sober history (theatris aut Milesiis fabulis sunt aptiora
quant historiae}." M. H. Liddell points out that the descrip-
tion of Kenneth's awakened conscience in Buchanan's His-
toria gives us " the picture of Macbeth's torture almost
exactly as Shakespeare conceived it " :

His Mind being disquieted with the Guilt of his Offence, suffered
him to enjoy no sincere or solid Mirth ; but in the Day he was vexed
with the corroding Thoughts of that foul Wickedness, which would



xviii THE NEW HUDSON SHAKESPEARE

always force themselves into his Mind, and in the Night terrible
Apparitions disturbed his Rest. At last, a Voice was heard from
Heaven, either a true one, as some think ; or else, such an one, as
his disquieted Mind suggested (as it commonly happens to guilty
Consciences), speaking to him in his Bed. 1

8. Earlier Plays. There is clear evidence that within a
few years of the production of Gorboduc, the first English
tragedy, Scottish legendary history was attracting the atten-
tion of dramatists as a quarry from which to take effective
material. Under the influence of the passion for chronicle
histories, and plays founded on romantic legend, a Tragedie
of the King of Scottes came into existence as early as 1568;
about 1590 Robert Greene produced The Scottish Historic
of James IV, slaine at Flodden, intermixed with a pleas-
ant Comedie, presented by Oboram King of Fayeries 2 ; and
Henslowe in his Diary, under April 27, 1602, refers to a
play called Malcolme, King of Scottes. But dealing with the
Macbeth legend are two works of special interest in this con-
nection : (i) Macdobeth, probably dramatic and certainly
anterior to Shakespeare's play, and (2) a Latin Dramatic
Dialogue given before King James at Oxford, probably
anterior.

(i) Macdobeth. In The Stationers' 1 Registers under the
date August 27, 1596, is a reference to a "Ballad of

1 This translation is from the English version of Buchanan's His-
tory of Scotland, published in Edinburgh, 1751. In The Anatomy of
Melancholy, Burton quotes this passage from Buchanan.

2 The fact that this play (in the writing of which, according to
Fleay, Lodge collaborated with Greene) seems really founded on
the Italian romance of Astatio and Arrenopia in Giraldi Cinthio's
Gli Hecatommithi, 1565, does not affect the argument regarding
the growing popularity of Scottish themes for dramatic treatment.



INTRODUCTION xix

Macdobeth," and the same entry refers to " the ballad en-
tituled The taming of a shrew." Collier held that if The
Taming of the Shrew, which is known to be a play, was
recorded as a ballad, Macdobeth was probably of the same
character, and he sought to identify it with the " miserable
stolne story " referred to by Will Kemp, a famous actor of
clowns' parts, in his Kempes nine daies wonder, printed in
1600. In searching for a ballad-maker who had written an
unauthorized account of some of his morrice-dancing adven-
tures, Kemp says :

I met a proper vpright youth, onely for a little stooping in the
shoulders : all hart to the heele, a penny Poet whose first making
was the miserable stolne story of Macdoel, or Macdobeth, or Mac-
somewhat : for I am sure a Mac it was, though I never had the
maw to see it.


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