William Tuckwell.

Reminiscences of Oxford online

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Our barrels to assail,
Come, Hsten, while in pleasing gibe
The rare ingredients I describe

Which float in Brasenose Ale.

Guiltless ahke of malt and hop,
Our buttery is a druggist's shop

Where quassia's draughts prevail;
Alum the muddy liquor clears.
And mimic wormwood's bitter tears

Compose our Brasenose Ale.

All ye who physic have professed,
Sir Kit^ and Poticary West,-

Your practice gone bewail !
The burning mouth, the temple's throb,
Sick stomach, and convulsive sob.

Are cured by Brasenose Ale.

1 Sir Kit— Sir Christopher Pegge, p. 60.
^ Poticary West, p 62.
K



258 EEMimSGENGES OF OXFORD.

As poisons other poisons kill,

So, should we with convivial skill

Old Syms's ^ wine assail.
Or Latimer's immortal tun,
" Herbert " yclept or " Abingdon,"

We're cured by Brasenose Ale.

The fair Cheltenia's opening salt
Must yield to our factitious malt ;

What double sconce - can fail 1
But, if you want some tonic stuff,
You readily will find quant : suff :

A gill of Brasenose Ale.

Mysterious as the Sibyl's leaves
The battels are which each receives ;

But, freshmen, cease to rail !
You're fed and physicked ; in your bills
Each week is vinegar of squills.

Bark, salts, and Brasenose Ale.

Oh that our Bursar would consent
To give the bottled porter vent.

Porter beloved by Dale ; ^
Smuggled no more by Joe3"'s ^ stealth,
It would improve the College health.

Well scoured by Brasenose Ale.

My muse, a half reluctant prude,

In dudgeon vile George Smith ^ pursued.

Afraid his verse should fail ;
When next the annual Ode he woos.
May he invoke a different Meux,

T' improve our Brasenose Ale.

' Syms and Latimer, wine merchants, p. 250.

^ A double sconce was a fine for improprieties in Hall ; the culprit
was compelled to drink a gallon of ale.

' Rev. Joseph Dale and .Joseph Hodgkinson, Fellows of the College,
addicted to Double X.

* Allusion lost.



APPENDICES. 259

B.

ODE,

Recited on the Anniversary Dinner of the Chess
Club, by the Laureate, Thomas Dunbar.

{See p. 13.)

From the bright burning lands and rich forests of Ind,

See the form of Caissa arise ;
In the caverns of Brahma no longer confined,

To the shores of fair Europe she flics.

A figure so fair through the region of light

All natives with wonder survey,
As her varying mantle now darkens with night,

Now beams with the silver of day.

Let Whist, like the bat, from such splendour retire,
A splendour too strong for his eyes ;

The Trump and Odd Trick let dull Av'rice admire,
Entrapped by so paltry a prize.

Can Finesse and the Ten-i\.ce e'er hope to prevail

When Reason opposes her weight,
When inviolate Majesty hangs in the scale,

And Castles yet tremble with fate 1

When the bosom of Beauty the throbbing heart meets.

And Caissa 's the gay Valentine,
What Chessman, who'd tasted such amorous sweets.

His Mate but with life would resign 1

But 'tis o'er — Terebinth ^ the decision approves.

And Whist has contended in vain ;
To the Mansion of Hades the Genius removes,

Where he gnaws his own counters in pain.

* " Terebinth " needs a scholiast ; can " Termagant " be meant ?



260 EEMINISCENGES OF OXFORD.

On Philosophy's brow a new lustre unfolds,

.; Mild Reason exults in the birth ;
His creation benign Father Tuckwell beholds,
And Steph ^ gives the chaplet to Mirth.



c.

HENRY MATTHEWS.

{Note to p. 13.)

Henry Matthews well deserves a notice. His father.
Colonel Matthews, was the owner of a beautiful seat called
Belmont, on the Wye, in Herefordshire, Colonel of MiUtia
and long M.P. for the county ; a sapling planted by him
in 1788 is still called Colonel Matthews' oak. In his old
age Henry was wont to attend on him to bed each night,
where as his head settled into the pillow he repeated always
in his Herefordshire dialect the same complacent formula,
" I tell yer — 'Enery — I thinks — the most comfortablest place
in the world is bed — fur — there ye forgets all ye're cares."
One of the sons, Charles Skynner Matthews, was the
intimate Cambridge friend of Byron (Life by Moore, vol. i.,
p. 125), and was drowned in 1812. Another, Arthur, I
knew well as a Canon of Hereford. Henry was the third.
At Eton he was a reckless madcap, driving tandem
through the town, and once lighting a bonfire on the floor of
Long Chamber. He became a Fellow of King's ; his health
broke down, he travelled, publishing in 1820 his "Diary of
an Invalid," which reached a fifth edition. In 1821 he
was appointed Advocate Fiscal of Ceylon, married Emma
Blount, of Orleton Manor, Herefordshire, and sailed for India ;
passing through Oxford on his way to Southampton, and
leaving for my father, who was away, a touching letter of
farewell, which I possess. He became Judge in 1827, and died
on May 20th, 1828. His son is the present Lord Llandaff.

^ Steph was Stephens, Fellow and Vice-Principal of Brasenose,
afterwards Rector of Belgrave, near Leicester



APPENDICES. 261

D.

THE LETTER H.

{See p. 66.)

I insert the original for the sake of comparison. Its author-
ship was doubted at the time, and it was assigned to Lord
Byron. Lady Stanley, in her " Early Married Life," gives
Miss Fanshawe's appropriation of it :— " I do give it under
my hand and seal this 12th day of February, 1819, that to the
best of my belief the Enigma of the Letter H was composed,
not by the Right Honourable George Lord Byron, but by
me, Catherine Maria Fanshawe."

'Twas in heaven pronounced — it was muttered in hell.

And Echo caught faintly the sound as it fell.

On the confines of earth 'twas permitted to rest.

And the depths of the ocean its presence confessed.

'Twill be found in the sphere when 'tis riven asunder,

Be seen in the lightning, and heard in the thunder ;

'Twas allotted to man with his earliest breath,

Attends at his birth and awaits him in death.

Presides o'er his happiness, honour, and health.

Is the prop of his house, and the end of his wealth.

In the heaps of the miser 'tis hoarded with care.

But is sure to be lost on his prodigal heir.

It begins every hope, every wish it must bound.

With the husbandman toils, and with monarchs is

crowned.
Without it the soldier, the seaman, may roam.
But woe to the wretch who expels it from home.
In the whispers of conscience its voice will be found.
Nor e'en in the whirlwind of passion is drowned :
It will soften the heart, and, though deaf be the ear,
It will make it acutely and instantly hear.
Yet in shade let it rest like a delicate flower :
Ah ! breathe on it softly — it dies in an hour !



262 BEMmiSGENCES OF OXFORD.

E.

CHARLES WORDSWORTH.

{See p. 86.)

Epitaph on ms Wife, in Winchester Chapel.

I, nimium dilecta, vocat Deus, I, bona nostrse
Pars animse ; moerens altera, disce sequi.

Translated by Lord Derby.

Too dearly loved, thy God hath called thee; go,
Go, thou best portion of this widowed heart

And thou, poor remnant lingering here in woe,
So learn to follow, as no more to part.



CHARLES WORDSWORTH.

Inscription in the Grimsel Hotel Book.

'Xropeiv, KaOevheiv, eaOieLv, iriveiv, ttoXlv
^oopelv, " BafSala^ w? kuXov" KeKpayevai,
KOVTOV rpcTrrj-^vv yepcnv olaKoar po^elv,
TuXKian /Safety, touvo/jL iv ^lSXco ypdcpeiv,
6/ji/3po(f)opov 0)9 TO, TrXetara hva(^riixeiv Ala,
TOioaS' 6 (dlor6<i eart tmv ohonropoiv.

Translated : —

To walk, to sleep, to eat, to drink,
To cry, " How lovely, don't you tliink ? "

To wield a six foot alpenstock.
Talk French, write name in Grimsel book.

To curse the rain's incessant pour ;
The pleasures these of foreign tour.



APPENDICES. 2(53

F.
DRAMATIS PERSONiE OF THE "BOTHIE."

{See p. 98.)

Hobbes was certainly Ward Hunt, afterwards First Lord of

the Admiralty.
Lindsay, the " Piper," was F. Johnson of Christchurch, with

some touches of W. H. Davies.
Airlie was probably Deacon of Oriel, who joined Clough's

reading party in the year following.
Arthur Audley was Herbert Fisher of Christchurch, with, say

the Walronds, a touch of Theodore Walrond.
Philip Hewson was Clough himself, with some traits from

Winder of Oriel.
Adam was probably not a portrait, but not unlike Clough.
Hope cannot, I fear, be now identified.



a

SEPTEM CONTRA CAMUM.

{See p. 114.)
i. Vacant.

ii. Robert Menzies, University,
iii. Edward Royds, Brasenose.
iv. William B. Brewster, St. John's.
V. George D. Bourne, Oriel,
vi. John C. Cox, Trinity,
vii. Richard Lowndes, Christchurch.
viii. George E. Hughes, Oriel.
Coxswain. Arthur T. W. Shadwell, Balliol.



264 REMINISCENCES OF OXFORD.

H.

FRAGMENTA E CODICE BAROCCIANO.i

(See p. 130.)

" Insanientem navita Bosphorum."

Tentabo. Horat. Od. III., iv. 30.

EXCUDEBAT W. BAXTER, OXONII.

The origin of this clever skit is given on p. 130. Its
charm lies in the dexterous rendering into Homeric Greek
of Oxford names and witticisms.

MONITUM.

^Tf i?omeru Fragmcnta duo, quae in nobilissimo Codice apud Biblio-
fv ^ founrin thecam Bodleianam evolvendo nuper detexi, religionis duxi non
the Bodleian, ppimo quoquc'tcmpore publici juris facere. Auctoris nomen de-
sideratur ; colorem tamen vere Homericum habent. Adjeci
ea quse inter legendum mihi occurrebant, turn ex aliis auctoribus,
tum e conjectura petita : sed perfunctorie et currente calamo
omnia, ut reliquias vere aureas quam citissime cum eruditis
communicarem.

Dabam Oxonii, Prid. Cal. Grsec. cio . lO . ccc . xxxrv.
Imprimatur, ••WelUngton, Cancellarius.

I.— E PROCEMIO, UT VIDETUR.

Mrjviv deiSe 6ea ^Oiai^^porov, i] irpola-^ev
avBpa^ apt(jTrja<; irepl Boariropov t(^i fxd'^eadaL'
IId(7a<; Be Wvxa<;, Kat ^Idovwi eXKe')(iTO)va<i,
Clan*"^° ^ Meprcbva^ 6^ eTapov^, KadeBprju S" o(rot dfuptve/jLOvraL,

TrjkeTrvXa) r oiKova ivl Fvarepo), evOa KekevOoi 5

3. 'lao^oy, St. Jolin's. eAKex^roii/ar, Horn. II. xiii. 685.
5. Tv(Trfpcf>, Worcester.

1 Where these jeux d^esprit are in a dead language I have
appended a translation or short paraphrase.



APPENDICES.



265



Sva/3aT0t avdpcoTTOicrtv vir ajvoii]'? dXey^ivrj';,
SKifj,fj,€pcov<i r\ ael yivo'i dart^k'i 'AttoWwvi,
rov<i Be Mere^erepovi eptSt ^vverjice fjid')(ea9ai.

* * * *



IL— CATALOGI FRAGMENTUM.

^Ev SaTriSoo S" kKarepOev Idovas; €\Ke-^iTO)va<;

Xelfiap eKoaixTjcre (Tri')(e(nv, Kal Xeipbaro<^ aA,\o? 10

^pL6vTepo<i, jjLec^cov, crTi^ap(OTepo<i iv TroXe/jboial,

<PivT\€o<;' 0*9 CKarov 7ro\e/j,ov /XT^crTwpe? eirovTO,

rtfirjv dpvvfjbevoi ^ ApOovpiov iTTTroSafioto'

M.eproivo<i S' erdpov<i, fcparepow crrt^j^a? dcnncrTdcov,
k^rjKOVTa j36riv d<ya6o<i Kocr/nTjcrev "JEXei09* 15

(TTrjae S'dycov o6i IlTjXeLSea) rd^avTo (f)a\ar/'y6<i.

BaWioXel'i S' rj/yev 6e6(f)iv M.rj(jTO)p drakavTO^i,
MT^fTTCop, 09 fjiiKpo'i fiev erjv Se//-a.9, dWd fxa')(rjTr]<i'
ovvofjia S' ea-^ev dfjuerpov, dOeacparov, ovS" ovofiacrTov
Tft) S' dp eirovO' eKarov kcll irevre fieXaLvo'^lTcove'i. 20

*AX)C o'loiCTiv dvacra dp-yrjjeTt,'; icrrl ^iXi'ir'm]
roialhe ^6^o<i erjv Ke(^d\rj ' eKarov S' vtto tovtco
ripooe^ KoafXTjOev tS' oyScoKovra Bopeloi.

8. Men^erepovs, Exeter.
10. X6?^ap, Wjaiter, President of St. John's.
12. ^ivrXeov, Wintle, Senior Fellow of St. John's.

15. "EA.eios, marshy, Marsham, Warden of Merton.

16. nr]\(iSew, supporters of Peel.

17. M^o-Tcop, the Master.

18. oiji/ofj.a K . T . A., the uncouth name Jenkjms.

21. *iXi'7r7r77, Queen Philippa, Foundress of Queen's.

22. *(5^oj, Fox, Provost of Queen's.

23. Bopuoi, the Scholars and Fellows of Queen's, mostly from
northern counties.



Wynter (p. 157)
and Wintle, a
Don of the
whist, port
wine,andTory
school.lead St.
John's.



The " man of
the marshes,"
Dr. Marsham,
leads Merton.



The Master
leads Balliol,
small but va-
liant. Dr. Fox
leads Queen's.



266 BEMIKISGENGES OF OXFORD.

Dr. Bridges leads ^AW^ av vvv, vaLov(TLV oaoi Tpia KuTTTTa KuKiara,

Corpus. ^ . , , ^jv . , ,. o-

77pa)? yjyefMovev ecoco^ iroXe/xoio ye(pvpa'i, Lo

6'yZooKOVT upi6fjiu> KCLt aiTavTa'i (l)ato-)(^iro)va<?,

'AXX" oaoc ei? KaQehp-qv irepl Boairopov ip/epeOovro
{/jiaKprjv api^ieirovTes arapTTirov, ov ra peeOpa
^ wieidhf'^'two XapfiXov rj8 'lat^ crvfi/BdWerov olSpifiov vhwp)

miehtv lexica, ,/ c> '-v w ■> > \ ^ ' ^, 5 •> r < o/v

leads Christ- r^ bi'irv\(OT0<; ap ean, oir/KoaLOL av eKuarrjv dU

church. ^ , / /I

dvepa e^oi-^vevaL \iXaiojxevoL pLw^eaaauar,
Tataocfiopo^ KocrfXTjae, Bvco Zo\v')(pcrKLa ttoWcov
Xe^LKa, 8vcr,SdaTa-)^9\ oh Su/xvriaL crr[-)(a^ ai'Bpwv
ripcocov, KpLTLKOJV tiTTep ov hvo y civhpe IBeaOac
rXalev drapfxvKTOLcri, TrpocrcoTraaL, aypLara Xvypa 35

otoi vvv ^poTol eia, 6 Si fxiv pea, irdXXe koI oio'i.
Dr. Maebridc Oi S' AiTOjjba'yhaXia'i kXclvt} SdivvvTai, ev AvXrj,

leads Magda-
len Hall. ^5^^ jxeya arjfMaLVoyv apd^rjaev 6 UapOevoirdlo'^'

Tftj S' dpa TrevryjKovd' emovro pieXatvo-)(^LT(ov€^.

'^EOvea 8' dvOpcoTTcov yaXKevrepa, yoKKO'Kpocrai'ira, 40

Dr. Gilbert leads g^Q^fj^^^ YCk^epTO'^ a<yev' TToXXol 8' iiTTO TOVTW

67rX'na<i ^aauXrje'^ eicoa-jJLeov evOa kcii ev6a'

MvKT7]p ot9 (f)6peraL XuXkou^ Seu'oio jreXwpov,

{arjixa ^p6T0i<i epiBo<i, Fopyiiov icparo^ diroppco^)

opOo'i eV e7;^et779, Trepl cravpcorijpa irvXaaOeh' 45

TMvBe SirjKoaLOL TroXepbovBe kcll ecKoac jBaivov.



24. Tpia KoTFTra, C C. C, Corpus, KaKiara, referring to a proverb — the
three bad C's — Cappadocians, Cilicians, Cretiins.

25. y€(pi'ipas, Brydges, President of Corpus.

33. XeSi/ca, Suidas and Etymologicon Magnum.

3iJ. aTapfivKroiai, unwinking

38. nap6fvoTra7os, Macljride. upufirimv — lie was Professor of Arabic.

41. Ti\^sprus, Gilbert, Head of Brasenose.

43. Mu/cTTjp Xa\KoCj iTfKdipov, the brazen nose over the gate.



APPENDICES. 267

HveuBii S' etTro/jbepot XeuKau^evi, ZovkLy^oheipM, ^'^au'souIs^*^^



eTTT Xaav rjpuxov Se/caSe?, hia (^uXottiv alvrjv,



UaaoiV i/c Wu)(^cov It^OifJioraTOi /cat apiaroL,

arjpL/ca cr€iovTe<; KapaKoXXta, Terpa(f}aXrjpoi. 50

' TTt C; \ T/- 'v ' zr ' T AT ' Dr. Cramer leads

JliK oe lS.a'7r7]\eLov Js.pa/x7]pio<i (opro rseoto, NewinnHaii.

Tov KUi diro 'yXcoacTTj'i /ie'Xtro? yXvKiOLtv peev av8r]
rfj irepvai hy'^pioio TravT^yvpa aKpnop^vOrp.
/jbovi/o^ erjv S' erdpoiv, iravpo^; re ol eaireTO Xao9.

Tov^ Se Mere^erepovt; 6 MaptXatSv<; ay 'leoz/eu*? 55 Dr. Coiiier Jones

^ ' ' ' leads Exeter,

fXecSiOCOV ^XoCTVpOLcn TrpOcrMTracrLV ITnrOKOjJiGlO flve*^" Pokers.'^

KaKK6(f)aX}]<i' 0? X^''^ '-'■^'■^ BoaTTopov dvOvirarevoov

cTKriTTTp ex^v, 'HcpaLarov rexydafiara, OeaKeXa ep<ya,

(bv rpia p.€v ^P'^^^i 'Tp^-Ci S' dpyuporjXa rervKTO,

hoiKe he BocriTopiot^ ^acnXevcnv o KvXXottoBlcov 60

TToXXolcn vrjeaat Kai cicrreL Travrl dvciaaetv.

TOv<i fiev dyev iroXe/xovS'' dXXov^ S' otKoc KariXeiTre

Tei^ea (f>povpovPTa<; xdi i7rd\^La<i ol/coSo/xovpra^;'

rjfitav yap rereXeaTo, to S' r]fiL(TV yvfivov iXeccfiOr]. 64

47. SueuSsi, Sneyd, Warden of All Souls, noted for liis long neck and
corresponding white tie.

51. Kpa^urjpioy, Cramer, Principal of New Inn Hall.

55. MapiXatd-ns 'Juvevs Collier Jones, Rector of Exeter.

58. ffK^iTTTpa, the bedel's staves ; he was Vice-Chancellor.

60. KuWorroSloov, lame-foot, Vulcan.

64. Buildings must have been going on at Exeter, probably the
Turl front.

The following lines about Shuttleworth were apparently
never printed, but handed round in writing with copies of the
printed piece.

^Avhpoiv S' ovK rjyetro TrepiKXvro^ ^A^coKepKc^' Dr. Shuttie-

crTTj 8' airavevd^ krdpwv, 7re^o(Bripis.vo^ e'lveKa p.iTpi)'^. with his c-e

stands apart.



268 REMINISCENCES OF OXFORD.

I.

OXFORD.^

{Seep. 150.)

O'er Oxford's halls the dewy hand of night

Sows the still heavens with gems of lustrous light,

Earth sinks to rest, and earthly passions cease, -

And all is love, and poesy, and peace.

How soft o'er Wykeham's aisle and Waynflete's tower

Falls the mild magic of the midnight hour ;

How calm the classic city takes her rest,

Like a hushed infant on its mother's breast !

How pure, how sweet, the moonbeam's silver smile

Serenely sleeps on fair St. Mary's aisle,

And lends each sculptured saint a chastened glow.

Like the calm glory of their lives below.

Now, stilled the various labours of the day.

Student and Don the drowsy charm obey,

E'en Pusey owns the soft approach of sleep.

Long as his sermons, as his learning deep :

Peaceful he rests from Hebraistic lore.

And finds that calm he gave so oft before.

Lo ! where on peaceful Pembroke beams the moon,

Delusive visions lull the brains of Jeune ;

Slowly he finds in sleep's serene surprise

The mitred honours which the world denies ;

Dreams of a see from earthly care withdrawn.

And one long sabbath of eternal lawn.

[Lacuna valde deflenda, sed ne in antiquissimo quidem codice
suppleta.]

See, fresh from Eton sent, the highborn dunce,
So late a boy, now grown a man at once :

^ Composed by W. W. Merry, Alfred Blomficld, Cliarlcs Bowen, and
J. W. Shepard, all of Balliol.

Given to Mr. Madan in 1885 by J. R. King of, Oriel, who was
present at the composition, and himself contributed a few words. To
Mr. Madan's kindness I owe this copy, and other valuable help.



APPENDICES. 269

Proud, he asserts liis new-found liberty,

And slopes in triumph down the astonished High.

Mark the stiff wall of collar at his neck,

More fit to choke the wearer than to deck ;

And the long coat which, dangling at his heels,^

His " bags " of varied colour scarce reveals.

So, when the infant hails the birthday grant

Of gracious grandmother or awful aunt.

Forth from the ark of childhood, one by one,

The peagreen patriarch leads each stalwart son;

O'er Noah's knees descends the garment's hem.

And clothes in solid folds the shins of Shem,

His ligneous legs in modesty conceals,

And two stout stumps alone to view reveals.

Pleased with the sight, the infant screams no more.

And groups his great forefathers on the floor ;

Sucks piety and paint from broad-brimmed Ham,

But thinks that even Japhet yields to jam.



J.

ON CHANTREY'S CHILDREN IN LICHFIELD
CATHEDRAL.

{See p. 159.)

Osborne Gordon.

'A Molpa a Kpvepa to) KcCkco ttulS' ^A(f)poSlTr]<;

ripiraae' tmv KoXoiv t/? KOpo^; iaO' "AiBa ;
'"AWa (TV 7' ^A'yyeXla, top arjSea jjuvdov ej(ovcra,

BdaKe, fxekavrei'^ri irpo'i hofjuov eXOe 6eov.
Ai^ov 8', w Salfzov, rav KoXav twXecra? dypav,

ov <ydp TCL'i T^u^a?, ovhe ra (joifiar e%et9.
' Ai fiev <ydp -xlrv^dc fierefiijaav e? ovpavov evpvv,

(TcofJiaTa B' kv <yala VTjypeTOV vttvov exet.

1 The long ulster-like coats which came in just then (in 1856) are
alluded to



270 BEMINISGEN0E8 OF OXFORD.

May be thus translated, faithfully, not adequately :

Love's fairest twins cold Fate has rapt from earth :

Death craves each loveliest birth.
Go, thou, whose lore insculps the unpleasing word.

Go to the dark-realmed lord.
Forbid him triumph; — his the power to slay,

Not his to hold the prey.
Their forms unwaking sleep beneath the sod.

Their souls rest aye with God.

I transcribe from a copy given to me at the time of its
composition. In the " Anthologia Oxonensis " is an altered
reading of line 4, Bau/c', Wi, TrayKoiTav tig 'Ailao hofxoy, pro-
bably the latest correction of the author. Both epithets are
finely classical — fieXavreixi) Pindaric, TrayKoiray Sophoclean.
I append a translation, the best I can render : it is quite
inadequate as transmitting the old-world feeling of the
original, but it is nearly literal. 'AyyeXia, line 3, I have
taken to mean the sad message of death inscribed in the
sculptured forms. The Dean of Durham thinks that the
somewhat tame last line (last but one in the translation)
shows inability on Gordon's part to "get in" the thought
he had — " the souls rest in heaven, the bodies are immor-
talised in stone."

K.

CARMEN.^

In Theatre Sheldoniano.

NoN Recitatum

VII. Die Junii, MDCCCLIII.

{See p. 159, in which the poem is paraphrased.)

Quern Virum aut Heroa lyra vel acri
Tibia sumis celebrare, Clio ?
Scilicet quem te voluere Patres
Hebdomadales.

' By Osborne Gordon ; on tlic Installation of Lord Derb}' as
Chancellor.



APPENDICES. 271

Te decet jussum properare carmen,
Ficta nam Phoebus patitur, tuisque
Laudis indignse fidibus canoris
Dedecus aufert.

Jamque dicatur gravis et decorus,
Et sibi constans memoretur idem,
Ille, qui multis superare possit
Protea formis.

Quin et insignem paribus catervam
Laudibus toUas, quibus, heu fatendum,
Ista de nobis hodie paratur
Pompa triumphi.

Plura si tangas, tacuisse velles ;
Vix enim linguae tulit eloquentis
Prsemium, verbis relevare doctus
Prsemia magnis.

Nee magis palmam meruit decoram
Ssevus in mitem, nimiumque vincens
Dulce ridentem Samuelis iram
Voce cruenta.i

His tamen constat decus omne nostri,
Hie Duci magno Comes advocatur,
Talibus flentes premimus tropaeis
Grande sepulchrum.

Deditis ergo gravis ille nobis
Partium tristem trahit hue ruinam,
Et rates obstat reparare quassas
Isidis unda.

Gaudeant istis pueri et puellse :
Mente diversa notat, et Theatri
Excipit vani'sonitum maligno
Patria risu.

^ This refers to a passage between Lord Derby and Samuel, Bishop
of Oxford, during a debate on the Canada Clergy Reserves in the
House of Lords. Tlie Bishop advocated their surrender ; " Fiat justitia,
ruat csehim," he said. Provoked by his arguments, and by the
aggravating smile with which he met his own indignant attack,
Lord Derby quoted the hne from Hamlet, " A man may smile, and
smile, and be a villain " (see p. 32).



272 EEMINISCENGES OF OXFOED.

L.

FACSIMILE OF THE "THUNNUS" PARODY.

{See p. 160.)

In a congregation to be holden on Saturday, the 31st

ixistant, at Two o' Clock, the following form of Statute ■will be

promulgated.

F, JUNIUS,

Vice-Can.
University Catacohbs,
Nov. 3. 1860.



Placait UniversUati 2009.

In Epitaphio Thunni in Mussjo Acadsmico depositi htcc verba

THUNNUS QUEM VIDES

MENSE J.^NUARI1 A. S. MDCCCLVII

AB HENRICO W. ACLAND TUNC TEMPORIS ANATOMIAE IN AEDE XTI. PRAELECTORE

EX MADEIRA INSULA

CUO HENRlCUP/1 G. LIDDELL AEDIS XTI. DECANUM

INFIRMA VALETUOINE LABORANTEM DEDUXEHAT

PRAETER OMNEM SPEM OXONIAM ADPORTATUS EST.

TYNA ENIM NAVE VAPORARIA IN QUA REDIBAT PRAELECTOR

AD SCTL ALBANI PROMONTORIUM IN COMITATU DORSETIAE EJECTA,

QUUM IPSE VIX SOSPES E FLUCTIBUS EVASIT.

HIC P1SCI3 IN NAVE REUCTUS PER VOLUNTATEM NAUTARUM AD TERRAM ADVECTUS EST,

DEINDE IN MUSAEO AEDIS XTI. POSITUS

PER ARTEM CAROLI ROBERTSON ESKEAETETeH.

abrogare, et in eorum locum quaj sequuntur eubrogarc: —

THUNNUS QUEM RIDES

P/IENSE JUNIl A. S. MDCCCLX

A3 HENRICO W. ACLAND NUNC TEMPORIS MEDICINAE IN ACAD. OXON. PROFESSOaE RECK)

EX MUSAEO ANATOMICO

DE QUO HENRICUM G. LIDDELL AEDIS XT!. DECANUM

AETERNA MANSUETUDINE PERORANS SEDUXERAT

PRAETER OMNIUM SPEM OXONlENSIUM HUG ADPORTATUS EST.

ORATIONE ENIM VAPORARIA IN QUA GAUDEBAT PROFESSOR

AD SCTI ACLANDI GLORIAM IN CCNGREGATIONEM DOCTISSIME INJECTA,

QUUM MUSAEUM IPSUM VIX SOSPES EX HCSTIBUS EVASIT,

KAEC AREA IGNAVE REFECTA PER SEGNITATEM MAGISTRORUM AD FINEW PROVECTA EST,

QUAE IN MEDIO AEDIFICIO POSITA

PER ARTEM BENJAMINI VyOQDWARD UKUMnPn'.,,.



APPENDICES. 273

M.

THE STORY OF PHAETHON.

By P. N. Shuttleworth,

{See p. 173.)

Once on a time, so goes the tale,
The driver of a country mail,
One Phoebus, had a hare-brained son.
Called from his uncle Phaethon.
This boy, quite spoilt vrith over care
As many other children are.
All day, it seems, would cry and sputter
For gingerbread or toast and butter;
And sure no father would deny
Such trifles to so sweet a boy.
But that which rules all earthly things
And coachmen warms as well as kings,
Ambition, soon began to reign
Sole tyrant in this youngster's brain ;
And, as we find in every state
The low will emulate the great.
As ofttimes servants drink and game
Because their lords have done the same,
The boy, now hardly turned of ten,
Would fain be imitating men ;
Till what, at last, must youngster do,
But drive the mail a day or two.
In vain with all a father's care
Old Phoebus tries to soothe his heir,
In vain the arduous task explains
To ply the lash and guide the reins,
Tells him the roads are deep and miry,
Old Dobbin's blind and Pyeball fiery ;
At length he yields, though somewhat loath,
And seals his promise with an oath :
S



>74 BEMINISCEXOES OF OXFORD.

The oath re-echoing as he sware
Like thunder shook his elbow chair,
Made every rafter tremble o'er him,
And spilt the ale that stood before him.
All then prepared in order due.
The coach brought out, the horses too,
Glad Phaethon with youthful heat
Climbs up the box and takes his seat.
And, scarce each passenger got in,


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