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Jodhpur, vii. 243, 244 ; Kashmir and
Jamu, viii. 76, 77 ; Kathiawar States,
viii. 93, 94; Khairpur, viii. 136, 137;
Kotah, viii. 307 ; Kuch Behar, viii.
326, 327 ; Laccadive Islands, viii. 394,
395 ; Maldive Islands, ix. 252 ; Mani-
pur, ix. 332, 333 ; Mysore, x. 95, 96 ;
Orchha, x. 425 ; Orissa Tributary
States, x. 476, 477 ; Rampur, xi. 458 ;
Sikkim, xii. 486, 487 ; Travancore,
xiii. 351, 352 ; Udaipur, xiii. 408.

Adoni, town and taluk in Madras, i. 25.

Adoption, Hindu practice of, article
' India,' vi. 414, 415.

Adrampet, port in Madras, i. 27.

Adur or Andur, family of Kdvalgars in
Madras, i. 27.

Advances to cultivators and weavers, in
Ahmadabad, i. 90 ; Ahmadnagar, i.
104; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 125; Bom-
bay, iii. 54 ; Champaran, iii. 341 ;
Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 451 ; Dacca,
iv. 86 ; Goa, v. 95 ; Berar, v. 269 ;
Orchha, x. 425 ; Orissa, x. 459 ; to
Santal colonists, xii. 231.

Advichinchars, tribe of wandering jugglers
in Dharwar, iv. 260.

Adyal, town in Central Provinces, i. 27.

Aeng, river and town in Burmah, 1-27.
See An.

Afghan dynasty of Delhi (1540-56),
article ' India,' vi. 291.

Afghanistan, History of, under the
Duranis ^1747-1846), article 'India,' vi. |



406 ; early British dealings with (1800-
37), 407 ; Afghan dynastic quarrels,

407 ; Russian intrigues, 407 ; installa-
tion of Shah Shuja, and occupation of
Kabul by a British force (1839), 407,

408 ; rising of the Afghan people,
murder of the British envoy, and mas-
sacre of the British army on its retreat
through the snow to India (1841-42),
408 ; the British army of retribution,
408, 409 ; Lord Ellenborough's pro-
clamation, 409 ; second Afghan war
(1878-81), 426, 427 ; murder of Sir L.
Cavagnari, the British Resident, 427 ;
retributive occupation of Kabul, 427 ;
Sir F. Roberts' march from Kabul to
Kandahar, and defeat of Ayub Khan,
424; recognition of Abdur Rahman
Khan as Amir, 427 ; the Rawal Pindi
darbdr, 427 ; trade routes to Afghan-
istan, 586 ; value of Afghan trade, 586.

Afghanistan, mountainous region between
N. - W. India and Eastern Persia,
i. 27-53 J boundaries, 28, 29 ; natural
divisions, 29, 30; rivers, 30-33;
lakes, provinces, and towns : — Istalif,
33 ; Charikar, 34 ; Kilat-i-Ghilzai, 34,
35 ; Girishk, 35; Farrah, 35 ; Sabzavar,

35 ; Zarni, 35, 36 ; Lash, 36 ; Ghorian,

36 ; natural productions — minerals, 36,

37 ; climate, _ 37, 38 ; agriculture, 38 ;
domestic animals, 38, 39 ; industrial
products, 39 ; trade, 39-41 ; races of
Afghanistan — Duranis, 41 ; Ghilzais,
41 ; Yusufzais, 42 ; Kakars, 42 ; Kizil-
bashis, 42, 43 ; Hazaras, 43, 44 ;
Aimaks, 44 ; Hindkis, 44 ; Baluchi's,
44 ; political institutions, 46, 47 ;
government, 47 ; revenue, 47 ; military
force, 48 ; language and literature, 48 ;
history, 48-52 ; antiquities, 52, 53.

Afghan-Tiirkistan, i. 53-56 ; population,
55 ; products and industry, 55 ; his-
tory, 55, 56 ; antiquities, 56.

Afghan War, first (1838-42), article
' India,' vi. 407-409. See Afghanistan,
history of, supra. Local notices —
Afghanistan, i. 49-51 ; assistance given
by the Nawab of Bahawalpur, i. 423 ;
siege of Ghazni, v. 72 ; occupation of
Kabul and massacre there, vii. 272,
273 ; operations at Kandahar, vii. 392-
394 ; the forcing of the Khaibar pass,
viii. 125-127 ; occupation of Sibi, xii.
457> 458 ; opposition of the Mirs to
the British march through Sind, xii.
5H-

Afghan War, second (1878-80), article
'India,' vi. 426, 427. .5^ Afghanistan,
history of, supra. Local notices —
Afghanistan, i. 52 ; assistance given by
the Nawab of Bahawalpur, i. 424 ;
capture of Kabul and operations there,



IJVDEX.



vii. 273, 274; operations at Kandahar,
vu - 395 ' 398 ; marches through the
Khaibar pass, vii. 127 ; occupation of
Pishin and its cession to the British,
xi. 189; cession of Sibi, xii. 458;
Sonmiani used as port of debarkation
for stores, xiii. 61.

Afridis, an Afghan clan west and south
of Peshawar, i. 42.

Afzalgarh, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 57.

Afzul Khan, murder of, by Sivaji at Par-
tabgarh, xi. 77, 78.

Agai, town in Oudh, i. 57.

Agar, petty State in Bombay, i. 57.

Agar, town in Central India, i. 57.

Agar attar, a perfume made at Patharia,
xi. 87.

Agarpara, town in Bengal, i. 57.

Agartala, capital of Hill Tipperah State
in Bengal, i. 57, 58.

Agartala, Old, ruins in Bengal, i. 58.

Agarwala, trading and banking caste.
See Marwaris.

Aga>hi, port in Bombay, i. 58.

Agastya, the Brahman Saint of Southern
India, legend of, article ' India,' vi.
329. See also Tinnevelli, xiii. 299.

Agastya-malai, peak in Madras, i. 58.

Agates, found in Kaira, vii. 300 ; Kapa-
dwanj, vii. 439 ; Mysore, x. 92 ; Revva
Kantha, xii. 49.

Agate ornaments, Cambay famous for, iii.
274.

Age, population classified accordiug to.
See Population section under each Dis-
trict.

Agencies, for the joint superintendence of
the smaller Native States : Baghel-
khand,i. 416, 417; Bhil or Bhopawar, ii.
394, 395 ; Deputy Bhil, ii. 395 ; Bhopal,
ii. 406 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 152 ; Central
India, iii. 297 ; Guna, v. 201 ; Indore,
vii. 10 ; Kathiawar, viii. 88-97 '■> Mahi
Kantha, ix. 175-179 ; Western Malwa,
ix. 267-272 ; Palanpur, x. 535-539 ;
Rewa Kantha, xii. 48-54 ; Surat, xiii.
136.

Aghoris, a carrion-eating sect of Sivaite
devotees, article ' India,' vi. 214.

Aghwanpur-Mughalpur, town in N.-W.
Provinces, i. 58.

Agidri. See Temples, Parsi Fire.

Agnew, Col., his administration of
Raipur, xi. 369.

Agnew, Mr. Vans, murdered by Mulraj,
obelisk to, at Multan, x. 12 ; demar-
cated boundaries of Spiti, xiii. 70.

Agni, the Vedic God of Fire, article
4 India,' vi. 80.

Agoada, headland and bay, in Western
India, i. 58, 59.

Agra, Division in N.-W. Provinces, i. 59,
60.



Agra, District in N.-W. Provinces, i. 60-
67 ; physical aspects, 60, 61 ; history,
61, 62 ; population, 62, 63 ; agriculture,
63, 64 ; natural calamities, 64, 65 ;
commerce and trade, etc., 65, 66 ;
administration, 66, 67.

Agra, talis/l in N.-W. Provinces, i. 68.

Agra City, capital of Akbar the Great,
who built the fort, article ' India,' vi.

294 ; Akbar's tomb at Sikandra near,

295 ; embassy of Sir Thomas Roe to the
Emperor Jahangir, 301 ; 367 ; Shah
jahan's great architectural works at the
Taj Mahal and Moti Masjid, 304 ;
deposition of Shah Jahan and imprison-
ment within Agra Fort (where he died),
by his usurping son Aurangzeb, 305 ;
establishment of English factory at
(1620), 367. Local notices — i. 68-76 ;
site and area, 68; history, 68-71 ;
architectural works, 71 ; Jama Masjid,
71, 72; fort, 72, 73; Taj Mahal, 73-
75 ; tomb of Ihtimad-ud-Daula, 75 ;
Akbar's tomb near, 75 ; population,
75, 76 ; manufactures, trade, etc., 76 ;
municipality, 76.

xVgra Canal, irrigation work in N. India,
i. 76, 77 ; article ' India,' vi. 29, 532,
533. Local notices — Agra District, i.
61 ; Delhi, iv. 183 ; Gurgaon, v. 220 ;
Muttra, x. 44.

Agra, village in Bengal, i. 77.

Agra Barkhera, petty State in Central
India, i. 77.

Agradwip, island in Bengal, i. 77.

Agrahara Vallalur, town in Madras, i. 77.

Agrarian riots, in Bamanghati, ii. 40 ;
Bombay, iii. 57 ; Pabna, x. 513.

Agricultural castes. See Castes.

Agricultural day-labourers. See Day-
labourers.

Agricultural exhibitions. See Exhibitions.

Agricultural Relief Acts for Southern
India, vi. 449, 450.

Agricultural school at Saidapet in Madras,
vi. 516; ix. 35, 119; xii. 140, 141.

Agricultural stock in India, vi. 519-523 ;
famous breeds of cattle and horses, 520,
521. See also Cattle, Horses, and Sheep.

Agricultural products, article ' India,' vi.
chap. xvii. pp. 482-544. Agriculture in
India, the occupation of almost the entire
population, 482, 483 ; various systems
of agriculture, 483 ; rotation of crops,
petite culture, 4S3, 484 ; statistics of
rice cultivation in different Provinces,
484-486 ; hill cultivation, 486 ; wheat,

486 ; area under principal food-grains,

487 ; millets and minor cereals, 488,
489; pulses, 489; oil -seeds, 489;
vegetables, fruits, and spices, 490 ;
palms and sugar-cane, 491 ; cotton,
491-494; jute, 494, 495 5 indigo,



INDEX.



495-498 ; opium, 498, 499 ; tobacco,
499) 5°° ; uncertainty of Indian crop
statistics, 500 ; approximate area under
certain principal crops, 501 ; special
crops, coffee, 502-504 ; tea, 504-509 ;
cinchona, 509-511 ; silk, 51 1-5 14; lac
and lac-dye, 515 ; model farms, then-
small success, 515, 516 ; the problem
of improved husbandry, 517 ; the im-
pediments to better husbandry, namely,
want of cattle, want of manure, and
want of water, 517-519 ; agricultural
stock, 519-523; forest conservancy and
growth of the Indian Forest Depart-
ment, 522 ; 524-527 ; nomadic cultiva-
tion, 527, 528 ; irrigation and its
function in India during famine, 528,
529 ; irrigation areas in the different
Provinces, 529-538; irrigation statistics
for British India, 538, 539 ; famines
and their causes, 539, 540 ; summary of
Indian famines, 541, 542 ; the great
famine in Southern India (1876-78),
542-544. Sec separate alphabetical
headings of crops, etc., also Agricultural
section under each District.

Agriculture in India, small holdings,
article 'India,' vi. 62; absence of
large towns, 62.

Agroha, historic town in Punjab, i. 77, 78.

Agror or Agrore, frontier valley in Punjab.

Agi'imbe, pass in Madras, i. 78.

Agustisvaram, tdlnk in Madras, i. 78.

Agwanpur-Mughalpur, town in N.-W.
Provinces, i. 78.

Agwon, revenue circle in Burma, i. 78, 79.

Ahalya Bai, ruled in Indore, vii. 5 ;
founded city of Indore, vii. 9 ; lived at
Maheswar, ix. 173.

Ahams, former rulers of Assam, i. 79-81 ;
history, 79, 80 ; religion, 80 ; present
numbers, 81 ; their administration of
Assam, i. 342-344 ; now a crushed tribe,
article ' India,' vi. 71; present descend-
ants of, vi. 188. Local notices — See Dar-
rang, iv. 143, 145 ; Kamrup, vii. 359 ;
Lakhimpur, viii. 428-430 ; Nowgong,
x. 409 ; Sibsagar, xii. 461, 462, 463.

Ahankaripur, town in Oudh, i. 81.

Ahar, ruined city in Rajputana, i. 81.

Ahar, ancient town in N.-W. Provinces,
i. 81, 82.

Aheriyas, tribe of dakdits in Etah, iv.

359-

Ahi, the Vedic Demon of Drought, vi. 81,
and footnote.

Ahiri, zcuninddri and forest in Central
Provinces, i. 82.

Ahirs, or Goalas, a pastoral caste, espe-
cially numerous or otherwise notice-
able, in Allahabad, i. 189; Azamgarh,
i- 395 > Bahraich, i. 430 ; Balrampur,



ii. 25 ; Banda, ii. 50; Bara Banki, ii.
no; Basti, ii. 209; Behar, ii. 225;
Bengal, ii. 296 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 346 ;
Budaun, iii. 119 ; Bulandshahr, iii.
137; Burhapara, iii. 166; Cawnpur,
iii. 283; Central Provinces, iii. 316;
Chichgarh, iii. 408 ; Cuttack, iv. 69 ;
Delhi, iv. 182; Dewa, iv. 235 ; Etah,
i y - 359 5 Etawah, iv. 373; Faizabad,
iv- 3§3 ; Fatehpur, iv. 424 ; Gaya, v.
52 ; Ghazipur, v. 66 ; Gurgaon, v. 218,
219; Hazaribagh, v. 373; Jaunpur,
vii. 154; Jhansi, vii. 222; Lohardaga,
viii. 481 ; Lucknow, viii. 496 ; Main-
puri, ix. 203, 206 ; Western Malwa,
ix. 269 ; Monghyr, ix. 484 ; Muzaffar-
pur, x. 79 ; Oudh, x. 498 ; Partabgarh,
xi. 70 ; Patna, xi. 99 ; Purniah, xi.
325 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 354 ; Rajputana,
xi. 408, 410; the Santal Parganas, xii.
229 ; Saran, xii. 253, 258 ; Seoni, xii.
31 ; Shahabad, xii. 327 ; Singhbhum,
xii. 536, 537 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 98 ;
Unao, xiii. 430.

Ahirwas, ruined fort in Central India, i. 82.

Ahiyari, village in Bengal, i. 82.

Ahmadabad, District in Bombay, i. 82-
93 ; physical aspects, 83, 84 ; history,
84, 85 ; population, 85-87 ; manufac-
tures, 87, 88 ; agriculture, 88-91 ;
natural calamities, 91 ; roads, trade,
etc., 91, 92; administration, 92, 93.

Ahmadabad, city in Bombay, i. 93-98 ;
physical aspects, 94 ; history, 94, 95 ;
population, 95 ; commerce and manu-
factures, 95, 96 ; pottery, 96 ; paper
manufacture, 96, 97 ; roads and streets,
97 ; architecture, 97, 98.

Ahmad Ali Khan, Nawab of Farukh-
nagar, hanged for participating in the
Mutiny, iv. 418.

Ahmadgarh, village in N.-W. Provinces,
i. 98.

Ahmad Khan Bangash, Pathan chief of
Farukhabad, caused Chhatar Sal to call
Marathas into Bundelkhand, iii. 155.

Ahmadnagar, District in Bombay, i. 98-
107 ; physical aspects, 99, 100 ; his-
tory, 100 ; population, 100- 102;
agriculture, 102, 103 ; trade, etc.,
103-105 ; rates of interest, 105 ; de-
pressed condition of the peasantry,
105 ; railways, 106 ; administration,
etc., 106. 107; climate, 107.

Ahmadnagar, Sub-division in Bombay, i.
107.

Ahmadnagar, city in Bombay, i. 107-
1 10 ; physical aspects, 107, 108 ; popu-
lation, 109 ; architecture, 109 ; roads
and streets, 109, no.

Ahmadnagar, Muhammadan kingdom of
W. India (1490-1636), article ' India,'
vi. 288.



INDEX.



Ahmadnagar, village in Oudh, i. no.

Ahmad Nizam Shah, founded Ahmadna-
gar (1494) and a dynasty there, i. 108.

Ahmadpur, town in Punjab, i. no.

Ahmadpur, trading village in Bengal, i.
no.

Ahmad Sayyid, an Afghan fanatic, de-
feated by Sher Singh, a Sikh general,
at Derband, iv. 229.

Ahmad Shah 1., king of Gujarat (1413-
43), founded Ahmadabad, i. 94; built
fort of Dohad, iv. 12 ; built hill fort of
Gawilgarh, v. 43.

Ahmad Shah Bahmani, founded a Mu-
hammadan kingdom in the Deccan, iii.
36.

Ahmad Shah Durani (1747-61), article
' India,' vi. 314, 315. Local notices —
Formed Afghanistan into an empire, i.
49 ; conquered Afghan-Tiirkistan, i.
56 ; destroyed Amritsar, i. 256 ; or-
ganized coalition before the battle of
Pan i pat at Aniipshahr, i. 295 ; in the
Bannu valley, ii. 91 ; twice sacked
Delhi, iv. 193 ; his authority in Dera
Ghazi Khan, iv. 211, and Dera Ismail
Khan, iv. 221 ; ravaged Gujrat, v. 190 ;
established semblance of order in Haz-
361 ; founded the present city



of Kandahar, vii.



his tomb there,



vii. 391 ; conquered Kashmir, viii. 61 ;
took Lahore, viii. 406 ; plundered
M intra, x. 54 ; victory of Panipat, xi.
45-47 ; defiled the Sikh temples, xi.
264 ; ceded Pishin to Nasir Khan of
Khelat, xi. 189 ; also Quetta, xi. 337 ;
granted the lands of the Barha Sayyids
in the Upper Doab to Najib Khan,
xii. 116; plundered Shahdara, N.-W.
Provinces, before the battle of Panipat,
xii. 341 ; made Mir Muhammad Kal-
hora tributary and invaded Sind, xii.

Admadzais, tribe of Kumbarani Brahuis,

iii. IOO.
Ahmedabad. See Ahmadabad.
Ahmednagar. See Ahmadnagar.
Ahobalam, shrine in Madras, i. no.
Ahpyouk, revenue circle in Burma, i.

no, 111.
Ahraura, town in N.-W. Provinces, i.

in.
Ahtaran. See Attaran.
Aiavej, petty State in Kathiawar, i. III.
Aidaha, village in Oudh, i. in.
Aigur, town in Mysore, i. in.
Aihar, town in Oudh, i. 11 1.
Aikota. See Ayakotta.
Aimaks, The four, nomadic tribe in

Afghanistan, i. 44; Herat, v. 391.
Aing-gyi, village in Burma, i. ill.
Ain-i-Akbari, or Chronicles of Akbar,

translated by Blochmann, article



' India, 'vi. 272 (footnote) ; 291 (footnote

1) ; 295 (footnotes).
Ainur Marigudi, State forest in Mysore,

i. in.
Airi, teak forest in Central Provinces, i.

in.
Aitchison, Sir C. U., Chief Commis-
sioner of Burma (1878-80), iii. 176;

Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab,

xi. 270 ; his Treaties quoted, iii. 293,

x. 490, xii. 89, xii. 150.
Aitchison 's, Dr. The Trade Products of

Leh referred to, viii. 400.
Aix-la-Chapelle, Madras restored to the

English by the Treaty of (1748), article



Indi;



179-



Aiyar, river in Madras, 1. III.

Ajabpur, Native State in Bombay, i. in.

Ajaigarh, Native State in Central India,
i. 112, 113.

Ajai Pal, conquered by Mahmiul of
Ghazni, and killed in battle with the
Chandel Raja of Kalinjar, iv. 410.

Ajanta Indhyadri, hill ranges in Berar,

i - II 3-
Ajanta, cave temples in Berar, i. 1 13-1 16 ;

sculpture and architecture, 1 14 ; paint-
ings, 115 ; monasteries, 115, 1 1 6.

Ajaniir, town in Madras, i. 116.

Ajgain, town in Oudh, i. 1 16.

Ajgaon, town in Oudh, i. 1 16.

Ajimpur, town in Mysore, i. 1 16.

Ajit Singh, Raja of Jodhpur, formed alli-
ance with Jaipur and Udaipur against
the Muhammadans, vii. 241.

Ajmere-Merwara, British Province in
Rajputana, i. 117 -131; physical
aspects, 117-119; history, 1 19-122;
population, 122-124; agriculture, 125,
126 ; land tenures, 126, 127 ; natural
calamities, 127, 128; forests, 128;
commerce and trade, etc., 128, 129 ;
administration, 129, 130 ; medical
aspects, 130, 131.

Ajmere, city in Rajputana, i. I3 I-I 33 5
establishment of an English factory at
(1614), article 'India,' vi. 366.

Ajmirgarh, hill in Central Provinces, i.

l 33- . , .

Ajnala, village and tahsil in Punjab, 1.

133, 134- . r, ^ •

Ajodhya, ancient town in Oudh, 1. 134,

135-

Ajodhya, trading village in Bengal, i. 135.

Ajra, town in Bombay, i. 135.

Aka Hills, tract of country in N.-E.

India, i. 135, 136.
Akas, aboriginal hill tribe of Assam,

article 'India,' vi. 57. Local notices —

i. 135, 136.
Akalgarh, town in Punjab, 1. 137.
Akalkot, feudatory State and town in

Bombay, i. 137, 13S.



INDEX.



Akalkot, i. 138.

Akar-ali, old raised road in Assam,
i. 138.

Akbar the Great, founder of the Mughal
Empire (1556- 1605), article 'India,' vi.
291-300 ; chief events of his reign,
291 (footnote; ; his work in India,
292, 293 ; conciliatory policy towards
the Hindus, 293 ; conquest of Rajput
chiefs, and extension and consolidation
of the Mughal Empire, 293, 294; change
of capital from Delhi to Agra, 294 ; his
religious faith, 295 ; army, judicial, and
police reforms, 296 ; his revenue sur-
vey and land settlement of India, 297,
298 ; revenues of the Mughal Empire
under Akbar, 297-300. Local notices —
Founded Agra, i. 61, and died there,
i. 69 ; took Ahmadabad, i. 93 ; offered
thanks at Ajmere for his son's birth, i.

121 ; annexed Berar, i. 141, 142, iii.
144; built fort of Allahabad, i. 196;
took Asirgarh, i. 339 ; built fort of
Attock, i. 382 ; Bardvvan taken by his
troops, ii. 127 ; reconquered Gujarat,
iii. 36; took Broach, iii. 113; an-
nexed Burhanpur, iii. 162 ; built
palace there, iii. 164 ; Gondwana in-
vaded by his armies, iii. 311 ; stormed
Chitor, iii. 431 ; founded Fatehpur
Sikri to be his capital, iv. 433 ; took
fort of Gwalior, v. 236 ; established
Muhammadan colony at Gopamau, v.
323 ; founded Jalalabad, vii. 76 ; re-
moved capital of his eastern provinces
from Jaunpur to Allahabad, vii. 153 ;
conquered Jodhpur, and married Jodh-
bai, sister of its Raja, vii. 241 ; heard
of his father's death, and ascended the
throne at Kalanaur, vii. 323 ; con-
quered Kangra, vii. 414, 415 ; con-
quered Kashmir, viii. 6 ; conquered
Gujarat, viii. 91, ix. 267 ; overran
Khandesh, viii. 152 ; repaired the fort
of Lahore, viii. 415 ; much improved
Lucknow, viii. 505 ; incorporated
Malwa, ix. 267 ; said to have founded
a city on site of Murshidabad,
x. 32 ; occupied Nagaur, x. 158 ;
annexed Nimar, x. 330 ; his victory
over Hemu, the general of Sher Shah,
at Panipat, xi. 45 ; took Pawagarh, xi.

122 ; his policy with the Rajput chiefs,
xi. 405 ; besieged Satana, xii. 274 ;
his tomb at Sikandra, xii. 481 ; united
Sind to the empire, xii. 510, 511 ;
built hill fort and laid out the Najfb
Bagh at Srinagar, xiii. 77 ; took Surat,
xiii. 120 ; conquered and converted
the last Hindu Raja of Laur, xiii.
146 ; destroyed Tatta, xiii. 219 ; de-
feated by the Rand of Mewar, xiii. 404 ;
born at Umarkot, xiii. 421.



Akbar Khan, son of Dost Muhammad,

murdered Sir W. Macnaghten, i. 50 ;

made Wazir of Afghanistan, and died,

i. 51.
Akbar Sayyid of Sitana, elected king of

Hazara, but expelled by Ghulab Singh,

v. 362.
Akbarbandar, trading village in Bengal,

i. 138.
Akbarnagar, old name of Rajmahal,

Bengal.
Akbarpur, town and tahs! I in N.-W.

Provinces, i. 138, 139.
Akbarpur, town and tahsil in Oudh, i.

139.
Akbarpur, village in Bengal, i. 139.
Akbarpur-Singhauli, pargand in Oudh,

i- 139.

Akdia, petty State in Bombay, i. 140.

Akheri. See Ikkeri.

Akhnur. See Aknur.

Akkachillelu (The Sisters), isolated rocks
near Kosigi in Madras, viii. 300.

Akkayavalasa, estate in Madras, i. 140.

Aklaj, town in Bombay, i. 140.

Akniir, town and fort in Punjab, i. 140.

Akohri, town in Oudh, i. 140.

Akola, District in Berar, i. 140-146 ;
physical aspects, 140, 141 ; history,
141, 142 ; population, 142, 143 ; agri-
culture, 143, 144 ; land tenures, 144 ;
natural calamities, 144 ; manufactures
and trade, 144, 145 ; roads and rail-
ways, 145 ; administration, 145 ;
meteorological aspects, etc., 146.

Akola, tdhik in Berar, i. 146.

Akola, town in Berar, i. 146, 147.

Akola, Sub-division in Bombay, i. 147.

Akona. See Ikauna.

Akora, town in Punjab, i. 147.

Akot, town and tdluk in Berar, i. 147,
148.

Akouk-taung, hill in Burma, i. 148.

Akrabis, Arab tribe, near Aden, i. 24.

Akrani, paj-gand in Bombay, i. 148.

Akras. See Vaishnav monasteries.

Akyab, District in Burma, i. 148-158 ;
physical aspects, 149, 150; history,
150-154; population, 154, 155 ; agri-
culture, 155-157 ; manufactures, etc.,

157 ; communications, trade, 157 ;
revenue, etc., 157; administration, 157,

158 ; climate, etc.

Akyab, town, seaport, and head-quarters
of a District in Burma, i. 158-160 ;
history, 158, 159; public buildings,

159 ; commerce and trade, 159, 160 ;
population, 160.

Akyaw, revenue circle in Burma, i. 160.
Al, a scarlet dye. See Dyes.
Alabakhshpur, town in Bengal, i. 161.
Alabaster, Mr., ThelVheelofLaw, quoted,
article ' India,' vi. 137 (footnote).



INDEX.



Alaf Khan. General of Ala-ud-din, de-
stroyed the Rajput dynasty of Gujarat,
i.i. 36.

Alagar, range of hills in Madras, i. 161.

Alahyar-jo-Tando, town and taluk in
Bombay, i. 161.

Alaiphur, trading village in Bengal, i. 161.

Alaknanda, river in N.-W. Provinces,
i. 161, 162.

Alambadaf, town in Madras, i. 162.

Alamdanga, trading village in Bengal,
i. 161.

Alamgir II., the last real Mughal Em-
peror, iv. 193.

Alamgir Hill, peak in Orissa, i. 162.

Alamgfrnagar, ancient fort in Bengal, i.
162.

Alamnagar, village in Bengal, i. 162.

Alamnagar, pargand in Oudh, i. 162, 163.

Alamnagar-Thomsonganj, town in Oudh,
i. 163.

Alamparai, village in Madras, i. 163.

Alampur, petty State in Bombay, i. 163.

Alampur, pargand in Central India, i. 163.

Alam Shah, Emperor, visited Budaun,
and after his deposition by Bahlol
Lodi, retired and died there, iii. 117.

Alandi, town in Bombay, i. 163, 164.

Alapur, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 164.

Ala Singh, founder of the dynasty of
Patiala, his history, xi. 88 ; his struggles
with the Bhatti chieftains, xiii. II.

Alattur, town in Madras, i. 164.

Ala-ud-din, the second King of the Khilji
dynasty (1295-1315), article 'India,'
vi. 281 ; his invasion and conquest of
Southern India, 281, 282 ; massacre of
Mughal settlers, 282 ; Hindu revolts,
282. Local notices — Murdered his
uncle, Sultan Firoz Shah, at Karra,
i. 187, viii. 48 ; his invasions of the
Deccan, iii. 143, iv. 165, v. 261 ; took
Daulatabad, then known as Deogiri,
lv - : 59 5 twice repulsed Mughals from
Delhi, iv. 192 ; visited Ellora, and
reported to have carried off Hindu
princess, iv. 349 ; twice took and
sacked Jaisalmer, vii. 67 ; conquered
Malwa, ix. 267 ; took Ranthambor,
xi. 511 ; took Chittor, xiii. 403 ; took
Ujjain, xiii. 417 ; invaded Telingana,
xiii. 521.

Ala-ud-din Hasan Shah Ganga Bahmani,
founded the Bahmani dynasty at Kul-
barga, viii. 332.

Ala-ud-din Husain Shah, first successful
Muhammadan invader of Kamrup, vii.

357-

Ala-ud-din Ghon, expelled the Bhars from
Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; story of its cap-
ture, xiii. 104.

Ala-ud-din Muhammad, Sultan of Khaw-
rism, took Kandahar, vii. 392.



Alaungpaya (Alompra), conquered the
Talaings of Pegu, iii. 176 ; drove the
Peguans out of Upper Burma, and
founded a dynasty, iii. 221, 222 ; con-
quered Hanthawadi, v. 313 ; founded
Kan-aung, vii. 388 ; conquered Tenas-
serim, ix. 408 ; his conquest and de-
struction of Pegu, xi. 127 ; his history,
xi. 229 ; rebuilt Dagon and called it
Rangoon, xi. 428 ; coated the Shwe-
san-daw pagoda with gold, xii. 439 ;
murdered Mgr. G. M. Percoto, Bishop
of Massulis, xiii. 158 ; conquered
Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; took Tenasserim,
xiii. 240 ; conquered and deported the
Yun or Rwun Shans, xiii. 557.

Alaut, pargand in Central India, i. 164.

Alawakhawa, fair in Bengal, i. 164.

Alawalpur, town in Punjab, i. 164.

Alay Khyoung, revenue circle in Burma,
i. 164.

Alay-Kywon, revenue circle in Burma,
i. 164.

Al Biruni, Arab geographer (circ. 1000
A.D.), mentions Khandwa, viii. 162 ;
quoted, on the Maldive Islands, ix.
250 ; on the failure of the Hindus to
take Lahore, xi. 261.

Albuquerque, Alfonso de, second Viceroy



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