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pur, ix. 143-149 ; Pale, near Mahad,
ix. 154; Manikiala, ix. 320; Meerut,
ix - 393 5 Muttra, x. 53 ; Naltigiri, x.
187; N.-W. Provinces, x. 362, 363;
Orissa, x. 429 ; Oudh, x. 484 ;
Padrauna, x. 526 ; Patna, xi. 94 ;
Peshawar, xi. 158; Rajagriha, xi. 380,
381 ; Rani-nur, xi. 507, 508 ; Sahet
Mahet or Sravasti, xii. 127 - 134 ;
Sanchi, xii. 194-196; Sankisa, xii.
223, 224 ; Sarnath, xii. 269, 270 ;
Shivner, xii. 410; Tamhik, xiii. 172;
Udayagiri, xiii. 414, 415 ; Lake Wuhir,
xiii. 538.

Buddhist influences on later religions,
analogies of a Japanese temple to Hin-
duism and Christianity, vi. 152, 202.

Buddhist kings. See Asoka.

Buddhist monasteries, at Buddh Gaya,
iii. 127 ; in Lower Burma, iii. 181 ;
Gramang, v. 175 ; Mandalay, ix. 389;
Patur, xi. 118; Sikkim, xii. 486;
Spiti, xiii. 70-72.

Buddhist temples, at Amarapura, i. 210 ;
Ava, i. 389 ; Bandarban, ii. 57 ;
Gramang, v. 75 ; Hajipur, v. 291 ;
Kanum, vii. 438; Mahamuni, ix. 155,
156. See Pagodas, Burmese.



Buddhist population in India, article

4 India,' vi. 136 (and footnote). See

also Appendix V., vi. 693.
Buddhists, special mention of, in Akyab,

i. 154; Amherst, i. 237; Assam, i.

359 ; Bassein, ii. 196 ; Bengal, ii. 292 ;

Bhutan, ii. 415 ; Lower Burma, iii.

178, 179 ; Chittagong, iii. 438 ;

Dabling, iv. 77; Goalpara, v. 114;

Hanthawadi, v. 314 ; Henzada, v.

385 ; Kamrup, vii. 359 ; Kangra, vii.

418 ; Kashmir, viii. 69 ; Kumaun, viii.

352; Kunawar, viii. 362; Kyauk-

pyu, viii. 386 ; Ladakh, viii. 396 ;

Lahul, viii. 421 ; Lakhimpur, viii.

430 ; Mergui, ix. 408 ; Nepal, x. 279 ;

Prome, xi. 230 ; Punjab, xi. 272, 274;

Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 175 ; Sando-

way, xii. 201 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 431 ;

Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; Sikkim, xii. 486 ;

Spiti, xiii. 70-72; Taung-ngu, xiii. 223 ;

Tavoy, xiii. 230 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ;

Thayet-myo, xiii. 280 ; Thon-gwa, xiii.

290.
Buddri. See Bhadri.
Budge-Budge. See Baj-Baj.
Budhana, town and tahsil in N.-W.

Provinces, iii. 127, 128.
Budhata, village in Bengal, iii. 128.
Budhpur, village in Bengal, iii. 128.
Budihal, village and taluk in Mysore,

iii. 128.
Budikot, village in Mysore, iii. 129.
Buffaloes, article 'India,' vi. 520. Local

notices — Assam, i. 349 ; Bikaner, ii.

439 ; Cachar, iii. 234 ; Chitaldrug,

iii. 426 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; Monghyr,

ix. 479 ; Nilgiri Hills, x. 319 ;

Palni Mountains, xi. 19 ; Punjab, xi.

2 59 ; Sagar, xii. 105 ; Shimoga, xii.

404 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; Tumkur, xiii.

379-
Buffaloes, Wild, article ' India,' vi. 658.

Local notices — North Arcot, i. 312 ;

Assam, i. 349 ; Balaghat, i. 453 ;

Bhagalpur, ii. 343 ; Bogra, iii. 26 ;

Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; Cachar, iii.

234 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ;

Darrang, iv. 142 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291 ;

Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; Faridpur, iv.

397 ; Garo Hills, v. 26 ; Goalpara, v.

112; Gwalior, v. 229; Himalaya

Mountains, v. 409 ; Indore, vii. 2 ;

Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; Kamrup, vii. 355 ;

Khasi Hills, viii. 173 ; Lakhimpur,

viii. 427 ; Maimansingh, ix. 192 ;

Manipur, ix. 325 ; Midnapur, ix. 425 ;

Monghyr, ix. 481 ; Naga Hills, x. 143 ;

Noakhali, x. 341; Pabna, x. 512;

Palasgaon, x. 542 ; Patna State, xi.

115; Phuljhar, xi. 168; Rajshahi, xi.

429 ; Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Sibsagar, xii.

460; Singhbhum, xii. 531; the Sun-



INDEX.



55



darbans, xiii. 109, 3S9 ; Sylhet, xiii.
145 ; Tipperah, xiii. 314.

Buffalo Rocks, a group of rocks off Cape
Negrais, Lower Burma, iii. 129.

Bu'hler, Dr. G., Tour in Search of Sanskrit
Jl/SS., published in the Journal of the
Bombay Branch of the Asiatic Society,
No. xxxiv. A, vol. xii., 1 877, quoted, vi.
102 (footnotes I and 3) ; Digest of the
Hindu Law of Inheritance, Partition,
and Adoption, 1 17 (footnote 2).

Building stone. See Gneiss, Granite,
Marble, and Quarries.

Bukera, village in Sind, iii. 129.

Bukkacherla, village in Madras, iii. 129.

Bukkapatnam, town in Madras, iii. 129.

Bukkarayasamudram. See Bakkarayasa-
mudram.

Bukkur, fortified island in Sind, iii.
130.

Bulandshahr, District ofN.-W. Provinces,
iii. 130-141 ; physical aspects, 131-133 ;
history, 133-135; population, 135, 136 ;
agriculture, 136- 1 38 ; natural calamities,
138 ; commerce and trade, 138, 139 ;
administration, 139, 140 ; medical
aspects, 140, 141.

Bulandshahr, town in N.-W. Provinces,
iii. 141, 142.

Bulcherry. See Balchari.

Buldana, District in Berar, iii. 142-148;
physical aspects, 142, 143 ; history,
143, 145 ; population, 145 ; agriculture,
145 - 147 ; natural calamities, 147 ;
manufactures and trade, 147 ; roads
and railways, 147 ; administration,
147, 148 ; meteorological and medical
aspects, 148.

Bulsar, Sub-division of Bombay, iii. 148.

Bulsar, port and town in Bombay, iii. 149.

Bulti, tract of country in Kashmir, iii.
149.

Bui - Tul, pass near Kashmir valley, j
iii. 149.

Bumawadi, township in Lower Burma, I
iii. 149.

Bunas, aboriginal tribe in Faridpur, iv.
400, 402 ; Pabna, x. 514.

Bund, town in Punjab, iii. 150.

Bundala, town in Punjab, iii. 150.

Bundelas, a Rajput tribe, formerly the
ruling race in Bundelkhand, ousted by '
the Marathas, article ' India,' vi. and |
footnote. Local notices — Overran j
Allahabad, i. 187 ; not numerous in
Banda, though giving their name to the
District, ii. 50 ; their history, iii. 154,
155 ; in Central India, iii. 295 ; con-
quered Damoh from the Gonds (1500),
and lost it to the Marathas (1750), iv.
108, 109 ; in Hamirpur, v. 301 ; con-
quered Jalaun, vii. 94 ; Jhansi, vi'.
217 ; their numbers there, vii. 222 ;



held Kalinjar fort, vii. 332 ; their rule

in Chanderi, viii. 448 ; mutineers in

1857 in Lalitpur, viii. 449, 450;

their importance there, viii. 451 ;

Orchha, their oldest principality, x. 425 ;

their insurrection in Sagar(i842), xii.

102.
Bundare, village in Madras, iii. 150.
Bundelkhand, tract of country in Central

India, iii. 150-157 ; physical aspects,

151, 152 ; population, 152 ; agriculture,

152-154; area, population, etc., 153;

history, 154-157.
Bundi, State in Rajputana, iii. 157-159.
Bundi, town in Rajputana, iii. 159, 160.
Bunera, town in Rajputana, iii. 160.
Bunhar, hill river in Punjab, iii. 160.
Bun-maw, pagoda in Lower Burma, iii.

160, 161.
Burabalang, river of Orissa, iii. 161.

See also Balasor District.
Bura Dharla, tributary of the Dharla

river, Bengal, iii. 161.
Bura Mantreswar, name sometimes given

to the Hugh river, Bengal, iii. 161.
Bura Tista, old channel of the Tista river,

Bengal, iii. 161.
Burdikas, Baluchi tribe in the Upper

Sind Frontier, xiii. 440.
Burdis, Baluchi tribe in the Upper Sind

Frontier, xiii. 440, 441, 442.
Burdu, town in Central India, iii. 161.
Burgess, Mr., Archaological Survey of

Western India and other works, quoted

or referred to, on Mount Abu, i. 4, 5 ;

Ajanta, i. 114-116; Aurungabad, i.

388 ; Bhadreswar, ii. 340 ; Elephanta,

iv. 341, 342 ; EUora, iv. 349, 350 ;

Junagarh, vii. 263; Kera, viii. 116;

Kotal, viii. 302, 303 ; Palitana, xi.

5-8 ; Than, xiii. 248, 249.
Burghiir, hills in Madras, iii. 161.
Burghur, village in Madras, iii. 161.
Burha, town and tahsil in Central Pro-
vinces, iii. 161, 162.
Burhana. See Budhana.
Burhan Nizam Shah, king of Ahmadnagar

(14.98-1553), defeated by the king of

Bijapur, i. 108.
Burhampur, tahsil in Central Provinces,

iii. 163.
Burhampur, town in Central Provinces,

iii. 163-165.
Burhapara, pargajid in Oudh, iii. 165,

166.
Burhee. See Barhi.
Buri Dihing, river of Assam, iii. 166.
Buri Gandak, river of Bengal, iii. 166.
Buriganga, river in Bengal, iii 166, 167.
Burin-naung (or Branginoco), wealthiest

ruler of Pegu (1550-81), iii. 175, xi.

228, 229, 475.
Burirhat, village in Bengal, iii. 167.



56



INDEX.



Buriya, town in Punjab, iii. 167.

Burma in ancient times and in the 15th
century A.D., article 'India,' vi. 403 ;
encroachments on India and first Bur-
mese war (1824-26), 403, 404; annexation
of Assam, Arakan, and Tenasserim,
404 ; second Burmese war (1852) and
annexation of Pegu, 413, 414 ; pro-
sperity of Burma under British rule,
414 ; annexation of Upper Burma (ist
January 18S6), 430 ; export of rice
from, 572 ; trans-frontier trade with,
5S8-590 ; geology of, 639, 640.

Burma, British (now Lower), iii. 167-209 ;
area and population, 168 ; physical
aspects, 168-172; history, 172-176;
population, 176 -178; religion and
ethnography, 178-185; social con-
dition of people, 185-192; land tenures,
192, 193 ; wages and prices, 193, 194 ;
means of communication, 194, 195 ;
commerce, manufactures, etc., 195-201 ;
mines and quarries, 201 ; coal, 201,
202; forests, 202-205; revenue, etc.,
206 ; administrative statistics, 206,
207 ; education, 207 ; medical aspects,
climate, etc., 207-209.

Burma, Independent (now Upper), iii.
209-229 ; natural products, 210 ; forests,
210, 211 ; minerals, 211 ; wild animals,
212 ; domestic animals, 212 ; popula-
tion, 212, 213 ; administration, 213-
216 ; revenue, 216, 217 ; arts and
manufactures, 217, 218 ; commerce,
218, 219 ; money, 219 ; weights, 219,
220 ; calendar, 220 ; language and
literature, 220 ; history, 220-229.

Burmese, The, conquerors of the Ahams,
i. 80 ; in Arakan, i. 152 ; in Assam, i.
344; their history, iii. 220-229; con-
quest of Mandalay (1886), ix. 288 ;
conquered Pegu, xi. 127.

Burmese architecture. See Architecture,
Burmese.

Burmese War, First (1824-26), article
' India,' vi. 403, 404. Local notices —
Under Akyab, i. 153, 154; Assam
annexed, i. 344 ; Bassein taken and
evacuated, ii. 195 ; Upper Burma, iii.
223-225 ; Raja of Cachar restored by,
iii. 232; British detachment annihi-
lated at Ramu, iii. 437 ; in Henzada,
v. 384; Mergui stormed, ix. 408;
capture of Ramri, xi. 464 ; Rangoon
taken and evacuated, xi. 483 ; caused
by an attack on the island of Shahpuri,
xii. 370 ; capture of Syriam, xiii. 159 ;
annexation of Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; opera-
tions at Donabyu in Thon-gwa, xiii.
289 ; terminated by treaty of Vandabu,
xiii. 548.

Burmese War, Second (1852), article
' India,' vi. 413 ; Bassein annexed, ii.



195 ; Upper Burma, iii. 226, 227 ; the
battles of Akauk-taung, v. 384, 385 ;
operations at and round Pegu, xi. 128 ;
Rangoon captured, xi. 483 ; the Shwe-
Dagon pagoda captured, xii. 428 ;
fighting round Shwe-maw-daw, xii.
437 ; capture of Taung-ngu, xiii. 227 ;
of Donabyu in Thon-gwa, xiii. 289.

Burlton, Lt., murdered by the Khasis
(1829), viii. 171.

Burn, Col., drove the Sikhs out of
Muzaffarnagar(i804), x. 69 ; surrounded
at Shamli by the Marathas, xii. 375.

Burnell, Dr., Paleography of Southern
India, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 103
(footnote); The Ordinances of Manu,
114 (footnotes); Daya-vibhagha, 117
(footnote) ; 195 (footnote 2) ; identities
Kankanhalli with the Konkanapur of
Hiuen Tsiang, vii. 434 ; on the Syrian
Christians of Kodungalur, viii. 240 ;
researches into the early history of
Madras, ix. 9 ; on the derivation of the
name Madras, ix. 103 ; on the cross
found at St. Thomas' Mount, xii. 143,
144 ; catalogued the Tanjore library,
xiii. 196.

Burnes, Sir Alexander, assassination of,
in Kabul (1841), vi. 408. Local
notices — His description of Afghan-
istan, i. 31 ; made Resident at Kabul,
i. 49 ; and murdered there, i. 50 ;
identifies ruins of Udainagar with
Nicsea, iv. 122; estimate of the revenue
of Herat, v. 392 ; on the term Hindu
Kush, v. 418 ; on Jalalabad, vii. 77 ;
his camp nearly flooded in Khaibar
Pass, viii. 124 ; allowed to go up the
Indus by the Mirs of Sind (1830), xii.

5H.
Burr, Col., defeated the Marathas at

Kirki (1817), viii. 221.
Burroughes, Sir William, portrait of, by

Lawrence, in High Court, Calcutta,

iii. 251.
Burrows, Gen., his defeat at Maiwand

(1880), vii. 395, 396.
Burt, Capt. , on the temples at Kha-

jurahu, viii. 140.
Burton, Lt., first discovered connection

of the Tsanpu with the Brahmaputra,

vii. 19.
Bushkariks, tribe in the Hindu Kush,

v. 417.
Bussy, M. de, got Adoni for the son of

Muzaffar Jang (1752), i. 27 ; capture

of Bobbifi (1756), iii. 21, xii. 485 ;

ruled the Northern Circars, iii. 469,

xii. 484, 485 ; recalled by Lally, iv. 3 ;

took Gingi (1750), and repulsed the

English (1752), v. 84 ; took the British

factorv at Ingaram (1757), vii. 18; took

Karnul (1752), viii. 52 ; his admini-



INDEX.



57



stration of Kistna District, viii. 228 ;
his policy, ix. 13 ; head-quarters of
Rajamahendri (1754-57), xi. 383 ; took
Vizagapatam (1757), xiii. 49S ; taken
prisoner at Wandiwash (1760), xiii.
518.

Butan. See Bhutan.

Butana, town in Punjab, iii. 229, 230.

Butchireddipalem. See Bachireddipalem.

Butler, Capt., killed by the Nagas(i875),
x. 145.

Buxar. See Baxar.

Buot-le. See Pa-de.

Byadgi. See Baladgi.



Cabot's attempt to reach India by way of
the north-west passage, vi. 363.

Cabral's expedition to India (1500), and
establishment of factories at Calicut
and Cochin, article ' India,' vi. 358.
Local notices — iii. 269 ; iv. 1 1.

Cachar, District in Assam, iii. 230-239 ;
history, 230 - 232 ; physical aspects,
232-234 ; population, 234-236 ; agri-
culture, 236,237; manufactures, trade,
etc., 237, 238 ; tea cultivation and
manufacture, 238; administration, 238,
239 ; medical aspects, 239.

Cacharis, a semi-Hinduized aboriginal
tribe of Assam and North-Eastern
Bengal, article 'India,' vi. 71 (foot-
note). Local notices — Called Kochs,
when of Hindu religion, in Cachar, iii.
230, 231 ; their rising (1881), iii. 232 ;
number of, iii. 235 ; Kamriip, vii.
355-359 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 431 ; Now-
gong, x. 409 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464. See
also Kochs.

Calamities, natural. See Natural calami-
ties.

Caird, Sir James, on the factory workers
in Bombay, iii. 81.

Calastri. See Kalahasti.

Calcutta founded (1686), article 'India,'
vi. 371 ; capture of, by Siraj-ud-Daula,
and the Black Hole, 381 ; re-capture of,
by Clive, 381, 382 ; canals, 553 ; as a
seaport and its share of trade, 559,
560 ; iii. 239-268 ; history, 240-243 ;
in the last century, 243-245 ; as the
capital of India, 245-247 ; modern city
of, 247-249 ; native quarters of, 249 ;
monuments and public buildings, 250,
251 ; churches, 251-253 ; Hugh bridge,
253 ; town of, 253, 254 ; census, 254-
256 ; religious and caste classification,
256 ; governing body, 256, 257 ; water-
supply, 257, 258 ; drainage works,
258 ; police, 258 ; jails, 258 ; educa-
tion, 259 ; medical charities, 259,
260 ; mortuary returns, 260 ; tempera-
ture, 260 ; cyclones, 260, 261 ; port,



261, 262 ; shipping and tonnage, 262 ;
foreign sea-borne commerce, 262-264 ;
imports, 264 ; exports, 264-269 ; trea-
sure, 266 ; coasting trade, 266, 267 ;
landward trade, 267, 268.

Caldecott, John, first astronomer at the
Trivandrum Observatory, xiii. 369.

Caldwell, Bishop, Comparative Grammar
of the Dravidian Languages, quoted,
article ' India,' vi. 65-68, and foot-
notes ; 173 (footnote 2); 240 (foot-
note 1) ; 327 (footnotes 2 and 3); 328
(footnote) ; 330 (footnote 2) ; 332
(footnote) ; 340 (footnote 1) ; 369
(footnote). Local notices — Asserts
Brahuis to be Dravidian, iii. 98 ; on
temple of Gangaikandapur, iv. 465 ;
asserts Kandhs to be allied to the
Gonds, vii. 401 ; on the term Karnatik,
viii. 31, 32; indentifies Ptolemy's
' Kolkai Emporium ' with Korkai, and
Marco Polo's ' Can" with Old Kayal,
viii. 107 ; on the language of the
Kurumbas, viii. 377 ; his researches
into the early history of Madras, ix. 9 ;
on the affix ' bar ' in Malabar, ix. 217 ;
on the language of the Todas, x. 310 ;
en the cromlechs on the Nilgiris, x.
322, 323 ; on the kingdom of Pandya,
xi. 42 ; on the early history of Tinne-
velli, xiii. 299 ; consecrated Assistant
Bishop (1877), xiii. 304.

Caldwell, Capt., improved 'Grand Anicut'
in Tanjore (1830), xiii. 189.

Calian, historic town in Madras, iii. 268.

Calian. See Kalyan.

Calico, derived from Calicut, iii. 269.

Calicut, taluk in Madras, iii. 268.

Calicut, town in Madras, iii. 286-270 ;
visits of Vasco da Gama to, and es-
tablishment of a Portuguese factory,
y i- 357? 358 ; attempt of the English to
establish a factory at, vi. 367.

Calimere Point, promontory in Madras,
iii. 270.

Calinga. See Kalinga.

Calingapatam. See Kalingapatam.

Call, Mr., his works on Fort St. George,
ix. 107.

Callayi. See Kallayi.

Calliaud, Gen., took Kondapalli (1766^,
viii. 287 ; his battle with Lally at St.
Thomas' Mount (1759), xii. 143; his
operations against Madura (1757)
covered by Muhammand Vusaf, xii.
422.

Calventura, rocks in Lower Burma, iii.
270.

Calvinistic Mission, Welsh. See Missions.

Camalapur. See Kamalapur.

Cambay, State in Bombay, iii. 271-273.

Cambay, chief town of State in Bombay,
iii. 273, 274.



53



INDEX.



Cambay Gulf, strip of sea near Kathia-
war, iii. 274, 275.

Camels, article ' India,' vi. 520. Local
notices — Afghanistan, i. 38 ; Afghan-
Turkistan, i. 55 ; Bikaner, ii. 439 ;
Cutch, iv. 62 ; Hissar, v. 430 ; Jaisal-
mer, vii. 68, 69; Jerruck, vii. 180;
J hang, vii. 210 ; Joclhpur, vii. 239 ;
Montgomery, ix. 500 ; Nawanagar, x.
252 ; Punjab, xi. 259 ; Rajputana, xi.
418; Rawal Pindi, xii. 31 ; Sind, xii.
507 ; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 264 ;
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 466.

Camel-hair embroidered shawls, vi. 603.

Camel's Hump, peak in Madras, iii. 275.

Camp of Exercise on the plain of Panipat,
(1885), xi. 47-

Campbell, Sir Archibald, Governor of
Madras (1786-89), ix. 67.

Campbell, Gen. Sir Archibald, in the j
first Burmese war (1824-26), i. 153, j
iii. 223-225 ; marched up the Irawadi '
valley, after capture of Donabyu, v.
384 ; detached force to Mergui, ix.
408; took Prome, xi. 236; his capture
of the stockades at Donabyu, xiii. 289.

Campbell, Dr., Superintendent of Darji-
ling, seized by Raja of Sikkim (1849),
iv. 131, xii. 485 ; estimate of popula-
tion of Sikkim, xii. 485, 486 ; founded
fair of Titalya, xiii. 335.

Campbell, Sir Colin (Lord Clyde), relief
of Lucknow by, article ' India,' vi.
421 ; campaign in Oudh, 421, 422.
Local notices — His operations round
Cawnpur, iii. 283, 291, 292; his relief
of Lucknow, viii. 514; and final con-
quest of that city, viii. 515 ; his cam-
paigns in Oudh, x. 495, 496 ; occupied
Shahjahanpur, xii. 346.

Campbell, Sir George, Specimens of the
Languages of Lndia, quoted, article
' India,' vi. 67 (footnote). Local
notices — Lt. -Governor of Bengal (1871-
74), ii. 279 ; Chief Commissioner of the
Central Provinces (1867-70), iii. 320;
his Educational Reforms, impetus
given by, to education in Bakarganj, i.
448 ; Balasor, ii. 10 ; Bhagalpur, ii.
351 ; Cachar, iii. 238 ; Champaran,
»i- 343> 344 5 Dacca, iv. 87, 88 ;
Darrang, iv. 149 ; Faridpur, iv. 406 ;
Goalpara, v. 119; Kamrup, vii. 364,
365 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 437 ; Maiman-
singh, ix. 200; Maldah, ix. 247;
Manbhum, ix. 285 ; Monghyr, ix. 488 ;
Murshidabad, x. 30; Nadiya, x. 140;
Noakhali, x. 351 ; Pabna, x. 519;
Patna, xi. 104, 105 ; Pun, xi. 309 ;
Purniah, xi. 330 ; Rajshahi, xi. 438 ;
Rangpur, xi. 500 ; Santal Parganas,
xii. 235 ; Saran, xii. 258 ; Shahabad,
xn - 333 J Sib.agar, xii. 470 ; Sylhet,



xiii. 155, 156; Tipperah, xiii. 320;
Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 398.
Campbellpur, cantonment in Punjab, iii.

275-
Canals in Sind and Bombay, article
'India,' vi. 530, 531 ; the three great
Punjab canals, 531, 532; the Doab
canals in the N.-W. Provinces, 532,
533 5 Orissa canal system, 534 ; the
Son canals and irrigation in Bengal,
534> 535 '■> irrigation works in the
Madras deltas, 536, 537. Local notices —
The Agra, i. 76, 77 ; at Alleppi, i.

200 ; the Arrah, i. 334, 335 ; at Ashta-
gram, i. 23^ ■> in Bahawalpur, i. 422 ;
the Bali, ii. 12 ; the Baliaghata, ii.
12 ; the Banka, ii. 75 ; the Bari Doab,
u - I 53" I 55 5 tne Baxar, ii. 220; in
Behar, ii. 224; in Bengal, ii. 315;
the Bihiya, ii. 422 ; in Bombay, iii.
55 ; the Bukkacherla, iii. 129 ; in
Lower Burma, iii. 195 ; the Chausa,
iii. 378 ; the Buckingham in Chen-
galpat, iii. 381 ; the Chik Devaraj
Sagar, iii. 409; the Chilka, iii. 417 ;
the Circular Road, iii. 469 ; in
Cochin, iv. 7 ; Cuddapah, iv. 53. 54 ;
Cuttack, iv. 67 ; Dakatia, iv. 96 ;
works at Dehri, iv. 177 ; the Diamond
Harbour, iv. 284 ; the Ellore, iv. 351 ;
the Bhognipur in Etawah, iv. 368 ; the
Ganges in Etawah, iv. 372 ; the
Ganges, iv. 472-475; the Lower
Ganges, iv. 475-477 ; in Ganjam, v. 7 ;
Gaya, v. 44, 45 ; Godavari, v. 133 ;
the Ganges, starts from Hard war, v.
334 ; the Western Jumna in Hariana,
v. 337 ; the Hasli, y. 344, 345 ; in
Hoshiarpur, v. 452 ; in Hiigli, v. 490 ;
on the Indus, vii. 15, 16 ; the Eastern
Jumna, vii. 356-358; the Western
Jumna, vii. 358-361 ; in Karnal, viii.
39 ; at Kashmor, viii. 79 ; the
Kendrapara, viii. 113, 114; in Khair-
pur, viii. 133 ; the Khanwah, viii. 164,
165 ; the Corbyn-wah, Khushab, viii.
213, 214 ; the Kistna, viii. 237 ; in
Larkhana, viii. 462 ; the Machhgaon,
viii. 533 ; the Bari Doab, head-works
at Madhupur, viii. 543 ; the Karnul-
Cuddapah, ix. 44 ; the Buckingham,
ix. 115; Maghiana, ix. 139, 140;
the Mahanadi system, ix. 158-163 ; in
Malabar, ix. 233 ; the Mandapetta, ix.
292 ; in Mehar, ix. 396 ; the Midna-
pur High Level, ix. 434, 435 ; in
Montgomery, ix. 494 ; in Multan, x.
2, 3 ; in Muzaffargarh, x. 57 ; from the
Eastern and Western Nara, x. 200,

201 ; in Naushahro, x. 243 ; in Noa-
khali, x. 340, 350; in the N.-W. Pro-
vinces, x. 3S2 ; in Orissa, x. 461 ; at
Passur, xi. 80; the Patna, xi. 114;



INDEX.



59



from the Penner, xi. 133 ; in Peshawar
city, xi. 158 ; the East Coast at Porto
Novo, xi. 222 ; in the Punjab, xi. 278,
281 ; in Kohri, xii. 64 ; works at
Rupar, xii. 83 ; the Riipnarayan and
Rasulpur, xii. 84, 85 ; workshops at
Rurki, xii. 86 ; works at Saharanpur,
xii. 125 ; in Satara, xii. 281 ; at Sat-
khira, xii. 287 ; at Seringapatam, xii.
320 ; the Son, xii. 325, 326 ; in Shah-
pur, xii. 359, 368 ; at Shikarpur, xii.
395 ; in Shwe-gyin, xii. 433 ; the
Sirhind, xii. 552 ; the Upper > s ohag,
xiii. 45, 46 ; the Lower Sohag, xiii.
46 ; the Son system, xiii. 54-57 ; in
Srinagar, xiii. 75 ; in Sukkur, xiii. 91 ;
the Calcutta, xiii. 114; the Swat
river (under construction), xiii. 142;
the Taldanda, xiii. 165 ; in Tando
Muhammad Khan, xiii. 177 ; in Tan-
jore, xiii. 191 ; in Thar and Parkar,
xiii. 262, 263 ; Tolly's Ndld, xiii. 336 ;
at Twan-te, xiii. 386 ; in the Twenty-
four Parganas, xiii. 388, 389 ; at
Umarkot, xiii. 420 ; in Unao, xiii.
427 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 439.
See also local notices of the principal
Canals under their alphabetical head-
ings.

Canara, North. See Kanara.

Canara, South. See Kanara.

Candahar. See Kandahar.

Cane, Sugar. See Sugar-cane.

Cannanore, town and port in Madras, iii.
275, 276.

Canning, Earl, Governor - General of
India (1856-62), article ' India,' vi.
417-424. The Mutiny of 1857-58, 417-
424 ; downfall of the Company, 422 ;
India transferred to the Crown, and the
Queen's Proclamation, 423, 424 ; the
first Viceroy, 424 ; financial and legal
reforms, 424. Local notices — His state-
visit to Luck now, viii. 515 ; moved
capital of N.-W. Provinces from Agra
to Allahabad, x. 369 ; his proclamation
confiscating the soil of Oudh, x. 503.

Canning, Lady, tomb of, in Barrackpur
Park, ii. 175.

Canning, Port. See Port Canning.

Cantonments and military stations, Fort
Abazai, i. 2 ; Abbottabad, i. 2, 3 ;
Aden, i. 14 ; Agra, i. 68 ; Ahmadabad,
i. 97 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 109 ; Alipur, i.
180; Allahabad, i. 192; Ambala, i.
224, 225; Amritsar, i. 264; Asirgarh,
i- 338, 339; Attock, i. 381, 382;
Aurangabad, i. 388 ; Bakloh, i. 450 ;
Banda, ii. 55 ; Bangalore, ii. 66-68, 71,
72 ; Bareilly, ii. 145, 146 ; Barrackpur,
ii. 175, 176; Baxa, ii. 219, 220; Bel-
gaum, ii. 238; Bellary, ii. 250, 251;
Benares, ii. 262 ; Berhampur (Madras),



ii. 324; Berhampur (Bengal), ii. 325 ;
Bhuj, ii. 408; Bolaram, iii. 34; Bom-
bay, iii. 83 ; Calcutta, iii. 254 ; Calicut,
iii. 268-270 ; Campbellpur, iii. 275 ;
Cannanore, iii. 275, 276 ; Cawnpur, iii.
289 ; Chakrata, iii. 326 ; Chanda, iii.
356; Cherat, iii. 391, 392; Dagshai,
iv. 94 ; Dalhousie, iv. 97 ; Darjiling,
iv. 141 ; Dehra, iv. 168 ; Delhi, iv. 186 ;
Deolali, iv. 203 ; Deoli, iv. 203 ; Dera
Ghazi Khan, iv. 218; Dera Ismail
Khan, iv. 227 ; Dharangaon, iv. 250 ;
Dharmsala, iv. 255 ; Dharwar, iv. 266 ;
Dhulia, iv. 283 ; Dibrugarh, iv. 285,
286 ; Dinapur, iv. 299 ; Disa, iv. 304,
305; Dohad, iv. 312; Doranda, iv.
314 ; Dum-Dum, iv. 320 ; Dwarka, iv.
327; Edwardesabad, iv. 339, 340;
Paratwada, near Ellichpur, iv. 348 ;
Faizabad, iv. 388, 389; Fatehgarh, iv.
420, 421 ; Firozpur, iv. 447, 448 ;
Goona, v. 159 ; Govindgarh, v. 174 ;



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