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ducts. — Agriculture almost the sole
occupation of the people, 482, 483 ;
various systems of agriculture, irriga-
tion, manure, 483 ; rice in the different
Provinces, area, out-turn, 484 - 486 ;
wheat, millet, pulses, oil-seeds, vege-



INDEX.



157



tables, 486-490 ; fruits, spices, palms,
sugar, 490, 491 ; cotton cultivation in
different Provinces, exports, 491-494;
jute cultivation and preparation, ex-
ports, 494, 495 ; indigo cultivation in
different Provinces, 495, 496; exports
of indigo, system of planting, 497,
498 ; opium cultivation and manufac-
ture, 498, 499 ; tobacco cultivation,
trade and method of curing, 499, 500 ;
table of crop statistics, acreage, 501 ;
coffee, its introduction into India,
and growth, 502 - 504 ; tea in
India, its history and statistics, 504-
507 ; processes of tea cultivation and
manufacture, 508, 509 ; cinchona cul-
tivation and manufacture, statistics of,
509-511 ; the Company's silk factories,
511, 512; silk area of Bengal, silk
statistics, 512, 513 ; jungle silk, lac,
lac-dye, 513-515; model farms, the
problem of improved husbandry, 515-
517 ; the impediments to better hus-
bandry, 517-519; agricultural stock of
India, 519-523 ; breeds of cattle, horse
fairs, studs, wild elephants, 520-522 ;
the forest department, 522 ; 524-528 ;
wanton destruction of forests, Indian
timber trees, 522 ; 524 - 526 ; forest
conservancy, its results, 526, 527 ;
nomadic tillage, its destructiveness,
527, 528 ; irrigation, its function in
India, 528, 529 ; irrigated area in Sind,
Bombay, Punjab, 529 - 532 ; in the
N. - W. Provinces, Oudh, Bengal,
Orissa, 532-535 ; in Madras, Mysore,
Central Provinces, 535-537 ; statistics
of cultivation and irrigation, 538 ;
famines, their causes, drought, flood,
blight, war, 539, 540 ; necessity for
husbanding and utilizing the water-
supply, 540, 541 ; history of previous
famines (1769 to 1876), 541, 542; the
famine of 1876-78, its area, 542, 543 ;
remedial efforts, mortality, expendi-
ture, 542-544 ; famine, a weak check
on population, 544.

Chap. XVIII. Means of Communi-
cation. — Indian railway system, Lord
Dalhousie's trunk lines, 545 ; Lord
Mayo's branch lines, 545 ; the four
classes of Indian lines of railway, 546 ;
' Guaranteed ' railways, 546, 547 ;
' State railways,' 547, 548 ; ' Assisted '
and Native State railways, 548, 549 ;
railway statistics, 549, 550; roads, old
military routes, 550 ; the Grand Trunk
Road, Bombay inland route, 550 ; ex-
tension of roads, bridges of boats, 551 ;
navigable rivers, 551, 552; navigable
canals, Malabar back-waters, etc., 553,

554-

Chap. XIX. Commerce and Trade.



— Ancient, mediaeval, and modern
trade of India, 555, 556 ; large sea-
borne trade impossible under the
Mughals, 556 ; growth of trading
and industrial cities under British rule,
556-558; rise of Calcutta and Bombay,
557 ; summary of Indian exports (1700-
1885), 558 ; India's balance of trade
and yearly savings, 558, 559 ; fourfold
division of modern Indian trade, 559 ;
the sea-borne trade of India, 559, 560 ;
early Portuguese trade (1500-1600),
560; Dutch monopoly (1600), 560;
English factories and trade (1600-
1700), 560, 561 ; growth of trade,
quinquennial table of foreign trade,
561, 562 ; Indian foreign trade statis-
tics, imports and exports, 563-581;
imports, cotton goods, treasure, 565,
566 ; 568, 569 ; exports, raw cotton,
jute, rice, wheat, 569-572 ; exports,
oil-seeds, indigo and dyes, tea, coffee,
573 • 575 '■> export of cotton and jute
manufactures, 575, 576 ; countries with
which India trades — England, 577;
China, Straits, Ceylon, Mauritius,
France, Italy, 577, 578; United
States, Australia, 578; distribution of
foreign trade of India, 579, 580 ;
effects of the Suez Canal on Indian
trade, 581 ; Sir R. Temple on the
balance of India's foreign trade, 581-
583 ; coasting trade of India, shipping
statistics, 584-586 ; frontier trade with
Afghanistan and Central Asia, 586,
587 ; the Himalayan trade routes —
Nepal, Tibet, 587, 588; trade with
Bhutan and the North-Eastern Fron-
tier, 588 ; trade with Independent
Burma and Siam, 588, 589 ; tables of
Trans-Frontier landward trade, 589,
590 ; internal trade, trading castes,
591, 592; local trade, the village
money - lender, 592 ; religious fairs,
village markets, 593 ; internal trade a
safeguard against famine, 593, 594 ;
statistics of internal trade in certain
Provinces, 594, 595 ; growth of large
marts, local trading centres, 595-597.

Chap. XX. Arts and Manufactures.
— Manufactures of India, art-work, 598;
competition with the English artisan,
598 ; native industries, village crafts,
599 ; cotton weaving, its decline, 599,
600 ; but still a domestic industry
throughout India, 600, 601 ; special
fabrics, muslins, chintzes, saris, 601,
602 ; silk-weaving, classes of silk fabrics,
602, 603 ; steam silk factories, 603 ;
embroidery, Kashmir shawls, leather
work, 603 ; carpets and rugs, processes
of manufacture, 604, 605 ; goldsmiths
and jewellers' work, precious stones,



158



INDEX.



605, 606 ; iron-work, cutlery, chain
armour, damascening, 606, 607 ; brass
and copper work, bidart ware, 607,

608 ; Indian pottery and sculpture, 608,

609 ; wood - carving, inlaying, ivory-
carving, 609 ; European industries,
steam cotton-mills, 610-612 ; their
manufactures, competition with Man-
chester, 611, 612; statistics of Bombay
cotton-mills, their future prospects, 610,
611; 613; jute mills, manufacture of
gunny, 614, 615 ; exports of jute, Indian
consumption, growth of the trade, 615,
616; brewing, paper-making, leather,
etc., 616, 617.

Chap. XXI. Mines and Minerals. —
Indian iron, native system of working,
618 ; failure of early English efforts,
618, 619 ; difficulties of iron-smelting
in India, 619; Indian coal, its inferior
quality, 619 ; history of Bengal coal-
mining, 619-621 ; the four great coal-
fields, future of Indian coal, 622 ; salt
manufacture, the Punjab Salt Range,
622, 623 ; saltpetre, manufacture and
export of, 623, 624 ; gold and gold-
mining, the Wainad quartz reefs, 624,
625 ; copper, lead, tin, antimony, co-
balt, 625, 626 ; petroleum and mineral
oils, 626, 627 ; stone, lime, kankar,
marble, slate, 627, 628 ; diamonds,
cornelians, pearl fisheries, 628, 629.

Chap. XXII. Geology. — Geology,
the Himalayan region, 631, 632 ; the
Lower Himalayas, Siwaliks, Salt Range,
632, 633 ; Indo - Gangetic plain, its
geological age and history, 633, 634 ;
Peninsular India, Vindhyan rocks, 634,
635 ; Gondwana, Panchet, Talcher,
and Damodar series, 635, 636 ; the
Raniganj coal seams, 637 ; Deccan trap,
laterite, 638, 639 ; geology of Burma,
639, 640.

Chap. XXIII. Meteorology. — Me-
teorological geography, the Eastern and
Western Himalayas, 641, 642; air-
currents, vapour-bearing winds, 642 ;
Punjab frontier, Indus plain, the great
Indian desert, 642, 643 ; Gangetic plain,
Eastern Bengal, Assam, 643, 644 ;
central table-land, Satpura range, 644 ;
Malwa plateau, Aravalli range, 644 ;
southern plateau, Anamalai Hills, coast
strip, 644, 645 ; Ceylon and Burma,
646, 647 ; observatory stations, 646,
647 ; temperature, atmospheric pres-
sure, wind, humidity, etc., 647, 648;
rainfall returns, 649, 650 ; sun-spot
cycles, 650, 651.

Chap. XXIV. Zoology and Botany. —
Mammals of India — lion, tiger, leopard,
652, 653 ; wolf, fox, jackal, dog, hyaena,
654> 655 ; bear, elephant, rhinoceros,



wild hog, 655-657 ; sheep and goats,
antelopes, nilgai, deer, 657, 658 ;
bison and buffalo, 658 ; ornithology,
birds of prey and game birds, 659 ;
reptiles, loss of life from snake-bite, the
'cobra,' 660; fishes, insects, locusts,
661 ; Indian flora in various Provinces,
662-664.

Chap. XXV. Vital Statistics.—
Sources of health returns, their un-
trustworthiness, 665, 666 ; death-rate
in India ; average duration of life, 666,
667 ; vital statistics in different Pro-
vinces, 667-675 ; tables of birth and
death rate, 676-679 ; health of the
European army, causes of mortality,
675, 680-682 ; health of the native
army, causes of mortality, 682 - 684 ;
health statistics of the jail population,
684, 685.

Appendices. — I. Area, towns and
villages, houses, population, etc., of
British India in 1881, 689; II. towns
and villages of British India, classified
according to population, 690 ; III. cul-
tivated, cultivable, and uncultivable
area, land revenue, etc., in Provinces
for which returns exist, 691 ; IV. popu-
lation of British India, classified accord-
ing to sex and age, 692 ; V. population
of British India, classified according to
religion, 693 ; VI. Asiatic non-Indian
population of British India, classified
according to birthplace, 694 ; VII.
non- Asiatic population of British India,
classified according to birthplace, 695 ;
VIII. list of 149 towns in British India,
of which the population exceeds 20,000,
296, 297 ; IX. population of British
India, classified according to education,
698-702; X. population of British India,
classified according to caste, sect, and
nationality, 703.



India on the eve of the Mughal conquest
(1526), article ' India,' vi. 290.

India, origin of the name, vi. 1-3.

Indian Caste, by Dr. J. Wilson, quoted,
article ' India,' vi. 194 (footnote i) ;
195 (footnote 2) ; 196 (footnote 1).

Indian products mentioned in the Bible,
article ' India,' vi. 163.

Indian Society as described by Megas-
thenes (300 B.C.), article 'India,' vi.
168, 169.

Indian vernaculars and their literature,
article ' India,'vi. chap. xiii. pp. 325-355,
Asiatic civilisation of India as found by
the early European powers, 325, 326 ;
India in the 1st and the 16th centuries
A.D., 326, 327; the Dravidians or non-
Aryans, their language and its place



INDEX.



159



in philology, 326-328 ; the Dravidians

in Sanskrit literature, 328 ; pre-Arynn
Dravidian civilisation, 328 ; Brahmanic
influence on the Dravidians, 329, 330 ;
development of Dravidian speech into
vernacular literatures, 330 ; the Tamil
dialect, 330, 331; Jain cycle of Tamil
literature, 331 ; the Tamil Ramayana,
331, 332 ; Sivaite and Vishnuite Tamil
hymnology, 332, S33 '■> modern Tamil
writers, t>32> ; Beschi, the Jesuit Tamil
scholar, 333 ; recent statistics of Tamil
literature, 333 ; Aryan languages of
North India, Sanskrit, 334, 335 ; evi-
dence as to whether Sanskrit was ever
a spoken language, 334-33° 5. Panini
and Vararuchi, ancient Sanskrit gram-
marians, 336 ; the Prakrits or ancient
spoken dialects of India, their diver-
gence from Sanskrit, 336 ; routes of
Prakrit speech, 337 ; Prakrits developed
by Buddhists for their Scriptures, 338 ;
evolution of modern vernaculars from
Prakrits, 338, 339 ; their Prakrit frame-
work and Sanskrit enrichments, 339 ;
non-Aryan element in the vernaculars,
proportion of non-Aryan words, 340,
341 ; the fourfold composition of the
vernaculars, namely, the Prakrit and
aboriginal elements, Sanskrit borrow-
ings and Persian terms, 342 ; the seven
vernaculars of India, 342, 343 ; verna-
cular literature and vernacular writers,
343, 344 ; Rajputana poetical litera-
ture, 344 ; Hindi authors from the 12th
to the 19th centuries, 345, 346; Marathi
literature and authors, 346 ; Bengali
literature, its three periods, 343-348 ;
Bengali religious poetry, 349-351 ; Ben-
gali poets from the 16th to the 1 8th
centuries, 349-352; the court of Nadiya,
the chief seat of learning in Bengal in
the last century, 352 ; Bengali prose
literature in the 19th century, 354;
the Bengali drama, 354.
Indigo, Cultivation of, in different localities,
article ' India,' vi. 495, 496 ; systems of
indigo planting and out-turn in Bengal
and Behar, vi. 497 ; export of, vi. 497 ;
574. Local notices — Cultivated in Agra,
i. 64; Aligarh, i. 173; Allahabad, i. 189;
North Arcot, i. 316; South Arcot,
i. 323 ; Atmakur, i. 379 ; Azamgarh,
i. 398; Badvel, i. 412; Babawalpur,
i. 422 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Banagana-
palli, ii. 43 ; Bankura, ii. 83 ; Bard-
wan, ii. 130; Benares, ii. 258; Bengal,
ii. 271, 303, 304; Bhagalpur, ii. 349;
Bombay, iii. 53; Budaun, iii. 120;
Bulandshahr, iii. 137; Bundi, iii. 159;
Upper Burma, iii. 210 ; Cambay, iii.
271; Cawnpur, iii. 285, 286; Cham-
paran, iii. 341 ; Chengalpat, iii. 386 ;



Cochin, iv. 5 ; Cuddapah, iv. 52, 55 ;
Darbhangah, iv. 125 ; Dera Ghazi
Khan, iv. 214 ; Etah, iv. 362 ; Etawah,
iv. 374; Jaizabad, iv. 384; Faridpur,
iv. 403 ; Farukhabad, iv. 413 ; Garo
Hills, v. 31 ; Cava, v. 49; Godavari,
v. 127, 128; Gwalior, v. 228; Haidar-
abad, v. 245 ; Haidarabad (Sind),
v. 280 ; Hardoi, v. 326 ; Howrah,
v. 463 ; Hugh, v. 494 ; Jaunpur, vii.
156; Jessor, vii. 187, 188; Karnul,
viii. 37; Karwaitnagar, viii. 52; Kathia-
war, viii. 96 ; Khairpur, viii. 133, 136 ;
Kistna, viii. 230 ; Kyauk-pyu, viii.
387 ; Larkhana, viii. 463 ; Madras, ix.
2 9> 3 1 5 Mahul, ix. 186 ; Mainpuri,
ix. 208 ; Maldah, ix. 244 ; Meerut, ix.
387 ; Mehar, ix. 397 ; Midnapur, ix.
429 ; Monghyr, ix. 485 ; Multan, x. 7 ;
Murshidabad, x. 26, 29 ; Muzaffargarh,
x. 61; Muzaffarnagar, x. 72; Muzaf-
farpur, x. 81; Nadiya, x. 135, 136;
Nellore, x. 266; N.-W. Provinces, x.
375; Oudh, x. 501; Pabna, x. 515;
Partabgarh, xi. 71 ; Purniah, xi. 327 ;
Rajshahi, xi. 433 ; Ramri, xi. 463 ;
Rangpur, xi. 496 ; Saharanpur, xii.
120; Salem, xii. 166; Santal Par-
ganas, xii. 232; Saran, xii. 251,
255 ; Shahabad, xii. 329 ; Shujabad,
xii. 426 ; Sibsagar, xii. 466 ; Sind, xii.
520 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 360 ; Unao,
xiii. 432 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 492 ;
Vontimetta, xiii. 503.
Indigo factories, in Agra, i. 65; Aligarh,
i. 175 ; South Arcot, i. 326 ; Atur, i. 383 ;
Azamgarh, i. 399 ; Bara, ii. 105 ; Basant-
pur, ii. 182 ; Behar, ii. 224 ; Belsand
Kalan,ii.252; Bengal, ii. 303, 304; Bhag-
alpur, ii. 350; Bilsi, ii. 459; Birbhum,
iii. 9 ; Cambay, iii. 272 ; Cawnpur, iii.
286 ; Champaran, iii. 341, 343 ; Chen-
galpat, iii. 387 ; Cuddalore, iv. 46 ;
Cuddapah, iv. 53 ; Darbhangah, iv.
125 ; Dasna, iv. 154; Dehri, iv. 177;
Etah, iv. 364 ; Faridpur, iv. 405 ;
Farukhabad, iv. 415 ; Gahmar, iv. 460;
Arvval in Gaya, v. 48, 49 ; Godavari,
v. 129; Jami, vii. 126; Jaunpur, vii.
157; Jessor, vii. 187, 1S8; Kantai,
vii. 437 ; Karnul, viii. 41 ; Kudarkot,
viii. 329 ; Ramri in Kyauk-pyu, viii.
388 ; Lehra, viii. 469 ; Madhepur, viii.
541 ; in Madras Presidency, ix. 53 ;
Mahatwar, ix. 170; Maimansingh, ix.
198 ; Mainpuri, ix. 220 ; Maldah, ix.
246 ; Mandrak, ix. 309 ; Meerut, ix.
389; Midnapur, ix. 430,434; Monghyr,
ix. 487; Motihari, ix. 521; Multan,
x. 7, 8 ; Murshidabad, x. 28 ; Muzaf-
farpur, x. 81 ; Nadiya, x. 137 ; Nagas-
tasti, x. 157; Najafgarh, x. 178; Nel-
lore, x. 269 ; N. -W. Provinces, x. 396 ;



I 60



INDEX.



Oudh, x. 507; Pabna, x. 517, 5 2 ° 5
Pandaul, xi. 35; Pharha, xi. 166;
PIrpainti, xi. 187; Pullampet, xi. 241 ;
Purniah, xi. 328 ; Rajshahf, xi. 435 ;
Rayachoti, xii. 39; Santal Parganas,
xii. 234 ; Saran, xii. 257 ; Sarya, xn.
272, 273 ; Sasni, xii. 273 ; Siyana, xm.
45 ; Ujhani, xiii. 416, 417 ; Umargarh,
xiii. 419 ; Bangarmau in Unao, xiii.
432, 434.
Indische Altert/iumskimde, by Lassen,
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 161 (foot-
note 1); 191 (footnote 2); 340 (foot-
note 2).
Indo- Aryan stock, its _ European ^and
Eastern branches, article ' India,' vi.
75, 76 ; their march towards and into
India, religion, etc., article 'India,'
vi. 76-78.
Indo-Bactrian dynasties in the Punjab,
xi. 260 ; their coins found at Buland-
shahr, iii. 141 ; Hazara, v. 360 ; Jalal-
pur, vii. 81 ; Multan, x. 4 ; Sonpat,
xiii. 62.
Indo-Gangetic plain, Geology of, article
'India,' vi. 633, 634; meteorology of,
vi. 643, 644.
Indo-Greek treaties (306 and 256 B.C.),

article 'India,' vi. 167, 170.
Indo- Scythian kings probably conquered
all Kathiawar, viii. 90; their coins
found at Asarur, i. 337 ; Dipalpur, iv.
304; Gujrat, v. 189; Mong, ix. 478;
Sewan, xii. 332 ; Shorkot, xii. 424.
Indore, Native State in Central India,
vii. 1-8; physical aspects, 2 ; popula-
tion, 3 ; railways, 4, 5 ; industries, 4, 5 ;
history, 5-7 ; administration, 7, 8 ;
climate, 8.
Indore, capital of State in Central India,

vii. 8-10.
Indore Agency, vii. 10.
Indori, hill torrent in Punjab, vii. 10.
Indra, the Vedic God of Rain, article
'India,' vi. 80, 81 ; influence of the
rainy season on Aryan mythology, 80 ;
displaced by the modern Brahmanical
Triad, 81.
Indus, great river of Northern India and
Sind, vii. 10-17 ; article ' India,' vi. II-
13; its upper waters, 11 ; its feeder
the Sutlej, II, 12 ; its inundations, 1 1 ;
lower course, 12; irrigation facilities,
13; 529; silt deposits, 13; steam
flotilla recently broken up by opening
of the railway system, 552.
Infanticide, Notices of, in Bahraich, i.
430 ; Bara Banki, ii. 114 ; Bulandshahr,
iii. 135; Cutch, iv. 61-63; Edar, iv.
339 ; Etawah, iv. 373 ; Gonda, v. 154 ;
Hamirpur, v. 301 ; Hardoi, v. 324 ;
among the Karens, viii. 4 ; Mainpuri,
ix. 207, 208 ; Meerut, ix. 3S5 ; among



the Meos, ix. 420 ; Moradabad, ^ ix.
507 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 70 ; Nawana-
gar, x. 253; Saharanpur, xii. 118;
Shahjahanpur, xii. 347.

Inglis, Sir W. defended the Residency at
Lucknow (1857), viii. 513, 514.

Inhanna, town and pargand in Oudh,
vii. 17.

Injaram, town in Madras, vii. 17. 18.

Inlaying work, article ' India,' vi. 609.
See Enamelling.

Inquisition established by the Portuguese
at Goa (1560), article ' India,' vi. 241,
253 ; autos da fe, vi. 254 ; abolished
(1812), vi. 254.

Inscribed pillars of Asoka, article ' India,'
vi. 145, 146. See Asoka.

Insects, Indian, article ' India,' vi. 662 ;
Madras Presidency, vi. 99-101.

Insects, Ravages of, in Banda, ii. 52 ;
Broach, iii. 108 ; Etah, iv. 363 ; Naga
Hills, x. 152; Noakhali, x. 349;
Salem, xii. 162 ; Saran, xii. 256. See
also Locusts.

Insein, town in Lower Burma, vii. 18.

Institutions, political and legal, of the
Afghans, i. 46; of the Arakan Hill
tribes, i. 301 ; of the Ahams in Assam,
i. 342, 343 ; in Baluchistan, ii. 39 ; in
Bhutan, ii. 412; in Coorg, iv. 35; of
the Daphlas, iv. 119; in Hill Tipperah,
v. 397, 398; of the Kandhs, vii. 401,
402; of the Khasis, viii. 175 ; of the
Kols, viii. 254-256 ; of the Lushais,
viii. 530; in Manipur, ix. 329, 330;
of the Miris, ix. 445, 446 ; of the
Angami Nagas, x. 149 ; of the Kukis,
x. 150; of the Santals, xii. 240.

Institutions, local societies, etc., the
Hemabhai at Ahmadabad, i. 97 ;
Aligarh, i. 175, 176; Allahabad, i.
192 ; Benares, ii. 267 ; in Bombay,
iii. 71, 72 ; Dacca, iv. 87 ; Delhi, iv.
196; the Suhrid Sabha at Faridpur,
iv. 405 ; the Vasco da Gama at Goa,
v. 96 ; Gonda, v. 156 ; Mechanics at
Howrah, v. 465; Jamalpur, v. 119;
the Roberts at Lahore, viii. 418 ;
Madras, ix. 118; the Frere at Maha-
baleshwar, ix. 143 ; the Martin at
Peshawar, xi. 160 ; Rangoon, xi. 484 ;
Salem, xii. 160. See also Libraries,
and Reading-rooms and Museums.

Interest, Rates of, in different Districts,
Ahmadabad, i. 92; Ahmadnagar, i.
105; North Arcot, i. 317;. South
Arcot, i. 325 ; Azamgarh, i. 398 ;
Bengal, ii. 302 ; Bogra, iii. 29 ; Coim-
batore, iv. .19; Farukhabad, iv. 414;
Firozpur, iv. 443 ; Goa, iv. 95 ; Berar,
v. 269 ; Kaira, vii. 306 ; North
Kanara, vii. 373 ; Khandesh, viii. 157 ;
Kolaba, viii. 269 ; Nasik, x. 234 ;



INDEX.



161



Poona, xi. 208 ; Tanjore, xiii. 192 ;
Thana, xiii. 257.

Internal and local trade of India, article
'India,' vi. 591-596; village money-
lenders, travelling brokers, and religi-
ous fairs, 592, 593 ; internal trade,
the safeguard against famine, 593 ;
normal action of internal trade, 594;
Provincial statistics of internal trade,
594> 595 '■> trade statistics of a large
town, village mart, and annual fair,
594-596-

Introduction to the Mai to Language, by
the Rev. E. Droese, quoted, article
'India,' vi. 327 (footnote 1).

In-tu, the Buddhist etymology of the
word ' India,' vi. 2.

Inundations. See Floods.

Invaliding, Causes of, in the European
army, article ' India, vi. 681.

In-yeh, town in Lower Burma, vii. 18.

In-yeh-gyi, lake in Lower Burma, vii. 18.

Ipecacuanha, cultivated in Darjiling, iv.
137; Malabar, ix. 229; Mysore, x.
103; Utakamand, xiii. 451.

Irak, river in Bombay, vii. 18, 19.

Irawadi, river in Burma, vii. 19-23.

Irich, historic town in N. -W. Provinces,
vii. 23, 24.

Irodu. See Erode.

Iron, found in Afghanistan, i. 36 ; Tara-
garh Hill in Ajmere-Merward, i. 1 18 ;
Akrani, i. 148 ; Alwar, i. 203 ; Amba-
garh Chauki, i. 212; Anantapur, i.
274 ; Angul, i. 290 ; North Arcot, i.
312 ; South Arcot, i. 327 ; Assam, i.
347, 348 ; Atiir, i. 382 ; Baba Budan,
i. 403; Bagh, i. 414; Balaghat, i.
454 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Bamra, ii.
41 j Banda, ii. 46, 47, 53 ; Bangalore,
ii. 59 ; Bankura, ii. 79 ; Bardwan
ii. 127; Barul, ii. 177, 178; Basim,
ii. 183 ; Bastar, ii. 205-207 ; Bellary,
ii. 241; Bengal, ii. 271, 274, 275;
Bey pur, Ii. 335 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 345 ;
Bhandara, ii. 361 ; Bijeraghogarh, ii.
426; Bilaspur, ii. 451; Bir, ii. 462;
Birbhum, iii. 2, 9, 10 ; Teagar (Bom-
bay), iii. 44 ; Bonai, iii. 85, 87 ; Boras-
ambar, iii. 89; Bundelkhand, iii. 152;
Jaipur (Assam), iii. 166; Lower Burma,
iii. 201 ; Central India, iii. 295 ; Central
Provinces, iii. 300 ; Chamba, iii. 329 ;
Chanda, iii. 349 ; Chhatarpur, iii.
396 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 423 ; Chittur, iii.
454 ; Chope, iii. 456 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ;
Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ;
Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; Cutch, iv. 60 ;
Cuttack, iv. 72 ; Darjiling, iv. 130,
138 ; Deocha, iv. 199 ; Dera Ghazi
Khan, iv. 209 ; Dewalgaon, iv. 235 ;
Dhar, iv. 246 ; Dharwar, iv. 258 ;
Dhenkanal, iv. 269 ; Dindigal, iv.
VOL. XIV.



301 ; Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; Ganjam,
v. 2 ; Garhwal, v. 22 ; Godavari, v.
123 ; Goona, v. 159 ; Gujainli, v. 178 ;
Gurgaon, v. 216; Gwalior, v. 228;
Haidarabad, v. 241; Berar, v. 260;
Hassan, v. 346; Hazdribagh, v. 378;
Heggadadevankot, v. 382; the Hima-
laya Mountains, v. 412 ; Hosur, v.
460 ; Inchalkaranji, v. 509 ; Jabalpur,
vii. 34 ; Jashpur, vii. 145 ; Jehlam,
vii. 167 ; Jhabua, vii. 194 ; Jhalawar,
vii. 199 ; Jhang, vii. 206 ; Kadur, vii.
283 ; Kaira, vii. 300 ; Kaladgi, vii.
315; Kalahasti, vii. 321; North
Kanara, yii. 369 ; South Kanara, vii.
376; Kangra, vii. 412; Kangundi,
vii. 431 ; Karauli, vii. 471 ; Karnul,
viii. 34 ; Kashmir, viii. 67 ; Bakharla
in Porbandar, viii. 96 ; Khandesh,
viii. 151; Khasi Hills, viii. 171-173 ;
Kistna, viii. 226 ; Kolaba, viii. 261 ;
Kolar, viii. 273 ; Kolhapur, viii. 281 ;
Korea, viii. 297; Kumaun, viii. 349;
Kyauk-pyu, viii. 386 ; Laira, viii.
423 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Lalmai
Hills, viii. 458 ; Lohardaga, viii. 476 ;
Madras, ix. 5 ; Madura, ix. 121, 122 ;
Makrai, ix. 215; Jat and Parda in
Western Malwa, ix. 268 ; Malwan, ix.
273 ; Mandi, ix. 298 ; Maikal Hills
in Mandla, ix. 305 ; Manipur, ix. 324 ;
Mao-san-ram, ix. 343 ; Mattod, ix.
366 ; Mergui, ix. 407 ; Monghyr, ix.
479, 480 ; Murshidabad, x. 22 ;
Mysore, x. 92, 106, 107, 114; Nar-
singhpur, x. 223 ; Narwar, x. 227 ;
Nawanagar, x. 253 ; Nellore, x. 262 ;
Nepal, x. 278 ; Nimar, x. 328 ; Nong-
krem, x. 353 ; Orissa Tributary States,
x. 471 ; Palmaner, xi. 15 ; Panagur,
xi. 24; Panna, xi. 50; Patna State,
xi. 116; Pawi Mulanda, xi. 123;
Bajaur. xi. 146; Phuljhar, xi. 168;
Pohir, xi. 197 ; Porbandar, xi. 215 ;
Pudukattai, xi. 237 ; Raigarh, xi. 362 ;
Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rairakhol, xi. 378 ;
Rajputana, xi. 401 ; Rampur (C. P.);
xi. 460 ; Ramri, xi. 463 ; Sagar, xii.
101 ; Salem, xii. 153 ; Sambalpur,
xii. 179; Sandur, xii. 207; Santal
Parganas, ^ xii. 227 ; Sarangarh, xii.
260 ; Satara, xii. 276 ; Sawantwari,
xii. 296 ; Seoni, xii. 309 ; Shahpur,
xii. 361; Sheila, xii. 378; Shimoga,
xii. 400; Singhbhum, xii. 531; Sir-
mur, xii. 554 ; Sonpur, xiii. 63 ;
Talcher, xiii. 164; Tarikere, xiii.
213; Tavoy, xiii. 228; Tendukhera,
xiii. 241 ; Travancore, xiii. 345 ;
Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; Tumkiir, xiii.
375; Udaipur (Rajputana), xiii. 401;
Udaipur (Bengal), xiii. 411, 412;
Vinukonda, xiii. 476 ; Wiin, xiii. 538.
L



162



INDEX.



Iron mining and smelting, difficulties of
Indian iron-works, article ' India, vi.
41, 619; indigenous methods of iron-
smelting, 618; failure of English efforts,
618, 619; Government efforts, 619.

Iron-smelting, Charikar in Afghanistan,
i. 34 ; Alwar, i. 205 ; Assam, i. 348 ;
Atur, i. 383 ; Baba Budan Hills, i.
403 ; Balaghat, i. 456 ; Banda, ii. 53 ;
Bangalore, ii. 64; Belia Narayanpur,
ii. 239 ; Bellary, ii. 247 ; Bengal, ii.
275 ; Bir, ii. 462 ; Birbhum, iii. 9, 10 ;
Deulghat in Buldana (steel), iii. 147 ;
Lower Burma, iii. 198; Central Pro-
vinces, iii. 19; Chanda, iii. 354; Chital-
drug, iii. 426 ; Cuttack, iv. 72 ;



Online LibraryWilliam Wilson HunterThe imperial gazetteer of India (Volume 14) → online text (page 30 of 65)