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Western Malvva, ix. 269 ; Manbhum,
ix. 2S3 ; Midnapur, ix. 429 ; Nadiya,



INDEX.



141



x. 135; Nepal, x. 277; N.-W. Pro-
vinces, x. 381 ; Orissa, x. 459 ; Purl,
xi. 306; Ratnagiri, xii. 9; Rohtak,
xii. 73 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; Sawantwari,
xii. 296 ; Shahabad, xii. 329 ; Simla,
xii. 493 ; Sind, xii. 520 ; Sirohi, xiii.
5 ; Tanjore, xiii. 187 ; Tarai, xiii. 210 ;
Tipperah, xiii. 317; Unao, xiii. 432;
Wiin, xiii. 543. See also charas and
gdnjd.
Hemtabad, village in Bengal, v. 383.
Hemu, Hindu general of Sher Shah,
defeated by Akbar at Panipat (1556),
xi. 45.
Henckell, Mr., first Judge and Magistrate
of Jessor (1781 -89), vii. 185; his
scheme for the reclamation of the
Sundarbans, xiii. no, III; in pur-
suance of which he founded the trad-
ing villages of Chdndkhali, hi. ^ 359,
Henckellganj, v. 383, and Kachua, vii.
278.
Henckellganj, village in Bengal, v. 383.
Henzada, District in Lower Burma, v.
383-390 ; physical aspects, 383, 384 ;
history, 384, 385 ; population, 385-
387 ; agriculture, 387, 3S8 ; admini-
stration, 388-390.
Henzada, town and township in Lower

Burma, v. 390.
Hephaistion, Alexander's general, said to
have taken Peukelasor Pushkalavati,
xi. 147.
Herakles, said by Diodorus to have
founded Pataliputra or Palibothra,
now Patna, xi. 106.
Herat, Province of Afghanistan, v. 390-

2.
Herat, town in Afghanistan, v. 392, 393.
Herbert, Sir Thomas, quoted on Sand-

wip Island in 1625, xii. 210.
Herodotus, mentions Miiltan, x. 3.
Herpes, a prevalent disease in Kheri,

viii. 197.
Herumalu, village in Coorg, v. 393.
Heshto, river in Chutia Nagpur, v. 393.
Hickey, Mr., quoted on Tanjore, xiii. 181.
Hides and horns, Centres of trade, in :
Ahankaripur, i. 81 ; Amethi Dungar,
i. 231 : Arava-Kvirichi, i. 307 ; Bastar,
ii. 206; Basti, ii. 212; Dacca, iv. 91 ;
Dindigal, iv. 301 ; Fatehpur, iv. 431 ;
Gopalpur, v. 161 ; Hardoi, v. 327;
Jodhpur, vii. 239 ; Lalganj, viii. 445 ;
Maulmain, ix. 372 ; Monghyr, ix.
487; Nawabganj, x. 248; Rampur,
xi. 458; Rasra, xi. 514; Sahibganj,
xii. 135 ; Tirupatur, xiii. 327; Wardha,
xiii. 527.
Higgins, Lieut., defeated the rebels in

Sambalpur, xii. 180.
Higginson, Nathaniel, Governor of
Madras (1692-98), ix. 66.



High Courts of Justice in India, article

' India,' vi. 433.
High Level Canal. See Mahanadi.
Hijili, sea -coast tract in Bengal, v.

394-

Hijili, navigable canal in Bengal, vi. 553.

Hill, Gen. R. Sale, commanded expedi-
tion against the Akas (1883-84), i.
136.

Hill, Major Sir William, defended Pegu
(1852), xi. 12S.

Hill cultivation, article ' India,' vi. 9 ;
486. See also Nomadic cultivation.

Hill forts (Maratha) in the Deccan,
article 'India,' vi. 318. See also Forts,
Hill.

Hill Tipperah, Native State in Bengal,
v. 394-401 ; physical aspects, 394,
395 ; history, 395 -397 ; political con-
stitution, 397, 398 ; population, 398-
400 ; agriculture, 400 ; commerce and
trade, 400 ; administration, 400, 401 ;
medical aspects, 401.

Hill and Border tribes, the Abars, i. I ;
in Afghanistan, i. 41-45; in Ahmad -
nagar, i. 101 ; the Akas, i. 135, 136;
on the Anamalai Hills, i. 270, 271 ; in
the Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 299-301 ; in
North Arcot, i. 315 ; South Arcot, i.
322 ; Assam, i. 353-355 ; the Hatkars,
ii. 185, 186 ; the Bhils, ii. 387-392 ;
the Brahuis, hi. 98-100; in Cachar,
iii. 235 ; Central Provinces, hi. 305-
311 ; Chitta^ong Hill Tracts, iii. 449,
450 ; the Coorgs, iv. 34, 35 ; the
Daphlas, iv. 119, 120 ; the Garos, v.
28-30 ; Tipperahs, v. 399 ; the Juangs,
vii. 249-252 ; the Kandhs, vii. 400-
405; Karens, viii. 1-7; Khamtis, viii.
144-146; Khasis, viii. 174, 175;
Kochs, viii. 228 ; Kols, viii. 253-260 ;
Kotas, viii. 300-302, x. 311 ; Kurum-
bas, viii. 375, 376, x. 311, 312;
Lushais, viii. 530-532, x. 150, 151 ;
Malassers, ix. 237 ; Malayalis, ix. 237-
240; Mikirs, ix. 436-438, x. 15 1 ;
Miris, ix. 443-450 ; Mishmis, ix. 462-
465 ; Mohmands, ix. 475, 476 ;
Nagas, x. 147-150; Naikdas, x. 176,
177; Chenchus, x. 185, 186; on the
Nilgiri Hills, x. 309-312 ; Todas, x.
309, 310; Badagas, x. 310, 311;
Irulars, x. 312 ; on the Palni Moun-
tains, xi. 17, 18; Santals, xii. 236-
246 ; Chins, xiii. 280 - 2S2 ; in the
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 441-445.
See also Customs, Manners and mode
of life, Dress, Food, Funeral cere-
monies, Houses and huts, and Marriage
ceremonies.
Hisla, town in Bengal, v. 401.
Himalaya Mountains, The, v. 401-414 ;
Himalayan system, the, 402 ; northern



142



INDEX.



chain, 403-405 ; central chain, 405-
407; southern chain, 407, 408 ; physical
geography, 408, 409 ; flora and fauna,
409; geological structure, 409-412;
minerals, 412 ; ethnology, 412 - 414 ;
article 'India,' vi. 4-10; the double
wall and trough, 5, 6 ; passes and off-
shoots, 6 ; water-supply and rainfall,
7 ; scenery, vegetation, irrigation, and
products, 7-10; animals and tribes,
10 ; geology, 631-633 ; meteorology of,
641, 642. See also Trans-Himalayan
trade.

Himmat Bahadur, Raja, head of devotees
in Bundelkhand, his policy in 1802, hi.
156; was granted Kalpi (1803), and
died (1804), vii. 342.

Himmatgarh, village in Central India, v.

Himmat Khan Bahadur, Nawab of
Karnal, murdered the Nizam, Muzaffar
Jang, at Rachoti, viii. 42.

Hindan, river in N.-W. Provinces, v.

414-

Hindaun, town in Rajputana, v. 414.
Hindaur, village in Oudh, v. 414, 415.
Hinde, John, Deputy-Governor of Fort

St. David, became Governor of the

Madras Presidency (1746) on ihe

capture of the city, ix. 67.
Hindi literature and authors, article

' India,' vi. 345, 346.
Hindia. See Handia.
Hindol, tributary State of Orissa, v.

415-

Hindoli, town in Rajputana, v. 415.

Hindri, river in Madras, v. 415, 416.

Hinduism, Rise of (750 to 1520 A.D.),
article 'India,' vi. 192-228. Disinte-
gration of Buddhism, 191 ; preaching
of Kumarila, 191 ; persecution of
Buddhism, 191, 192 ; caste and reli-
gion the twofold basis of Hinduism,
192 ; race origin of caste, 192 ; modi-
fied by 'occupation' and 'locality,'
192 ; complexity of caste, 192, 193 ;
the Brahman caste analyzed, 193, 194 ;
building of the caste system, 194 ; Hindu
marriage law, 195 ; ancient mingling
of castes, 195; 'occupation' basis of
caste, 196-199 ; the Vaisyas or ancient
cultivating caste, 196; the 'right-
hand ' and ' left-hand ' castes of Mad-
ras, 196, 197; the Dattas of Bengal,
197 ; Shahas, Telis, and Tambulis
forcing their way into higher castes, 197;
caste, a system of trade-guilds, 197,
198 ; working of the Indian trade-
guild, its funds, charities, reward,
and punishments, 198, 199; excom-
munication a penalty for a breach
of caste rules, 199, 200 ; the religious
basis of Hinduism, its stages of evolu-



tion, and how far influenced by Bud-
dhism, 200, 201 ; Beast hospitals,
201 ; monastic religious life, 201, 202 ;
analogies of Japanese worship to Hin-
duism and Christianity, 202 ; serpent
ornamentation in Buddhist, Hindu,
and Christian art, 202, 203 ; coalition
of Buddhism with earlier religions,
203 ; shrines common to various faiths,
203, 204 ; non - Aryan elements in
Hinduism, 204 ; phallic emblems in
Hinduism, 204, 205 ; fetish-worship
in Hinduism, 205, 206 ; the Sdlgrdm
or village deity, 206 ; jungle rites,
206, 207 ; non-Aryan religious rites
merging into Hinduism, 207 ; Brah-
man founders of Hinduism, 207 ; low
caste apostles, 207, 208 ; mediaeval
Hindu saints, their miracles, 208;
Kabir's death, 208 ; Brahman reli-
gious reformers, 209, 210 ; growth of
Siva-worship, 210-215 ; Siva-worship
in its philosophical and terrible aspects
211; twofold aspects of Siva and of
Durga. his queen, and their twofold
sets of names, 211, 212 ; human sacri-
fices as late as 1866, 212, 213 ; animals
substituted for human sacrifice, 213 ;
the Charak-puja or swinging festival,

213 ; the thirteen Sivaite sects, 213,

214 ; gradations of Siva-worship, 214,

215 ; secret orgies of Sivaism, 215 ;
the 'right-hand' and 'left-hand'
forms of Siva - worship, 214, 215;
Siva and Vishnu compared, 215 ;
Vishnu the Preserver always a friendly
god, 215 ; his incarnations or avatars,
215 (and footnote) ; 216 ; the Vishnu
Puranas, 216, 217 ; Brahmanical and
popular Vishnuism, 217 ; Vishnuite
religious reformers, 217-222 ; Rama-
nuja, 217 ; Ramanand, 218 ; Kabir,
218, 219; Chaitanya, 219-221;
Vallabha-Swami, 221, 222 ; Krishna-
worship, 222, 223 ; the twenty chief
Vishnuite sects, 223 ; theistic move-
ments in Hinduism, 223 ; the Sikhs,
and Nanak Shah, their spiritual founder,
223 ; Jagannath, the coalition of
Brahman and Buddhist doctrines
forming the basis of Vishnu-worship,
223, 224 ; Car festival of Jagannath,
224 ; bloodless worship of Jagannath,
self-immolation a calumny, 224-226 ;
gentle doctrines of Jagannath, 226 ;
religious nextts of Hinduism, 226 ;
practical faith of the Hindus, its toler-
ance, 226, 227 ; the modern Plindu
triad, 227 ; recapitulation, 228.

Hindu architecture, article ' India,' vi.

112. ^Architecture.
Hindu kingdoms of the Deccan, article

1 India,' vi. 286.



INDEX.



43



Hindu population of India, article ' India,'
vi. 51. See^\%o Appendix V., vi. 693,
and Population section in the several
District articles.

Hindu Tribes and Castes, by the Rev. M.
A. Sherring, quoted, article ' India,'
vi. 193 (footnote 1); 194 (footnotes
2, 3, and 4); 195 (footnote 2); 221
(footnote 4).

Hindu Rush, range of mountains in
Central Asia, v. 416-419 ; passes, 416,
417; geology, 417; enthnology and
religion, 417, 418; general character-
istics, 418, 419.

Hindupatti, village in N.-W. Provinces,
v. 419.

Hindupur, town and taluk in Madras, v.
419, 420.

Hindur, Hill State in Punjab, v. 420.

Hindustan, historic name for tract in
Northern India, v. 420, 421.

Hinganghat, trading town and tahsil in
Central Provinces, v. 421, 422.

Hinglajgarh, hill fort in Central India, v.
422.

Hingni, town in Central Provinces, v.
422.

Hingoli, town in Haidarabad, v. 422.

Hingona, village in Central India, v. 423.

Hippon, Capt, established first English
agency at Masulipatam (1611), ix. 353.

Hirapur, State in Central India, v. 423.

Hirdenagar, village in Central Provinces,
v. 423.,

Hirde Sah, son of Chhatar Sal, took
Garhakota (1703), built Hirdenagar
there, and died (1739), v. 12, 13.

Hirehal, town in Madras, v. 423.

Hirekal, range of hills in Mysore, v. 423.

Hiremagaliir, village in Mysore, v. 423.

Hiriyur, village and taluk in Mysore, v.
423, 424.

Hirode, village in Mysore, v. 424.

Hisampur, pargand in Oudh, v. 424, 425.

Hislop, Mr., quoted, on the Gonds, iii.
306 ; the Gond religion, iii. 309.

Hislop, Gen. Sir Thomas, defeated the
Marathas at Mehidpur (181 7), ix. 398.

Hissar, Division in Punjab, v. 425.

Hissar, District in Punjab, v. 425-433 ;
physical aspects, 426, 427 ; history,
427, 428 ; population, 428-430 ; agri-
culture, 430, 431 ; natural calamities,
431 ; manufactures, etc., 431, 432 ;
administration, 432, 433 ; meteorologi-
cal aspects, etc., 433.

Hissar, tahsil in Punjab, v. 433.

Hissar, town in Punjab, v. 434.

Histoire du Christianisme des hides, by
La Croze, article ' India,' vi. 232 (foot-
note 1); 240 (footnote 4); 241 (footnote
1); 242 (footnotes).

Histoire de la Litter attire Hindouie et



Hindoustanie, par Garcin de Tassy,
article 'India,' vi. 343 and footnote.

History of Architecture, by Mr. J. Fer-
gusson, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 304
(footnotes). See also Fergusson.

History of British Rale (1757- 1885),
article ' India,' vi. chap. xv. pp. 378-
430. Madras, the first British territorial
possessioninIndia(i639), 378; Southern
India after the death of Aurangzeb
( l 7°7)y 378 ; French and Fnglish in
the Rarnatik, 378 ; first French war
and capture of Madras by the French
(1746), 379 ; second French war (1750-
6i)> 379 ; Clive's defence of Arcot
(1751), 379; Sir Eyre Coote's victory
of Wandiwash (1760), 397; capitulation
of rondicherri and Gingi, 380 ; the
English in Bengal (1634-96), 380;
native rulers of Bengal (1707-56),
Miirshid Kuli Rhan, Ali Vardi Rhan,
and Siraj-ud-daula, 380, 381 ; capture
of Calcutta by Siraj-ud-daula (1756),
381 ; recapture of Calcutta and battle
of Plassey, 382; Mir Jafar (1757-61),
3%3 - 3S5 \ Zaminddri grant of the
Twenty -four Parganas, 383; Clive's
Jdgir, 383, 384 ; Clive, the first Gover-
nor of Bengal, 384 ; deposition of Mir
Jafar and enthronement of Mir Rasim
(1761), 3S5 ; Mir Rasim's quarrel with
the English, and massacre of Patna,
385, 386; first Sepoy Mutiny (1764),
3S6 ; battle of Buxar (1764), 386 ;
Clive's second Governorship (1765-67),
partition of the Gangetic valley, the
Diwani grant of Bengal, and reorgani-
zation of the Company's service, 386,
387 ; dual system of administration
(1767-72), abolished by Warren Hast-
ings? 3^7> 388 ; Warren Hastings'
administration (1772-85), 388-392 ; his
administrative reforms, and policy to-
wards native powers, 388; Warren Hast-
ings, the first Governor-General of India
(1774), 388 ; his financial administra-
tion, and sale of Allahabad and Rora
to the Wazir of Oudh, 389, 390 ; with-
holds the Emperor's tribute, 390 ; the
Rohilla war (1773-74), 390 ; plunder of
Chait Singh and of the Oudh Begams,
390 ; charges against Hastings and his
impeachment, 392 ; the first Maratha
and Mysore wars, 392, 393 ; Lord
Cornwallis' administration (1786-93),
his revenue reforms, the Permanent
Settlement of Bengal, and second
Mysore war, 393, 394 ; Sir John Shore
(1793 -98), 394; Lord Wellesley's
administration (1798-1805), 394-399;
French influence in India, 394 ; state of
India before Lord Wellesley, 395; Lord
Wellesley's scheme for crushing French



144



INDEX.



influence in India, 395, 396 ; treaties of
Lucknow and with the Nizam, 396 ;
third Mysore war and fall of Seringa -
patam, 396, 397 ; Wellesley's dealings
with the Marathas, and the second
Marathawar, 397, 398; British victories
and annexations (1803); British dis-
asters, Monson's retreat, and Lake's
repulse before Bhartpur (1804-05), 398 ;
India on Lord Wellesley's departure
(1805), 398, 399 ; Lord Cornwallis'
second administration as Governor-
General (1805), 399 ; Sir George Barlow
(1805), 399; Earl of Minto's admini-
stration (1807-13), his embassies to the
Punjab, Afghanistan, and Persia, 399,
400; Marquis of Hastings' administration
(1814-23), the Nepal war and treaty of
Segauli, the Pindari campaign, the third
and last Maratha war, and annexation
of the Peshwa's territories, 400-402 ;
Mr. Adam, pro tern. Governor-General
(1823), 403 ; Lord Amherst (1823-28),
Burmese encroachments on India, first
Burmese war and annexation of Assam,
Arakan, and Tenasserim, 403, 404 ;
capture of Bhartpur, 404; Lord William
Bentinck (1828-35), his financial reforms,
abolition of Sati, suppression of Thagi
and cruel rites, renewal of Company's
Charter, Mysore taken under British
administration, and Coorg annexed,
404-406; Sir Charles Metcalfe (1835-
36), the grant of liberty to the
Press, 406; Lord Auckland (1836-42),
our early dealings with Kabul, the
disastrous Afghan campaign, and
annihilation of our army, 406 - 408 ;
Earl of Ellenborough (1842-44), the
Kabul army of retribution, the ' Gates
of Somnath ' travesty, annexation of
Sind, and Gwalior outbreak, 408, 409 ;
Lord Hardinge (1844-48), the first
Sikh war and annexation of the Cis-
Sutlej tract, 410, 411 ; Earl of Dalhousie
(1848-56), 411-417; his administrative
reforms and public works, 412 ; second
Sikh war and annexation and pacifica-
tion of the Punjab, 412, 413 ; second
Burmese war and annexation of Pegu,
413, 414 ; Lord Dalhousie's dealings
with the Native States, the doctrine of
' Lapse ' in the case of Satara, Jhansi,
and Nagpur, 414, 415 ; Berar handed
over by the Nizam of Plaidarabad, as
a territorial guarantee for arrears of
subsidies and for the payment of the
Haidarabad contingent, 415 ; annexa-
tion of Oudh, and Lord Dalhousie's
grounds for the measure, 415-417 ; Earl
Canning (1856-62), 417-424 ; the Sepoy
Mutiny and its causes, 417-419; the I
outbreak at Meerut and Delhi, and '



spread of the Mutiny, 419 ; loyalty of
the Sikhs, 419, 420; the siege of
Cawnpur and massacre of the survivors,
420; Lucknow, 420, 421 ; siege and
capture of Delhi, 421 ; reduction of
Oudh by Sir Colin Campbell, and of
Central India by Sir Hugh Rose, 421,
422 ; India transferred to the Crown,
the Queen's Proclamation and general
amnesty, 423, 424 ; Lord Canning's
financial and legal reforms, 424 ; Lord
Elgin (1862-63), his death at Dharm-
sala, 424; Lord Lawrence (1864-69),
the Bhutan war and Orissa famine,
424, 425; Lord Mayo (1864-72), the
Ambala Darbdr J internal and financial
reforms, and abolition of inland customs
lines, his assassination, 425 ; Lord
Northbrook (1872-76), the Bengal
famine of 1874, dethronement of the
Gaekwar of Baroda, and visit of the
Prince of Wales to India, 425, 426; Lord
Lytton (1876-80), Proclamation of the
Queen as Empress of India, famine of
1877-78 ; the second Afghan campaign,
426, 427; Lord Ripon (1880-84); en d
of the second Afghan campaign,
rendition of Mysore to its hereditary
Hindu dynasty, internal administrative
reforms, LocalGovernment Acts, amend-
ment of Criminal Procedure, reconsti-
tution of the Agricultural Department,
revenue reforms, the Education Com-
mission, abolition of customs duties,
Bengal Tenancy Bill, 427-429 ; Earl of
Dufferin (1884), 430; annexation of
Upper Burma (1886), 430.
History, Local. See the Historical section
under each District and important city
and Native State, and especially Aden,
i. 15-17 ; Adoni, i. 26, 27 ; Afghanistan,
i. 48-52 ; Afghan-Turkistan, i. 55, 56 ;
Agra District, i. 61, 62, city, i. 68-71 ;
the Ahams, i. 79, 80 ; Ahmadabad, i.
94, 95 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 107, 108 ;
Ajmere-Merwara, i. 122; Akyab, i.
150-154; Aligarh, i. 169-171 ; Allah-
abad District, i. 186-188, city, i. 195-
198 ; Alwar, i. 203 - 205 ; Ambala, i.
215-217 ; Amritsar, i. 256, 257 ; Arcot,
i. 312-314; North Arcot, i. 312-314;
South Arcot, i. 321, 322; Arrah, i.
334, 335 ; Assam, i. 342-346 ; Azam-
garh, i. 394, 395 ; Bahraich, i. 426-429 ;
Balasor, ii. 4-6 ; Balkh, ii. 16 ; Balram-
pur, ii. 24, 25 ; Baluchistan, ii. 28 ;
Banda, ii. 47-49 ; Bangalore, ii. 60, 61 ;
Bankura, ii. 80, 81 ; Bannu, ii. 89-91 ;
Bara Banki, ii. 107-109; Bardwan, ii.
127, 128 ; Bareilly, ii. 138-140; Baroda,
ii. 160 - 164 ; Basim, ii. 184, 185 ;
Bassein (Bombay), ii. 191, 192;
Bassein (Burma), ii. 194, 195 ; Behar,



INDEX.



145



ii. 227; Bellary District, ii. 241-243,
town, ii. 251 ; Benares District, ii.
255-257, city, ii. 263, 264 ; Bengal, ii.
275-281 ; Betul, ii. 329, 330 ; Bhagal-
pur, ii. 345 ; Bhandara, ii. 361, 362 ;
Bhartpur, ii. 372-375 ; Bhaunagar, ii.
380, 381 ; Bhopal, ii. 403-405 ; Bhutan,
ii. 415-417; Bijapur, ii. 423, 424;
Bijnaur, ii. 429-431 ; Bikaner, ii. 440 ;
Bilaspur, ii. 446-449 ; Bobbili, iii. 20-
22; Bombay Presidency, iii. 35-40,
city, iii. 74-77 ; Broach District, iii.
109, city, iii. 113, 114; Budaun, iii.
117 -119; Bulandshahr, iii. 133-135;
Buldana, iii. 143 - 145 ; Bundelkhand,
iii. 154-157; Burhanpur, iii. 162-164;
Lower Burma, iii. 172-176; Upper
Burma, iii. 220-229 ; Cachar, iii. 230-
232; Calcutta, iii. 240-246; Calicut,
iii. 269, 270 ; Cambay, iii. 272, 273 ;
Cawnpur, iii. 280-283; Central Pro-
vinces, iii. 300-303 ; Chanda, iii. 349-
351 ; Chandragiri, iii. 363 ; Chengalpat,
iii. 382, 383 ; Chera, iii. 391 ; Chital-
drug, iii. 423, 424; Chittagong, iii. 435-
437 ; Chola, iii. 455, 456 ; the Northern
Circars, iii. 467 - 469 ; the Cis-Sutlej
States, iii. 470, 471 ; Cochin State, iv.
2-4, town, iv. 11, 12 ; Coimbatore, iv.
15, 16; Coorg, iv. 28-31 ; Cuddalore,
iv. 46; Cuddapah, iv. 48-50; Dacca, iv.
80-82 ; Damoh, iv. 108, 109 ; Darrang,
iv. 143, 144; Daulatabad, iv. 158-160;
the Deccan, iv. 165, 166 ; Dehra Dun,
iv. 170-172; Delhi District, iv. 179,
180, city, iv. 189-195; Dera Ghazi
Khan, iv. 210-212 ; Dera Ismail Khan,
iv. 220-222 ; Dholpur, iv. 276, 277 ;
Diu, iv. 307, 308 ; Ellichpur, iv. 345,
346 ; Etah, iv. 358-360 ; Etawah, iv.
370-372; Faizabad, iv. 381, 382;
Farukhabad, iv. 409-411; Fatehpur,
iv. 423-425 ; Firozpur, iv. 440, 441 ;
Ganjam, v. 3, 4 ; Garhwal, v. 17-19 ;
Ghazipur, v. 62-65 ; Gingi, v. 83, 84 ;
Goa, v. 96-106; Goalpara, v. 112-114;
Godavari District, v. 123-125 ; Gonda,
v. 147-150; Gorakhpur, v. 165-167;
Gujranwala, v. 180-182 ; Gujrat, v.
189 - 191 ; Gurdaspur, v. 207 - 209 ;
Gwalior, v. 230-233; Haidarabad State,
v. 248-252, city, v. 254-258 ; Berar,
v. 261-265; Hamirpur, v. 298-300;
Hardoi, v. 322-324 ; Hassan, v. 346,
347; Hazara, v. 360-363; Hill Tipperah,
v. 395-397,; Hoshangabad, v. 443,
444 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 452-454 ; Hugh,
v. 490-492 ; Indore, vii. 5-7 ; Jabalpur,
vii. 31, 32 ; Jaipur, vii. 55-57 ; Jaisal-
mer, vii. 67, 68 ; Jalanclhar, vii. 85,
86 ; Jalaun, vii. 94 - 96 ; Janjira, vii.
140, 141 ; Jaunpur, vii. 151 - 153 ;
Jhang, vii. 207-209; Jhansi, vii. 217-221;
VOL. XIV.



Jodhpur, vii. 240-243 ; Kalinjar, vii.
33 l -333> Kalpi, vii. 341, 342; Kamrup,
vii. 356-358 ; South Kanara, vii. 377,
378 ; Kandahar, vii. 391-398 ; Kangra,
vii. 414-417; Karachi District, vii.
446, 447, town, vii. 454, 455 ; Karnal,
viii. 20-22 ; Karnul, viii. 41-43 ; Kar-
war, viii. 54, 55 ; Kashmir, viii. 60-62 ;
Kathiawar, viii. 90-92 ; Khairpur, viii.
134; Khandesh, viii. 151-153 ; Kistna
District, viii. 227, 228 ; Kodungaliir
(Cranganore), viii. 240, 241 ; Kohat,
viii. 243-245 ; Kolaba, viii. 262-264 >
Kolhapur, viii. 281-283 ; Kotah, viii.
304-306; Kuch Behar, viii. 319-322;
Kulu, viii. ^f 339 '> Kumaun, viii.
350-352 ; Lahore, viii. 405-407 ; Lakh-
impur, viii. 428, 429 ; Lalitpur, viii.
448-450; Lohardaga, viii. 477-479;
Lucknow District, viii. 493-496, city,
viii. 502-511 ; Ludhiana, viii. 519-521 ;
Madras Presidency, ix. 9-15, city, ix.
103, 104; Madura, ix. 122-124; Marie,
ix. 171 ; Mainpuri, ix. 203, 204; Mala-
bar, ix. 220-222 ; Mandla, ix. 301-303 ;
Mangalore, ix. 313; Manipur, ix. 326-
328; Masulipatam, ix. 353-355; Meerut,
ix. 383-385 ; Midnapur, ix. 425, 426 ;
Mirzapur, ix. 454, 455 ; Moradabad,
ix. 505 - 507 ; Multan, x. 3 - 5 ; Mur-
shidabad, x. 22-24 > Muttra, x. 45-47 ;
Muzaffarnagar, x. 68-70 ; Mysore, x.
92-95 ; Nagpur, x. 165-169 ; Narsingh-
pur, x. 218-220; Nellore, x. 262-264;
Nepal, x. 284-291 ; Nimar, x. 329-331 ;
Noakhali,x. 341-343; N.-W. Provinces,
x - 361-370 ; Orissa, x. 428-432 ; Oudh,
x. 483-496 ; Patna District, xi. 94-98,
city, xi. 106-108; Pegu, xi. 125-128;
Peshawar, xi. 147 - 150 ; Poona, xi.
200-204; Prome, xi. 226-229; Punjab,
xi. 259 - 270 ; Raipur, xi. 368 - 370 ;
Rajputana, xi. 403-407 ; Rajshahi, xi.
429-431; Rangoon District, xi. 473-
476, city, xi. 481-484; Rangpur, xi.
490-492 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 5, 6 ; Rawal
Pindi, xii. 23-25 ; Rewa, xii. 46, 47 ;
Rohtak, xii. 69-71; Sagar, xii. 101-
103; Saharanpur, xii. 115 -118; St.
Thomas' Mount, xii. 143, 144 ; Salem,
xii. 153-155; Sambalpur, xii. 179-181 ;
Sandur, xii. 207, 208 ; Satara, xii. 277,
278 ; Sawantwari, xii. 297, 298 ; Seoni,
xii. 309, 310; Seringapatam, xii. 318,
319; Shahpur, xii. 361-363 ; Shikarpur,
xii. 386-392 ; Shimoga, xii. 400, 401 ;
Sholapur, xii. 412, 413 ; Sialkot, xii.
441-443 ; Sibi, xii. 457, 458 ; Sibsagar,
xii. 460, 461 ; Sikkim, xii. 484, 485 ;
Sind, xii. 508-516; Singhbhum, xii.
53 2 -534 ; Sirmur, xii. 554 ; Sirohi, xiii.
3, 4; Sirsa, xiii. 11, 12; Sitapur, xiii.
30-33 ; Spiti, xiii. 69, 70 ; Surat, xiii.
K



146



INDEX.



120-124; Sylhet, xiii. 145-147; Syriam,
xiii. 158, 159; Tanjore, xiii. 181-183 ;
Tatta, xiii. 218, 219 ; Taung-ngu, xiii.
221-223; Tavoy, xiii. 229; Thar and
Parkar, xiii. 264-266 ; Tinnevelli, xiii.
298-301 ; Travancore, xiii. 345-347 ;
Trichinopoli, xiii. 355-357 ; Tulsipur,
xiii. 373, 374 ; Udaipur, xiii. 402-408 ;
Unao, xiii. 427-430 ; Utraula, xiii. 456-
458 ; Vellore, xiii. 467-469 ; Vizagapa-
tam, xiii. 484-488 ; Wandiwash, xiii.
517, 518; Wun, xiii. 539, 540. See
also Family history.

History of British India, by J. Mill,
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 314 (foot-
note 3); 365 (footnote 2).

History of India, by the Hon. Mount-
stuart Elphinstone, quoted, article
'India,' vi. 270 (footnote); 291 (foot-
note); 300 (footnote); 302 (footnotes);
306 (footnote 1).

History of India as told by its own
Historians, by Sir Henry Elliot,
quoted, article 'India,' vi. 271; 287
(footnote 2); 291 (footnotes); 295 (foot-
note 2); 300 (footnote); 302 (footnote
2); 306 (footnote 1); 313 (footnote).

History of the Settlements and Trade of
the Europeans in the East and West
Indies, by Abbe Raynal, quoted, article



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